35 Burst results for "cbc"

Former Obama Intern, Desiree Tims, Runs For US Congress

On One with Angela Rye

06:41 min | 2 weeks ago

Former Obama Intern, Desiree Tims, Runs For US Congress

"Are you doing array is doing fantastic carrio. I can't complain I'm happy to be with you today. I know it's been a little difficult getting scheduled. You gotta go out here raise money and may cause and win the seat listen. Every day, we're working hard to get the drop down. We have a lot of work to do. Yeah. Yeah. Well, at know that it's you have your work out free but I also know you're willing for the job in addition to hearing about you just from being on the board of Clarkston CBC pack also Special Little Nudge from our shared in winter. Are you gonNA talk to desert I said my pleasure it'll be monthly. Enough. Still. Always happy to get to get an edge my real vaseline to case. My boss to. Answer yes, she is. So phenomenon spirit in always had. So the first thing I want to go to actually is There is a song that's out right now. That is urging people it really to me is like the modern doper cooler version of schoolhouse rock and it's. A song by a yellow pain who when guide Efron Cory who works with him? I was like Oh God. No, and then come to find out. That's your cousin. Yes. Yellow pain is your president as right. We gotta get him to do a song for you. Hear that. Song. That's just for you so I helped educating. About voter suppression by how the definite words I need one specific desert for Congress. I have to think of that. So this the whole song came about because I'm back home. After you know the Obama Administration ended worked on Capitol Hill and I was like okay I am going to take a break from public service because people think he'll staffers make a lot of money and we don't What's What's and I was on the higher end but girl what's Yeah One more time for people in the back. So, law school they night at Georgetown and I was like, okay. I'm going to work at a firm for a little bit pay my student loan debt down a good for a few weeks. Or years and Michael Copy shoes real now trip here in there. That was that was what I invasion high yellow pain is on. On your to. On. Your standard requires well, okay because we. INSTAGRAM's sophisticated yet you're right now in. One at a time but ultimately, death rate is told you how to make more money instagram this season. So exactly right I claim home I'm limited ground talking to people about what's happening. So when I moved back home the KKK March downtown. Dayton? That weekend and then we had tornadoes in a match shooting and I was like, okay we have to vote and we have to make sure people are in retention but everyone here on the ground in my family they know me from working in the Obama White House and so sometimes when I say things in Angela, you know this, we say things because they are you guys are politicals. It's sometimes doesn't reach them in the way it should and I thought well, my cousin, he conscious rapper talks about a lot of things and I was like I need you to talk about this song. I have a song about voting in my head it's going to be like schoolhouse rock but hip hop. Though and I think it can work. He was like I. Don't know and I was like, no you can do it in the months reidy fleshing out ideas how to save you call. I. Now we need a robbery in Congress. I can't rent. Over like yours, the concept you're, Ryan. Here's the lyrics. This is what we're going to say we have to talk about what happened in two thousand ten we have to talk about our have to talk about judges at the scene we have. That No. It worked out. It was great I'm so glad he. Goes raise lyrics this little bit you now hidden talent. Okay. So in addition to being a a Georgetown educated a lawyer, you also are the granddaughter of Ashir, crapper. Talk to me a little bit about what this means having that in your lineage also opted those are the things that ground us that people don't see and don't hear about since asked me a little bit about that. Yes. So my Popo is I called him now is from the deep South. So like beyond Daddy Alabama Louisiana, my maternal side is Alabama in my paternal side is Louisiana so. Shout to be onset I'm Louisiana both sides. Okay. So he migrated from Alabama, to Ohio, in the late nineteen forties part of the great migration like many black people go live in Chicago and Detroit and the path as to how we got. There was the our parents and grandparents came for opportunity and you know he dropped out of school when he was six years old because he had to work the fields, but he could never go back to school but. He still was able to reach the middle class work in a factory in real heatless taught me the importance of hard work and made me promise to go to school for as long as I could because he couldn't and that's why I continue. I went to the first family to get the undergraduate degree. Then I got the Masters Okay Papa be done. He was like Oh is that he can you go further. Pressure. He lived to see me graduate from law school, but it was a promise I made him. He'd he'd passed away from stage for a lung cancer but I will him through the White House so that was one of his last trips. Through the Obama White. House before Obama left in mayhem that promise that I will continue to keep going in idea but he taught me the importance of hard work and perseverance and that's what I'm doing. So I may not have the most money here is a congressional candidate I may not come from the wealthiest bag ground but I come from a background of hard workers in no one will be desert hymns

Barack Obama Georgetown Congress Obama White House Louisiana Alabama Obama Administration White House Instagram Efron Cory Daddy Alabama Louisiana Clarkston President Trump Robbery Michael Copy Dayton
Former Obama Intern, Desiree Tims, Runs For US Congress

On One with Angela Rye

04:29 min | 2 weeks ago

Former Obama Intern, Desiree Tims, Runs For US Congress

"Are you doing array is doing fantastic carrio. I can't complain I'm happy to be with you today. I know it's been a little difficult getting scheduled. You gotta go out here raise money and may cause and win the seat listen. Every day, we're working hard to get the drop down. We have a lot of work to do. Yeah. Yeah. Well, at know that it's you have your work out free but I also know you're willing for the job in addition to hearing about you just from being on the board of Clarkston CBC pack also Special Little Nudge from our shared in winter. Are you gonNA talk to desert I said my pleasure it'll be monthly. Enough. Still. Always happy to get to get an edge my real vaseline to case. My boss to. Answer yes, she is. So phenomenon spirit in always had. So the first thing I want to go to actually is There is a song that's out right now. That is urging people it really to me is like the modern doper cooler version of schoolhouse rock and it's. A song by a yellow pain who when guide Efron Cory who works with him? I was like Oh God. No, and then come to find out. That's your cousin. Yes. Yellow pain is your president as right. We gotta get him to do a song for you. Hear that. Song. That's just for you so I helped educating. About voter suppression by how the definite words I need one specific desert for Congress. I have to think of that. So this the whole song came about because I'm back home. After you know the Obama Administration ended worked on Capitol Hill and I was like okay I am going to take a break from public service because people think he'll staffers make a lot of money and we don't What's What's and I was on the higher end but girl what's Yeah One more time for people in the back. So, law school they night at Georgetown and I was like, okay. I'm going to work at a firm for a little bit pay my student loan debt down a good for a few weeks. Or years and Michael Copy shoes real now trip here in there. That was that was what I invasion high yellow pain is on. On your to. On. Your standard requires well, okay because we. INSTAGRAM's sophisticated yet you're right now in. One at a time but ultimately, death rate is told you how to make more money instagram this season. So exactly right I claim home I'm limited ground talking to people about what's happening. So when I moved back home the KKK March downtown. Dayton? That weekend and then we had tornadoes in a match shooting and I was like, okay we have to vote and we have to make sure people are in retention but everyone here on the ground in my family they know me from working in the Obama White House and so sometimes when I say things in Angela, you know this, we say things because they are you guys are politicals. It's sometimes doesn't reach them in the way it should and I thought well, my cousin, he conscious rapper talks about a lot of things and I was like I need you to talk about this song. I have a song about voting in my head it's going to be like schoolhouse rock but hip hop. Though and I think it can work. He was like I. Don't know and I was like, no you can do it in the months reidy fleshing out ideas how to save you call. I. Now we need a robbery in Congress. I can't rent. Over like yours, the concept you're, Ryan. Here's the lyrics. This is what we're going to say we have to talk about what happened in two thousand ten we have to talk about our have to talk about judges at the scene we have. That No. It worked out. It was great I'm so glad he. Goes raise lyrics this little bit you now hidden talent.

President Trump Congress Ryan Efron Cory Instagram Obama White House Obama Administration Clarkston Michael Copy Robbery Dayton Georgetown Angela
1 person is dead after a shooting during protests in downtown Portland

State of the Union with Jake Tapper

00:27 sec | 2 weeks ago

1 person is dead after a shooting during protests in downtown Portland

"Just overnight another person was killed near a protest this. Time in Portland Oregon? Where demonstrators clashed with pro-trump ralliers according to the New York Times. The man who was killed was wearing a hat with Patriot prayer insignia a far right group based in Portland this death comes after two people were killed during protests in Kenosha Wisconsin where a seventeen year old trump supporter has been charged with those

Portland New York Times Kenosha Wisconsin Oregon
Office of the Director of National Intelligence says it will cease in-person briefings

State of the Union with Jake Tapper

01:57 min | 2 weeks ago

Office of the Director of National Intelligence says it will cease in-person briefings

"The Office of the Director of National Intelligence will no longer briefed Congress in person on election security a move that house speaker, Nancy Pelosi, and intelligence chairman Adam Schiff called quote a betrayal of the public's right to know how foreign powers are trying to subvert our democracy. Joining me now is the chair of the Homeland Security Committee in the Senate Republican Senator, Ron, Johnson of Wisconsin and Mr. Chairman. Thank you so much. I I want to talk about what? Happened in Portland, we saw someone get killed overnight amid clashes there, and the president has been tweeting and re tweeting before dawn this morning he called for the Mayor of Portland to resign and be arrested. He painted protesters as thugs and cities. In chaos. You are the chairman as I mentioned of the Senate Homeland. Security Committee are you comfortable with the present appearing to inflame tensions instead of what we normally see from presidents, which is trying to calm them down. Maury Dan Listen I've been urging calm across the board particularly in light of what happened here in Kenosha but as I said in opening. Statement when we had the acting secretary well before my committee when when you encourage disdain for the police, you encourage criminals when you do little or nothing to stop rioting. You encourage anarchy. So when you're encouraging criminals and anarchy. People's lives are lost you have more more and more destruction more and more violence. So what we need, we need to get control of the situation and until we until we do, we're going to have more violence we're going to have unfortunately. Prep trenchantly more loss of life. So we need to get control the situation we need to encourage calm an here's something else we need to do. We need to figure out what we do all agree on and we share the same goal. We all want to save prosperous and secure America in states and communities. Let's concentrate on those areas of grievance. That's that's how we achieved the unity everybody says they want

Homeland Security Committee Mr. Chairman President Trump Adam Schiff Senate Homeland Portland Director Of National Intellige Nancy Pelosi Maury Dan Listen Wisconsin Senate Senator Kenosha Congress America RON Johnson Secretary
Why You Need to Optimize Your Content for Search Intent

Marketing School

03:49 min | 3 weeks ago

Why You Need to Optimize Your Content for Search Intent

"Welcome to another episode of Marketing School I'm Eric Su and I'm Neil Patel and today we're GonNa talk about why you should optimize your content I search intent. What do we mean my search intent Neil So when people search for something a lot of times there's intent behind and what we mean by intent is i. Someone could be looking to buy a laptop fixed their phone. Those are all intent base searches. You don't want content that just ranks out there on. Google. For random things that could just be information all that don't have any intent behind because the moment you lack in tat, you'll see tons of traffic that don't convert into leads sales or anything like that. Yeah. So if you think about it, let's just take our agency websites as an example. So you know at the higher end of the funnel, what we're basically teaching people right like Oh. What is a marketing funnel? What is digital marketing? What is SEO, and we might bring in a lot of traffic from the top of the funnel but the intent there is people are just trying to learn they're trying to educate themselves. They're not necessarily looking to take action. Now, maybe closer to the, you have top of the funnel of middle of the funnel, and then you have bottom of the funnel bottom of the funnel might be taught. Digital Marketing Agency right in that scenario that person's probably looking for top digital marketing agency they want to take an action. Right. They're doing research probably further in the research versus like another query or if you think about ECOMMERCE I, might be looking for you know instead of saying what are the best basketball shoes I might be looking for top reviewed basketball shoes. So the intent there is different. So you got to think about like if you're creating content you create for top of the funnel but you got to think about the whole enchilada and think about how things flow. So you can drive more conversions that will affect your bottom line. And from all types of different keywords that you can go after ones that have by related words in there like by or cheap or affordable, or discounts or coupons, they tend to come while the other types of keywords that convert while is comparison keywords like male versus convert kit, right so people are looking at brand names, and if you have content that describes the differences, there's a lot of intent there and you could potentially get sign ups as well. So when you're doing your cured research, don't just look for what has a lot of traffic look for Cubans. Have High CBC because WanNa have high CBC, tend to convert more visitors into buyers and also look for keywords that are. Very specific when it comes to evaluating a proctor service or buying like mentioned top X Y and Z or X. Y and Z, brand name review right or competitor one against competitor to those are all examples of tears that have high intent and when you look at these keywords whether it's top of funnel middle, center or bottom on all and I know I've been focusing more on bottom of funnel. You need to make sure that your content goes over all those things like it's reviews you better have a lot of reviews from other people whether it's video tax. If it's brand comparisons, you better have a table the outlines what is your brand offers competitors and white people should choose you. The final thing I'll add for my side is used tools like uber suggest, and you can basically look at what keywords your competitors are optimizing for. The other thing I'll do too is I think over suggests can do this as well. You look they're paid ads, what they're bidding on. Okay. So youtubers digest and look at what they're actually bidding on because what they're bidding on historically does keyword probably convert. Well, if they don't have a high volume and they keep bidding on it over extended time period that means it's probably working or they're stupid which I. Guess You shouldn't be looking at your competitive stupid. But assumed that they're not stupid or I assume that they're not gonNA, burn the money in it not worth, right? Yeah. Then that's your research right there. You don't need to try to figure everything out from scratch

Neil Patel Wanna Basketball Digital Marketing Agency Eric Su Google
Microsoft plans cloud push with foreign governments

CNBC's Fast Money

03:21 min | Last month

Microsoft plans cloud push with foreign governments

"Do have some news here on Microsoft's CNBC's Jordan novick report that Microsoft is signing deals with foreign governments to offer cloud packages. This would be sort of like the bundle. Remember it simple for the dod the Pentagon remember there's that Djeddai contract with up to ten billion dollars over ten years that's being contested by Amazon Microsoft. Already has relationships with foreign governments. We don't know which ones yet here this could evolve joins understanding is this is going to be formally announced later this year, of course, we know in that cloud infrastructure intrastructure market Amazon. Go head to head in two thousand, nine, hundred Amazon control about fifty percent of that market and Microsoft and told about fifteen percent of it. Microsoft shares no ticket high here in the after hours Brian Back to you. Right up one point, four percent just thank you very much. All right. By the way for more than Microsoft's cloud feelings, you can head over to CBC Dot Com read more about that story that Joshua's talked about from our crack team. They're more yet another stock not as not not as superlative as apple, but certainly has been a monster of a moneymaker. Well. If you look at a five year charter Microsoft. Better chart so. The turnaround there that started a few years ago under such Adela has been all about the cloud has been all about enterprise like Microsoft teams is going to be taking market share. There's there's a major argument that you. You'd be buying that selling zoom as you look to to even just where I think some of the big tech giants will probably push around companies like zoom. So Microsoft is is as far as I'm concerned. They are the other company to be talking about in in this world of of Mega Cap Tech. This is the multiple that is you know depending on what you think you should be paying. Thirty two to thirty five times is that cheap? Well, they are taking market share in the cloud. There's no question that they are beginning to to really dominate but as your. Gaming is a billion dollar business and Microsoft clearly is is navigated the the regulatory environment. The irony is, of course you know. Back, in one, thousand, nine, hundred, Ninety, eight, they were the ones that really started this. I think this focus on big cap tech and they're the ones that seem to be navigating best right now. Care Certainly. So be cared quickly go back to you talked about Apple Peter Lynch model like I love my phone. So I'm GonNa Buy Apple you don't hear a lot of people say man I really love that outlook. Oh, I couldn't live without excel. Zoom player I'm kidding on that one there an enterprise everybody deserve. The same kind of a French in that a consumer is going to or maybe more. Well, I. Think your point's well taken that in this environment where a lot is driven by narrative and. Just getting that attention of the so-called robinhood traders Microsoft isn't necessarily that exciting, right but look at the business that had has it's got great contracts coming up in contrast to Amazon. It appears that it's got kind of the tap on the shoulder from the government to go out there and get these contracts. I mean the government talked about them buying TIKTOK. That's a that's an acknowledgement that Microsoft has got a bit of a regulatory governmental tailwind to it. I agree ten listen it's it's over maybe it's over valued it. It was my pick few weeks ago when I did the fast pitch or whatever that thing is we did and I one and I'm still riding high from that and I would still apply Microsoft.

Microsoft Amazon Apple Pentagon Jordan Novick Brian Back Adela Cnbc Peter Lynch CBC Joshua
Charges dropped against Aboriginal chief in violent arrest

As It Happens from CBC Radio

00:31 sec | 3 months ago

Charges dropped against Aboriginal chief in violent arrest

"Alan Adam is no longer facing criminal charges. The elbert first nations leader was charged in March after RCMP officers violently arrested him. When news of the incident became public a few weeks ago, many people including the prime minister were shocked by what the police had done. A DASH CAM video recorded by the RCMP shows an officer tackling chief Adam. He punches him and puts him in a chokehold leaving his face bloodied. Today chief Adam was cleared of any wrongdoing. The officers are under investigation by Alberta's police

Alan Adam Rcmp Officer Prime Minister Alberta
Seven Generations - With Karl Dockstader (Oneida)

Iroquois History and Legends

06:50 min | 3 months ago

Seven Generations - With Karl Dockstader (Oneida)

"Hello and welcome everyone and we're so glad to have you today. Joining me is Carl docstater and just to give you a little background on this guy he's a member of the United. Nation, and he's the program called for the four year Fellowship Center about four years ago. He and a colleague of his started a podcast called one dish one Mike, and since then it's transformed into a weekly on air radio show, and recently he. He became a recipient of Canadian Journalism Foundation CBC. Fellowship for his. Outstanding Work I've been on his show before the ever since our show started. We've communicated back and forth, and finally it's my delight to introduce this man, and on top of that all he's an avid buffalo bills fan, so I would like to give a big severely to Mr Pro docstater You're very kind to Gaydos in the youngest log into low to Jota, what's the? What can I do? GEICO Ajayi? That translates to many Ms Carl. Just kidding There's there's a lot more in there. that I I like to introduce myself with Mitch official name is often as possible because our our language is under threat. I think that using any language like even if you only know Golly, even if you only know gateway when you're saying goodbye to someone or or something similar to goodbye, or or if you're seeing Jawa, thank someone. I think that every bit of language revitalization is is important, so so thank you for for having me on your show I have a gigantic fan. If you go into the archives, you can find an episode where we interview Andrew Shannon I may podcasting Betsy Andrew and I think that it's really just forty five minutes of meat gushing lick offend will. So but but you're worth it I mean it, it's it's really be concept. Your show that that you're doing at I'm I'm glad to be on for for something. Maybe a little outside of the box of avoid normally, so they are having beats danger. It's it's outside of the box, but i. feel like when we started the show. This is more of what we wanted. It's easy to talk about dead people because if you. You get something wrong well. They're not around to defend themselves. What's really hard for me? Is from a loving history and background is a lot of times. We try as hard as we can to point out. The the members of the six nations are still around today. There's still a vibrant part of our communities. They still contribute still here at not not like two or three of them left and on our show I have to. To purposely save the holding. The schone are instead of the haughtiness. SCHONE did and a lot of times we use the past tense. I I apologize to it now. You know when you're talking about past historical events that happens a lot, but we'd like to point out all the contributions that people have made in the past, and how the influenced our history and culture and society, and so it's just good to have somebody from today. Today that can can speak for today. I know you're just one person I. Know You don't speak on behalf of all indigenous people on the continent. I know you don't speak on behalf of everyone from the Oneida nation. You probably don't speak on behalf of your family either. It's good to have other perspectives because Caleb. I realized that we're limited in our scope. I wanted to have somebody come on. That could give me an. Update, but just what is Oneida culture like today? And what are the issues that your people are facing today? And then I also WANNA. Look towards the future a lot of times we get bogged down today's issues. Today's Oracle stuff, and as this podcast is recorded as different, but I realized that years from now decades from now hopefully, when people are still listening to you and me working back through the archives that you know we can, we can look forward and see what what does the future stand? What does the to row treaty mean for both our peoples in the future going forward. So that's a long winded. Introduction, BUT I want to turn over your Harlan just give you really open ended just give me a background about yourself and your upbringing. Yeah, thank you, thank you for the opportunity again. I think that what you said is probably key at. If if you're just tuning in if tuning in because of me than you've heard me, say this before if tuning into your recoil, ledges, mystery podcasts, and you're hearing me for the. The first time I think it is important that we're hitting on that concept. The Ngoni people are are still here and I, even like like I had to check myself I was helping my daughter my my nine year old at the time ten year old daughter. Do you a project for history? And it's it's difficult to sift through the history texts and to see them. Talk about how we were as people like, say we. We are as a people like we were still doing. Ceremonies were still. I'm literally trying to grow white corn, even as we speak like I'm. I'm sitting here. Thinking created rain last night because we're not something that their lives in a textbook sitting on sitting on a shelf somewhere, that's something that we want to bring a so having opportunity to come on with you today to to really remind people that can onto says about about living. Living History. History is something we're still living right now is super cool I. one of the reasons I like to get on. This side of the microphone is is that I don't have to talk about myself, so it's it's different since since I now you're the one that's technically behind the Mike but I mean I can say is that it's What it really pride myself on is is activity in my own community. I went and I volunteered tirelessly from a friendship center work at the forgery native. Friendship Centre by day. I volunteered there before I worked there I volunteered at the other friendship center in our region, the Niagara Regional Native Center and that for everything we do is indigenous people I. Think I think it's really evaluated on a on a community level and I. think that's something that we've actively done. Is that individuals? Success is just not the metric. That's not the measurement for for who we are as. at least in in the community circles that I that I hang out so so for me. My production into community was movement called idle no more if you will see American listeners after how how familiar they'll be with that movement, but there was an effort in in two thousand, twelve, twenty, thirteen to to really got environmental measures to take away protection from wire to fundamentally changed the relationship between the government and indigenous people. In four women stood up and said that we're not going to be idle anymore. We will be idle, no more and we need to. We need to put a stop to this. And our people got behind those women and all of our people. It felt like like there was a total consensus in our community that had an off and I saw the seismic shift almost ten years ago. Where people like we have to do something so so for me, that was almost may may rebirth into community I was I was just living regular life, and you know trying to trying to hold down a good job trying to buy a house and worrying about the things that normal people. People worry about and then. I saw this groundswell of activity in our community, and it really opened. My Eyes Act that we need to work together to federal sell change

Mike Carl Docstater Canadian Journalism Foundation Gaydos Fellowship Center Geico Ms Carl Friendship Centre Golly Mitch Andrew Shannon Niagara Regional Native Center Caleb Jawa Official Forgery Oracle Betsy Andrew
Seven Generations - With Karl Dockstader (Oneida)

Iroquois History and Legends

05:39 min | 3 months ago

Seven Generations - With Karl Dockstader (Oneida)

"Hello and welcome everyone and we're so glad to have you today. Joining me is Carl docstater and just to give you a little background on this guy he's a member of the United. Nation, and he's the program called for the four year Fellowship Center about four years ago. He and a colleague of his started a podcast called one dish one Mike, and since then it's transformed into a weekly on air radio show, and recently he. He became a recipient of Canadian Journalism Foundation CBC. Fellowship for his. Outstanding Work I've been on his show before the ever since our show started. We've communicated back and forth, and finally it's my delight to introduce this man, and on top of that all he's an avid buffalo bills fan, so I would like to give a big severely to Mr Pro docstater You're very kind to Gaydos in the youngest log into low to Jota, what's the? What can I do? GEICO Ajayi? That translates to many Ms Carl. Just kidding There's there's a lot more in there. that I I like to introduce myself with Mitch official name is often as possible because our our language is under threat. I think that using any language like even if you only know Golly, even if you only know gateway when you're saying goodbye to someone or or something similar to goodbye, or or if you're seeing Jawa, thank someone. I think that every bit of language revitalization is is important, so so thank you for for having me on your show I have a gigantic fan. If you go into the archives, you can find an episode where we interview Andrew Shannon I may podcasting Betsy Andrew and I think that it's really just forty five minutes of meat gushing lick offend will. So but but you're worth it I mean it, it's it's really be concept. Your show that that you're doing at I'm I'm glad to be on for for something. Maybe a little outside of the box of avoid normally, so they are having beats danger. It's it's outside of the box, but i. feel like when we started the show. This is more of what we wanted. It's easy to talk about dead people because if you. You get something wrong well. They're not around to defend themselves. What's really hard for me? Is from a loving history and background is a lot of times. We try as hard as we can to point out. The the members of the six nations are still around today. There's still a vibrant part of our communities. They still contribute still here at not not like two or three of them left and on our show I have to. To purposely save the holding. The schone are instead of the haughtiness. SCHONE did and a lot of times we use the past tense. I I apologize to it now. You know when you're talking about past historical events that happens a lot, but we'd like to point out all the contributions that people have made in the past, and how the influenced our history and culture and society, and so it's just good to have somebody from today. Today that can can speak for today. I know you're just one person I. Know You don't speak on behalf of all indigenous people on the continent. I know you don't speak on behalf of everyone from the Oneida nation. You probably don't speak on behalf of your family either. It's good to have other perspectives because Caleb. I realized that we're limited in our scope. I wanted to have somebody come on. That could give me an. Update, but just what is Oneida culture like today? And what are the issues that your people are facing today? And then I also WANNA. Look towards the future a lot of times we get bogged down today's issues. Today's Oracle stuff, and as this podcast is recorded as different, but I realized that years from now decades from now hopefully, when people are still listening to you and me working back through the archives that you know we can, we can look forward and see what what does the future stand? What does the to row treaty mean for both our peoples in the future going forward. So that's a long winded. Introduction, BUT I want to turn over your Harlan just give you really open ended just give me a background about yourself and your upbringing. Yeah, thank you, thank you for the opportunity again. I think that what you said is probably key at. If if you're just tuning in if tuning in because of me than you've heard me, say this before if tuning into your recoil, ledges, mystery podcasts, and you're hearing me for the. The first time I think it is important that we're hitting on that concept. The Ngoni people are are still here and I, even like like I had to check myself I was helping my daughter my my nine year old at the time ten year old daughter. Do you a project for history? And it's it's difficult to sift through the history texts and to see them. Talk about how we were as people like, say we. We are as a people like we were still doing. Ceremonies were still. I'm literally trying to grow white corn, even as we speak like I'm. I'm sitting here. Thinking created rain last night because we're not something that their lives in a textbook sitting on sitting on a shelf somewhere, that's something that we want to bring a so having opportunity to come on with you today to to really remind people that can onto says about about living. Living History. History is something we're still living right now is super cool I. one of the reasons I like to get on. This side of the microphone is is that I don't have to talk about myself, so it's it's different since since I now you're the one that's technically behind the Mike but I mean I can say is that it's What it really pride myself on is is activity in my own community. I went and I volunteered tirelessly from a friendship center work at the forgery native. Friendship Centre by day. I volunteered there before I worked there I volunteered at the other friendship center in our region, the Niagara Regional Native Center and that for everything we do is indigenous people I. Think I think it's really evaluated on a on a community level and I. think that's something that we've actively done. Is that individuals? Success is just not the metric. That's not the measurement for for who we are as.

Mike Carl Docstater Canadian Journalism Foundation Fellowship Center Gaydos Geico Friendship Centre Niagara Regional Native Center Ms Carl Forgery Golly Mitch Andrew Shannon Jawa Caleb Official Oracle Betsy Andrew
7 Alternative Ways to Promote Your Content in 2020

Marketing School

03:32 min | 3 months ago

7 Alternative Ways to Promote Your Content in 2020

"Super committed to your success online. We've worked with them to a special offer. Just remarking school listeners, all you have to do is go to dream host dot com slash marking school to learn more and get your website online today. Welcome to another episode of Marketing School. I'm Eric Su and I'm Neil. Patel and today we're GONNA talk about five alternative ways to promote your content in two thousand twenty saga I I? One is zest. That's Z. E. S., T., I S. so I mentioned this a couple of episodes ago, but zest is a little known basically promotion to especially. If you're doing marketing business related content, you can put your content out there i. think you can pan the CBC basis, but you can use promote your content number two most people. People don't do this and I. Don't know why I don't know if you do eric, but we've been using adds a lot recently for content, it works out really wellness, super cheap, and it drives a ton of traffic funny enough. We started driving pinterest at traffic to our content that has affiliate links, and we're getting a positive roi so cheap while I mean any ads are arbitrage I like. Oh, you're arbitraging, but that's like anything so anyway, but usually to fill. It links as hard to make a positive Roi right, but. Or so cheaper to say, this is great while number three, you can do to Boola out brain yet to boone out brain these. Are you know the little I? Guess content recommendations you see on the bottom of like CNN and all these other big website so those I've seen a lot of people may at work I personally haven't made it work before so anyway you can test it out number four and this one works like a charm i. do this all the time, but very few people cop me and I don't know why I push notifications same anytime. I have contact I collect. Push notifications, subscribers and I'll do blast out and I kid you not like I can get. Get seven ten thousand extra visitors to blog, plus just by being a push notification, and you can go to subscribers dot com to sign up for that, and then the fifth one fifth one would be twitter actually actually I don't think people utilize twitter, enough or just leave it at that, but I actually see the same people's promoted tweets over and over, and that does like the branding does affect me like I. Was Andrew Wilkinson from tiny Houston that you want to sell your business want to say like I. keep seeing it over time like that's kind of embedded in me now, so twitter ads I think it's definitely worth taking a look at number six is a bonus. If you're in SAS. Software or agency YOU COULD USE G to to promote your business capterra is another option that. These review sites basically give you an option to promote what you have going on or. Promoting content, but you're promoting your business, so that's a bonus that doesn't really fit at number seven. Another bonus doesn't fit for all of you. Is Start collecting phone numbers on your website like you know how you collect email? Start collecting phone numbers. We're starting to test out texting people whenever released new content and the click rates are through the roof, the unsubscribe rates and people saying stop the taxi also through the roof and. And early high, but after the first one that you said, the unsubscribe rate is drastically slowing down, so it gets better after the second third for tax and people like it, but sending him text messages every time you have new content we're finding that works really well. What are you using the tax because I know a Gary V's community? What do you use Tokyo Api integration I've devs. And how do you see the open? Open, rates and the UNSUBSCRIBE 's so whenever we ended up texting the open rates I. Don't know we twit. UTM codes in the links were able to e the click rates, but if I send out a hundred text messages were getting like sixteen, Seventeen Eighteen,

Eric Su Twitter Marketing School Gary V CNN Patel Pinterest Andrew Wilkinson Boone Z. E. S. Houston
A conversation about race, privilege and making space

Unreserved

05:33 min | 3 months ago

A conversation about race, privilege and making space

"Watch a dot. Say Nin, hello, and welcome this unreserved on CBC Radio One I'm Rosanna dare child. In October of two thousand and eighteen I moderated, a panel called inside outside at six degrees held at the art gallery of Ontario. It's an event that invites authors, academics, politicians, and big thinkers together to discuss pressing issues. And Right, now there is one issue that has captured the world's attention. The death of George Floyd a forty six year, old, black man and in Minneapolis police officer now charged with second degree murder. His death was witnessed around the world and sparked support for the black lives matter movement with protests from Merika to Australia. We are at a turning point in our history, so we thought it was a perfect time to revisit this conversation. Today on unreserved. We're talking about power, privilege and asking. How willing are we to make meaningful change? Joining me on stage, our Alexis McGill Johnson of the perception institute. Is Your allure author speaker and Internet yeller not to know bed. National Inuit leader and president of new tap read Cana Tommy and Sassy assassin professor of Sociology at Columbia University. Okay so I'm afternoon. We're going to have a conversation around place. Power Privilege, who hasn't who doesn't and perhaps more importantly how we are shifting to create new spaces. I want to start with of course are beautiful panelists here? I want to ask you first of all to tell US share with us. Where you come from because as my elders teach, you cannot know where you're going until you know where you've come from. or at least that's what my mother would say when she sent me to the store. my first question to each of the panelists are what is the place that you come from? Perhaps we'll start with me. Thank you very much I guess I'm still trying to figure that one out. I. I thought I came from Canada. I was the young person and I'm not quite sure if that's the right. Way To think about where I'm from now. Nuts. which is. A region in new one of our four regions northern Labrador and we very recently got self-government, two thousand and five. But I grew up. There I also grew up in the United States I I grew up. Kind of between a lot of different worlds so I, Can i? Also say that I'm a global citizen as well so I am the national leader I am in Okinawa proud indigenous person. But it doesn't. Then, take back any of the other parts of me, that exist as well and I'm I'm comfortable insertive in that space, and I think that is sometimes confusing to the rest of the world that I have not indigenous ancestry as well that my mother is none dishes. That's fine and getting the acceptance from. Canada and North America that I can be indigenous, but I can also have non indigenous parts. That is a part of this power dynamic that I hope that we can discuss this afternoon about assertiveness in. Indigenous. Without the. The qualifiers that indigenous people put on us. And if we don't fit into those myriad of boxes than we somehow lose all of our rights altogether. And we will get into that because that is an interesting place of privilege to. TRY TO KICK doors. Down into so that we're GONNA. Wait to Alexa. So, we're my from. Kind of like to say I'm from a period of time. I was I was born in Nineteen, seventy two, which is important to me as a social identity really. but it's important for me. Because it was, it was halfway I was born kind of right in the middle of a post wave, second wave, feminism, and the Black Power Movement and my parents, both particularly my mother lived at the intersection of both of those movements growing up. She was incredibly active as a woman is. She, she had US marching in in our Shakey's an Afro puffs as as children I'm pretty sure I learned the words to. We shall overcome before I learned the US pledge of allegiance. My choice of professional careers always been trying to to understand interrogate these these. Frameworks power and Privilege Ed. I studied political science. Which I think is a study of power. But have found myself now consistently in these rooms, as one of few one of only, if not the only woman woman of Color, and so I've been this bridge I think kind of connecting. Connecting the dots in a lot of different iterations from a cultural perspective where I've worked with a number of artists and democratic organizations, organizing young people to the current work that we do have perception which is around translating the science of our brains and bodies understand difference in how we connect to each other in those ways.

United States Canada CBC George Floyd Shakey Black Power Movement Minneapolis Ontario Second Degree Murder Alexis Mcgill Johnson Australia Alexa Perception Institute Officer North America National Inuit Labrador Okinawa Columbia University Professor Of Sociology
Blackout Tuesday: Why is everyone posting black squares online?

Q

04:27 min | 3 months ago

Blackout Tuesday: Why is everyone posting black squares online?

"Today the music industry is taking a strong and surprising stance the world hasn't really seen before some of the biggest music labels in the world have decided the June second today will be known as blackout cheese day as part of an initiative called the show must be paused to executives from Atlantic Records to black women Briana Agyemang and Jimmy let Thomas started this initiative in response to the recent deaths of George Floyd Brianna Taylor Ahmad armory and other black people who've been killed by police officers so today a number of major labels and artists are stopping their everyday operations in solidarity and support and to talk systemic racism in major streaming services like Spotify apple music and YouTube music are also taking part with cancellations moments of silence and special playlists but today's blackout is also drawing some criticism we've convened a special Tuesday Q. this music panel to get into it a harmony is a freelance music journalist and critic Lisa Christiansen is a CBC arts reporter on the line from Vancouver harmony today's blackout cheese day tell us exactly what record labels are doing or not doing today Kate's house so it's unclear because a lot of the record labels that have come forward and said that they're going to participate haven't been specific about what they will or will not be doing today H. I. universal music group did mention that they're holding their releases for this week and donating to bail out funds for protesters and suggestions from the two creators of this movement have included each offer some taking a break if one has been impacted by the results of the police killings and just need a moment to green they've also suggested making financial contributions to the families of George Floyd and Brianna Taylor and are breached they've also suggested making financial contributions to protesters are connecting with leaders who are building grassroots campaigns and learning more about it to raise resources for those who want to position themselves as allies Mr from what you're saying on social media today how how widespread is this it's really everywhere it really started over the weekend it started picking up and then by yesterday I just noticed almost everything I was looking at had some kind of statement music labels blog streaming service or DJ music studios even bands now this morning there are just a lot of black squares in my feet the creators of this initiative Atlanta great Atlantic record label execs to Mila Thomas and Brenda Agyemang say today is quote a day to take a beat for an honest reflective and productive conversation about what actions we need to collectively take to support the black community harmony what are you hoping for here what conversations do you hope today's blackout might spark yes so I hope it's a day of introspection for record labels for the music industry and for everyone it's time to draw a line in the sand and speak out against police brutality and systemic racism I'm also hoping it's a day to identify aspects of music industry culture that promotes anti black racism or incubate anti back racism behind the scenes and the lives of the artist but these labels represent I think it's a data call out that org charts and critically examine how many black people are consistent power and decision making tables I'm it's a time to have those conversations but also to create a concrete action plan yes I've seen some concerns emerging today around this black out the harmony especially around people using the hash tag black lives matter what are you hearing right so I'm seeing criticism emerging emerging this morning about how performative at this camp is and how potentially dangerous it is so for instance I can close with black lives matter floods out critical information that organizes are using on the ground protesters are using the black lives matter hashtags to document what is happening on the ground in real time this year fundraising links and other resources that support the black lives matter movement and right now on Instagram if you look it's just taken over with black squares with what other criticism hearing right now well I think a lot of people very very concerned that it's just perform it is it's an easy way to not do anything at all you know it's just Hey look we are observing that and also some of the language and if you look at some of the posts is very vague we're taking some time out we're going to think so I think the only way for this day to be really successful is for those of us who have sat in meetings there needs to be some actionable items that come out of this and people need to be able to prove that they did do something that day and it wasn't just to put a square up on your social media feed

Will COVID-19 bring down Airbnb?

The Big Story

10:54 min | 4 months ago

Will COVID-19 bring down Airbnb?

"Ever since we launched this show almost two years ago. Now we've done episodes about the housing crisis in Canada comes up often and it comes up everywhere from Pi to Nana avert to big cities like Vancouver and Toronto and Montreal. And every time we cover it we start with. Why how did this situation come to be and there are of course some different reasons in different places but one thing one thing keeps coming up again and again and you get one? Guess as to what we'll city place here in the downtown core as one of the highest concentrations of airbnb rental units in Toronto and tonight some housing advocates are saying. That is booming. Business is driving up the prices for those who are actually looking for a permanent home. That was then though and this is now on a city known for its sky high pricing when it comes to housing and rentals is seeing a bit of a shift. According to experts since the Ontario government has banned airbnb there was actually a huge influx in rental apartments being available right now. Nobody is traveling not even within Canada. And as you might imagine that has had an impact on airbnb business model and Bhai impact. I mean it has basically obliterated so what happens to the rental markets Canada's biggest cities to thousands of airbnb landlords some of whom have staked their financial future on this platform to the company itself. Does it di- Does it? Evolve and what happens to the future of development in big urban centers because in order to understand? How much could change from here? You also have to understand how much AIRBNB has done to drive the direction of cities in the past decade. So that's where we'll start. Who knows where we'LL END UP Jordan Heath Rawlings and this is the big story. Matt Elliott is a columnist who writes about municipal policy. He writes in the Toronto Star. He writes for the CBC and several other publications. I mad. Hey we're gonNA talk about Airbnb today and It's decline. I guess in Toronto and in other cities around the world. But why don't you I kind of give me an explanation? As to how AIRBNB rose to such dominance in the rental markets of big cities. I mean the short answer is money. I mean. Imagine you're a landlord and you sort of have choices with the property. You Own the traditional way where you find. A long-term tenant You know you can make some money off of that. But there's some what landlords might describe as hurdles. You know the rules around addictions raising rent or whatever Whereas AIRBNB is way simpler. A bad tenants don't really last for longer than few days in most cases and then the money. I think the money is just the big thing I mean. Imagine you could rent a place for two hundred dollars a night for fifty nights a month. You're at three thousand dollars a month in income from that. That's more than the average rent in most Indian neighborhoods and Enough to carry a mortgage worth a million dollars or so so landlords are looking those two options they were increasingly going the RBM Dui. Because I know you cover Toronto. We'll just sort of use it as a proxy for some of the biggest Global cities which have some of the same problems with AIRBNB. Can you give me a sense of the size of AIRBNB IN TORONTO? Before the pandemic began like how dominant is it was it was very dominant and increasingly so a fair. Bnb which is an anti airbnb at secret supporting a note that but they did some number crunching and looked at the data from AIRBNB and they estimated there were about seventy three hundred Units on BNB that did not comply with the regulations passed by the city of Toronto. Those regulations are not enforced when they were doing this. But those were the rules. Saying you know you can't rent out an entire house that you don't live in you can only rent out your principal residence. So seventy three hundred units that would have been on the rental market but been consumed by AIRBNB. is hugely significant in rental market as tight as Toronto or vacancy rates over. The last few years have been around one percent so you know I think one of the reasons people got pretty fired up about AIRBNB. Is this idea that you know these are. This is a rental market. That is very very challenging. Very expensive very tight and airbnb comes along and suddenly another chunk of air. Rental market is no longer in the market. And we're going to get to the pandemic I promise in in one second but How much in the hallways at City Hall was this hot button issue in the months leading up to say February or early March? When things started happening I mean housing. In general is such a huge huge issue at City Hall There's increasingly concerns that you know we're looking at a city that is just unaffordable for anybody but the top of the economy. So if you're a service worker if you're a teacher you're a nurse if you're a police officer like all of these jobs some of which pay pretty darn well when you look at what housing was renting for in Toronto. It just wasn't really doable for a lot of these people especially if they're people that are looking at you know. I want to start a family. Have a couple of kids and the only one of the people in a couple goes to work in those situations. Those that arrangement used to be doable. In a city like Toronto increasingly. It was not so when you have that sort of greater backdrop of housing counselors and bureaucrats and policymakers and advocates are looking for levers. They can pull. That might improve the situation. How many looked at AIRBNB and said okay? This is a relatively new thing. It has taken units out of the rental market This is something that we can look at it as a way. You know for whatever difference. That'll make it would make some difference to to make things better. As far as housing goes but you mentioned that they weren't yet enforcing the regulations they were not and I mean that's that's an interesting story by itself because the regulations passed by council which I mean at a high level. The major changes that they wanted to impose. Were you know you can only rent out your principal residence so if you have a condo and you want rent it for a couple of weeks on AIRBNB in the summer while you're off on vacation or whatever that's totally fine but if you buy another condo with the plan to just rent it on airbnb making income off of it that was going to become a against the rules. There was also going to be a cap on the number of nights you could rent a a unit in Toronto. One hundred and eighty nine year was going to the CAP But when they passed those Suddenly there was a challenge by a landlord turned out. Airbnb was supporting this challenge. And while that was before the a tribunal they held things up for a two years pretty much but a year and a half to two years while they waited for a ruling on whether these regulations could actually go into effect that finally resolve itself in the fall. But then all of the sudden you have this pandemic happen and you know the has stuff stuff as ended up on pause result. What'S HAPPENED TO AIRBNB IN TORONTO? And other places since the pandemic began it all kind of blew up To be honest I'm AIRBNB. The renters are primarily travelers Whether international or domestic travellers they're people come in from one place to another and in mid March Traveling shutdown just is not happening so there goes the market for airbnb in most cities So all the sudden you have a situation where you have all the supply thousands of units that were on Airbnb and that's how landlords made their income Suddenly were empty a bookings being cancelled and going forward. There's not a lot of hope for our travel to resume in the near term so it was a major shock to the system as all these units suddenly no longer had people in them at all. How bad could this get for the company if it continues? And what have they sort of gun in an attempt to respond to they've done a few things Airbnb announced a fund support landlords. Who were facing cancellations? You know for bookings that came in before the Pandemic Aso I think there is a desire on airbnb. Parts to see this Just sorta sustain the urban economy. Obviously they want to make sure there's still people with airbnb listings after all. This happens That airbnb itself is facing major. Financial Distress They have laid off. I think a quarter of their workforce They are saying they are revenue for the year is about half what it was projected to be at the start of the year. So they're facing a multi billion dollar. Hit and resorting to layoffs. And it's a really tough situation for for the company and then for landlords. I think some of them are going to be able to whether this because they're looking at the situation where they know they bought a unit listed on Airbnb they can defer either mortgage right now at a lot of banks. So maybe there's a way that they can hold on and and keep going through this but you also have situations where landlords have hugely over leveraged themselves. You know really gambled on this as a way to make a quick buck. And you know they're looking at situations where okay. This was going to be my My Nest Egg is is how was going to get rich and that is is really starting to fall apart for a lot of them. When I wrote about this for the star a few weeks ago I got a lot of emails from Landlords with immunes who were just incredibly angry about what I had written Because I was not coming down on the side of the landlords talking about you know how much of their life savings tied up in this Airbnb Model and this their despair for what's going to happen in the future. Can you give me an example of what that looks like when you get severely over leveraged investing in Airbnb Imagine a situation where you come into Toronto and you buy a house for yourself for you know everything in Toronto as close to a million dollars these days. So so you buy a million dollar hosts to live in and then you think well you know to make some extra money. I will also by Condo for a half million dollars and

Airbnb Toronto Canada City Hall Ontario Government Principal Matt Elliott CBC Jordan Heath Rawlings Montreal Vancouver Airbnb. Officer
How Indigenous people are making connections and finding support during COVID-19 pandemic

Unreserved

04:22 min | 5 months ago

How Indigenous people are making connections and finding support during COVID-19 pandemic

"Is it important for you? To use ingredients from an indigenous worldview so to speak so becoming a chef and focusing on indigenous Lou cultures of the Americas know within the last seven years researching and in gaining knowledge. I realized that you know knowing where food comes from seasonally you know and food is our medicine and we have to continue serving or ancestral foods. No special bearing a timely. Today you know just serving on for example sage or Cedar T. for example has a lot of anti oxidants you know has a lot of these on properties that are able to help with your immune system Now you've been making large batches of food for weeks now. What would you say is the best dish that you've created on Tuesdays? We we try and and follow the traditional culinary restaurant scene. If you may so every Tuesday we do talk. Oh I know so instead of serving India Tacos we we. We focus on the South List and a Mexican style tacos of using fresh corn tortillas in Cedar Braids Bikes and hominy temporary beans. Oh my gosh. My mouth is watering right now. Brian so why do you think it's important particularly during this difficult time for people to turn to community and each other for support you know for me be? Navajo? The southwest and residing here in Dakota and territories. You know I feel like this. Is My second home being here as a chef and having a platform that I have I feel like I can use that as a tool to my advantage. So how this community dot org are forgotten about daring the ZAPPA crisis and why does send a native American elders? What inspired you to focus on them. Specifically something needed you know is just not only talk about unity when we talk about commute to you know we got to. Nali look towards our next generation of kids but also look into our roots and elders no showing that respect shown dot common love of where we came from. Well thank you so much for your efforts and your time today Brian. Thank you for the opportunity to share a story in the work that we are doing. Brian. Yeah Z. Is a Navajo Chef based out of Minneapolis? In addition to cooking. Up MEALS FOR ELDERS. Brian also sharing how to cooking videos on his youtube channel which focuses on indigenous ingredients to check out photos of some of his culinary creations. Check out our website at CBC DOT CA slash unreserved. So all in here is part of our traditional homelands this is attritional Gary Oak ecosystem which is part of our traditional food systems. So there's some more beautiful folks. I hope that you can see the chemists in bloom and we'll try to find some are walk. That was Cheryl. Bryce walking through Megan also known as Beacon Hill Park in Victoria. Her walk was shared on Instagram. Live through a series curated by the open space gallery. And it's one of the many ways that Cheryl is helping her community connect with nature. Right now Cheryl is from the song. He's nation traditionally known as Liikanen Cheryl. Welcome back to the show. Oh hello thank you for inviting me so tell me. Why did you want to do this? Virtual Nature Walk. I narrowed that everyone is staying home right now. And connecting to family and land in different ways into this is another way to connect to our homelands but also to educate and provide opportunity for people staying home to be able to visit these sites. Virtually and having me as a local indigenous women and From the songs nation being able to talk about the history of the land and this is just one spot. I wanted to share with everyone within my community in the greater community to connect with lands. Even if it's virtually right now

Liikanen Cheryl Brian Cbc Dot Ca Navajo Gary Oak Youtube Dakota Minneapolis Beacon Hill Park Victoria Bryce Megan
Man posing as officer kills 16 in Canada shooting

Seattle's Morning News with Dave Ross

01:07 min | 5 months ago

Man posing as officer kills 16 in Canada shooting

"Morning sixteen people were killed during a shooting rampage yesterday but it wasn't on the U. S. as in the town of port of pick in the Canadian province of Nova Scotia the gunman had disguised himself as a police officer the target is first victims before attacking others randomly in their homes it's believed to be the deadliest such incident in Canadian history CBC correspondent Tom Murphy is a Nova Scotia multiple firearm calls at a port of pick hosts several casualties inside and outside around eleven thirty PM Saturday Mike McKay salt several buildings burning your artid mall community play morning police released the shooter's name neighbors are shocked to learn it's the normally mild mannered Gabriel workman he was spotted in the brook field area right he was there any type of rash the fact that this individual had a uniform in a police car disposal certainly speaks to it not being a random act police cornered workmen and Irving big stop in Enfield twelve hours after a ninety two kilometers away from where it seems to have all begun the shooter was finally

Nova Scotia Officer Tom Murphy Mike Mckay Gabriel Workman Enfield CBC Irving
Gunman in Nova Scotia allegedly dressed as police officer

KYW 24 Hour News

00:33 sec | 5 months ago

Gunman in Nova Scotia allegedly dressed as police officer

"Now at least sixteen people are dead after a man dressed as a police officer went on a shooting rampage across Nova Scotia in Canada authorities believe the gunman targeted his first victim before attacking others randomly in their homes that come in now dead CBC correspondent Tom Murphy's ins Nova Scotia says is believed to be one of the deadliest mass shootings in Canadian history multiple firearm calls at a port of pick hosts several casualties inside and outside around eleven thirty PM Saturday Mike McKay salt several

Officer Nova Scotia Tom Murphy Mike Mckay Canada
Cuomo: Coronavirus deaths are stabilizing at a "horrific rate"

On the Road with Dane Neal

01:06 min | 5 months ago

Cuomo: Coronavirus deaths are stabilizing at a "horrific rate"

"Two hundred thirty seven CPD employees have tested positive for the virus since March twenty fifth the police department has issued more than two thousand dispersal orders telling people to stop congregating in large groups Lori Lightfoot spoke at that same news conference our first responders are making daily sacrifices to protect the lives of others I used to say to anyone who's listening don't make their sacrifices be in vain stay home and save lives meanwhile New York state appears to be at its eight packs in the fight against the virus CBC's Margaret Millar reports from New York governor Andrew Cuomo delivering more positive data in the states fight against corona virus the curve of the increase is continuing to flag he says it appears the state has reached a plateau the number of hospitalizations appears to have hit an apex in the apex appears to have to be a plateau and that is good news but the bad news is that seven hundred and eighty three people died just yesterday in New York it is stabilizing AD and horrific rates he says it's still too early to say when life here will return to

Lori Lightfoot CBC Margaret Millar Andrew Cuomo New York
Connecting in isolation: Indigenous people create, find and share community online

Unreserved

05:53 min | 6 months ago

Connecting in isolation: Indigenous people create, find and share community online

"Are you missing being able to talk to your co workers face to face longing for the days when meetings didn't use zoom Google hangouts or other technology my next guest is embracing her virtual work meetings? Scour Nadi in her team meet in the virtual world second life for work the Mohawk artist is the CO founder and CO Director of Aboriginal Territories in Cyberspace or ABC Tech. She's joining us for Montreal. Did tell us how it works. Hello Greg so describe your virtual indigenous world. What does it look like about? First of all it's called Atlantic Island And when you arrive with you're wearing your avatar in Atlantic island. The first thing you see is the celestial tree. Most of the things you'll see on optic. Ireland are parts of sets that I made with my wonderful team for Messina's that I've made in Michigan Amazon movies shot in a virtual environment. Like a video game. So you have this beautiful celestial tree which from my movie about the creation of the donor schone creation story But surrounding it now are some benches that you can sit on to so that you can enjoy the tree or chat with your chat with your fellow. Avatar It's in a kind of a plaza and all around in our different places you can go and look at. There's a museum of the future I call it. There is the wonderful campfire with the adirondack chairs. Around the MUSKOKA chairs around it. There's also another little corner that has a traditional pre contact longhouse side by side with a long house of the future and three sisters garden growing out in front. Well that's a sounds lovely and we're going to be posting a few pictures on our website at CBC dot ca slash unreserved. So people can see what it looks like for themselves. So whose idea was it to have a meeting in the comfy chairs around a big fire. Actually I can't remember exactly which member of our team suggested it. It was my dream. Come true though I have been I've been hanging out in this virtual world for quite a while and I've always seen as a space that could be used as a community space especially far. You know our communities who are spread out like as indigenous people were spread out across vast territory noticing North America. I could see this as being a place where we could come together and meet in an embodied way if we couldn't fly somewhere you know and talk about our issues or just visit. You know awesome so now. That more and more offices are moving to online meetings. What do you think the benefits are of this? Virtual option that you've created you know. Zoom is fine. And that's great but you know you. Do you really have to show all your workmates? Your apartment on your possible messy bedroom. You know you can set yourself up in a shared space and you can also put on. You Know Your Best. Avatar in your hair will be all done near makeup. His all done. You can be sitting in your underwear but you know wearing we're close. There's an added extra bonus for me. I believe in why you know one of the reasons I like to hand in a virtual world like this is because there's like a fantasy element I mean in this. I've built this world with again with the help of my amazing team. I've built this space. That's like it's an indigenous space. Where else do you get to hang out around the celestial tree? Yeah I think it's so it's it's just beautiful for me thing to be able to share with other people with the People. I'm working with and you know we're not We're not a business so to be in a space that allows us to continue dreaming and imagining is very beneficial. Less sounds amazing. I for one would make myself twenty pounds lighter and my brain's be perfect every time. Yup You can do. That isn't that it is so. Is this virtual space open to visitors? As a matter of fact it is However you might show up there Zana and you might like not know quite what to do since you're a new job in our language so you might kind of walk around and you might find it you might. If you're lucky you know how to walk around but you know you might not quite know how to interact with things or you might feel kind of lonely talk about social isolation if you show up there for PM and no one's even there. I'm then happened a lot. So what we decided to do is to set up. Activating active island. Which is the weekly time slot that we make sure we're in world so one at least one of our team is in world at that time and they're there to visit with you or show you around or tell you all your avatars. Here's actually on backwards. Let me help you you know. And and that's turned out to be a nice way for people to get into seeing the space but You know I think again imagining what the space could be and conversations have happened as well so I invite you to come on Friday afternoon. Two thirty you know we have a web page. Www DOT AB tech ab T. E. C. Dot land and that. Be that webpage. You can figure out how to visit US awesome while I will be sure to To get my best avatar outfit on and come visit Awesome thank you so much for your time. Today you're very welcome

Atlantic Island Google Co Founder Montreal United States Greg North America Abc Tech T. E. C. Dot CBC Co Director Of Aboriginal Terr Michigan Muskoka Social Isolation Ireland Zana Messina Amazon
"cbc" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

01:47 min | 2 years ago

"cbc" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

"The podcast version of q the cbc radio show thanks a lot for streaming this or downloading this bit of stressful morning this morning i'm not gonna lie to you i had to interview my new boss the new head of cbc canada catherine tate and you know we have a job to do around here and i'm happy to do it you know should ask hard questions and ask real questions to people but not everyday you ask it to the person who ultimately is is signing your paycheck she signed my paycheck i don't know anyway interesting conversation a little bit about her vision for the cbc and how you know this idea of going digital is not going anymore it's gone digital it's now digital and we talk a little bit about how the cbc conserve people like you who listen to this stuff on podcast who listened to the stuff not on necessarily traditional radio or on television so i was heartened by our conversation they'll be can check it out at jail richardson's by with the new book for the tortoise franz simon dune ahead of the world cup semi final talks about why style in soccer is sometimes as interesting as what goes on on the pitch as they say and the pride and joy of country music charley pride show starts now in a job like this you get a chance to talk to all kinds of different people but you don't often get to interview your own boss meccan only go well right catherine tate is the brand new president and ceo of cbc canada she's been working in the film and tv world for decades she's also the first woman to lead the public broadcaster in the history of the cbc catherine tate joins me live right now from studio in montreal.

catherine tate richardson soccer president and ceo montreal cbc
"cbc" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

02:14 min | 2 years ago

"cbc" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

"You what's the first thing that comes to mind when you think of cbc maybe the national maybe on the road again maybe airing happy gilmore ten times a year on tv for some reason now it's probably that exploding pizza logo which you've seen kicking around for years you know the cbc logo the original logo made a splash back in the seventies back when there was a whole wave of iconic canadian logos popping up everywhere like the c n logo which you can still see on trains or the lion you see when you stop by the royal bank it's amazing how these little logos can get embedded in your brains and for decades i mean i've met when i mentioned each of those logos they immediately popped into your brains even if you haven't seen them in a long time and new documentary makes pretty convincing case that there's a lot more to these designs than just company branding i think the working symbols of those times were a snapshot of a portent time that we were in the growth of this nation and it helped define an attitude of new pulse abilities not tied to the past but look towards the future so did canadians design these symbols or did these civils in fact designed canada that is a clip from design canada which is a new documentary celebrating the many innovations in graphic design the came out of this country in particular in the late sixties and early seventies as you're about to hear this film really talks up the role these symbols had in establishing something like a distinctly canadian identity greg derail is the director of design canada graphic designer himself based in vancouver you're also going to hear from a guy named fritz got chalk one of the designers featured in the film his agency ash goth shock was pretty much at the forefront of the canadian design boom which even played a role he thinks in establishing national unity so greg i'll start with you what compelled what compelled you to make this yeah so i think when i look back on it now you know there's three main factors that really made me wanna make this film was grown up as a designer in canada myself i felt these symbols have somehow played a small role in how identifies a canadian.

gilmore vancouver fritz greg cbc director of design
"cbc" Discussed on CBC Radio - Spark

CBC Radio - Spark

01:50 min | 2 years ago

"cbc" Discussed on CBC Radio - Spark

"This is a cbc podcast discover what millions around the world already have audible has canada's largest library of audiobooks including exclusive content curated by and four canadians experienced books in a whole new way were stories are brought to life by powerful performances from renowned actors and narrators with the free audible app you can listen anytime anywhere whether you're at home in the car or out on a jog the first thirty days of the audible membership or free including a free book go to www dot audible dot ca slash cbc to learn more hi i'm nora young this is spark from cbc radio this time with mark zuckerberg taking his apology tour to europe we thought the time was right for a special look at the state of social media a social media swamps us in information of dubious quality is reputation more important than ever we are your peak data everything can be known with luke leaks from internet and yet we have feeling that we sort of lose control entering the reputation age and who wouldn't want to be part of organizing the world information which the whole lot different than i really wanted to come in and write some cold in the program what the tech sectors audacious mission statements tells about them and the rest of us i up though breaking the trust busters on spark the future incoming the future is coming features come coming arrive intact arrive intact this is this is spark.

mark zuckerberg canada nora young cbc europe luke thirty days
"cbc" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

01:59 min | 2 years ago

"cbc" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

"This is a cbc podcast discover what millions around the world already have audible has canada's largest library of audiobooks including exclusive content curated by and four canadians experienced books in a whole new way were stories are brought to life by powerful performances from renowned actors and narrators with the free audible app you can listen anytime anywhere whether you're at home in the car or out on a jog the first thirty days of the audible membership or free including a free book go to www dot audible dot ca slash cbc to learn more there is a long standing idea there's you might even want to call it like a stereotype that comedians miserable not like in person but maybe that's stuck around for a long time because you don't really hear a lot of jokes on stage about happiness you don't really hear on the comedians coming up going how's it going everybody nice to be here thanks for coming in pretty good everything's great life nothing is wrong and i'm not upset about anything but when tig notaro gets up on stage and says something like that it's the truth i know you came for punch lines i've been doing stand up for twenty years and in order to make you happy i have to make myself happy i and it truly tickles me to tell you a long boring story ends with so that was a hard time a little bit of tig notaro in her new netflix special happy to be here tig broke out onto the comedy scene in twenty twelve during what she calls the worst years of her life there was a near death experience the death of mother the end of a relationship she was diagnosed with cancer but these days takes material comes from more upbeat place her family her marriage and thankfully her good health pignataro join me studio in los angeles to talk a little bit about watson spire her latest special and the reality that even when.

netflix los angeles canada watson twenty years thirty days
"cbc" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

02:08 min | 2 years ago

"cbc" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

"This is a cbc podcast discover what millions around the world already have audible has canada's largest library of audiobooks including exclusive content curated by and four canadians experienced books in a whole new way were stories are brought to life by powerful performances from renowned actors and narrators with the free audible app you can listen anytime anywhere whether you're at home in the car or out on a jog the first thirty days of the audible membership or free including a free book go to www dot audible dot ca slash cbc to learn more show businesses fall actor thing dan and models and then they're me i thing that model i can make the word canadian found that thing when i'm over the then people mistake me for an america i'm outraged as when they conversed too right but he called one of the most memorable characters and actually neither of those things that ever happened now i'm never mistaken as an american horse you couldn't you couldn't really make canadian sixty no no i can't do it as scott thomsen is is here to talk a little bit about buddy called one of the most memorable characters to come out of kids in the hall he's introduced buddy to audiences all across north america starting with the kids in the hall then years later when buddy was a correspondent on stephen colbert the colbert report even in person on tour bring buddy to the stage like he's doing again in a new show called apparat daleus the buddy cole monologues got to nobody call even better about twenty years ago when scott and his writing partner paul bellini published buddy babylon the auto biography of buddy cole a fictional account of buddies life story i'm doing this in front of you so it'd be like is it all accurate so far th god i can't stop thinking philip roth though because i'm making liver tonight at.

scott thomsen stephen colbert paul bellini cole philip roth canada america north america partner twenty years thirty days
"cbc" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

01:36 min | 2 years ago

"cbc" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

"This is a cbc podcast discover what millions around the world already have audible has canada's largest library of audiobooks including exclusive content curated by and four canadians experienced books in a whole new way were stories are brought to life by powerful performances from renowned actors and narrators with the free audible app you can listen anytime anywhere whether you're at home in the car or out on a jog the first thirty days of the audible membership or free including a free book go to www dot audible dot ca slash cbc to learn more this might be the ultimate dream scenario imagine you're playing in a band and you're torn across europe your visiting a brand new city a part of the world i mean even brand new country you haven't seen before every single night tour comes to an end and you are not in any way ready to go home yet but you realize that you know exactly have nine to five to go home to nothing really stop you from extending your trip so you decide to hunker down in spain for a while one of the members of yukon blonde got to live out this dream scenario a couple years ago when his band you come on wrapping up european tour jeff made a temporary home from self in spain it ended up becoming the perfect spot to start working on the baynes new album you're going to hear lots more about this adventure from jeff in the ban in just a minute but first here's one of the brand new songs off that brand new album recorded live and accused ideo this is you calm blonde with love the way you are.

spain jeff baynes ideo canada europe thirty days
"cbc" Discussed on CBC Radio - Spark

CBC Radio - Spark

01:39 min | 2 years ago

"cbc" Discussed on CBC Radio - Spark

"This is a cbc podcast discover what millions around the world already have audible has canada's largest library of audiobooks including exclusive content curated by and four canadians experienced books in a whole new way were stories are brought to life by powerful performances from renowned actors and narrators with the free audible app you can listen anytime anywhere whether you're at home in the car or out on a jog the first thirty days of the audible membership or free including a free book go to www dot audible dot ca slash cbc to learn more hi i'm nora young this is spark from cbc radio this time how museums are changing with the times they didn't just want or expertise they also wanted the stuff but that stuff includes way more than the rooms pool of historical objects building global museum for the digital future and we're used to social media influencers internet celebrities amassing thousands of fans and modeling the wears of brands but what happens when the influence our isn't real difference between fiction fiction and you know things that are supposed to replicate real life we look at virtual influencers first up though sure i'm human promise on spark the future incoming the future is coming features coming coming arrive intact arrive intact this is this is spark.

canada nora young cbc thirty days
"cbc" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

02:14 min | 2 years ago

"cbc" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

"This is a cbc podcast discover what millions around the world already have audible has canada's largest library of audiobooks including exclusive content curated by and four canadians experienced books in a whole new way were stories are brought to life by powerful performances from renowned actors and narrators with the free audible app you can listen anytime anywhere whether you're at home in the car or out on a jog the first thirty days of the audible membership or free including a free book go to www dot audible dot ca slash cbc to learn more this is probably something you learn growing up and it still holds true first impressions are important first impressions can really stick with people that's why the first q show i did i tried my best not to curse the next person you're about to hear from is julian denison he's a fifteen year old actor from new zealand and the first impression a lot of people have him on film while he was feeling a bunch of potato chips setting fire to a mailbox and stirring up trouble what am i going to do maybe a rocket launcher gonna come for all soon merits not awesome ricky it serious hey dangerous to them to prison king stop that's jillian denison in hunt for the builder people which is a film you may not have seen but it's the kind of film that if you have seen it it's probably your favorite film do you know what i mean like it's considered to be a real cult film like you know it's not necessarily the biggest film in north america but those who have seen like it an awful lot but i will say it's also the highest grossing film ever to come out of new zealand and it was a film that impressed ryan reynolds vancouver's owned tom power doppler ganger ryan reynolds so when the canadian actor was putting together his latest film deadpool two hey knew he just had to work with julian and just like that jillian denison was adopted into the marvel universe scoring role in the highly anticipated deadpool two which by the way opens in theaters this weekend don't worry about a ri proving the power of a first impression even when it's a bit of a wild one.

julian denison jillian denison north america ryan reynolds canada vancouver fifteen year thirty days
"cbc" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"cbc" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

"This is a cbc podcast discover what millions around the world already have audible has canada's largest library of audiobooks including exclusive content curated by and four canadians experienced books in a whole new way were stories are brought to life by powerful performances from renowned actors and narrators with the free audible app you can listen anytime anywhere whether you're at home in the car or out on a jog the first thirty days of the audible membership or free including a free book go to www dot audible dot ca slash cbc to learn more canadian this warm weather that's starting to come with the arrival of spring may have had a chance to walk around with a bit you know walk around your town your city maybe you've even come across one of the sheriff fire signs of spring seeing buskers strumming away for change performing on the sidewalk i don't know if you know this so many big musicians when you listen to them a lot of them got their start busking like rod stewart tracy chapman ed sharon and passenger and the next musician you're about to hear james bay in only a couple of years james win from busking on the streets of brighton in england to walking the red carpet at the grammy's he even kind of kept up his busker look long hair fedora dark jeans dirty laced up boots but now james bay is changing up that image and moving into the next chapter of his career this friday he stopped drops his second album electric light and just like his new look his new sound surprising a lot of his fans to as you're about to hear that idea of transformation and pushing yourself creatively to keep trying new things while it's what drives james baid keep doing what he does just like busking and the simple art of performing keeps motivating him as well take a listen.

james bay brighton england grammy canada busking ed sharon james baid thirty days
"cbc" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

01:59 min | 2 years ago

"cbc" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

"This is a cbc podcast discover what millions around the world already have audible has canada's largest library of audiobooks including exclusive content curated by and four canadians experienced books in a whole new way were stories are brought to life by powerful performances from renowned actors and narrators with the free audible app you can listen anytime anywhere whether you're at home in the car or out on a jog the first thirty days of the audible membership or free including a free book go to www dot audible dot ca slash cbc to learn more hey how are you it is monday may fourteenth this is the podcast version of q the cbc radio show i said hey how are you like mark wahlberg haywire cohen he don't all right barton i dunno jerry o'connell is on the show today who you might know from his new television show carter where he plays this great it's a guy who wants played a detective on hollywood now getting to be a detective in real life you might know from crossing jordan you might know him when he was a kid in vernon stand by me though as a friend damage donald just texted v if you had to channels in the eighties you knew him from the television show my secret identity which was this canadian show jerry o'connell was the most surprising guest he came in with seventy five canadian references and talked about drake and the toronto transit commission and anyway it was very very fascinating but also he went somewhere in talking about how working on police procedural law and order can get kind of boring which i think you don't hear people say very often i really enjoyed talking to him john stanley and amanda perez or here to talk about atlanta the revival of brooklyn nine nine and the also talked a little bit about don quixote which i think i'm pronouncing correctly a film about don quixote which is twenty years in the making almost thirty years in the making and now is about to come out the winner of the prison prize for best canadian music video loved having fantasia fritz on.

jerry o'connell carter hollywood donald drake toronto transit commission amanda perez atlanta brooklyn don quixote canada mark wahlberg vernon john stanley thirty years twenty years thirty days
"cbc" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

01:58 min | 2 years ago

"cbc" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

"This is a cbc podcast discover what millions around the world already have audible has canada's largest library of audiobooks including exclusive content curated by and four canadians experience books in a whole new way we're stories are brought to life by powerful performances from renowned actors and narrators with the free audible app you can listen anytime anywhere whether you're at home in the car or out on a jog the first thirty days of the audible membership or free including a free book go to www dot audible dot ca slash cbc to learn more okay so see if you remember this beautiful thing for her to full day for labor good you the neighbor leaves take for with you that might bring it back to what sitting in front of the tv i remember sitting in front of my name powers house in salisbury street and saint john's and it was one of those tv's that had cabinets on the cabinets didn't open you know one of those it reminds you of sitting in front of your tv watching mr rogers change into one of his bright cartoons slip on a pair comfy shoes something he did for more than thirty years from nineteen sixty eight all the way to two thousand one fred rogers touch sheldon had to be kind had to be neighborly he'd always be quick to remind you that he liked you just the way you are morgan neville was one of the millions of kids who watched and learned from mister rogers he grew up to be an award winning director his latest project is a documentary that explores the life and legacy of the kindest man on television it's called won't you be my neighbor just had its canadian premiere the hot docs festival in toronto as you're about to hear morgan neville wasn't.

sheldon morgan neville mister rogers director toronto canada saint john thirty years thirty days
"cbc" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

01:49 min | 2 years ago

"cbc" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

"This is a cbc podcast discover what millions around the world already have audible has canada's largest library of audiobooks including exclusive content curated by and four canadians experience books in a whole new way we're stories are brought to life by powerful performances from renowned actors and narrators with the free audible app you can listen anytime anywhere whether you're at home in the car or out on a jog the first thirty days of the audible membership or free including a free book go to www dot audible dot ca slash cbc to learn more it is choose so that means it's time to catch up on all things pop culture with our good friend anti donahue she stops by every week to she loves right now and one thing she could do well without we call it to goods and bad and just walk into the studio here in toronto hi hello very breezy just like walking in going on hang out squad under the desk i live i know what your first one is but i'm really excited to talk about it so what is your first good okay so because we're all very lucky ver fortunate people donald gopher hosted snl this weekend and then reminded us all of you love him so much so i mean obviously they'll like if you've been following donald glover's career this is the actor donald dean actor aka future linda covers in you might know him from atlanta you might know from community i mean way to ruin my description very carefully orchestrated continue he did get a start writing comedy so he wrote for thirty rock tina fey is even been like we knew he was going to be big even then so how larry wonderful host but then he surprised us by dropping to new childish gambino songs challenge game being his rap alter ego one is called saturday and the other this is america and then a video for another taxes america dropped as well and here's a listen.

donahue snl donald glover atlanta tina fey canada toronto donald gopher donald dean america thirty days
"cbc" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

01:30 min | 2 years ago

"cbc" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

"This is a cbc podcast discover what millions around the world already have audible has canada's largest library of audiobooks including exclusive content curated by and four canadians experience books in a whole new way we're stories are brought to life by powerful performances from renowned actors and narrators with the free audible app you can listen anytime anywhere whether you're at home in the car or out on a jog the first thirty days of the audible membership or free including a free book go to www dot audible dot ca slash cbc to learn more hey i'm tom power welcome to the show it is one of choose day may this is the podcast version of q the cbc radio show pretty exciting show today but before we get to it i want to thank you for coming out to the q live at the marquis and halifax it was like such a beautiful experience for me not just because i got to essentially have hometown show like a hometown show in how ex but also just see my old friends and i've been living in trauma now for like six or seven years and i love it up here but the you know it's still a bit strange to me to be honest still strange to be living here at all and going back to these goes and being able to see see some buddies meant the world to me so thanks thanks so much coming out that out of the way morgan neville is on the show today who's morgan esco he's academy award winning documentary one of the most important documentary maker especially around pop culture of time the reasonings on the show is he made this beautiful.

halifax morgan neville canada seven years thirty days
"cbc" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"cbc" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

"This is a cbc podcast discover what millions around the world already have audible has canada's largest library of audiobooks including exclusive content curated by and four canadians experience books in a whole new way we're stories are brought to life by powerful performances from renowned actors and narrators with the free audible app you can listen anytime anywhere whether you're at home in the car or out on a jog the first thirty days of the audible membership or free including a free book go to www dot audible dot ca slash cbc to learn more hey how i it is monday may seventh and i'm going to i'm going to level with you i'm tom power this is the podcast version of cutesie radio show that is not mean levelling with you that's just me saying thing i always say the level with you that it is currently thursday may third and i am recording this podcast incher today because we are about to embark on a trip to my favorite part of this country the east coast of this country i call home a halifax nova scotia which romy growing up in saint john's might well have been toronto and tokyo new york all wrapped up into one city so we're about to head there the show you're about to hear is the show that happened at the marquee ballroom sunday night we'll be happening this sunday in my world i know this is a little bit confusing all gonna say is that i hope it all goes well i hope what you're about to hear is great i have a feeling it's going to be we have some of the best guests ever in the history of the east coast some of the best musicians ever to come out of the east coast i'm so excited for you to hear it and unless it didn't happen it should start now.

saint john york canada toronto tokyo thirty days
"cbc" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

01:43 min | 2 years ago

"cbc" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

"I'm lack limbs in battery i'm performing artist and woman that's from both greenland and canada and i live in it's on a long stretch of hills and plateaus and it surrounded by tundra you step off of my back deck and you're on the tundra and right in front of us is probush obey jesse inland doke full of eilly which are harp seals and birds and fish it's a very rich place beautiful place the song is bike a mile lewke who it's called shit jacoby tuna and i chose the song for the q block party because it is such an essential part of nunavut and cbc nunavut is on all the time in just about everybody's household in other and across the north it's actually the source of indicated news and culture that everybody can just switch on so we hear jet is doing a lot in anybody from calloway who's listening will be like oh yeah there goes again and it's such a sweet song because in all across the circum polar world and have a love affair with our land with new and that's why all of our reach have that word in new now which means land nunavut new night netivot.

greenland nunavut calloway canada
"cbc" Discussed on CBC Radio - Spark

CBC Radio - Spark

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"cbc" Discussed on CBC Radio - Spark

"You're listening to spark from your friends at cbc radio your jackson palmer the creator of does coin say it's important to shift the focus back to building the technology behind cryptocurrency rather than focus on speculation otherwise a whole space runs the risk of imploding and the technology forgotten well professor at cornell university's computer science department is doing just that amine mean goon seer is the codirector at the initiative for cryptocurrencies and smart contracts and initiatives started by faculty members from several universities in the states do you hold any cryptocurrencies yourself right now of course i do i ask which once um this though for some i hold i hold of igf coins amin is an expert in the technology that powers cryptocurrency rather than the cryptocurrency markets this interview is not meant to be marketed vice and means organization works on the core technologies powering many of the cryptocurrencies and tries to make them better so what does he make of the frenzy in space older than the big hurt but will encrypt a girl who you've been circular just about everything that her toward blockchain's immigrant horns has seen a lot of her in her um and vote everything that is radio curricula circle some kind health takers of people who are putting money into its uh just throw on the officer the fifth refusing to turn into something valuable so they're nod of normal we have seen for many different kinds of efforts before where people fee from technological a promise and they jump in and um and the happens in various different waves we are quite aware he's into blockchain's revolution.

professor cornell university codirector blockchain officer cbc computer science
"cbc" Discussed on CBC Radio - Spark

CBC Radio - Spark

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"cbc" Discussed on CBC Radio - Spark

"You're listening to spark from your friends at cbc radio your jackson palmer the creator of does coin say it's important to shift the focus back to building the technology behind cryptocurrency rather than focus on speculation otherwise a whole space runs the risk of imploding and the technology forgotten well professor at cornell university's computer science department is doing just that amine mean goon seer is the codirector at the initiative for cryptocurrencies and smart contracts and initiatives started by faculty members from several universities in the states do you hold any cryptocurrencies yourself right now of course i do i ask which once um this though for some i hold i hold of igf coins amin is an expert in the technology that powers cryptocurrency rather than the cryptocurrency markets this interview is not meant to be marketed vice and means organization works on the core technologies powering many of the cryptocurrencies and tries to make them better so what does he make of the frenzy in space older than the big hurt but will encrypt a girl who you've been circular just about everything that her toward blockchain's immigrant horns has seen a lot of her in her um and vote everything that is radio curricula circle some kind health takers of people who are putting money into its uh just throw on the officer the fifth refusing to turn into something valuable so they're nod of normal we have seen for many different kinds of efforts before where people fee from technological a promise and they jump in and um and the happens in various different waves we are quite aware he's into blockchain's revolution.

professor cornell university codirector blockchain officer cbc computer science