12 Burst results for "catherine newbury"

"catherine newbury" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

As It Happens from CBC Radio

03:10 min | 2 years ago

"catherine newbury" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

"This is a cbc podcast from the brilliant might have mindy kaeling comes the sharp end timely comedy late night emma thompson plays legendary late night talk show host catherine newbury who's world turned upside down when she hires her first hand only female staff writer molly patel played by mindy kaeling originally intended to smooth over diversities concerns her decision brings about unexpectedly hilarious consequences as the two women who are separated by culture and generation become united by their love of biting punched by the darling of this year's sundance film festival late night also stars john lift ghana hugh dancy amy ryan in dennis o'hare and it's directed by vancouver zone michigan at joined is in theaters on june fourteen for the very end very relevant now hello i'm carol off good evening i'm karen gordon this is as it happens the podcast addition nice breaking the silence one of china's best known wieger writers died shortly after he was released from a chinese we education camp his loved ones were too afraid to tell us canadian daughter then he was gone the healthy the wealthy and the fight for his post rise dogmeat thing makes his pitch for corporations and the ultra rich to papers expansion of healthcare to include dental i care and prescription drugs on impeachable witness she's a democratic congresswoman and she's had her ringside seat impeachments this to american presidents now though lofgren tells us why she doesn't want donald trump to be the third search bringing it home a farewell conversation with anna maria tramonte above the tough realities of war reporting on why the current never shied away from the darker corners of canadian chipping the leg fantastic researchers in nashville nashville create eight tripping treadmill so they can study how they're subject stumble and then the post as build eight better prosthetic leg an horns but lemme researchers in australia say were spending so much time staring bring down at are smartphones some of us are growing sharp little bones out of the back of her head as it happened the thursday edition radio that only get straight to the point he was one of the most famous writers in the western chinese province of shinjo and he novels and nonfiction works about his people the weaker now nerve mohammed toasty has died less than two months after he was released from a chinese detention count you in says the china maybe keeping up to one million leaguers and other they're muslim in so cold reeducation camps like the one where mr tony withheld toting end his loved ones are tying his death to his treatment in the camp we reached mr tony daughter

anna maria tramonte mr tony mohammed toasty chipping vancouver staff writer emma thompson shinjo australia nashville mindy kaeling donald trump lofgren china karen gordon michigan dennis o'hare amy ryan molly patel catherine newbury
"catherine newbury" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

As It Happens from CBC Radio

05:11 min | 2 years ago

"catherine newbury" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

"This is a cbc podcast from the brilliant might have mindy kaeling comes the sharp end timely comedy late night emma thompson plays legendary late night talk show host catherine newbury who's world turned upside down when she hires her first hand only female staff writer molly patel played by mindy kaeling originally intended to smooth over diversities concerns her decision brings about unexpectedly hilarious consequences as the two women who are separated by culture and generation become united by their love of biting punched by the darling of this year's sundance film festival late night also stars john lift ghana hugh dancy amy ryan in dennis o'hare and it's directed by vancouver zone michigan at joined is in theaters on june to further their final end very relevant now hello i'm carol off good evening on cruise how this is as it happens the podcast addition tonight a long hard seconds look the city of thunder bay will review the deaths of nine indigenous people after ontario's police watchdog found they're racist attitudes that police continued to inadequate investigations disappearing post act prosecutors announced murder charges against foreman they say were responsible for shooting down malaysia airlines flight seventeen but the suspect will we never show up in court prince among madness and a new report by you and investigators find credible evidence that the saudi crown prince is liable and the killing of journalist jamal shoji figments of his reemerging imagination indigenous artists brian young and has made a career of conjuring magic from everyday items and tonight he'll sit down with carol discuss the purpose of his report pissing wild horses couldn't keep her away in nineteen fifty nine phyllis doll won the title miss rodeo canada and sixty years later she'll be back in the saddle at the local rodeo after long thrilling rides began end man of you our listeners a guy on the norwegian island explains why he's he's pushing have his home named the world's first time free zone and why there's no time like the present for there to be no time in the present as it happens the wednesday edition radio knows when they do cancelled time it will be a last minute decision there lived ended far too soon and perhaps soda investigations into their deaths this week thunder bay police announced they would review the deaths of nine indigenous people in the city that move follows a recommendation by the office of independent police review director to reinvestigate the cases the civilian oversight body found police had failed to conduct adequate investigations at least in part because of racist attitudes and racial stereotyping one of the cases to be reviewed is that of kyle more so the seventeen year old is one of five young people whose bodies were found in rivers in and around thunder bay back in twenty fifteen cbc thunder bay spoke with his brother josh academic that had been physical demands assassin minutes ago hours second he's always been a hotdog diamond you'd always in my head right now is diggle bottom everyday when i wake up i think he did he did things you had a filter head of and it's just so sudden that to pass song and a i believe that the reason why camacho for education in for a brighter future for himself and that's what you do but things happen differently i guess that's josh gimmick speaking to the cbc in twenty fifteen dean his brother come more so is found dead in the macintyre river in thunder bay in two thousand and nine investigation into his death is one of nine being reviewed by the thunder bay police for those who died were young people from remote indigenous communities who came the thunder bay to attend high school tony until august wrote about the in her book seven fallen feathers racism death and hard truths in the northern city we reached her in toronto tanya what is it mean to have police review investigations into these deaths this is a big step it's something that i think the families the community everyone who knows about the cases of people that have died in thunder bay and not been thoroughly investigated this is something that we've all been waiting for but it's also bitter sweet but doesn't mean that they will be reinvestigating 'cause there's two reports this lumber talking about now is that they they investigations have to be reviewed reviewed but it doesn't mean they will be reinvestigated is that right well the way it looks like to me is that what sylvie haas the police chief of debate has announced is

mindy kaeling emma thompson seventeen year sixty years
"catherine newbury" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

13:22 min | 2 years ago

"catherine newbury" Discussed on KQED Radio

"News. Michelle Martin the women's World Cup is underway in France. And as usual in the early rounds, the underdogs have been getting dispatched by the powerhouses pretty handily, but Tuesday's match between the US in Thailand took this to a new level. The US crush the ponies thirteen to zero for some. This was a cause for celebration and vindication as the US women have been pressing their governing body for better pay and conditions. But for some commentators, the lopsided result raises questions about sportsmanship, and even ethics should the Americans have kept running up the score against the vastly outmatched ties to settle this we've called, Sean Klein lecturer in ethics and philosophy at Arizona State University. And he's with us now from K J Z in Arizona. Thank you so much for joining us. Thanks for having me, and professor client. I want to mention that you teach a class, in sports ethics class that has a whole section of the syllabus devoted to the ethics of running up the score. So you have thought a lot about this. You watch this game. Did it strike you as? Ethical in the moment. I thought it was exciting. I thought it was ridiculous. I kept running to my son and saying they scored again, they scored again, I didn't experience it as lacking in sportsmanship. And when you say, ridiculous, you don't mean that in a bad way you made like ridiculous like, wow, this is ridiculous. Yeah. I mean this is crazy crazy. This is I've never seen this. This is Michael Jordan leaping over all the defenders in basketball. This is Serena Williams, demolishing, her competition in tennis match. It was a sporting moment that you just don't see. And so it would that that part was exciting to see that historical aspect of it. And so what do you make of the way this has kept bubbling up all week? I just want to know that they the US coach Jill else said that, if this had been a men's soccer match these questions would never have come up. I don't know any way to test that theory. But, but why do you think this has bubbled up like that has all week? I mean, I think she's, she's right to degree. I do. Think that the fact that this is the women's World Cup is playing a role of why it's getting attention. It's getting at the same time these questions, do get raised in other sports. I mean, I can't recall it being raised in, in men's soccer certainly from the US perspective has never gotten close to having this kind of match at least on the winning side. But in other sports, whether it's the NFL men's college football baseball flipping the bad after homerun celebrations. This question does get raised against men's teams you did mention the celebrations, that so that is another sportsmanship question that has come out of this match. But the way that US women celebrated their goals, you know, jumping in each other's arms or rolling on the field. I mean that's pretty standard stuff. But, but I do wonder if you think that the fact that the team kept celebrating when they kept scoring do you think that's something that's pushing people's buttons? I do think that, that's the driving force for a lot of the discussions. But what the players were doing was coming together in some of the cases so you take Mallory Pugh. This was her first World Cup goal. Yes, it was the eleventh goal that the US scored, but this is her first goal. So of course, she's going to celebrate. And of course, the team around her is going to come to her and celebrate that shows great team chemistry that, that they're all so happy for Pugh success achievement in a chief, that she's been dreaming about since she was six years old. So I think that, that, that ability to dream, and then celebrate when you have achieved your dream, I think is one of the magical things of sport. And I would hate to see us not celebrate that I wanted to ask you for the people who think it's just not a good look. Or maybe it just makes it US look bad. Or like bullies. Why do you think that it was important from, from the standpoint of the US women for them to play hard and score as many goals as they could? Like what point do you think they were making one is just internal to the to the team that they can play well together in the context of a game in front of fans on international TV I also think that's a message to the rest of the field that the US is here to defend their championship and they're going to play hard. I think it's also import. In terms of telling women that it's okay to be who they are. It's okay to be great. It's okay to pursue greatness and to achieve greatness, and it's okay to, to celebrate your chief mitts and not to run from them and not to hide from it, and I think that's an important message. Well, I do want to note the USA place. She lay tomorrow Sunday care to handicapper for us. I think that the US will win. I don't think we'll get into the double digits again. I'll say that it may be more like a let's say six to one score. Let's go with that. Okay. He hosts the podcasts called the sports ethicists, where questions like this often come up, Sean, thanks so much for talking to thanks for having me finally today, late night television. It's something of an American institution, those personalities delivering monologues with Chris one liners and snarky takes on the week's news as a celebrity interviews. Maybe funny skits, they become so much a part of people's lives. They're like a combination of best friend, news anchor and therapist for many people. But every so often when a show gets cancelled or there's a public squabble over time slot. The audience gets a glimpse of what often lurks behind the scenes demanding and unreasonable bosses long hours, cliqueish co workers and hardly any racial or gender diversity, not really the stuff of jokes. But writer and actor Mindy Kaeling somehow, manages to find humor and redemption in late night comedy. Movie late night, stars Oscar-winner, Emma Thompson as talk show host, Catherine Newbury, a once popular comedian, who broke through the glass. Feeling of late night comedy, only to pull up the ladder behind her and settle into a stale predictable show fed by a crew of all male, all white writers, that is until Molly Patel, played by indicating joins the writer's room as a diversity higher and starts to shake things up. Mindy Kaeling Emma Thompson, joined me recently from London to talk about their film, and I started our conversation by asking Kaeling why she created a strong female lead for a film, set in late night, which in real life is dominated by men. I've wanted to write about late night so much because I'm one of those comedy nerds that was obsessed with the growing up. I read every book about it. I was an intern at late night with Brian before I moved over into the half hour world to work on the office, but that environment is very famous, even among comedy writers, because it is hyper masculine, hyper competitive very ruthless, and I was not interested really in writing a movie with a an older white male lead. Which is what we see and a lot of these shows and I had always wanted to write something for at Thomson. I thought you know, this actually could be a perfect vehicle for her. Can you just wanna work with her, or you just thought if the kind of classic late night, host were a woman instead of the guy in a suit, it would be Thompson? What made you think of her when I say, nice things about Emma and she hates it so much, and she wants to curl up and die because she's English, and she also can pathologically not take a compliment. But here's why Emma, is my favorite living actor. And I've loved her since I was in eleven year old girl, and I saw her in much ado, about nothing. So for me, it many actors can do dramatic roles, and we give them awards to do it. But so few can be funny and you drama, and it is it is in my opinion, much harder to comedy than it is to do drama, and Emma can do both. And she was just inspiring to me for such a long time, and I wanted to write for her, and I said, I know it science fiction further to be a female late night, talk show, host in even more. So for her to have the job for thirty years, but it was the only thing that made sense for me to write 'em. What about this role appeal to you? Oh, well, everything I met Mindy, and she told me, she'd written something fool me, and I thought, maybe it's going to be about an elderly. In doses. Because it generally is when people write things for me and I read it in full house later Ryan my agent and said, please tell the I couldn't be more thrilled that I will start tomorrow if that's possible. There's so many issues to unpack in this film. I don't wanna make people think it is a documentary 'cause it's not. And it is very funny, but there's a lot in there. The racism, sexism ageism, as we are speaking now this week late night, lost another female host busy tonight, which was hosted by busy Phillips, it was cancelled which leaves one woman late night was just Samantha b who's talked a little bit about her struggle. And I was wondering, is there something about that role that just makes it hard place for women to be what, what's your, what's your take on that? I think that there is something a little bit much. Oh, about the late night, slot, a little bit kind of nineteen seventy Saturday night. Live everybody's. Night. Taking coke Joan believe she's announcing that women funny, and it's, it's tough old world for, for a woman, and Catherine is the person to manage to survive it, and it's called star, and she said to make sacrifices, and she's probably had to build a reasonably happen carapace, but she's also bright enough to recognize that she's got to change. And she's got to listen, and that's the story say wonderful about this story is so often when you female often movies, she doesn't change. She's just the eagles. Stepmother, the evil boss of cold, Ouragan, archetype person. But what Mendis done is creating actual passan living breathing person who the beginning is does find it difficult to accept actually the fact that she's no longer successful as she thought she was. She suddenly realizes that she's been complacent and because she is genuinely committed to being excellent. She decides she's going to change and it takes a while. But finally Mendis does breakthrough to they create working relationships, the so fun to watch developing, and doesn't tunnel soft and fluffy at the end just become something very real very believable in very uplifting, Catherine's character does not care what people's reactions are to her honest, answers, and honest, desires, if she sees any kind of inefficiency she calls it out without anger, and it's, it's interesting. We've been doing press for the movie, and everyone has been using words like bitchy in cold and it's not that she's bitching, she's just dispassionately expressing what she needs. Yeah. Do you know what it feels like when you do that, especially if you'll pathologically nice, you want to be kind to everybody, like me, as I experienced playing Catherine is a kind of five week holiday from being, you know, having to look after everybody I was just so it was so bliss. Awful just tiny round to someone who was boring me and say, I'm not interested shot off and then apologizing to the rest of the week about it. I never used those words, bitchy and coal. In fact, I would not and I wonder whether the whole point of the movie. Well, the movies funny, that's the point of the movie, but part of it is the whole question of how women get to express authority. That's one of the points and what it means when they do. So what does it say that the fact that people are using those words to you, when that's the whole point is to redefine, what it means to express authority, if people are using those words to you, what does it say a man is entitled to have a private life, but because Emma's character is very private about her husband and her life, the certain people who've talked to us about the movies that was cold. But when I was writing, I didn't, particularly think that analysts cold, I thought that the character was crisp and to the point, and direct, and those are qualities that are so positive in male Lee. Leaders, but in a woman, turn certain people off people are still uncomfortable with the with the possibility that a woman would be directed her in her communication, with her employees that people thought she was cold. And I'm very happy. You're planning that because I don't think it is at all. No finds it both bracing undug, lifting and motivational as well. I think that women who've come out with these points have all been women. It's just that thing is having ingested patriarchal these this. Not being able somehow to be released by saying, Catherine. Whereas men, Catherine go. Yeah. That makes total sense. This the reason why at the end of the movie when on the conditions for my characters willing to stay there. She doesn't say you have to be nice everyone. She says no more withering looks and hire people who don't look like they normally do. She doesn't say, I need you to ask everyone about their day. We are in a moment in the United States, where this whole question like, what diversity means is something that is a part of the conversation, and your movie has has something to say about diversity. I'd like to ask you, how would you describe what it has to say about why it matters? Sure. So we talk a lot in the movie about the fact that Molly is a diversity higher. And I can't think of another movie or TV show that really talks about this head on with, that term the true than matters. The term has really pejorative connotation, I was diversity higher..

US Catherine Newbury Emma Thompson Sean Klein Arizona Mindy Kaeling Emma Thompson Molly Patel Michelle Martin Mendis Arizona State University professor Serena Williams Mallory Pugh Michael Jordan NFL lecturer France tennis basketball
"catherine newbury" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

11:51 min | 2 years ago

"catherine newbury" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Things considered from NPR news. I'm Michelle Martin the women's World Cup is underway in France. And as usual in the early rounds, the underdogs have been getting dispatched by the powerhouses pretty handily, but Tuesday's match between the us in Thailand took this to a new level. The US crush the Ponant thirteen to zero for some. This was a cause for celebration and vindication as the US women have been pressing their governing body for better pay and conditions. But for some commentators, the lopsided result racist questions about sportsmanship, and even ethics should the Americans have kept running up the score against the vastly outmatched ties to settle this we've called, Sean Klein lecturer in ethics and philosophy. Arizona State University, and he's with us now from K J Z in Arizona. Thank you so much for joining us. Thanks for having me. And professor Clint I want to mention that you teach a class, in sports ethics class that has a whole section of the syllabus devoted to the ethics of running up the score. So you have thought a lot about this. You watch this game. Did it strike? You as unethical. In the moment. I thought it was exciting. I thought it was ridiculous. I kept running to my son and saying they scored again, they scored, again, I didn't experience it as, as lacking in sportsmanship. And when you say ridiculous, you don't mean that in a bad way you mean like ridiculously. Wow. This is ridiculous. Yeah. I mean this is crazy crazy. This is I've never seen this. This is Michael Jordan leaping over all the defenders in basketball. This is Serena Williams, demolishing, her competition in tennis match. It was a sporting moment that you just don't see. And so it would that that part was exciting to see that historical aspect of it. And so what do you make of the way this has kept bubbling up all week? I just want to know that the, the US coach chill Ellis, said that if this had been a men's soccer match these questions would never have come up. I don't know any way to test that theory. But, but why do you think this has bubbled up like that has all week? I mean, I think she's, she's right to degree. I do think that the fact that this is the women's World Cup is playing a role of lie. It's getting the attention. It's getting at the same time these questions, do get raised in other sports. I mean, I can't recall it being raised in, in men's soccer certainly from the US perspective never gotten close to having this kind of match at least on the winning side. But in other sports, whether it's the NFL men's college football baseball flipping the bad after homerun the celebrations. This question does get raised against men's teams you did mention the celebrations, that so that is another sportsmanship question that has come out of this match. But the way that US women celebrated their goals, you know, jumping in each other's arms or rolling on the field. I mean that's pretty standard stuff. But, but I do wonder if you think that the fact that the team kept celebrating when they kept scoring do you think that's something that's pushing people's buttons? I do think that, that's the driving force for a lot of the discussions. But what the US players rejoin was coming together in some of the cases so you take Mallory Pugh. This was her first World Cup goal. Yes, it was the eleventh goal that the US scored, but this is her first goal. So of course. She's going to celebrate. And of course, the team around her is going to come to her and celebrate that shows great team chemistry that, that they're all so happy for few success in chief chief, that she's been dreaming about since she was six years old. So I think that, that, that ability to dream, and then celebrate when you've achieved your dream, I think is one of the magical things of sport. And I would hate to see us not celebrate that I wanted to ask you for the people who think it's just not a good look. Maybe it just makes it US look bad, or like bullies. Why do you think that it was important from, from the standpoint of the US women for them to play hard and scores many goals as they could? Like what point do you think they were making one is just internal to the to the team that they can play well together in the context of a game in front of fans on international TV I also think it's a message to the rest of the field that the US is here to defend their championship and they're going to play hard. I think it's also important in terms of telling young women that it's okay to be who they are. It's okay to be great. It's okay to pursue greatness and to achieve greatness, and it's okay to to celebrate your achievements and not to run from them and not to hide from it, and I think that's an important message. Well, I do want to note the USA place. She lay tomorrow, Sunday care to handicap at force. I think that the US will win. I don't think we'll get into the double digits again. I'll say that it may be more like a let's say six to one score. Let's go with that. Okay. That's Sean, he hosts a podcast called, the sports ethicists where questions like this often come up, Sean client, thanks so much for talking to us. Thanks for having me finally today, late night television. It's something of an American institution, those personalities delivering monologues with Chris one liners and snarky takes on the week's news as well as celebrity interviews. Maybe funny skits, the become so much part of people's lives. They're like a combination of best friend, news anchor and therapist for many people. But every so often when a show gets cancelled or there's a public. Squabble over time slot. The audience gets a glimpse of what often lurks behind the scenes demanding and unreasonable bosses long hours, cliqueish co workers and hardly any racial or gender diversity, not really the stuff of jokes. But writer and actor Mindy Kaeling somehow, manages to find humor and redemption in late night comedy who move late night, stars Oscar-winner, Emma, Thomson, as talk show host, Catherine Newbury, a once popular comedian, who broke through the glass ceiling of late night, comedy, only to pull up the ladder behind her and settle into a stale predictable show fed by a crew of all male, all white writers, that is until Molly Patel, played by indicating joins the writer's room as a diversity higher and starts to shake things up. Mindy Cailing an and joined me recently from London to talk about their film, and I started our conversation by asking Kaeling why she created a strong female lead for a film set in late night, which in real life is dominated by men. I've wanted to. Right about late night so much. Because I'm one of those comedy nerds that was obsessed with a growing up. I read every book about it. I was an intern at late. And it was kinda Bryan before I moved over into the half hour world to work on the office. But that environment is very famous, even among comedy writers because it is hyper masculine, hyper competitive very ruthless, and I was not interested really in writing a movie with a, an older white male lead, which is what we see and a lot of these shows and I had always wanted to write something for Emma Thompson. I thought you know, this actually could be perfect vehicle for her just wanna work with her, or you just thought if the kind of classic late night, host were a woman, instead of the guy in a suit, it would be Emma Thompson. What made you think of her case this one is in things, Emma, and she hates it so much, and she wants to curl up and die because she's English, and she also can pathologically not take a compliment? But here's why Emma's my favorite living actor and I've loved her since I was. Eleven year old girl and I saw her in much ado, about nothing. So for me many actors can do dramatic roles and we give them awards to do it. But so few can be funny and you drama, and it is it is in my opinion, much harder to comedy than it is to do drama, and can do both, and she was just inspiring to me for such a long time, and I wanted to write for her, and I said, I know it science fiction further to be a female late night, talk show, host in even more. So for her to have the job for thirty years, but it was the only thing that made sense for me to write 'em. What about this role appeal to you? Oh, well, everything I met Mindy, and she told me, she'd written something fool me, and I thought, maybe it's going to be about an elderly gist in dulcet, because it generally is when people write things full me. I read it in full house laze around my agent and said, please tell the I couldn't be more thrilled and that I will start tomorrow if that's possible. There's so many issues to unpack in this film. I don't wanna make people think it is a documentary because it's not. And it is very funny, but there's a lot in there. The racism, sexism ageism, as we are speaking now this week, late night, and lost another female host busy tonight, which was hosted by busy Phillips. It was cancelled which leaves one woman in late, and I was just Samantha b who's talked a little bit about her struggle. And I was wondering, is there something about that role that just makes it hard place for women to be what's your, what's your take on that? I think that there is something a little bit much. Oh, about the late night slot, a little bit kind of nineteen seventy today Night Live. Everybody's awful night. Taking coke Joan believe she's announcing that we don't funny and. It's, it's tough old world for, for a woman, and Catherine is the person to manage to survive it, and it's called her, and she said to make sacrifices, and she's probably had to build a reasonably hardened carapace, but she's also bright enough to recognize that she's to change, and she's going to listen. And that's the story say wonderful about this story is so often when you a female both in movies she doesn't change. She's just the evil. Stepmother, the evil boss of cold, Hourigan, archetype person. But what Mendis done is create an actual person living breathing person who the beginning is does find it difficult to accept actually the fact that she's no longer successful as she thought she was. She suddenly realizes that she's been complacent on because she is genuinely committed to being excellent. She decides she's going to change and it takes awhile. But finally Mendis. Does breakthrough to they create working relationships this? Oh, fun to watch developing, and doesn't turn soft and fluffy at the end just become something, very real very believable in very uplifting, Catherine's character does not care what people's reactions are to her honest, answers, and honest, desires, if she sees any kind of inefficiency she calls it out without anger, and it's, it's interesting. We've been doing press for the movie, and everyone has been using words like bitchy in cold and it's not that she's bitching, she's just dispassionately expressing what she needs do you know what it feels like when you do that, especially feel puff logically. Nice you won't be kind to everybody like me as I experienced playing Catherine is a kind of five week holiday from being, you know, having to look after everybody was just. So it was so blissful just tiny round to someone who was boring me and say, I'm not interested Shasha off. And then apologizing to the rest of the week about it. I never used those words, bitchy and coal. In fact, I would not and I wonder whether the whole point of the movie. Well, the movies funny, that's the point of the movie, but part of it is the whole question of how women get to express authority. That's one of the points and what it means when they do. So what does it say that the fact that people are using those words to you, when that's the whole point is to redefine, what it means to express, if people are using those words to you what is that even say a man is entitled to have a private life, but because Emma's character is very private about her husband and her life, the certain people who've talked to us about the movie said that that was cold. But when I was writing it, I didn't particularly think that I'm was cold. I thought that the character was crisp and to the point and direct and those are qualities that are so positive in male leaders..

us Emma Thompson Catherine Newbury Sean Klein NPR Arizona State University Arizona Mendis Michelle Martin Serena Williams professor Michael Jordan NFL lecturer Clint I France tennis basketball soccer
"catherine newbury" Discussed on Slate's Culture Gabfest

Slate's Culture Gabfest

10:06 min | 2 years ago

"catherine newbury" Discussed on Slate's Culture Gabfest

"So we've talked about Reed, Scott, who is the who plays Tom who's the head writer. I think he calls until the head monologue. Writer. He frequently calls himself that because he likes to boast about his superiority at the in the writer's room. But we haven't talked about the other love interest who becomes a love interest of both female characters both of 'em Thompsons and Medicare character played by Hugh dancy, who to be feels like he's the handsome guy of a decade ago. Right. He's sort of like the go-to babe from, I don't know, maybe ten fifteen years ago. And so having him play this maybe more slightly wizened haughty on on the writer's room. Staff seemed like an interesting casting choice to me. But he is also apparently kind of a horn dog who goes after every woman, who's anywhere near the set, which, which given the as maybe not that many, women basically gives them to opportunities that he seems to have conquered both of them. We don't find out until later that he has this past affair with immigration that's been covered up, but they do they do eventually stylish that. His character had an affair with Emma Thompson. Her. Is is sort of seriously ill. And so she cheated on her her sick husband with one of her writers for the show, and then that's that kind of blows up into I guess, that's kind of the third act complication for this movie that, that kind of blows up into a big scandal in addition to being this kind of, you know, highbrow kind of Dullard, and that killing her in the ratings and she also has this now people don't like her either. But that's what she has started to win back people's hearts and minds a little bit. Right. It's, it's posed to the rejuvenation of the show that the news about the Hugh dancy affair comes out, right? But you're right. That's what that's what essentially sparks the crisis in the movie that makes us have to resolve her story. John Lithgow story and, and Mindy killings, as well it I think the has like Emma Thomson, like it's like Mary, Kirk to like a comedy manager who over, here's this and so at, like, hey back, the comedy manager decided to like leak. The news of the affair, right? And after that comedy manager betrays her in that way, she system with her writing staff and says, okay, we're not addressing this on the show. It's, it's private. I'm not going to bring it up. And you all continue writing jokes that don't address it in any way. And I believe it's implied that the show actually continues on sort of stilted -ly lumbers forward with that policy for at least a few episodes, and refresh my memory. Who what is it that turns that turns her around? But how does Katherine Newbury decide? No, I am going to talk about it on air, and be honest and own up to the affair. I don't think there was like a wreck to line from a to b in terms of like her changing her mind. But the sense that I got with that she has this, like very interesting conversation with her husband played by Jon Luko. And basically, he forgives her for having the affair and having hit forgiveness like in her pocket. She feels more Bolden to talk about this affair on the show, Own volition? It's not that the writer's room creates a statement for her to say, she just abandons her monologue and tells the truth. Right. And again, the sort of plays into this all these issues are going to conversion, but this idea now that comedy needs to be at least often does. Well, when it's personal, you don't want the sort of like old school show, biz motto where like late night hosts, basically, kind of aren't people? They're just kind of professional joke tellers, and they would never let their personal life for personal feelings intrude on the air, and that's actually not how audiences kind of connect with people anymore. And it goes along with that, that part of that personality of the own is who you are, as a person, including your, your background and your race and your gender, so she has to, like, admit that she's a white woman, and that informs her perspective. And I it's not kind of universalize in a way that completely denies the specificity of who she is. That's true in a kind of demographic level, but just on a very personal like I need to talk about this heart betrayal of my husband as well. What a husband to have. Right. The Gianluca character gonna Parkinson's disease. He's like, he's, he's completely left out at the party just sitting alone in his room with his Pia. No. And he's still forgives her. I just I, I want to be married to that. John Lewis John Lithgow in these total, like, heartwarming not, his like Dexter serial killer persona. But yeah, so, yeah, it his most kind of, you know, lovable mode with lists. Go can do it all. So in spite of the fact that she wins hearts and minds by opening up in her monologue in confessing to the affair Emma. Thompson's character is still threatened with losing her show by the head of the network. Amy ryan. I love Amy Ryan, by the way in this very small role as this stele female network head who comes into her dressing room and says, you know, great. I'm glad that you're winning over your audience. But nonetheless, you're out and this shot comic played by Barunholtz, who's been groomed to take her place is, in fact, going to take her place, anyway. But shortly after that we see the baron Holtz character appearing on the show is a guest and Sam take it away. She basically declines to do it. She's not going to cut cut her own throat. And were to make things easier on the network or for right Barunholtz. Right. As she's been urged to do by the scar and Molly accounts here says no, don't, don't make it easy for them if they're going to do it, they're going to do it, but there's no reason that you need to make them with good. And they're not really saving face. You're just kind of writing yourself out of the story is a little grace for this and it's not not the way for thirty year career to end and yeah, it's a great. I think it's a great scene where she she awkwardly refuses to hand it off on the air. In fact, we haven't mentioned it. But there's, there's a few great scenes of her interviewing people on air, that maybe wish there had been even more of that, like, when the, the YouTubers storms often in fury, and all those moments on the youtuber she has this kind of young female youtuber on and is basically YouTubers like, you know, and they're doing this sort of typical interview, and then the YouTubers know what I'm like, I know you just had me on here to, like, make fun of like young people in YouTube, but actually I have, like seventy five million followers. And I know how many people watch your show, so fuck you and the. Storms off. He also like I only came on this show because my mom likes you. Yeah, I wish there'd been a little bit more of that generational warfare happening on, on her couch. She's interviewing people right? Because the internet isn't doesn't really figure that largely into this movie, except in the jokes about how Catharine Newbury knows nothing about it and doesn't want to learn anything about it. Think about her affair. Oh, that's right. We can you remind me of slates, little Cam slut, shaming in the workplace is everyone. I remember scanning closely for a m byline and there was known provided. We have our own England. I have our own ideas about who might have written. But yeah. There's been some debate internal slate debate about whether or not that seems like a fair. So had But I think. I think I think it's a good joke. It's nice to get slates name in lights in the movie. So the next big plot development, we have to deal with is molly's, firing so immediately after Emma refuses to step down, Molly gets fired from the writer's room because she wants to what is what is she doing hosting like a sort of benefit night at some theater on Catherine? Right. Yes. It's a cancer benefit cancer isn't funny. I love the name of the pitch. Pitch from somebody's got handed a lot of fires, and their lifetime. Yeah. So she is in Katherine, what's all the writers to stay late? And, and even though some of the writers are like, oh, you know, my, my kids, we're going to see me, you know, like this week or whatever, like they just they're cowed, and they do it. And many, you know, molly's, like I'm going to go can't, I promise people that I would see this thing. I can't not go and she leaves and she gets fired. So Molly takes off. She goes through the cancer isn't funny benefit. But there's a surprise guests at the cancer isn't funny benefit because Catherine Newbury. Her boss follows her there and ends up showing up for an impromptu moment of standup herself, and get you want to describe Catherine's performance. Yeah. I think this is maybe more than middle of the movie, but essentially, it's like a hardware Catherine Hatton. Completed, her makeover athletic someone relevance, again, as she goes onstage, and Oliver jokes thong. And then she figures out, she's going to start talking about how she an older woman in Hollywood. And how she can't wait until to like the same age of Tom Cruise, but she can't wait until, like she plays Sean Penn's mother or something. And then, let in the same movie Sean Penn will be childhood best friends with amount stone, anyway, she doesn't like whole bits and she like another stone in, like the path of like her realizing that if she is more personal than the audience, low respond to her EMMY Thomson's character defending to take indicate characters advices leg one or part of leg how the movies structured like a, a wrong calm because essentially Emma Thompson realizes that indicate Lang was right all along, and like, basically, can't get her back because many laying decide to get a job at Seth Meyers show. Oh, and I guess, like because she has I don't know, single-handedly figured out how to save kaffir new show. She has great clips, or whatever. And so many decides that she's going to move on with her life, and before we had seen her living with her aunt, and uncle in queens, and we had seen her for refusing to get any sort of life than so. Basically many is more than ready to like move on from this admittedly, like pretty toxic environment and have a like actual healthy life when Thomson flies in again. And basically says, like actually, like, would you mind coming back to my show, because, like I need to or something along those lines at it's totally like the rest to the airport. Yeah, it is. It is. I mean, in a way, I wish that this movie had dispensed with all of the heterosexual relationships because the romance really is a workplace romance between this boss and her employees. One thing I want the guy enjoyed that it does..

writer Emma Thompson molly Writer Hugh dancy Emma Thomson Amy ryan Catherine Hatton Katherine Newbury Tom Cruise Catharine Newbury Emma Sean Penn Medicare John Lithgow YouTube John Lewis John Lithgow Reed Jon Luko Bolden
"catherine newbury" Discussed on Slate's Culture Gabfest

Slate's Culture Gabfest

15:53 min | 2 years ago

"catherine newbury" Discussed on Slate's Culture Gabfest

"If that such a thing as possible, she likes to one of her favorite guests doors, Kerns Goodwin and Catherine gets the message from the new head of the network, played by Amy Ryan that she needs to shake things up or she's going to be taken off the air. So Katherine decides that she has a despite being the sort of female late night pioneer, she has writing staff composed entirely of middle aged white men, a decides that the way to shake things up. We're actually one of US Middle aged white men suggests that the way to shake things up is to hire a female person of color to her staff in Kaeling becomes that person. Yes. It okay. Stop there for for quick time out. I want to ask you what you think of that whole hiring process plot point at the beginning because it becomes important later that Mindy, Michaela is a quote diversity higher, right. She herself acknowledges that and there's some kind of discussions about it with the rest of the writing staff later on. But another thing that she is, is a higher from completely outside the, the institution of comedy writing. She is actually someone who works in a chemical plant was it in Pennsylvania. There's a chemical plant is right? And then she moved to queens to try to start her her comedy career and her only qualification seems to be hosting these amateur. You know, open mic comedy nights near the chemical plant. I this it's an it's very strange world at this movie posits where it's unsexy just enough that Emma Thompson has been running late night show for thirty years successfully, but it's sexist enough that there aren't any other female candidates are diverse candidates in the field, except for this person from completely outside. So there's a lot to ask if you were to accept. Yeah. I think in order for you to get on board with the movie, you just have to accept like. Like seven hundred things at all times that, like, probably would never aggressed but you, sir athlete go along with it in order for the movie to make sense. And like do it's magic on you. I think if you are able to make those concessions to the movie, then it's fun y'all got stuck with a little bit. I saw the movie when it premiered at Sundance, and it was sort of a big hit. They're all very, much sort of an atypical Sundance movie, and I wrote a piece, then just to kind of indulge this reaction where I got stuck on that aspect of it, because one way to look at this, maybe there is very famous moment in the eighties when Joan rivers who had been this frequent. Host guest host on the tonight show with Johnny Carson. The moment came to replace him. And because she had been committed the disloyal act of going in having her own show, which apparently was the quivalent of stabbing him that he she Carson basically blackballed her. And that was why Leno ended up getting the job. But that's never spoke to her again, which is just so cold. And so that's like a major fork in the road. So I you know, I got stuck for awhile on this kind of alternate history aspect of this, because the timing about lines up, there was about thirty years ago. So it's kind of like, what if Joan rivers had gotten a show then and I was just thinking about, like how different things be then because I mean, the, the situation for female hosts of the late night shows is still terrible. You know, it's a struggle to have Samantha b is going to regularly on the struggle. Philip Shoji of busy. Phillips, just got cancelled Michelle wolf show, got cancelled there's another one coming in the fall, but it is a struggle to have to on the air at the same time, let alone more than two. So you know what other cultural dominance would have fallen in the last thirty years if Joan rivers or someone like her and actually been on the. The air all that time is just something I kept thinking about, but it is, you know, part of what this movie is, asserting that those cultural touchstones kind of matter and that having people in those positions changes the way that we think about the entire landscape. Right. I think one of the things interesting about the movie, but also sort of just like I was like very hard for me to accept this idea that Catherine would be this female cultural putt, stem, and then care, so little about that, that would essentially not care that her writers were all white men, one of whom apparently got this job like literally from his father because of father had also been a writer for her. And so that for me I think it was like even more than likely long running high falutin female late night hosts thing, the thing I can really quake over was the fact that she just. With care so little that she would have no peanut writers. Right. I mean, I think that it's hard to do with, with the movie that I've kind of reconciled it, and I may just be a lot of people just went with it and immediately. So it's just my block that I've gotten past is it. I think despite the fact that the movie is called late night. It's really not about late night is kind of about workplace, dynamics, and broadly, apple across a lot of the fact that it is. In fact, that like thirty rock seems to have more specifically to say about like the dynamics of running this kind of on air variety show is not. You just going have to put that aside. And when you do put it aside, I forgot, I usually go around the table at the beginning and see everybody had a generally positive or negative reaction like when you do put it aside and accept the various of this alternate universe, that it posits did you like the movie I did. I mean I really like it on a character level. I mean, I think Thompson's character, and her performance is just magnificent in this. She's the, you know, the best thing about it, those writing, I would say and the acting. I mean just the existence of that character. Absolutely. And I like the relationship between her and michaela's character a lot, too, that's going to wear it works for me. Some of the broader swings that are maybe don't connect for me. But I really kind of enjoy in like onto it on that level. What about you, would you would you generally say that this would send people to see? Yeah, I think the toxin performance ridiculously fun, and I sort of liked that. The I love the idea of like a female mentor, and like a female sort of having a little wrong calm because I think it's like the kind of thing that you don't get are often. I think the movie that we're constantly comparing us to as whole. Traitors is the, the horse product, and I feel like, you know, ten years after that would be premier. Everyone's. A lot of people are in agreement that, like the movie kind of beef, the ending. And so, to have sort of a not to get ahead in this wiling. But to have basically a happy ending for the mentor protege. I thought was like very sweet on the way that they came together. I thought was also might nights, right? We'll Marinda priestly. The character of Meryl Streep plays, endeavours prod is much more the villain of the movie. I mean she's a big kind of lovable comic villain. But she is a person who needs to get a come up and does get her come up in the end. And an EMMY templates character is just not placed in any way in that position in this movie. I mean she is the attack in the sense that she's, what makes life difficult for everyone. But she is not the person that you want to see kind of, you know get hers in the end. I mean, I think the other thing is not a war around the priestly. She is this like singularly devilish figure and late night. Emma Thompson's issue is that she is complacent just like every other male late night host. And so you almost don't. Hold that a guest her even if like that. They see again, doesn't really quite work for the character. Yet, complacency is a feature that you often see in movies about entertainment. Right. I mean about unless it really is like an old washed up person that's on their way out like this is sort of about someone conquering their own professional complacency. At least Emma Thompson, storyline is about that. And that's really unusual storyline in a workplace comedy wrote him, and she is her Catherine. Newbury is a minute. Kirk who is really kind of rest on her laurels. I mean she is. This is the writing I kind of, like more than movie she is kind of unbelievably, disconnected from her writer's room to the extent that she doesn't know the names of the men entered and refers to the my number, and in fact, doesn't realize that one of them has been dead, for, like seven years. So she, so she is really just she's very firm ideas about what she wants them not to do which are particularly to make any jokes that, that touch on her gender anyway. But other than that, she just wants the sort of, you know, cookie, cutter or like vaguely, you know, I guess topical but not political jokes that, you know, pretty much every late night, monologue thrives on. And really, that's all the contact. She wants them. She just wants the one writer to show with a piece of paper at the beginning of the show, and that's it. Yeah, I mean, I have to say it just to push back a little on something said earlier, that I believe her internalized, sexism, Emma Thompson characters internalized sexism. I think it makes a certain amount of sense in the universe that she lives in the traits that her character wants to project on TV that, that she'd be fine with an all male writer's room. She doesn't want to tell jokes about gender that joke about, is it a joke about abortion rights for her, that she ends up skipping, you know, in the first monologue that she in which could have incorporated, some of Mali's writing and to me that was. Fascinating. Because at this point in the comedy landscape, it seems like we either get, you know, bad ass women who know that they're bad as women, and are trying to sort of better, the, the lot of all women, or we get just a doormats, you know, in the fact that she something in between that she's a very strong character, but she's not necessarily interested in empowering. Other women is a is a complex subject position for her to speak from that character is Britain's, so fully and perform so beautifully, and like her internalized sexism with, like the one bit of that character that I really wish have gotten more development because I think it was suggesting that it was there or that she had to sort of like minimize certain features of herself of her political beliefs or feminism or went up our inward to get ahead. But we just like to the quite get it right. I mean there there's an implication, we see one point, and Molly confess to bring this up triggers. Molly. The convention. It's like this huge comedy. Nerd Alicia doesn't really have much experience doing it professionally. So she not only loves Catherine show, but loves like her stand up from the eighties. And it went point kind of play this clip of her doing this bit in this, you know, kind of classically like horrible sweater and job up hair in red brick wall. Yes. Exactly. By talking about her kind of clinical depression. And that's you know, so it's not just her femininity that she's going to going away from it is like anything personal. And there's there's it's interesting that this may be kind of overlaps with they're the kind of cultural than racial, and sort of gender aspects of what's going on there. And there's also it's also just a story about kind of trends in comedy reminded me in some way of Mike, big Leah's sleepwalk with me, which is basically a story about him. Learning the stop telling jokes and start telling stories about himself to the extent that he doubted us, things that are almost, you know, that are more like, like theater than than stand up comedy. But that has been, you know so much the push. For at least a certain kind of comedy in the last several years. You know that it's like telling jokes kind of, you know, just the corneas like hacky est thing, you can do in the guy there be like, kind of telling like, you know, anti jokes or your need to be like doing something that's more like a kind of black person. You know, monologue often like delving into your own life in the basically. That's. Sort of the moral of the story in a way that is both the characters have to kind of sort of mind, their own experience, like whatever that is in order to. Connect with an audience. Yeah. Let's start talking about what happens is Molly shakes up the news room. So she writes that, I joke, it is a joke about abortion. It doesn't make it into the monologue. There's a sense that she is a thorn in the side of the writer's room, sort of right? And she's the strange combination of she's this under new who's brand new to the world..

Emma Thompson writer Joan rivers Catherine Johnny Carson Molly Michaela US Pennsylvania Amy Ryan Katherine Kaeling Sundance EMMY Kerns Goodwin Meryl Streep Mindy apple Philip Shoji Leno
"catherine newbury" Discussed on Pop Culture Happy Hour

Pop Culture Happy Hour

01:30 min | 2 years ago

"catherine newbury" Discussed on Pop Culture Happy Hour

"I saw it less as nobody is likeable, and more as nobody is totally wrong. Do you know what I mean? Like everybody is right. Some of the time. Everybody's rights, some of the time I agree with you, Glenn that, that Mexico seen really, really works in part because he's coming in a little bit as an audience surrogate of, like nobody's showing us why. Why she's good at her job? Right. But I then wanted the movie to course correct off of that and show her being good at her job, more instead of merely winning people over. I agree that there's, there's a whole story about a joke. She writes that, yes, I wanted it to be a better joke for the purposes of that story. I hear ya. I think one of the things that's really interesting about the character of Catherine Newbury, and one of the reasons that I find her journey really valuable has to do with the menopause, joke where yeah, that menopause, joke is not great. But the emotional arc that it's grounded in and the emotional work that it's doing in. There is actually really interesting to me, because what they're doing with Catherine Newbury is they are taking a character who came to power at a time went to be a woman in power meant that your job was to on sex yourself and be exactly like all of the other people in that space despite the fact that you're a woman. Now, we're in a different cultural moment where our expectation is that if you are. Different. You're going to use that difference to infuse and center, your comedy and you're gonna use that difference to create windows.

Catherine Newbury menopause Glenn Mexico
"catherine newbury" Discussed on Pop Culture Happy Hour

Pop Culture Happy Hour

04:02 min | 2 years ago

"catherine newbury" Discussed on Pop Culture Happy Hour

"And she is presented as the only late night network host who's a woman of whom of course in real life. There are none. They grapple with the ways in which she is in a transactional relationship with Molly where she is using Molly to kind of get out of criticism of her. That's valid about the lack of diversity in her writer's room. And so, I think the way that they let the film be honest about the fact that Molly is benefiting from getting this job, but she's also having to sort of this woman that she admires is making her feel small in a way by treating her like it's a transaction like you're here to make me look good. And then she tries to figure out, I think, sort of, how do I use that do I use that? So I agree with a lot of these criticisms. And yet, there's other stuff that kind of outweighed at all for me, and I do want to piggyback off of that a little bit and point out. That the comedy that didn't work is maybe two and a half minutes of the movie entirely. You know, the monologues that are given that are not barn burners, the stand up routine, that's a very discreet part of the film. And I think that the jokes in the dialogue between characters really really landed for me. I got a ton of laughs out of that section, and that's much more of the movie the studio. Sixty problem wasn't triggered for me to the same degree with this movie because it showed so little of the late night, comedy that the fact that it wasn't firing on all cylinders. Didn't ring any alarm bells for me. And I also think that Catherine Newbury is a fascinating complicated messy character that you just don't get to see that often in movies, especially for, you know, a woman over fifty in Hollywood to get a role like this is really actually pretty impressive. And I loved how messy they made her a loved the fact. She could be incredibly mean, and obviously, I think of all the people on this podcast, I am the most sensitized to Amazon's charisma. But I think that, that charisma is used here to round out a really thorny, spiky difficult character in a way that I- incredibly admired when instead of just leaning on her charm and having her be nanny McPhee late night host. Right. I mean, she charming, they have to come around to where the people that we meet in that first opening scene, wouldn't necessarily ever come around to her in the real world. But this is, you know, when I let off I said, that's fine and unlisted criticism. So let me let me correct a little bit. Here's what I really liked. I really liked the cast this is an impeccable cast of ringers people. I love a bit part is filled out by somebody whose work. I know in love is a very important thing that arise about midway through it arrives, just when I needed it to arrive because I was starting to pull away, and it's between her, and max Casella, who was a writer on the show where he basically says to her look, you can't just come in, and criticize you need to produce before you can criticize that is a small but fell to me realistic bit of advice that felt sound and true that moment needed to be in his phone because it was starting to get a little, too, she's going to charm their pants off. But here's the thing. I liked about that, too. Is that the criticism that she had given in the meeting that he's? Talking about where she comes in and sort of has a report because she's worn de a job where she kind of quality control. So she's got kind of a report about conceptually. Here's what I think the issues are, and she comes in, and I think she's right about this raw, she's clearly, right about this thing, and yet, then the Thompson character comes around and has an argument about why that bothers her and why she's angry about it. And I think they are both right in that scene in a way. Right. If I can go back to one of the conversations, Stephen, and I had last night, you were you were talking about the fact that you didn't like any of the people in the movie and found kind of no one route -able..

McPhee Molly max Casella writer Stephen Amazon Catherine Newbury Hollywood Thompson
"catherine newbury" Discussed on MYfm 104.3

MYfm 104.3

10:28 min | 2 years ago

"catherine newbury" Discussed on MYfm 104.3

"For, if they could we pack every day with exercise and faith socialization. So each visit, is your dogs, most exciting day ever other than the day you drop that pork chop. Visit dog Toby dot com because every dog deserves daycare. In theaters Friday, I am being the place. Host of this show to see her Catherine Newbury needed a miracle, we need to hire a woman what she got. This is my dream was Wally as its little Olten a little white. Okay. What can I do about lash Rolling Stone, Reeves newbie Kalian Thompson are irresistible in USA today calls it a surefire hit? I need this job. You'll find can I take a fired man? See lead by Dr under seventeen widow parent Friday, a city one zero four three on Sam Smith. You girl in their mind. Imagine dragons with up Los Angeles. This is holiday. Los angeles. All music. Four three. My FM we go. Good. Hugh. Food, huge the new bone. Stumbling not follow you. Bane, tattoo and some of bane. It's obvious. Asuka fully. Can. Foale you. Tattoo some of. Know. Masuko. Succoth. On the circle. Stumbling not follow. You can kit enough. Vein tattoo and some. Circle. Suck of you. Avin do. Lonely. My bed. Four three Maya feminine. So happy communica bales going to be at our heart radio music festival, along with the elephants Brown band, Tim McGraw Alicia, Keys, Mumford, and sons and more, you can win tickets Monday morning at eleven two and five. Chemical. Guys. Yeah. Good. More music, more variety for three FM. You only need the light latest bone.

alicia keys avin
"catherine newbury" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:43 min | 2 years ago

"catherine newbury" Discussed on KQED Radio

"It's happy hour on a Friday, and we have some sad news for tequila drinkers. This is a product that by definition can only be made in Mexico. So if President Trump imposes tariffs on goods from Mexico. This Monday has promised to Keila. We'll take a hit. Jacob co owns goes at tequila based in Atlanta, and he joins us now welcome. Hi, good to be here. Thanks for having me, the US imported one point four billion dollars worth of tequila last year. And most of these companies are owned by Americans operated out of the US like yours tells about goes at your company, how much do you import every month, for example? So goes to kilo we came to market in the spring of twenty fifteen we've been able to more than double business every year, since then today, we're importing about ten thousand bottles a month, and tequila can only be made in Mexico. Right. It's like champagne that can only be produced in the champagne region of France. That's exactly right. Ari and not just Mexico, but specifically a region in Mexico. That's mostly in the state of police, go, so is there a term? Like sparkling wine that is used for things that we would otherwise call tequila that are not produced in that specific region of Mexico. There really isn't not that you would go to the store and buy a couple guesses as to why that is the, the first reason is that so much about two Quila is about heritage in the tradition in the story and a lot of that if not all that's tied to Mexico and the second reason is, it's probably a lot more expensive to make it in America too. So what was your immediate reaction? When you heard this announcement from the White House that there was gonna be a five percent and possibly higher tariff on everything that comes over the border, including all the tequila that you import. Well, I would say surprise, followed by concern to be honest with you five percents, a lot, especially as it increases to ten fifteen and all the way up to twenty five. It could be pretty devastating trying to get as many bottles over the border as possible before these take effect. Honestly that wasn't really possible. There's such a short amount of time from the time that it was announced to Monday when the five percents supposed to go into effect. We didn't have time to do that. Now, what we are doing is we're trying to. Make contingency plans all the way from five percent to twenty five percent. And one thing we realized is well we're not importing on Monday. We don't import every day. So we're hoping these talks in DC. They'll come to a deal, and that we can essentially delay importing until a deal is made. But before it increases from five to ten percent, so it is an intricate little dance. We're trying to do so you kinda have to gamble is they're going to be a deal so you won't have to pay the five percent tariff. Or if you don't import right away, and there's no deal are you gonna have to pay ten fifteen twenty even twenty five percent? Yeah. That's exactly right. We're trying to play that game. So to speak. Wow. Yeah. You know it's the uncertainty that makes it a particularly intense situation for us right now. How long do you think it will be until Margarita drinkers at a bar start to feel the price increase? It's not gonna be that long to be honest with you. I could say probably within a month producers like goes, we have tough decisions to make. We're going to have to decide whether it's us the distributors, the restaurant, the liquor store or even the consumer that's going to have to bear, the brunt of tariffs. I could be wrong about this. But my impression is that high alcohol has a really steep profit margin, like if I'm paying ten dollars or more for a cocktail the cost of the tequila is actually very small is a possible that you can just absorb this price increase, we can to a certain point five percent and twenty five percent is drastically different just to mention we already are paying a federal excise tax and everything we import, which for us acquaints about twenty five percent of our cost of goods in terms of a high profit margin, we have a healthy margin. But again, at a certain point, we will have to make some tough decisions. Okay. So if people want to enjoy some tequila this weekend, before prices go up what's your recommendation of how they drink it? First of all, this, you drink Goza. If you're. With a slice of lime or just as I like a slice of lime. But you don't need it in, by the way, better, also get that line before the price goes up. Jacob gluck. Cheers, thank you, co owner of goes to Keila based in Atlanta, Georgia. News. You can use their, you're listening to all things considered from NPR news. The comedy late night, stars Emma Thomson, as a fading, TV host and Mindy Kaeling as a writer hired to make her more hip the film was popular enough with audiences. At this year's Sundance film festival to start a studio. Bidding war are critic. Bob Mondello says it has easy to see why we I Catherine Newbury standing backstage, preparing to accept the latest of many honors. She was the first female late night, talk show host on a major network, winning.

Mexico Keila Atlanta US President Trump Jacob co NPR Bob Mondello France White House Ari Jacob gluck Emma Thomson America DC Mindy Kaeling Catherine Newbury Georgia writer
"catherine newbury" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

05:40 min | 2 years ago

"catherine newbury" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"On I thought, you know what was going through my mind was that from a distance, my boobs have dropped so far. They just. Keep trying to find that policeman. He was gorgeous. And then he said to me, and so right up. So she does very well, because my daughter said mum. That's about the time. You came back from the shot. I know. Good. Eos yacht for the New York Times says about late night. I think it opens next week. I think opens this Friday Friday that it is fantastic. Really likes it, Emma. Thompson doing some of the best work, she's ever done, which is saying a lot surely Mindy. Kaylene. Of course, you know, she's playing Emma Thompson's playing, Catherine Newbury think broadcasting legend, like Johnny Carson, the first ever longest running female host of a prime time network show. She's been on the air for thirty years. And of course, that's never happened, so but it's just she's outlasted in the story Leno and lev Letterman, she's some of the names are dropped Seth Meyers shows up for cameo, but, you know, she's a whole like a sparkly fantastical creature unicorn because that doesn't really exist. But the movie. He is smart and breezy. And charming and funny. Sounds like a delightful. Doesn't it different Homer comedy? And so the ad networks, new boss is looking for new blood, and they would like to get some, she's got all male writers writing for her opening monologue and Mindy kaylene is hired and blah, blah, blah. So anyway, it looks it looks really good look good. It doesn't it. And I want more Emma Thompson. Yes. Please. How can we get her to do more projects? I don't know. I mean, I think more comedy to yes. Great at the Shakespeare. Great at the Jane Austen stuff, but I like her in contemporary comedies. So hopefully, we can get she mentioned her early career was lot of sketch comedy, it wise. Yeah. Anyway. So that's, that's Emma, Thomson giving us that Ellen Pompeo is giving an interview in variety talking about Grey's anatomy, because it's fourteenth year on the air while which is really something, and she said the culture behind the scenes on Grey's anatomy, was toxic for the first ten years. She said, we had serious culture issues, very bad behavior. Really toxic work environment. And when asked if there's a moment she wanted to leave the show she said there were many moments. It's funny. I never wanted off the bus in the year. I could have gotten off. She said when she became a mother, she said, I'm forty where my ever gonna get paid this kind of money. Right. She's in thinking bigger. But think about a hall of the people who are on grease in that me in the first ten years of the show is e Washington left, because he supposedly called T R night, the F word gay word that was home of fighting. I think he I think he was fighting with Patrick Dempsey. Well, yes. And then the drama with Patrick Dempsey, Catherine Hijo, who notably had a bad attitude, on the set of Grey's anatomy, crew self out of the EMMY nomination Reese because she said, nothing that she acted in. Red was good enough for your consideration. Believe since thank you. When he left, he said he in shonda had a breakdown of communication, which I'm just going to take demean that. She couldn't figure out a way to write his story line anymore. I couldn't San George quite honestly. I thought he was a weak character. Yeah. And well, he's found some work. Yeah. After that. He he was in the net GIO doing, these bio-, things, great Picasso. He played Picasso's gay friend. That's good. Let's see Catherine. I mean shonda rhimes yourself told entertainment or Hollywood reporter, that she's a no high go rule on her set which was just all that. No. Is that in behavior, don't act like a Katherine instead of my shows a? Yeah. And then Ellen Pompeo. I mean, that's kind of unbelievable that for ten years that it was a toxic work environment. But then she said, when I always knew Dempsey made more money than I did even though I am the title. Character reason Ademi. And so she well, now she's negotiated for a paycheck of twenty million dollars a year. Yeah, good for her for her good for her. If you're a sneaky, Pete lover that the third season which is airing right now. It's that's it. Yeah. That's okay. That's fine. I think so. Did you watch the third season though? No. I lost interest. The second one just didn't hold up for some reason. I know I hear what you're saying. All listen, we come back. It's time for the dirt alert. Mytalk one zero seven one everything. Entertainment..

Patrick Dempsey Ellen Pompeo Emma Thompson Grey Mindy kaylene Catherine Newbury Seth Meyers Thomson Jane Austen New York Times Eos Johnny Carson shonda Leno EMMY San George Katherine Reese reporter
"catherine newbury" Discussed on WRKO AM680

WRKO AM680

01:36 min | 2 years ago

"catherine newbury" Discussed on WRKO AM680

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