25 Burst results for "cassidy zachary"

"cassidy zachary" Discussed on Dressed: The History of Fashion

Dressed: The History of Fashion

06:56 min | 2 months ago

"cassidy zachary" Discussed on Dressed: The History of Fashion

"Day. We all get dressed. Welcome to trust the history of fashion a podcast that explores the who what when of why we wear. We are fashion historians and your hosts cassidy zachary and april callaghan dress listeners. Get excited because today we are going shopping. And because you know we love. All things sustainable. We are actually going vintage shopping. Just outside of paris at the famed and fabled and much beloved lay poofs flea market which according to many sources is the largest antique market in the entire world lay encompasses seven hector's or more than seventeen acres with seventeen hundred individual vendors and we went and saw them all. No so. I wish we did. I know what you might be thinking. This place is huge in its size. Might make a little more sense when you learn. That lee is actually a collection of fourteen individual markets. Each with their own specialties. In terms of the types of items for sale so nationally we just had to go here on our recent dressed fashion history tour of paris. yes Have to say casts a visiting with something that has been on my bucket list for the last twenty years of and for whatever reasons the last couple of times i've been to paris my plans just didn't line up to make to the flea market because it's only open on the weekends saturday and sunday. Although i will say that i do believe that there are certain higher and vendors in a couple of different specific markets that hold additional hours for professional decorators and other fellow dealers etc but now having been there not one not two but three times in august the twenty twenty one. Well let's just say it did not disappoint. Yeah and after. Say i had never even heard of it until you brought it up as a must stop on our fashion fashion-industry tour so i was in for a real treat. It was pretty incredible and even going multiple times. We are only able to explore a handful of the markets and even then we only scratched the surface because so many of the shops we visited were closed for august. But we still saw so much. We'll definitely be going back. And maybe we'll get a chance to check out the several other markets that we missed in this labyrinth of cover shops located just outside of paris and the nearby northern suburb of song. Won- yes and. I'm glad you brought this up cast. The flea market isn't located in paris proper because this actually has to do with a larger history of the buying and selling of used goods and this area of salt lon became really well known as a market for used items starting in the eighteen seventies but history of the second hand. Trade is much older than that in paris. Going back centuries before the eighteen seventies and we've mentioned it many times before on the show listeners. You know historically speaking clothing was considered mature valuable. Sometimes some of the most valuable things a person might own. You know unlike today when clothing is considered disposable by many people so historically because of the intrinsic value of clothing garments oftentimes went onto have second third or fourth lives beyond their original. Where in the past. It was far more common that a garment that was new to you was not actually knew at all in historically. Most women knew how to so after all and often fashion clothing for themselves and their families and they will do this from new links of kloss but more often than not these garments. After they were made were handed down within families there are passed onto friends etc. Once the original where no longer had used for them and the ultra wealthy might be the only segment of the population to never know what it was like to wear a prewar piece of clothing. Although their close austin became secondhand when no longer fashionable they were passed on to say. They're ladies in waiting. The personal maids ballots or other household staff clothing. Also found its way into the hands of a new where by means of being sold via the secondhand market yes and traders of used clothing have historically gone by a few different names fritters aka frippery which is a word. We see more often. Now biff irs chiffon yeas and rag in bone men include just to kind of few slang terms for traders Clothing and you know prior to the nineteen sixties when it was the hippies that made it well you know cool to issue capitalist structures inherent to the fashion system and they were wearing vintage clothing because of this they made it well hip. You know hippies yeah get it. The basically you know before the nineteen sixties. The dealing of us close came with a bit of stigma. And it's really easy to see why after reading descriptions from the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries about some of the sanitary conditions in areas where it used clothing was sold haiching being an entirely different matter at this time. Sometimes even bathing came with. Its own stigma. But all these used garments especially the ones that were sold at lower price points had likely had several previous owners and had accumulated you know all of these body oils and fluids and stains and soiling not to mention perhaps fleas in also bedbugs. And this is where the term fleamarket comes from and lay pufus translates to the fleas and french. And can i just say. I never even remotely related flea markets with actual sleaze. I just assumed it was some sort of other relationship between the word flee but the fact that it actually relates to fleas is interesting because it's such a common part of our vernacular today. It's super interesting. So needless to say the sale of secondhand clothing could be a bit of an unsavory and quite frankly dishonest business. Some dealers went so far to attempt to repair holes not with patches or men's but with a quick fix of sap or tar which clearly would not hold up for much longer them getting these items sold and out the door so during the eighteenth century certain covered passageways paris also sites where used garments of dubious quality were sold and this had a couple of benefits of course protection from the weather but also these passageways could be dark and dim and this aided in concealing the poor conditions of the garments. The flippers hawk. And i also would just want to say that. These covered passageways are. It's super interesting topic. In and of themselves they were basically early shopping malls or cades. There were at one point over one hundred fifty in paris. I think by the eighteen fifties and today only a couple remain including the Shwe zeal which we happen to stumble across when visiting the oldest haberdashery impairs ultra-modern located on another.

paris cassidy zachary april callaghan lee austin
"cassidy zachary" Discussed on Dressed: The History of Fashion

Dressed: The History of Fashion

07:38 min | 3 months ago

"cassidy zachary" Discussed on Dressed: The History of Fashion

"People in the world. We all have one thing in common every day. We all get dressed. Welcome to dress the history of fashion. A podcast marie explore the who. What when why we wear we are fashion historians and your host for callahan and cassidy zachary. While welcome back dress listeners. We are still actually standing on the route of low-pay waiting to continue artur still there jack. Hammering honking cars all of it were still there. But don't worry because we are going to as promised like part one of this series transport you back to the period when the reader lopate was known as the most luxurious shopping street in the world. And what better way to start. Today's episode then with the to your house of a man who can arguably be called the founding father of the ochamchira and the founding father of the of the pay we are standing at seven or sets clue della pay. And i'm wondering dress listeners. you have any guesses. He was the subject of our very first episode. dressed jess. I think that many of our listeners are already well aware of what's coming. Yes because of course seven repay was the home of the house of the qatar house of charles. Frederick were so this is where it all started and of course we could have started the riddler pay tour here. But then we'd be standing in the middle of the street. So i hope you understand why we started at one end and walk towards the other but we've arrived at the place where arguably the fashion reputation other it'll pay started was with worth and actually standing in front of it. The building almost looks exactly as it would have been worth opened his first italia with his business partner. Auto beaubourg at this very site over one hundred sixty years ago and i was in eighteen fifty eight. Yeah and i just have to say when cast. And i kind of like preparing to do this tour. And we were kind of walk in the streets and and and doing all the prep. We both got a little emotional about the fact that we've seen so many pictures of the house of worse than the outside from the nineteenth century and then we're standing across the street from it. It looks exactly the same. It hasn't changed now. It really has it and we're going to post pictures of of course the contemporary and historic photographs of these places. We took a lot of pictures. And we're going to do some side by side comparison so you can see because not all of the storefronts look the same but house of worth does it was pretty incredible to imagine what it would have been like during this the heyday of the street so worth openness for business with auto in eighteen fifty eight he was solo by eighteen. Seventy seventy one. In between this period he had earned the patronage of the empress. Eugenie herself. So you know no big deal. And he became the official designer of the court by eighteen. Sixty four so needless to say clients flocked in droves in their carriages chew the riddle pay and they would actually wait on his outdoor staircase in order to gain entrance and sadly we looked. We walked into the courtyard. The is gone but one can imagine. It seems as if that injury courtyard that we've seen him. Photos has been divided in half now. Somehow staircase isn't thirty anymore but We we were quite curious. I have to say and in terms of this ignificant of all of what we're saying. We just want you to remember that. This term haute couture was not really a term that had existed in worse day. This was a new term and he was largely responsible for setting the precedence for this elite designation within the industry and he kind of like built up this presence on the rule of pay around this elite industry in his presence on the street and worth himself can be credited for many innovations including the concept of the designer as taste maker. And this is something that we're incredibly familiar with today that it slick you know the designer who is the creative visionary but this was a entirely novel concept in the nineteenth century because prior to this it was kind of the client who would instruct their dressmaker earlier. Taylor rest who what they wanted. Not the other way around. It wouldn't be the maker that was the quote unquote creative genius. So you know part in parcells who worst dictatorial control of his clients. Wardrobes or what he envisioned that they should be wearing was also how he presented himself to the world and to his clients and he really did so as an artist he even went so far as to adopt artistic clothing and he dressed the part casts. Right all rembrandt is one compares the and and so much so like this kind of adopted persona was so tre or kind of like out there that in eighteen ninety harper's bazaar wrote that worth could be seen around his house on the regional pay quote during his official hours moving slowly about with two black dogs at his heels. His tall figure wrapped in a loose robe of the finest brown. Wool is still skullcap. On his will shaped head and introspective look upon his serious face. And there's actually wonderful photograph of him out there. So if you want to. Just google charles frederick worth and you will know exactly what we're talking about so another of worse important. Contributions west is innovative organization of the couture house by not only the specialties of tire and flu so tailoring draping departments. But he also created. These other niche specialties like setting sleeves making linings embroidery this essentially created an assembly line process whereby a single garment would pass along the chain for the worker to execute their specific task before handing it off to the next employees to execute their specialty. And so on so. This was a novel notion given that under old models. Sometimes a single person might complete garments construction with additional support from only in embroider or a beater and this is super interesting because this is one of the chief complaints by say like the arts and crafts movement against the industrial revolution. Is people really started. You know mechanising. What wants us to be supercricket process and breaking them down to beat what is the most productive and efficient absolutely and this was actually though one has to argue what allowed couture house to expand significantly because by eighteen seventy the house of worth employed approximately twelve hundred employees and several of them actually lived on the premises of the qatar house or in nearby buildings were employee dormitories. And also. i think this is really quite fascinating. That many couture houses at this time also provided lunch for their employees or their staff in these kind of like really light and airy employee dining rooms that were part and parcel to all these multi level buildings that these businesses were and we actually have a multitude of photographs of some of these things. Yeah and we'll actually post some because there's an incredible book that came out in nineteen ten creators of fashion. That really provides this wonderful behind the scenes element that you just don't often get to see so and i just love this one. Particular memory of the nineteenth century retailer pay from a nineteen twenties book a history of feminine fashion. Which has quote during the empire the root of pay and this is of course the empire of napoleon..

cassidy zachary house of the qatar house of ch callahan della jess marie Eugenie Frederick jack charles frederick parcells Taylor harper house of worth qatar house flu google napoleon
"cassidy zachary" Discussed on Dressed: The History of Fashion

Dressed: The History of Fashion

07:22 min | 3 months ago

"cassidy zachary" Discussed on Dressed: The History of Fashion

"Fifteen minutes could save you fifteen percents or more just the history of fashion as a production of iheartradio Over seven billion people in the world. We all have one thing in common every day. We all get dressed. Who is dressed the history of fashion. A podcast for explore. The who. what when of why we wear. We are fascist orients and your hosts april callaghan and cassidy zachary so today dress listeners. The root the pay appears as just any other store line street so you have the hustle and bustle of presient life. Which animates the street. We you know honking horns jackhammers. Various types of construction work totally The presence of cardi as black marble facade is really one of the last remaining hints at a bygone era when the street was heralded as one of the sheikh. If not these she gets streets in the world so what women war on the sidewalks of the retailer pay was newsworthy as what could be purchased in its shops. It was all reported in detail and fashion magazines across europe and america in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries and at this time the retail pay was the fashion street. I mean it was the fantasy of every aspiring fashion sta and also the reality of the uber wealthy and the elite from around the globe. So it was this international shopping destination of the glitterati of society from the demimondaine. All the way up to royalty from all around the world and the street itself was so legendary that had actually inspired perfumes. Plays and also imitations because this is quite interesting. Cast madison avenue in new york. Historically has kind of like especially kind of when it emerged as elite shopping destination in the us it was referred to as the new rubella pay in the nineteen twenties right and in one thousand nine hundred thousand. Five article by vogue magazine called the riddle. Pay quote the street of a thousand luxuries. The most luxurious the most complete shopping street in all the world within these limits are centered. The reasons that send the feet of every chic american woman who comes to paris flying to the root of the pay first last and many times in between end quote and april. It's not lost on us. That almost one hundred years after this article was written you and i were in fact to american women. Yes we actually dressed listeners. As you will recall from last week's a recap. We made the riddler pay the first stop on our recent fashion history tour of paris so we are so excited to share with. You are walking tour in hopes that you can imagine what it would have been like to shop. Once one of the most covetable shopping destinations in the world. Yes and even if you are in paris on your own you could take this podcast with you and this is our audio company. Meant to our tour of the pay. So we're gonna actually begin our tour on the opposite end of the plastic dome. So the end of the rule of pay that's closest to the palais gonyea the paris opera house. If you're standing in that direction near looking down the road you'll pay what you're going to see at. The end is the plastic dome which was just round plaza. And what we want to talk about here is the fact that that round plaza which now houses a column the statue on top. Actually that site was originally the home for church prior to the nineteenth century and in eighteen. O six napoleon bonaparte had that church demolished to make way for this new street into the loss fontham where he had erected a giant column crown with his statue not the same column in statue than it is today. But let's just say you know. Obviously it goes without saying that that when this statue was there during his reign the regional pay was actually called the rue napoleon and it was only after that he was finally deposed in eighteen. Fifteen that the street was given its new name for which it would earn world renown as a fashion destination as the russillo. Pay out on. Before i forget little fashion history facts here that person. Napoleon had demolished while apparently it also held the remains of one of fashion histories. Icons the madame de pompadour. And we're not exactly sure what happened to her remains and maybe one of our french colleagues out. There might and lightness. They might know and we'd love to hear yes absolutely so by eighteen. twenty two. The travel guide gallon. yanni's paris guide or strangers companion through the french metropolis. Described the riddle of pay as quote the center of the fashionable part of the city and quote. But at this time it was occupied by furnished hotels offices of physicians and surgeons and really the only fashioned purveyors of dress were to boot and shoemakers a few jewelers and a perfumer or perfume. Yea said this at all changed by the time the first stop on our tour opened its doors at twenty one. Rusillo pay an eighteen seventy one and while the coach house we are about to talk about opening eighteen seventy one. It really was only the latest incarnation of a family business. The history of which extends all the way back to eighteen sixteen when a family opened a lingerie which at this time meant linen undergarments. They opened this laundry and linens at business so dressed listeners will give you a couple of seconds but do you have any guests it dun dun dun dun dun dun. I love that you did the sound effects on the show. Because i can't sing but you can. And that is something that address start might know that you have been the singer to front woman of a few bands in your time. Oh my gosh. I mean yeah another lifetime. Does okay dress listeners. If you happen to guest. Jacques do say you'll be correct but if you did not guess jock please do not in any way shape or firm feel bad because do say today is is as you know outside of maybe people who are professionals in this field kind of a lesser known haute couture compared to like worth. But we do have to say this. Did you say house was one of the leading bella hawk. Could we're houses of the era and do say himself is perhaps today actually more famous for his illustrious art collection which included post impressionist and cuba's artists as compared to his career as a fashion designer so his collection included one of the most famous works of art of all time. Day mozelle davin yom which. Apparently he bought directly from so out of.

cassidy zachary paris vogue magazine cardi palais gonyea callaghan napoleon bonaparte paris opera house america europe Rusillo new york yanni Yea Jacques cuba mozelle davin
"cassidy zachary" Discussed on Dressed: The History of Fashion

Dressed: The History of Fashion

04:20 min | 3 months ago

"cassidy zachary" Discussed on Dressed: The History of Fashion

"Billion people in the world. We all have one thing in common every day. We all get welcome to dressed the history of fashion a podcast that explores who what when of why we wear we are fashioned stories and your hosts abra kellyanne and cassidy zachary dun dun dun dun dun dun dun dead that on dun done and so i mean listers. I might be humming a very familiar tune to many of you here comes. The bride is a popular song with a very literal title. But what. I did not know actually april before this episode is that the song has accompanied brides down the aisle for over one hundred and sixty years. Which is pretty incredible. I did not know that..

abra kellyanne cassidy zachary dun dun dun
"cassidy zachary" Discussed on Dressed: The History of Fashion

Dressed: The History of Fashion

03:53 min | 4 months ago

"cassidy zachary" Discussed on Dressed: The History of Fashion

"Is the production of iheartradio billion people in the world. We all have one thing in common every day. We all get dressed. Welcome to dress the history of fashion a podcast that explores the who what when of why we where we are fashion historians and your hosts cassidy zachary and april callaghan so cast. I know that..

cassidy zachary april callaghan
"cassidy zachary" Discussed on Dressed: The History of Fashion

Dressed: The History of Fashion

07:51 min | 4 months ago

"cassidy zachary" Discussed on Dressed: The History of Fashion

"So we got together to do a podcast to relive the show as so many of you have listened to drama queens on the iheartradio app apple podcasts. Or wherever you get your podcasts. That's not sta you hear the true story of a pilot who smuggled drugs for some of the world's most dangerous druglords don sporty style tells the tale in his own words behind the bars of a federal prison speaking on a smuggled cell phone fifty salt old. I listen to transport. Easter on the iheartradio app apple podcasts. Or wherever you get your podcasts. Trust the history of fashion production of iheartradio Cover seven billion people in the world. We all have one thing in common every day. We all get dressed. Welcome to stressed the history of fashion a podcast that explores the who what when of why we wear. We are fashion historians and your hosts april callaghan and cassidy zachary address listeners. We start today's episode with a love story of epic olympic proportions and origins in fact without the nineteen forty eight olympics. One of fashion's most beloved brands quite possibly. It would not exist april. Let's just say. The olympic flame was not the only flame lit at the nineteen forty eight olympics. Today's story actually begins in nineteen forty when the. Us olympic committee published their report for the games of the twelfth olympiad. Gone were the glowing reviews and praise of hitler and the nazi regime's nineteen thirty six olympics. And god were the olympics with the outbreak of world. War two this basically ensured that the next summer games originally meant to be held in helsinki finland were indefinitely postponed in so reads. The us olympic. Committee's report from that year quote. The united states was ready but the world itself was not. It is the fervent hope of the committee that the turmoil into which the universe has been tossed will subside soon so that the olympic ideals of brotherhood among men may emerge triumphant. May the olympic flame never die and made the olympic ideal soon again prevail as an indication of mankind's return to sanity so the olympics would not return until nineteen forty eight when they opened in london the international olympic committee referred to hereafter as the i o c had made some noticeable changes in the worst wake. The olympic salute long and opening ceremonies staple was gone because apparently it was too similar to the nazi salute. Although not related at all. But i'm you know other elements did remain well. It originated at the so-called nazi olympics of nineteen thirty six. The ioc decided to keep the olympic torch lighting ceremony and the relay as symbolic gesture and the so called relay of peace conducted through war. Torn europe became a really touching emblem of goodwill between nations. The lemon games offered an opportunity to boost morale and exhibit much needed international solidarity after the brutalities of world war so former adversaries who thought an opposite sides of the battlefield now athletic competitors four thousand one hundred and four athletes from fifty. Nine countries competed in one hundred and thirty six events in these games and that included to talion world. War two veterans and track and field team mates by the name of giorgio and a tapio. What's particularly cool about these. Two is not only were they stellar athletes. They were active where designers and following world war two. They went into business together creating wool tracksuits which they and their fellow olympic teammates wore these nineteen forty eight games. A tapio even made it all the way to the finals in the four by four hundred meter hurdle race at wembley stadium but his team did not play say didn't finish there was no reason given but we have to wonder if it was perhaps that he got a little too distracted by the good luck his future wife who was in a sixteen year old student by the name of rosetta gel meany and she was in the stands so apparently she noticed him as well because zita later called it an interview with nbc news. Quote our students seats. Were right near the changing rooms. At wembley stadium. I saw him. He looked like he was twenty one. I found out later that he was twenty seven. He had an extraordinary running style. Well octavio in. His teammates also noticed zita and her friends invited them to lunch. And can we say the rest is actually not just history. But it's fashion history because how many of your listeners out there have heard of knitwear brand called miss sony. I love the story. So much that massoni. I mean talk about an olympic match made in fashion heaven or maybe a fashion match made an olympic heaven either way the couple was married in nineteen fifty three and they set up a workshop together continuing the production of tracksuits until they moved onto the production of their now signature knitwear. The couple showed their first network collection in milan. In nineteen fifty eight and soon after rose to international success from the nineteen sixties onward and the duo really built this family empire selling their now signature brightly colored knitwear designs with their three kids taking over control of the business in the nineteen nineties. Yes and we will get to the nineteen ninety s soon enough dressed listeners. But in the meantime we still have a lot of laughs to swim over these next two episodes before we can get to our ultimate finish. Line the twenty twenty twenty one tokyo olympics so please forgive us while we hit fast forward on the remote. Yeah because did we mention that. The nineteen forty eight games were the first to be televised and broadcast around the world to people's homes so today's episode will conclude with nineteen sixty olympics held in mexico city and in order to get there. Let's quickly hit some of the highlights from the three olympic games. We'll be rock climbing cycling in vaulting by with great speed at the nineteen fifty to helsinki olympics. American olympic diver. Sammy lee was the first man to win back to back gold medals for the us when he took home the gold for the ten meter platform for the second olympics in a row he had previously won the gold at the nineteen forty eight olympics where he had also become the first asian american man to win. An olympic gold medal and lease achievements are incredible. When you learned that as a kid he honed his skills and a soft sand pit behind his diving coaches in the back yard. Amazing and reason for this was because segregation in american men. That lee was only allowed to swim at his neighborhood. Pool once a week on quote unquote in our national day. But obviously he persevered. Training are rather diving his way through sand to go.

olympic olympics tapio cassidy zachary Us olympic committee international olympic committe apple callaghan wembley stadium zita rosetta gel meany helsinki massoni finland us giorgio nbc news octavio london
"cassidy zachary" Discussed on Dressed: The History of Fashion

Dressed: The History of Fashion

08:08 min | 4 months ago

"cassidy zachary" Discussed on Dressed: The History of Fashion

"A podcast roby explored the who what when of why we wear. We are fascists. Orients and your host april kellyanne cassidy zachary so today dress listeners. We continue our exploration into the historical significance of drafts to the summer olympic athlete. Which if we were not clear in the first episode it is the summer not winter olympics. Which are the focus of this series and we are certainly fans of the winter olympics as well but that little dance around. The ice is gonna have to wait until february of next year when the twenty fourth winter olympics opened in beijing so stay tuned for an episode on the evolution of figure skating at tire. Which has a very intimate and surprising connection with fashion. We have been meaning to get to this episode for quite some time. Yes super excited so much. Look forward to including this episode as we will learn today. The fashion industry has played no small role in both the winter and summer olympics over the years while we might be familiar with the partnership between the world of fashion and the olympics. Today for instance ralph. Lauren has of course been the official outfitter of the us olympic and paralympic team since two thousand eight. This was not yet a relationship that had formed at the time of the nineteen twenty eight olympics. Which is where we left off an art last episode so today we pick up four years later at the nineteen thirty two olympics which we pinpoint as really laying the foundation for the symbiotic relationship between this international sporting event and the fashion industry that survives to this very day the games of the tenth summer olympia which were held in los angeles from july thirtieth to august fourteenth nineteen thirty two were notable for many reasons including the introduction of features that remain staples of the olympics. Today for instance the tenth olympiads length of sixteen days is particularly noteworthy here because prior to this the shortest summer games had been seventy nine days law. Which is i said. Last time i would totally watch days of the olympics and also The summer olympics in nineteen thirty two were also the first olympics to feature that tiered. Winner's podium that we all know and love and also the olympic village although the latter at this time was reserved for the male athletes and the women athletes stayed at a very luxurious hotel called chapman park in her oral interview with the la eighty. Four foundation american hurdler. Evelyn hall adams says quote. I was also really honored when i was selected as the friendliest girl in the village. I love this. I do too. I enjoyed changing costumes. Are changing our regular clothes. Sometimes we even changed uniforms back and forth. I changed with one of the german girls. Tilly fleischer. I wore her costume for pictures and she wore mine. I also changed with one of the japanese girls. This was only for pictures because we only had one uniform and couldn't trade them. But i did trade all my own clothes and all the jewelry i had. Which wasn't much and as exemplified by the trading of uniforms staying together. And these close quarters really fostered a sense of camaraderie between athletes were otherwise competitors. This success in the nineteen thirty two olympics was quite an impressive accomplishment considering took place during the great depression which is of course the huge economic downturn that wreaked havoc on the world beginning with the us stock market crash in nineteen twenty nine so despite the global reverberations of the depression thirty seven nations managed to send thirteen hundred plus athletes of which one hundred twenty six four women to compete in la with over one hundred events for comparison. This is just less than half of the athletes in amsterdam games which had preceded it and apparently getting these athletes to america. It was not easy. Some countries like brazil and cuba did not have the money to their athletes to la for their nineteen seventy two olympics so they sent them with goods like coffee beans and sugar hoping that they could trade their way in and apparently this worked for the brazilians but not for the cubans who sadly nine entry into the us because the value of sugar had gone down and not cover their expenses. Heartbreaking of just say heartbreaking so the depression definitely kept some athletes from the competition but the same cannot be apparently said of the spectators because some one hundred thousand people the most people in the audience in olympic history up until this point packed the stadium for the opening ceremony really eager to forget their woes in the midst of the depression and they really wanted to support the international spectacle of all prowess that was about to begin. Oh yeah and each country's athletes came to perform and perform they. Did the japanese swim team. For instance swept all of this swimming events but one there was a japanese swimmer by the name of casula kitamura who became the youngest male ever to win olympic gold. When it just fourteen he took first place in the fifteen hundred meter. Freestyle gold medal wins are also achieved by american swimmer. Helen madison who won gold in the one hundred meter and four hundred meter freestyle events and the four by one hundred freestyle relay and american track and field star. Mildred babe dietrichsen bay was her nickname. Took home the gold in both a javelin throw the high hurdles and then she took home silver in the high jump and it is said that babe dietrichsen would undoubtedly have security even more battles had women not thin limited to participating in only up to three events so mildred is really considered to be one of the greatest all around women athletes in his street. She excelled at not only track and field but also basketball baseball and golf and cass. As you know there. Is this very epic photo of her. At the tenth olympia snapped just a few moments before. She launches the javelin and she is wearing kind of the me to us now. White tank and shorts you know as her uniform and the red and blue. Us insignia on her chest as well as a stripe running across your chest and on the side of her shorts. Yeah so this is the uniform that we've seen many years prior worn by both men and women which honestly had not changed much since the debut of the modern olympics in eighteen ninety six but it is worth noting that at these first games and kind of after those first couple of games the uniform of t shirt and shorts would have been worn by male athletes. Only as women were not even allowed to participate in the eighteen ninety six games but even if they had there is no way in eight women would have been allowed to wear garments that revealed so much of their body. Yes but that would change. As more and more women came to participate in the olympics for women to become winning athletes for their nation they had to have clothing. That helped not hindered their performance. And we've talked about this on the show in the past. But i find it super interesting that it is actually women's stage performers and athletes who set the proverbial stage for all of these innovations in women's clothing that happened beyond the sporting arena. You know and they do this year sometimes. Even decades before clothing such as pants shorts tank tops etc became societally acceptable forms of dress for women and i mean even just one decade prior mildred bear arms and legs would have been downright shocking and perhaps in many ways it still was april because it was also at the nineteen thirty two olympics that this sixteen year old australian swimmer claire denis who actually won the gold medal and the two hundred meter breaststroke get this. She was almost disqualified for showing not quote.

olympics kellyanne cassidy zachary olympic chapman park depression Evelyn hall adams Tilly fleischer roby la Us olympia paralympic beijing casula kitamura Lauren ralph Freestyle gold medal Helen madison
"cassidy zachary" Discussed on Dressed: The History of Fashion

Dressed: The History of Fashion

07:10 min | 5 months ago

"cassidy zachary" Discussed on Dressed: The History of Fashion

"Of fashion is the production of iheartradio seven billion people in the world. We all have one thing in every day. We all get dressed. Welcome to dressed the history of fashion a podcast that explores the who what when we wear. We are fashion historians and your hosts cassidy zachary an april callaghan. Welcome back dressed listener. I two part two of our discussion of the exhibition and accompanying tour de force. Catalog get your hands on it now. Entitled sporting fashion outdoor girls eighteen hundred to nineteen sixty and originally slated to open in twenty twenty. The exhibition is now on tour in the us and will actually conclude its run at his home institution at the fitter museum at the fashion institute of design and merchandising in los angeles in twenty twenty four so today we welcome back the team responsible for this groundbreaking survey of sports women and the garments and accessories. Outdoor girls have warned for competition and play for more than one hundred and fifty years and encompassing seven hundred objects and ten years in the making a round of applause for kevin jones curator and christina johnson. Associate curator at the f. i. d. m. fit a museum. Welcome back dressed. We jump right back into our discussion with some of our favorite objects and speaking fantastic fines. I simply cannot pass up the opportunity to discuss another ensemble in the subzero style. Section with you. We've of course done an entire episode on driving fashion so it might sound familiar to some of our listeners. There's this fantastic winter ensemble from the nineteen. Ten's this era is one of both my april's favorite periods of fashion history. This outfit is actually rather frightening. We've discussed these motoring ensembles in the past mail. Journalists in particular how to really hard time coming to terms with something that hit women from view and made them so incredibly quote unquote unattractive despite the necessity of these garments. That really covered a woman from head to toe. I'd love if you could describe this ensemble for listeners and talk about the need for quote unquote auto face. Oh we love our nineteen. Ten's winter motoring ensemble. This would have been worn by a lady driver in her new car. And it's this great leather coat. This is on page two to three of the catalog. The leather coat is russian in inspiration russian cossack and it has these great big buttons and loops that are symmetrical in groups of three puffed sleeves. Wide cops of for she has her over boots on. She would have worn shoes or boots underneath these larger warmer boots and this wonderful red fox fur hat and veil but the auto phase is. What really makes the impression you know. The thing is what we think of. Cars is being enclosed today and they were not in the late late late nineteenth century and early twentieth century. Obviously it comes out of the carriage trade industry You know these cars were a lot of the main body was would. it was very heavy. It wasn't like the plastics. We have today or even lighter weight metals and so they were heavy and gonna be engines. You know at the time and it was kind of more like a lawn mower engine in these things so they needed to lighten the cars as much as possible. And so they had you know. Adjustable canvas hoods that would come up not fully enclosed that that you see kind of post world war one so you you are really exposed to the elements and also there was no if it was sweltering outside. You're sweltering in your car if it was freezing inside you're freezing your car in it. Had the enclosed environment where you could control kind of the temperature inside so obviously. This is a woman who is not in the sahara desert. I mean she is like in the middle of montana at forty degree below weather. And i'm sure she's loving that she's got this. Massive photon. that is heavy. And it's because it is completely lined in sheepskin timing the sleeves. Pockets everything the thin. That's kind of a tragedy about it as it was labeled in somebody had the label out so we have this beautiful ass. And that's it that's all we have the labels so we don't know where this was from. We don't never made it but it's about nineteen fourteen. Nine hundred fifteen and not only what you needed Attacked her body from the cold. But also with protect her fashionable garments that she would be wearing where is driving. Because you know she is in an open car so you're kicking up dust and dirt and debris and election and stuff so you know she takes code off and then she'd have her nice pristine outfit underneath. But you would also want to protect your face your skin you know. She's she does have these huge gauntlet gloves on that. Protect her hands and she's got the scarf on to help. Hold the hat on but also to protect her hair keep it clean and give her a little bit more warmth there and just this auto face. It was just another one of those. Many many patents hid fashion elements. That people were trying to invent that. They hope would catch on. That would serve a purpose and most of them went by the wayside. They were not practical or whatever. But i was able to find the patent for the auto face and on the inside. It has the numbers Even how much these things cost and it was this kind of lennon and was called crave netted linen. And i could never find with that word. Meant whatever this process is that they put the linen through that was supposedly to help block. Blizzard wins and so forth from getting through to your complexion and it's fitted with these with these goggles glass insets and it was. It has a nose flap in this mouth guard in it. Kinda just looks like something. Serial killer would wear kind of. Does you know art addressing for photography for this project caroline. Jamerson really helped us with that in so she would test stress pieces to see what needed to be padded out more if we were happy with the original selection of accessories That we were intending to use. And i guess she test this with the auto face one night but she positioned it so it would be the first thing you saw as you entered our storage before the open. The door i the lights on. And i screamed. That was my skimming moment because it is a statement so this.

cassidy zachary fitter museum fashion institute of design an christina johnson callaghan de force kevin jones los angeles sahara desert fox us montana Jamerson lennon caroline
"cassidy zachary" Discussed on Dressed: The History of Fashion

Dressed: The History of Fashion

08:24 min | 6 months ago

"cassidy zachary" Discussed on Dressed: The History of Fashion

"Was over seven billion people in the world. We all have one thing in common every day. We all get dressed. Welcome to address the history of fashion. A podcast explores the who what went of why we where we are fashion historians and your hosts cassidy zachary and april callaghan so cast in a nineteen seventy-three dr willie morrow who we will discuss a bit further in this episode wrote in his book. Four hundred years without a comb. He said quote hair in other words is the basic natural symbol of the things. People are watts. Become the social cultural significance of hairstyles should not be underestimated. Yes dr morrow who has been called the greatest barber the world has ever seen in quote was speaking specifically about black hair. Which is the subject of today's episode. We are so pleased to have dr topeka allenton and dr joseph underwood join us. Today to discuss their upcoming exhibition textures. The history and art of black hair which will open an early september. Twenty twenty one. The kent state university museum the exhibition. Which is the largest exhibition to date on black hair features two hundred and fifty objects and work from more than fifty artists. Wow yeah so at kent state doctor. Ellington serves as an associate professor of design and also the interim assistant dean for the college of arts and her areas of study include african art and folklore a focus that dr just happens to share as an assistant professor of history and he studies artists from the african continent and also the diaspora doctors ellington. And underwood we are so happy. You are joining us today. Welcome actress ellington. Underwood a very warm welcome to dress. I'm so excited to talk to you today. Excited to be here. Thank you thank you for the invitation april and we are just like so delighted that you both agreed to chat with us about your exhibition the history and art of black hair and dr ellington. I'm hoping that i can ask you the first question because the subject of black hair has been the focus of your academic career for two decades. Now which is amazing and it was born out of personal experiences which you detail in the introduction to the exhibition catalogue. So i'm hoping that you might share with our listeners. How your as you say hair. Traumas kind of led you to this amazing path of academic study. You know being a heuristic researcher is really interesting. Place be especially when you're studying culture and so throughout my life as a black female especially being a black female has brown skin of kiki hair. I'm always and people like me have always been on the outside of what beauty is supposed to look like in so you know going through things such as putting chemicals on my hair in order to try to assimilate into white society. Sang beauty is so my hair straight mirrors in other chemicals Ultra texture of are like you know black people's here like i've lost my hair On two occasions. My hair's falling out because of the harsh chemicals. I been and call Ugly you know. Because of the fact that i have kinky hair hair which some people call them quote nappy here. I even you know been faced with difficulties and in my work When i was a young person. I went to work for an amusement park. And this particular amusement park a list of all of the Hairstyles not allowed to be worn in. In the amusement park. In all of those hairstyles were black. Hair style and at that particular time i was wearing one of those black hair styles so basic when they were telling me that i had to assimilate in order to come to work basically all employees mute. Salak all american. You know whatever that means is so it was. It was difficult you know. Those kinds of traumas Stayed with you when it will shape the kind of person you become. Yeah and so. How did you begin studying this. As like you're you're kind of like specialty as an academic. It's always been something really close to me in big personal to me. You know on actor therefore appear trauma of working at the park and not being accepted in regards to the way that i was wearing my hair i was just curious to know why is society so against black beating. Why is the science You know how has this disdain for black people white beauty and so. That's that's how i got started. You know there was not back then. When i first started there were not many scholars that were doing work about like here. It's become more popular nowadays but it's There was a handful of that. Was doing that work and i just wanted to learn more about me. I wanted to learn more about culture and there was no other topic that was going to be as close to me. Is something like that. So as i think that like as cultural historians a lot of our personal passions end up getting played out into what it is that we actually what direction we take as cultural history because we want to figure stuff out. Yeah so dr underwood. You are an art historian. Can you tell us about when you dr ellington. I met and began working together and perhaps a little bit about the concept behind the exhibition. Sure so. I began working against state about four years ago. I have a career. Studying specifically african and postcolonial arcs away. That artists have helped shaped national identities in the post colony the way in the museum world or the material world how africa it gets represented or misrepresented so when i got introduced myself at the orientation for new faculty i talked about some of mine. Museum experiences and curatorial projects and dr ellen. D- dashed over match made in heaven. He said i had this idea for years. Would this be of any interest to you and you. This is like day one of work as agile something for next week. That's it so we've worked on this for about four years and The concept behind exhibition is that there is not one way to tell the story of black hair let it is so multifaceted and and complicated and long as we'll talk about it spans millennia aspect any particular geography cultural history and so we just wanted to offer a few different lenses through not only the art world kind of a white cube gallery look at black hair art but also material cultural history which really comes out of dr ellington's research and expertise so this is one of the first exhibitions that blended kind of high and low the fine arts and the vernacular mall together. I mean we've got over two hundred objects spanning millennia. So it's it's a lot to chew on but we're just offering a few perspectives on history and we'll get into this later but that's one of the things that i really loved about the show that it is like this whole entire world of types of as you've noted this is an enormous topic with hundreds of years of history behind it so i think maybe if we could i talk about the significance of hair and africa before european colonization in the fifteenth century. And you know to say here in africa and we've talked about us on show on the show before that just say in africa feels very reductive. Because it's an entire continent you know. Now africa's fifty plus countries but the the quote unquote map of the african continent. Looked very different four hundred years ago. Some hoping maybe one of you can tell us a little bit about how pan. African society was structured before.

april callaghan cassidy zachary ellington Today dr joseph underwood fifty plus countries fifteenth century four hundred years ago april Ellington early september two hundred hundreds of years africa first question today two occasions next week two decades dr ellington
"cassidy zachary" Discussed on Pants On Fire

Pants On Fire

08:08 min | 6 months ago

"cassidy zachary" Discussed on Pants On Fire

"If there's anything we've learned this past year is that we have no idea what the future will look like for kids but we have a pretty good idea. Tech will only grow and employers will be clamoring for stem skills. More than ever. So how can you prepare your child for tomorrow. We'll making sure they have the fun. They deserve today. Well how about ide- tech i. Detect is the world's number one stem program for kids and teens ages seven to seventeen founded in silicon valley available to you. Read at your home. The instructors are tech rockstars dedicated to helping your child develop skills and coating. Ai game design in three d. modeling using tools. They genuinely love and might already be using every day like my kids. Like roadblocks in minecraft with id techs online private lessons. You set your own flexible schedule for one on one instruction and you could even bring a sibling or a friend along for free. Get your child excited for the future. And equip them with tools to thrive when they get their visit. I detect dot com slash. Big fib today to reserve your child's spot and be sure to enter promo code big fib to receive one hundred dollars off. Id techs virtual tech camps. That's code big at id. Tech dot com slash. Big fib for one hundred dollars off. I detect dot com slash. Big fib code big fib. It isn't easy to find out who you really are and unlock incredible. Powers bobby wonder is going through a big change and needs friends like you to help him save the town of flu. Greville voiced by community star. Danny pudi bobby wonder will take you on weekly adventures. As he battles his nemesis mighty manila and indulges alien sidekick grab stack search for. Bobby wonder wherever you get your podcasts and visit go kid dot com for more information. That's go kid. Go dot com. It's time for the shorts on fire around when our experts have to answer as many questions as they can before. Time runs out experts to answer all the questions. You will have to be brief. Okay so elena. let's start with zane. You can ask zane your shorts on fire questions. Now what do you call. Underwear england chance. Although one of my favorites slang terms use trolleys. What kind of. I knew looks like shorts. Worn by professional fighters boxers which underwear brand began in nineteen in the nineteen. Hundreds and shamrock. Knitting loom factor. Men used to wear a core. Sex country is working on a kind of bacteria outfield underwear action off along space missions. That's me. I'm working on now. I believe that's russia. Were the matching underwear undershirts. That looked like comic book characters. Like wonder woman and spider man unders a ten year. Old jack singer broke the world record wearing the most pairs of underwear at the same time. How did you wear. I have no idea honestly at that time. Okay all right. We are going to reset the timer. Aren't we lisa was on my schedule. The do thank you so much. Elena you can ask cassidy your shorts on fire questions now. Worth pants is short. For what kind of underwear pantaloons men and boys shirts were worn underwear until when predominantly prior to the twentieth century. Men's and shirts were considered underwear because they weren't really seen outside of their suits. What do people do more often in the eighteen. Hundreds take back or change their well. Actually the eighteen hundreds when people actually started to get modern indoor plumbing but prior to that changing your underwear was used in of taking a bath when taking about what's considered bad for your health for hundreds of years don't ever take about it's really about russia. Teeth sucks belong in the underwear category. Yes box absolutely our underwear. Because they're worn under your clothing. How often do you doctor say we should change our. That's an interesting question. I don't know but in our modern times i would say it's every day you know what i'm listening to some doctors that this time. You should definitely listen to the doctor. Very good it's decision time. Elena must consider more than just the age old question boxers or briefs and consider all the facs she's heard today elena who is our big fibber. That's feel they were both very convincing. I have to say so. Go with her. I think the biggest favor is saying. Why do you think sein- is our big feber first of all 'cause all a lot of in these questions were hard what. I knew a few of them from researching. And i didn't know any of the things i think i would know. Underwear company called happy dog. Okay interesting logic. So we'll the actual underwear expert. Please tell us who you are supposed westerville myself. You may okay. Hi alita cassidy no. I'm a fashion historian. An ipod her. That is correct cassidy. Zachary is a fashion and dress historian and the other half of the team behind the iheartradio. Podcast dressed the history of fashion which she co hosts and creates with april callaghan welcomed by the way. Thank you for coming cassidy. Thank you for having me rate job. Elena it's time to debrief cassidy which baxter share that we're truly unmentionable. I mean zane actually i. i didn't know if elena was gonna pick me sane knew his stuff i mean. Everything's aim sideways. As far as i know it's true the only thing. Of course. I think the happy dog elena set very good. Okay saying what cheeky lies. Did you town that. Obviously tire backstories ally. I'd never i never went to. Mit wristy no happy dog company. Yeah i have never worked with isaac mizrahi. He is a signer ever worked with. What were some of the other ones to people should wear under Trolleys nickname for for underwear in england Fruit of the loom is not the brand that started a rock knitting bills. Hanes pain and then Men did use to wear corsets. Although i will say although boyfriend who is a costume designer wanted me to have it noted that while men did i in fact we're of course it was not nearly as common and was not last too long. Okay fair but they did which is interesting. I wouldn't have known that but it. It was true. In fact that russia is working on a bacteria that will eat old underwear astronauts on long space missions. Something that elena needs to know about. If we're going to go to space you did. Oh my i tell you wanna work. I wanna work at nasa whole thing and lisa spread. I see she loves eating underwear to really russia. You're listening you should talk to percy. That's exactly what. I don't.

alita april callaghan isaac mizrahi one hundred dollars Elena Zachary Danny pudi bobby happy dog tomorrow hundreds of years sane today Go dot com Id techs minecraft lisa iheartradio seventeen both eighteen
"cassidy zachary" Discussed on Pants On Fire

Pants On Fire

06:36 min | 6 months ago

"cassidy zachary" Discussed on Pants On Fire

"And the chafing synthetic wedgie of lies. I'm your host. Deborah goldstein and in the studio today is our sound effects robot lisa whose name stands for live in studio audience. Thank you thank you. Yes it's true. I am the heart and soul of this podcast and therefore here to fourth forthwith and all the fourth from this day forth word this podcast shall be known as the world according to lisa a no no lisa while you you are a very valued part of this podcast. We are a game show where kids are really the heart and soul and if anyone wants to know all about you they can submit questions for you to answer on. Ask lisa when we learn all about you and only you fine however in light of the fact that i am a crucial part of this podcast second only to the human child contestants the ask lisa show will therefore hair before forthwith henceforth and all the fourths be called inquiries for the indispensable essential insofar primly important loose. That's a pretty long and cumbersome name it's a name befitting an indispensable and essential robot. Wouldn't you say sometimes less is more lisa that does not make sense because last is always less and more means i get more cake. Okay but in this case it means you make more of an impact cutting to the chase instead of hiding behind a string of overwhelming and potentially confusing descriptions. We can talk about this later. So you can cut to the chase and tell everyone how are game works now. Is that okay with you. I always say less is more exactly. Every week we bring onto grownups. One is an expert. Oh man this other one makes me sick to my stomach. The other one is a lie. Yeah that's unfortunate morales. The job of a human child to help us figure out who because no one can spot a liar. Better than a kid. That's got him off. What are we talking about today. Deborah we are lying about underwear clothing. Worn underclothes typically next to the skin. These robots don't have to wear underwear do they. Of course not we choose to wear underwear because it's just gosh darn cozy. I suppose underwear can be really comfortable. That's true underwear is the fitted sheet to my mattress at the cupcake liner to my baking tin. The cotton candy to my clothes dryer. Why do you put cotton candy in the clothes dryer. I think the question should be. Why don't give you put cotton candy in the clothes dryer. Don't you line. you're dryer with cotton candy sir. Clothes smell good. Oh dear. I can't imagine the state of your dryer right now. I'll have to come take a look later but for now we gotta move on lisa. Who is our contestants today. i happen wondering why am i closed. They're so sticky and delicious. Anyway are human child. Contestant is a ten year old who loves learning about space. elena cleveland elaine. Well can how are you today so glad to hear an i also. I'm glad to hear that you love learning about space. Is that true. Yeah a few days ago. I watched the mars lander land on mars. I got really nervous. You got nervous because why were you nervous about it. The rovers are really expensive to make. So i was afraid it might crash. He wanted to college with that river. Did you yeah. Perseverance percy but yeah nice nice so you guys hung out together in school lisa us. That's incredible so that must have been exciting for you to watch to lisa right. Yeah it was. It was really cool. And then i texted him afterwards and he didn't text me back but i don't think it's because he doesn't like that i think it's because he's on mars. Yeah he's probably a little busy too. Yeah so that was really exciting for you to write. Elena yeah yeah. What do you think they're gonna find up there I would've prize of the fine if they find traces of aged life on mars awesome. That would be super cool. Really old people like deborah. Nice people grow robes. Yeah microbes lisa. While that would be amazing do you think they will i deal you do. Oh my gosh. i guess we'll just have to see and then is that something you wanna do as you get older study space. Yeah when i get older. I wanna work at nasa. Oh super cool. That sounds out of this world and elena. What do you know about our topic underwear. Is that something that is close to you close to me. Everyone wears it. So i guess they do a little bit about it. Everyone does because. There's that old phrase in latin simpler. Ub sub ubi which means for all of you. Latin scholars always wear underwear. Just in case. You were wondering. I've taught you something here today. Well maybe not technically okay. Our first expert is cassidy's accurate. Please introduce yourself to elena. Hi elena i am a fashion historian k. Thank you very much now. We are going to our second expert. Zane ashby's ain't these introduce yourself to elena. My name is zane. Ashby an underwear designer. Thank you very much. Let's go sounds mean we need to shift to our next segment right. Lisa pats right. Deborah is What is it called. Oh hotseat time yes. Oh hotseat time that is when we put our experts on the hot seat while they answer questions. Lisa should we put on the huts. He i this one is very tough. Because cassidy's zachary kinda rhymes and. I really liked that. But.

Deborah goldstein zane elena cleveland Elena Lisa cassidy lisa Deborah deborah Zane ashby Ashby elena Lisa pats second expert today Latin latin few days ago mars lander land on first expert
Supreme Glamour, an Interview with Mary Wilson

Dressed: The History of Fashion

05:34 min | 10 months ago

Supreme Glamour, an Interview with Mary Wilson

"Verse seven billion people in the world. We all have one thing in common every day. We all get dressed. Welcome to trust the history of fashion. A podcast where. We explore the who. What when of why we wear. We are fashion stories and your hosts abra callahan and cassidy. Zachary dresses thurs. I know that you will join april. And i when we say that we were both very sad to hear about the fact that miss mary wilson passed away last week at the age of seventy six years old. Yes i was a little heartbroken. I texted you right away. And i was like. Oh so of course miss. Mary was a founding member of the iconic american singing group. The supremes she was there at the beginning of the group in the nineteen fifties and was the last original member in the group when it officially disbanded in one thousand nine hundred seventy seven and she went on to a career as a solo performer motivational speaker author and perhaps unsuspecting archivist. Yes because miss. Mary took it upon herself to preserve the supreme sartorial legacy and her collection of the group's stunning performance ensemble served as the foundation of her two thousand nineteen book co authored with mark. Bego supreme glamour and april. I mean we feel so. Honored chose celebrated fulling episode of dressed with miss mary herself. She came on last season of course to share with us her incredible stories behind the supremes singular style she truly was an inspiring and wonderful woman whose legacy will undoubtedly live on for generations to come. Thank you for joining us stress listeners. In this listen back at our time with the one. The only miss mary wilson. We are super excited to have miss. Mary wilson with us today miss mary. Welcome to dressed. Thank you so much. And i'm glad to be with you. Yeah of this is truly an honor to have you here today. And i have to say i have not been this excited about a book in a very long time. I've i've read a lot of fashion history books and this one is is so beautifully written. It's so beautifully illustrated so many stories so much love and friendship and of course there's so much fashion in this book. It's such a beautiful mosh to your time in the supremes and the clothing. That was part in parcel to that experience. So i'm curious. What inspired you to write this wonderful book. Wow well it was fairly easy. Because i had already written books about the supreme so therefore you know it was one of the things will. My research was not as it didn't take as long because i had so much research from the other books. And you know writing about the supremes and our biography and and talking about how much we had accomplished and our career was a pleasure to actually sit down now and do something not just write about the book but do show pictures and and and the looks and what was behind the singing which was more fashion so it was really a lot of fun. Sort of demonstrating what we did in not just on recording and the music but how we look at how he felt when we were certain count and so was all about the gallons per gallon down to just like we were onto all those years and many of them are in your personal collection cracked. Have i think in the book. There's over twenty four sets of matching onstage on sambas so not just one of the dresses but all three of the dresses. How did you go about comprising this collection. Well First of all we supreme florence ballard diana ross and i would always travel and when we came home from the road we'd have to store the gown and then of course by new gowns or designers with bring us new gowns and some of the old account that we made perhaps worn on television We went to store them. And they accumulated who Throughout all the years right And as you know florence was no longer mcgrew. Diane was no longer in the group. And then we had the seventies supremes And i became sort of like the keeper of of everything and the manager of the trains and all those different things. So i accumulated the gown because of that and whenever anyone would leave As you know a couple of them. Did i ended up with all these counts because no one can take the guy. No one can take the gal with them. You know we the supremes as a group paid for them. And that's how. I ended up with the majority of the gals. Now all other gallons should be in my possession but The reason that i can't tell you how many i have is because many have been not just lost and i won't say stolen you know things have just disappeared. And then some of the places we have them stored you know. I don't i couldn't figure out where everything was stored inside. All these years asked the supreme i have just been Trying to recover those downs that are not in my collection but it really is my collection. Because as i said when i left everything was left to me also should say that even though they were left to me and i had bare instead of three Sometimes i ended up with just one but all three gowns were overset were supposedly with me.

Mary Wilson Abra Callahan Iconic American Singing Group Mary Zachary Cassidy Miss Mary Ballard Diana Ross Mark Mcgrew Diane
"cassidy zachary" Discussed on Dressed: The History of Fashion

Dressed: The History of Fashion

07:01 min | 11 months ago

"cassidy zachary" Discussed on Dressed: The History of Fashion

"It would appear that the nineteen nineties really laid the foundation for what would become this prolific career for yourself that you built for yourself in both costume and fashion design for the stage in the screen. You started your own label. I believe in two thousand and two you also designed for gwen. Stefani's label lamb. You did this show. stopping tour. Drove popstars from lady gaga britney spears multiple shows for cirque. So lay all the while you've been designing rupaul's drag looks for twenty seven years and counting. Is this mutually reinforcing relationship between fashion and costume design. Something you intended or did it. Kind of naturally evolved with your interest in. The opportunities received like a lot of things few decades ago a couple of decades ago. People really liked you to choose like a box. You know like. I am of this you know like and if you are fashion designer what are you doing. Wasting time dressing popstars. You're not serious. Designer ends them some. I fell into it a little bit. You just can't it because you have people are smart people around you encouraging and telling you either experience. What your experiences. But everything is and it's like a different paces than so it's like you know it's like i really started making clothes for popstars making clothes for lady ms cure you know in my early days and then rupaul and all these so i think i had in my mind like a real distinction of lake. There's fashion which was what i set out to do. And then there was costume design and it was like you kind of didn't mix the two but the more and more the i would do fashion the more and more sort of hostage design the world's kept pulling me in and i couldn't say no it was too interesting like you can't say no to gwen stefani like if you went to the line of clothing with me okay. You know you can't say no to doing michael jackson's final tour or like i had apprehension about doing cirque du soleil because i i guess i didn't really know it. I really wasn't paying attention to it so much. I knew what it was. But i hadn't been to show since like oh and i loved it but i felt like it was gonna take me away from something but it really just led me into another part of my life that would really become like at this point more dominant part for now. You never want to put that. Limits of this is who i am now but forever. It is who i am now. It's like i definitely love costume design. And like i think it's because it's like the line is so much fuzzier now like you know whether a costume designer stylist designer fashion designer of. It's like it's really all like it. The creative process and like people are more accepting to like understand the as one thing really you know so i love it. I'm like. I'm so happy that i also got swept into custody. Design communities like a different community. Love it you know. It's like all the people. I've met a whole different world than the fashion world and yet same. I'm such a huge fan of cirque du soleil and you've done i think three shows with them. Now can you tell us a little bit about designing for volta to me. It's compared to the other projects that you've done and you have such incredible resume to me. Cirque du soleil seems like it would be its own entity in that they're defying human capabilities. Basically and what they do and then. The costumes are such an integral part of that story. In the end it really becomes in ultimate combination of expression of leg language. I seek a fashion and costume and music come together. I definitely <hes>. Because my first shows were about. They're both michael jackson themes and maple with so much concentrated his image about fashion. Like i definitely wanted everyone to sort of like connect with the people on stage and in a way that sort of more relatable as allegro. I love this image of these outfits. I want to be this character. You know like. I wanted to feel inspired uncomfortable with the help on stage so much so that they can envision themselves as part of it you know and i think every show. I did that in both. I went even further because there was like a struggle in these <unk>. People's now because there's no music or languages in different words like there is. There is a narrative going on there was more <unk>. Kind of like defining the different parts of yourself in the sort of like finding your freedom at the end of it and it's sort of like defined in three different types of families of <hes>. Sort of like elites and play your everyday city people go about their lives and the people who live off lands on the free spirit so three distinct type characters that kind of needed to tell the story through the colors and textures attitudes <hes>. That they had so dead like at any time. If any of those people are on stage together he was clearly know different families on stage at the same time so i worked really hard to like make great distinctions of lake where elites like the only time we ever see metallic are on is in italy's world so anything that's shiny in hard. Is there in this sort of like everyday world. It's like you know an expiration of gray. Everything is shades of gray. But it's beauty. The constantly go is very fashionable. It's very like cd ends very like tailored in the in the freeze. Its like i might push was making things <hes>. Off of the land so like a lot of the outfits are patterned off of like backpacks like any packs. And you know anoraks in light comedy items. That might be discarded. You might find secondhand that they all get to be put together <hes>. With les seen or crocheting or shredding up the fabric relieving it into like tops for the free spirited. The i only wanted things that they could possibly have made themselves with their own hands. You know so it was. It was a great sort of leg project to explore. Define m and i wish it was still running. You know right now. Meeting with it was doing amazing and getting better every time every time i saw <unk>. Proving on the show but who knows who knows what happens <hes>. hopefully this year. There's something happens.

abra callahan suzanne bartsch three months Paul ten years twenty four hours april matthew iheart app first photo today iheartradio cassidy zachary twenty seven plus year eighties ten April new york first seven billion people
"cassidy zachary" Discussed on Dressed: The History of Fashion

Dressed: The History of Fashion

04:28 min | 1 year ago

"cassidy zachary" Discussed on Dressed: The History of Fashion

"You are here to discuss the peabody essex. Museum latest exhibition the women who revolutionized fashion two hundred and fifty years of design as the title suggests. This is not by any means a small topic. Can you tell us about the exhibit and a little bit about the inspiration behind its creation. Sure absolutely <hes>. So this exhibition actually is a partnership that we did our we're doing i should say <hes>. With the consortium and then hand in the netherlands and it is an extension of a show. They put on called them. Vitol's strong women and fashion and their show then travelled to belgium and we are essentially kind of the third venue. But it's. It's an interesting collaboration because it's not an identical repaying of their show so they're installation on which was was beautiful and spanned multiple rooms in multiple galleries and our show is going to be designed a little bit differently <hes>. And part of reason that we were very excited to partner with consortium is that they're so accommodating on really great partners they allowed us to borrow sixty objects from their election which was huge for us because of course the european collection <unk>. Phenomenal works that represent into the big european designers for which <unk> doesn't have that much representation and but of course being in the united states. We really wanted to draw out of some additional stories that pertain to designers the twentieth century. But also american designers <hes>. For whom there wasn't as much representation in their show the we've been able to augment <hes>. With twenty five works from our own collection some of which are recent acquisitions and <hes>. We borrowed a few pieces from the mfa in boston. We brought to pieces from the chicago history museum and then we're working with <hes>. To private collectors. So there are a hundred eight mannequins in the show. It's a really big show and it does run the gamut. We say two hundred and fifty years. It's not of course the comprehensive look but it does span that timeframe and so why an exhibition dedicated to i mean. This probably goes without saying what inspired you to do. An exhibition dedicated just to women designers. Well that's a great question <hes>. It actually takes me back to a time in chicago. Because i was working at the post. Your museum as the custom curators there and of course as a social history museum we were definitely thinking about a twenty twenty s. A hallmark year for the anniversary of the ratification of the nineteenth amendment. And so even then this back in two thousand seventeen <hes>. By partner just kapoor. And i were already beginning to catacomb the collection and look to see what we might do in honor of women. Because of museum itself was looking to do a year of women based programming and exhibitions. My life changed. Because i. I moved tuesday when massachusetts became the vashon. Tech's curator the peabody essex museum. Is i kind of put that idea dressed. Rest until i was scrolling through instagram. One evening saw me ho. Hey who's curator at the museum post image of stack of books and i noticed all the names on the books. And they were all women designers. She said something pithy like coming soon. And you know a strong women fashion. And so i sent her a direct message and i said hey. Tell me more what is going on. What are you doing when he planning <hes>. And she told me about the show. And i said oh. That's really interesting and said you'll have you ever worked with the us institution before she said. No we haven't <hes>. What would you be interested. And she said yes so. I went and saw the expedition. And i came back and i spoke with our colleagues here in just so happened that we had a are scheduled for twenty twenty and <hes>. We really been thinking at that point about doing anything dedicated to him in and so it all fell into place <hes>. We were slated to open in may but of course because of covid that did not happen. <hes>. but again because we have great partners they were very flexible. And now we're opening number twenty first.

peabody essex museum chicago history museum kunst museum cassidy zachary elizabeth keck salem massachussetts Quant essex pem Lucille gordon bonnie cashin Vitol boston belgium partner Phenomenal united states madeleine
"cassidy zachary" Discussed on Dressed: The History of Fashion

Dressed: The History of Fashion

05:30 min | 1 year ago

"cassidy zachary" Discussed on Dressed: The History of Fashion

"Seven billion people in the world. We all have one thing in common every day. We all get dressed. Welcome to trust the history of fashion. Podcasts are we explore the who what of why we wear. We are fashion historian and your host april kellyanne and cassidy zachary will hello dressed listeners. Today we are very excited to feature an exhibition. That does something that you know. We love to do on dressed. And that is celebrating the work of bad ass ladies from their history and today. And that's right because today we are welcoming the peabody essex museum fashion and textile curator pitcher sling card to the show to discuss. The exhibition. Made it the women who've revolutionized fashion and as the museum's website says through more than one hundred works made it celebrates the stories of women who revolutionized many aspects of the fashion industry and traces how these efforts parallel history of women's global struggle for equity and opportunity exhibition is actually collaboration between pem and the kunst museum didn't hog in the netherlands and it features clothing from both of these museums collections. As well as from private and public collections and so from every designer from elizabeth keck lead to lady. Lucille gordon to madeleine to bonnie cashin and low mary. Quant and then all the way to more contemporary designers like rei kawakubo <hes>. Irishman herpin gina. Kuma you do not want to miss this exhibition. It actually just opened in its on view until march twenty twenty one yes and alas we will not be able to make it to salem massachussetts in person this year especially right now so what better way to celebrate this exhibition them by being joined by his co. curator patriot. Welcome to the show. He had show welcome to dress. It's such a pleasure to have you here today thank you. I'm excited to be with you. So you are here to discuss the peabody essex. Museum latest exhibition the women who revolutionized fashion two hundred and fifty years of design as the title suggests. This is not by any means a small topic. Can you tell us about the exhibit and a little bit about the inspiration behind its creation. Sure absolutely <hes>. So this exhibition actually is a partnership that we did our we're doing i should say <hes>. With the consortium and then hand in the netherlands and it is an extension of a show. They put on called them. Vitol's strong women and fashion and their show then travelled to belgium and we are essentially kind of the third venue. But it's. It's an interesting collaboration because it's not an identical repaying of their show so they're installation on which was was beautiful and spanned multiple rooms in multiple galleries and our show is going to be designed a little bit differently <hes>. And part of reason that we were very excited to partner with consortium is that they're so accommodating on really great partners they allowed us to borrow sixty objects from their election which was huge for us because of course the european collection <unk>. Phenomenal works that represent into the big european designers for which <unk> doesn't have that much representation and but of course being in the united states. We really wanted to draw out of some additional stories that pertain to designers the twentieth century. But also american designers <hes>. For whom there wasn't as much representation in their show the we've been able to augment <hes>. With twenty five works from our own collection some of which are recent acquisitions and <hes>. We borrowed a few pieces from the mfa in boston. We brought to pieces from the chicago history museum and then we're working with <hes>. To private collectors. So there are a hundred eight mannequins in the show. It's a really big show and it does run the gamut. We say two hundred and fifty years. It's not of course the comprehensive look but it does span that timeframe and so why an exhibition dedicated to i mean. This probably goes without saying what inspired you to do. An exhibition dedicated just to women designers. Well that's a great question <hes>. It actually takes me back to a time in chicago. Because i was working at the post. Your museum as the custom curators there and of course as a social history museum we were definitely thinking about a twenty twenty s. A hallmark year for the anniversary of the ratification of the nineteenth amendment. And so even then this back in two thousand seventeen <hes>. By partner just kapoor. And i were already beginning to catacomb the collection and look to see what we might do in honor of women. Because of museum itself was looking to do a year of women based programming and exhibitions. My life changed. Because i. I moved tuesday when massachusetts became the vashon. Tech's curator the peabody essex museum. Is i kind of put that idea dressed. Rest until i was scrolling through instagram. One evening saw me ho. Hey who's curator at the museum post image of stack of books and i noticed all the names on the books. And they were all women designers. She said something pithy like coming soon. And you know a strong women fashion.

peabody essex museum united states Tech england chicago massachusetts partner vashon twenty twenty
The Women Who Revolutionized Fashion with Petra Slinkard

Dressed: The History of Fashion

05:30 min | 1 year ago

The Women Who Revolutionized Fashion with Petra Slinkard

"Seven billion people in the world. We all have one thing in common every day. We all get dressed. Welcome to trust the history of fashion. Podcasts are we explore the who what of why we wear. We are fashion historian and your host april kellyanne and cassidy zachary will hello dressed listeners. Today we are very excited to feature an exhibition. That does something that you know. We love to do on dressed. And that is celebrating the work of bad ass ladies from their history and today. And that's right because today we are welcoming the peabody essex museum fashion and textile curator pitcher sling card to the show to discuss. The exhibition. Made it the women who've revolutionized fashion and as the museum's website says through more than one hundred works made it celebrates the stories of women who revolutionized many aspects of the fashion industry and traces how these efforts parallel history of women's global struggle for equity and opportunity exhibition is actually collaboration between pem and the kunst museum didn't hog in the netherlands and it features clothing from both of these museums collections. As well as from private and public collections and so from every designer from elizabeth keck lead to lady. Lucille gordon to madeleine to bonnie cashin and low mary. Quant and then all the way to more contemporary designers like rei kawakubo Irishman herpin gina. Kuma you do not want to miss this exhibition. It actually just opened in its on view until march twenty twenty one yes and alas we will not be able to make it to salem massachussetts in person this year especially right now so what better way to celebrate this exhibition them by being joined by his co. curator patriot. Welcome to the show. He had show welcome to dress. It's such a pleasure to have you here today thank you. I'm excited to be with you. So you are here to discuss the peabody essex. Museum latest exhibition the women who revolutionized fashion two hundred and fifty years of design as the title suggests. This is not by any means a small topic. Can you tell us about the exhibit and a little bit about the inspiration behind its creation. Sure absolutely So this exhibition actually is a partnership that we did our we're doing i should say With the consortium and then hand in the netherlands and it is an extension of a show. They put on called them. Vitol's strong women and fashion and their show then travelled to belgium and we are essentially kind of the third venue. But it's. It's an interesting collaboration because it's not an identical repaying of their show so they're installation on which was was beautiful and spanned multiple rooms in multiple galleries and our show is going to be designed a little bit differently And part of reason that we were very excited to partner with consortium is that they're so accommodating on really great partners they allowed us to borrow sixty objects from their election which was huge for us because of course the european collection Phenomenal works that represent into the big european designers for which doesn't have that much representation and but of course being in the united states. We really wanted to draw out of some additional stories that pertain to designers the twentieth century. But also american designers For whom there wasn't as much representation in their show the we've been able to augment With twenty five works from our own collection some of which are recent acquisitions and We borrowed a few pieces from the mfa in boston. We brought to pieces from the chicago history museum and then we're working with To private collectors. So there are a hundred eight mannequins in the show. It's a really big show and it does run the gamut. We say two hundred and fifty years. It's not of course the comprehensive look but it does span that timeframe and so why an exhibition dedicated to i mean. This probably goes without saying what inspired you to do. An exhibition dedicated just to women designers. Well that's a great question It actually takes me back to a time in chicago. Because i was working at the post. Your museum as the custom curators there and of course as a social history museum we were definitely thinking about a twenty twenty s. A hallmark year for the anniversary of the ratification of the nineteenth amendment. And so even then this back in two thousand seventeen By partner just kapoor. And i were already beginning to catacomb the collection and look to see what we might do in honor of women. Because of museum itself was looking to do a year of women based programming and exhibitions. My life changed. Because i. I moved tuesday when massachusetts became the vashon. Tech's curator the peabody essex museum. Is i kind of put that idea dressed. Rest until i was scrolling through instagram. One evening saw me ho. Hey who's curator at the museum post image of stack of books and i noticed all the names on the books. And they were all women designers. She said something pithy like coming soon. And you know a strong women fashion.

April Kellyanne Cassidy Zachary Essex Museum Kunst Museum Elizabeth Keck Lucille Gordon Bonnie Cashin Low Mary The Netherlands Vitol Madeleine Gina Salem Chicago History Museum Belgium MFA United States Boston Kapoor
"cassidy zachary" Discussed on Dressed: The History of Fashion

Dressed: The History of Fashion

04:36 min | 1 year ago

"cassidy zachary" Discussed on Dressed: The History of Fashion

"Seven billion people in the world, we all have one thing in common. Every day. We all get dressed welcome to trust the history of fashion a podcast where we explore the WHO what when of why we wear, we are fashion, Estonians and Abra Callahan. Cassidy Zachary. Levi to the show dress listeners today we continue on with our conversation with Anna Jackson. Had of the Asian.

Abra Callahan Cassidy Zachary Anna Jackson Levi
"cassidy zachary" Discussed on Dressed: The History of Fashion

Dressed: The History of Fashion

04:38 min | 1 year ago

"cassidy zachary" Discussed on Dressed: The History of Fashion

"We turn our attention to the Harlem Renaissance very exciting time and place in one, thousand, nine, hundred, thousand New York and a place in which black Danny's played in especially pivotal role within black modernism and the making of the so-called quote unquote, new, Negro, where other scholars have argued that black dandyism during this period stood in direct opposition to black modernism. And what ways do you actually think it defined it? It's something that you coin as a freedom dream. Yeah I mean I. Talk About kind of Dan Black Dandyism and And Freedom James as different ways, in which the the freedom dream manifest right I think over time, and over historical time I mean. The renaissance is an amazing period in that regard. As I mentioned before it's the first time large numbers of black moved to urban areas and <hes>, and are able to establish really large scale, black communities, and what that means is people had been working in their home communities in small ways, some small and large ways for <hes> striving to do better striving for more right in various ways, striving to be different right to. To not be defined by the ways in which blackness have been defined for them during slavery and its aftermath reconstruction. I mean it's as constant struggle for black people to get out from under in some ways the waste black people are being represented the ways in which they're being treated by various institutions. Right, it's it's always about moving toward the ability to self define. And it becomes Harlem in the nineteen tens. Twenties Early Nineteen Thirties becomes this place where that for the first time for many People Harlem in Chicago and Boston and other places in Detroit Washington DC around the same time become these places when it seems possible for the first time, it seems possible because let people are gathered in community large community, in which all kinds of ideas about choice about different kinds of choices about how are we going to be black? However, we going to be black women. However, we in what how do we think about? About blackness in relationships sexuality, how do we WANNA do like? How do we WANNA? Do any of this? What about black art? What does that mean right <unk> artists, or are we black artists, right? What kind of responsibilities do we have to our communities? What kind of responsibilities do we have to ourselves? Can we actually afford to have responsibility to? These are all kinds of questions that people were able to ask individually, and with each other for the first time, so the dandyism comes into this kind of fascinating way, because on the one hand. Hand there there are some actors right in the renaissance. Who who want to there's this constant riffing that goes on in American culture that has to do with black representation in black people, so on the one hand black dandies come in as a critique of Minstrelsy, right. They're like. Oh, you think a black dandy. Is that? Let me show you right. The another way of Black Dandy can be right. I can have this fancy clothing I can have this education I can have this kind of like social life. I can have all of this, let. Let me. Show you that right, so there's one that's one version of it. Then there's a divorce version of it who is completely much more interested although it slide sometimes in respectability culture, it's I am going to respect my people and I'm going to be respected by majority culture, and this is the way that I'm going to represent myself right and <hes> and my aspiration. It's not just about pleasing you majority culture, but it's also about pleasing myself and understanding that I have a right to this. That's not just about a response to you. Then there are other kinds of people who are just you know really exuberant about the ways in which blackness maternity can go like. It's a huge time of experimentation again one of these moments of social upheaval, or in which we think about the jazz, ages and swaying like renaissance in Jazz. Age Are Co terminal. WHICH PEOPLE ARE EXPERIMENTING WITH GENDER? They're experimenting with sexuality. This is a period in which immigration to the US is experimenting with <hes> with class boundaries right so so there's this way which all of these things come together to create multiple kinds of black dandies who are in some ways conversation with each other <hes> and in conversation with both black culture right as well as majority culture, asking the question. What does a modern black person look like? What can that person embody? How is that person's embodied? And what relationship does clothing play to that? As again is kind of social semiotics that is constantly capable of being read and sending out messages

Black Dandies Dan Black Dandyism Harlem Monica L. Miller Harlem Renaissance Callaghan Cassidy Zachary Jorie Early Nineteen Thirties James Weldon Johnson infantry regiment Century Europe New York Minstrelsy US America Lacey Danny Congress Detroit France
Could California Get an Autobahn?

BrainStuff

05:55 min | 2 years ago

Could California Get an Autobahn?

"Today's episode was brought to you by the new Capital One saver card with which you can earn four percent cashback on dining and entertainment. That means four percent on checking out that new restaurant everyone's talking about and four percent on watching your team win at home. You'll also earn two percent cashback at grocery stores and one percent on all other purchases. Now when you go out you cash in what's in your wallet? Welcome to brain stuff from how stuff works. Hey, brain stuff, Lauren Bogle bomb here. Germany is known for several awesome things including veer brats. And of course, the autobahn bundles Audubon as it's known in Germany is really just if federal highway system there, but to visitors the allure of the autobahn is the speed limit or lack of one cars can top two hundred forty kilometers per hour during normal conditions on this famed freeway that's about one hundred fifty miles per hour. And now, a California legislator is proposing. A Bill that could make the state home to what is being called the American autobahn John Morlock, the Republican state Senator from Orange County introduced state Bill three nineteen in February of two thousand nineteen to relieve traffic congestion along interstate five and state route ninety nine according to the proposed plan both roadways would get new lanes. One northbound and one southbound drivers in the new lanes would not have to abide by a speed limit though, the existing sixty five miles per hour. Limit would remain in effect in the. The existing lanes that's about one hundred and five kilometers per hour. The idea also could provide an alternative California's controversial long-delayed and possibly canceled high speed rail project the proposal comes on the heels of California governor Gavin Newsom announcement that the bullet train as planned is too expensive at an estimated cost of seventy seven billion dollars and would take too long to build. There are no official cost estimates for the Audubon Bill, but in February Senator Morlock told the Los Angeles Times it could cost about three billion dollars. He also said the money would come from the states cap and trade program which requires companies to offset pollution by purchasing credits. If plans move forward the American auto Bahn would be constructed along major freeways with Bela Bach area, which is about eighty miles or one hundred twenty nine kilometers north of Los Angeles at the southern point in Sacramento or Stockton. At the northern end that means theoretically vehicles travelling north at one hundred miles per hour. In the unrestricted lane could make the trip from Sacramento. Tila Beck in about three hours coin that Dr takes over four hours well over depending on traffic. Aside from improving drive times for those along that route the authors of the Bill claim it would also help reduce congestion, which would in turn decrease greenhouse gas emissions from vehicles stuck idling for that reason. The Bill specifies that funding should come from California's greenhouse gas reduction fund which regularly supports transportation and transit projects that reduce pollution. Critics point out. However, the missions go up at high speeds, so encouraging people to drive faster means there wouldn't be any net reduction in pollution, in fact, Bill maga- Vern a spokesperson for the coalition for clean air told SF gate that the net reduction in emissions theory is ridiculous. In addition to the pollution, concerns. Critics are also worried about the risks. To drivers Maureen vocal a spokeswoman for the national safety council told USA today that numerous studies demonstrate that Wednesday's raised speed limits. They can expect an increase in traffic fatalities statistics from the US National Highway Traffic Safety Administration show that in two thousand seventeen speeding was a factor. In twenty six percent of all traffic fatalities that accounts for nearly ten thousand deaths. Several states across the US have increased speed limits. For instance, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, South Dakota, Texas, Utah and Wyoming allow drivers to travel eighty miles per hour on certain highways and Texas allows eighty-five miles per hour along a specific stretch of state highway one thirty that's up to about one hundred and thirty seven kilometers per hour. However, the current maximum speed limit in California is still seventy miles per hour about one hundred thirteen kilometers per hour. With some stretches along the proposed Audubon. Route a little bit lower. Californian's shouldn't get too excited. Though, yet the Bill has a long way before ever becoming law and may never get there. If it passes the vote in the states house and Senate it must then be approved by governor Newsom. For contrast Germany's autobahn covers seven thousand five hundred miles. That's about twelve thousand kilometers, and there are some sections with speed limits. New drivers in Germany are actually trained on the autobahn to learn how to handle the high speeds and the country's licensing process. A lot more difficult time consuming and expensive than it is in the United States if California's autobahn gets approved this three hundred some mile stretch of road might only be a start to a larger system. Today's episode was written by cherise three wit and produced by Tyler clang for I heart media, and how stuff works for more in this in lots of other topics. Visit our home planet. How stuff works dot com. Hebron stuff instead of an ad today. I wanted to tell you about another podcast that I think you might like dressed the history of fashion, join fashion historians, April Callaghan and Cassidy Zachary twice a week as they explore. The who what when and why of what we wear the history of fashion is a history of capitalism and culture, power dynamics in gender relations of politics, religion, and technology, full episodes drop on Tuesdays and beginning with season to April and Cassidy answer your questions in a fashion history mystery, Minnesota every Thursday find dressed the history of fashion on apple podcasts the iheartradio app or wherever you get your podcasts.

California United States Germany Senator Morlock Bill Maga- Vern Capital One Bill Sacramento Gavin Newsom Audubon Los Angeles Times Lauren Bogle Cassidy Zachary Tila Beck Bela Bach Orange County Tyler Clang Los Angeles
"cassidy zachary" Discussed on The Brooklyn Boys Podcast

The Brooklyn Boys Podcast

02:23 min | 2 years ago

"cassidy zachary" Discussed on The Brooklyn Boys Podcast

"I am a fan of the politics. I hate politics. I know and I love him at least political person you'll ever meet about lease political person. But you're up there. What are you searching for? You're looking for something in the computer, none of Brodie's at the controls. If you could tell you can't tell Janice smoothie shit today on the show. So here's a pulse. So whatever political party your into or whatever type of politician, you're into you may have rules in your mind. Like, oh, you know what I found out? They did drugs. They're out or I found out that they were anti woman in the seventies. And they're out. So I'm watching. Particular person who's running for president in the past week. I'm not going to get into it. Obviously there are democrat. 'cause there's only one Republican at this point who might be running for president so far. And in their rally twice. They said I could care less about something. We know it's I couldn't care. Right. So that person I vote for them. They could be the best candidate. I can't vote for them. I can't have it. I can't vote for someone to be in the White House. That says I could care less because they don't mean that if I can't trust them with the English language. I can't trust them with our government and our taxes discuss times to you know, the way that you hire interns, disqualify that hire the best interns, great inter off of a grammatical center. You discount people? Errors what we talking about? Like if you should run for the highest office and represent our country. I don't want you flying to Japan and the translator translates, I could care less and the Japanese president says who I think he means I couldn't careless. So he's out that particular candidate is out. Yes. It's a he. All right, there you go. That's it. That's those are my spills that that and the breakfast club a hell of a spiel, man. All right. We I was like, oh, I got plenty of plenty of stuff. You got a lot of stuff. But last week I read a list I got a longer list from last week. We're just getting started. We got the reason I played Neil, Patrick, Harris clip. Is it you're at a party? Yes, at Neil, Patrick Harris was at yes, I was and we'll talk about that coming up next, April Callaghan and Cassidy Zachary, we are fashioned historians and together, we host dressed the history of fashion a podcast. We explore the who what why we.

president Patrick Harris Neil Brodie Janice White House April Callaghan Japan Cassidy Zachary
What Can Earth's Deserts Teach Us About Martian Life?

BrainStuff

06:38 min | 2 years ago

What Can Earth's Deserts Teach Us About Martian Life?

"Hey brain stuff instead of an ad today. I wanted to tell you about another podcast that I think you might like dressed the history of fashion, join fashion historians, April Callaghan and Cassidy Zachary twice a week as they explore. The who what when and why of what we wear the history of fashion is a history of capitalism and culture, power dynamics in gender relations of politics, religion, and technology, full episodes drop on Tuesdays and beginning with season to April and Cassidy answer your questions in a fashion history mystery, Minnesota every Thursday find dressed the history of fashion on apple podcasts the iheartradio app or wherever you get your podcasts. Welcome to brain stuff from how stuff works. Hey, rain stuff, Lauren Vogel bomb here when it comes to searching for microbes on Mars, sending robotic Rover to the most arid environment on earth is a fine place to start as described in a study recently published in the journal frontiers in microbiology a team of researchers explored the extreme environment of Chile's Atacama desert. They wanted to develop strategies that future robotic explorers could use to seek out the hiding places of Marchin microbes in two thousand twenty both NASA and the European Space Agency will launch their first life hunting Rovers to the red planet. The Mars twenty twenty and Exo Mars Rover missions respectively. So mission managers will need to know where to look the other comma desert is about as extreme as it gets for life to eke out an existence not only is the region bone-dry. The core of the desert doesn't get any rainfall for decades at a time, but because of its elevation it also receives high levels of damaging all tra-, violet radiation. Plus, the soil is extremely salty these. Factors should make the Atacama desert toxic for life. But according to team leader Stephane pointing a professor at Yale and u s college in Singapore, some of the bacteria just below the surface quote survive right at the limit of bid ability, and this is very good news for the prospect of finding microbes on Mars pointing team deployed an autonomous Rover mounted drill and sampling device in the Atacama desert to see if it could extract soil samples containing microbes down to a depth of eighty centimeters. That's a little over two and a half feet as a comparison samples were also dug up by hand through DNA sequencing, the researchers found that the bacterial life in the samples from both methods were similar confirming that these hardy bacteria exist, and the autonomous extraction method was successful this test run Shore's up hope that if similarly hardy microbes also thrived just below the Martian surface, a robot could find them, however, finding microbial bio signatures on Mars could be very challenging for remotely operated. Mars rover. The researchers found that the subsurface. Population of bacteria were extremely patchy correlating with increased salt levels that restricted the availability of water appointing put it this way, the patchy nature of the colonization just the Rover would be faced with a needle in haystack scenario in the search for Martian bacteria. Previous studies have described the BIC witness population of relatively unremarkable photosynthetic bacteria. The populate the surface of the desert in Chile, these microorganisms that get their energy from sunlight things start to get a lot more interesting and indeed more alien just below the surface pointing said we saw that with increasing depth that the bacterial community became dominated by 'Bacterial that can thrive in extremely salty and alkaline soils. They in turn were replaced adepts down to eighty centimeters by a single specific group of bacteria that survive by metabolising methane. These specialized microbes have been found before in deep mineshafts and other subterranean environments, but they've never been seen beneath the surface of an arid desert pointing said the communities of bacteria that we discovered were remarkably lacking in complexity and this likely reflects the extreme stress under which they develop. Finding highly specialized microbes that can thrive in the extremely dry salty and alkaline Mars lake soils in the comma desert suggest methane utilizing bacteria could also thrive on the red planet. Elevated levels of methane have been observed on Mars by various spacecraft over the years most recently measures made by Nasr's curiosity Rover, and that's a big deal, unearth, biological and geological processes generate methane and intern microbes can metabolize methane for energy. The discovery of methane in the Martian atmosphere. Could mean there's some kind of active biology going on under ground to confirm this. We need microbe seeking missions that will drill below the surface. And now we have a strategy to track them down should microbial life on Mars. It would undoubtedly be the most significant scientific discovery in human history. But in the proud human tradition of naming new things, what would we call our newly discovered? Marsh neighbors, would we just copy the system of how we name life honor pointing said the way we assign Latin names too. S real bacteria is based on their evolutionary relationship tweets other. And we measure that using their genetic code the naming of Martian bacteria would require a completely new set of Latin names at the highest level if Martian bacteria were a completely separate nary lineage that is they evolved from a different common ancestor to earth bacteria in a second Genesis event. Granted if we find the genetic code of Mars life to be similar to earth life. It could be that life was transferred from earth to Mars in the ancient past via a massive impact a mechanism known as panspermia. But if we find a truly novel genetic code that emerged on Mars, the implications for understanding of life would be profound pointing said if we find truly native Marsh and bacteria, I would love to name one and call it. Planeta desert him superstars, which translates in Latin to survivor on the desert planet. Today's episode was written by Ian, O'Neill and produced by Tyler claim for I heart media, and how stuff works for more on this and lots of other hearty, topics. Visit our home planet. Testif- works dot com. Hey brain stuff instead of an ad today. I wanted to tell you about another podcast that I think you might like dressed the history of fashion, join fashion historians, April Callaghan and Cassidy Zachary twice a week as they explore. The who what when and why of what we wear the history of fashion is a history of capitalism and culture, power dynamics in gender relations of politics, religion, and technology, full episodes drop on Tuesdays and beginning with season to April and Cassidy answer your questions in a fashion history mystery Minnie's Minnesota every Thursday find dressed the history of fashion on apple podcasts the iheartradio app or wherever you get your podcasts.

Cassidy Zachary Atacama April Callaghan Mars Lake Chile Minnesota Apple Marchin Lauren Vogel Testif Yale Nasa Singapore Shore Team Leader European Space Agency Planeta Stephane Nasr
Why Is NASA Going Back to the Moon?

BrainStuff

05:55 min | 3 years ago

Why Is NASA Going Back to the Moon?

"Today's episode is brought to you by listerine ready tabs small discrete tabs, the transform from a solid to a liquid just to switch and swallow no sink required to get that just brushed clean feeling, and they pack a huge punch up to four hours of fresh breath, and the confidence that goes with it on the go wherever life takes you to a surprise meeting a date you want to freshen up for or just from one event to another try listerine ready tabs today. Find them near the mouthwash. Welcome to brain stuff from how stuff works. He brain stuff, Lauren Vogel bomb here. Nasa has announced that selected a dozen payloads of scientific equipment that it plans to fly to the moon on private commercial rockets and Landers the missions planned for later in two thousand nineteen are an early step toward achieving the space. Agency's overarching goal to send astronauts backed the moon via commercial space craft in twenty Twenty-eight necessary renewed focus on the moon reflects a late 2017 policy shift by the Trump administration which decided that these space agencies should return to the moon, which was last visited by Paolo seventeen astronauts back in December of nineteen seventy two. Previously. The Obama administration had abandoned a planned lunar mission, partly because of cost in favor of focusing upon going to Mars in the twenty thirties. We spoke with Steve Clark the deputy associate administrator for exploration in Nasr's science mission. Directorate he explained that the missions flown by commercial lunar payload services will include a mixture of scientific instruments and technology demonstrations, he said we want to fly a mixture as much as we can. So they collectively can provide data to the science community and to the folks who are designing the next human Lander the scientific instruments sent to the moon will be Clark said trying to characterize lunar surface looking for hydrogen molecules and actual traces of water or water ice in the soil and looking for various other elements there on the lunar surface. But those studies will do more than just add to our knowledge of earth's natural satellite. Nasa administrator, Jim Bryden Stein said in a press release. We know they're volatile is at the polls on the moon. Dan, and quite frankly that water ice could represent rocket fuel. If we have the capacity to generate rocket fuel from the surface of the moon and get them into orbit around the moon. We could use that to build a fuelling depot. On the technology side. One payload will include solar energy technology to attempt to advance the engineering of solar cells, hopefully, making the more efficient that open space missions that are dependent upon solar energy, but the work will have applications back on earth as well. Other technology being tested involves entry descent and landing systems, which will help improve the design of future lunar Landers, including the human Lander that eventually will take astronauts to lunar surface again necessary long range plan also calls for building a lunar orbital station in the twenty twenties which will serve as a platform. Both poor observing the lunar surface and staging manned exploration missions haven't instruments on the lunar surface as well as in orbit around the moon. We'll give humanity to new valuable vantage points from which to explore the moon and beyond unlike the Apollo program, the commercial space industry will be heavily involved in the effort. Transporting astronauts to the orbital station end down to the surface the agency. He already has announced plans to work with space companies to develop reusable lunar Landers those spacecraft could shuttle back and forth between the lunar orbital platform and the surface of the moon. We also spoke by E mail with Dale Scranton, the executive vice president of the national space Sidey, which is a nonprofit group whose goal is to promote a spacefaring civilization. He said that they support Nasr's strategy, quote, the fundamental advantage of a lunar orbital system in these support of lunar exploration and development is that it can be a gas station where reusable lunar Landers dock and are refueled NASA recently announced human land, a reference design, which features to reasonable components. The ascent stage and space tug along with a tanker to bring fuel to the lunar orbital station are constructive, but partial step in this direction at this point scrammed says that putting boots on the moon in the near future. No longer should be viewed as a desirable goal in itself. But rather as a means to further a larger plan of space colonization? He said humans on the moon should grow organically out of what we are doing on the moon not appear as a stunt and imitation of Apollo a to potential goals for lunar return include mining oxygen to fuel future Mars trips and building a radio telescope on the dark side of the moon to take advantage of the unique radio quiet on the side of the moon phases away from earth. Both of these goals will almost certainly include humans on the lunar surface. But boots are not the primary goal. We will certainly keep you in the loop. As more news comes to light. Today's episode was written by Patrick Jake, Hyder and produced by Tyler clang iheartmedia, and how stuff works for more on this. Unless of other topics that more than scratched the surface. Visit our home planet. How stuff works dot com. Hebron stuff instead of an ad today. I wanted to tell you about another podcast that I think you might like dressed the history of fashion, join fashion historians, April Callaghan and Cassidy Zachary twice a week as they explore. The who what when and why of what we wear the history of fashion is a history of capitalism and culture, power dynamics in gender relations of politics, religion, and technology, full episodes drop on Tuesdays and beginning with season to April and Cassidy answer your questions in a fashion history mystery, Minnesota every Thursday find dressed the history of fashion on apple podcasts the iheartradio app or wherever you get your podcasts.

Nasa Steve Clark Cassidy Zachary Lauren Vogel Landers Nasa Administrator Nasr Obama Administration Paolo Jim Bryden Stein Associate Administrator April Callaghan Minnesota DAN
How Has the HANS Device Improved Car Racing?

BrainStuff

04:32 min | 3 years ago

How Has the HANS Device Improved Car Racing?

"Today's episode is brought to you by listerine ready tabs small discrete tabs, the transform from a solid to a liquid just to switch and swallow no sink required to get that just brushed clean feeling, and they pack a huge punch up to four hours of fresh breath, and the confidence that goes with it on the go wherever life takes you to a surprise meeting a date you want to freshen up for or just from one event to another try listen ready tabs today. Find them near the mouthwash. Welcome to brain stuff from how stuff works. Hey, brain stuff, Lauren vocal bomb here in the early days of car racing. Even a minor accident could be fatal. For example, Patrick Jack mart was killed at mid Ohio in one thousand nine hundred one after a head on collision with a Bank his car was left relatively unscathed. But Jack Martin ended up with a skull fracture caused severe brain damage lucky for other racers to of Jack marts friends stepped in and created a safety device that has changed the sport of car racing forever. Those friends were Jim downing and Jack marts brother-in-law Dr Bob Hubbard the two decided to combine Downing's knowledge of racing and Hubbard's expertise in engineering and skull anatomy to develop new safety gear to try to prevent deaths like Jack marks from happening. Again, these simple and effective invention. They created became known as the Hans device short for head and neck support. The Hans device isn't like a car airbag, which inflates a cushion to stop the driver in case of a collision. Instead, the Hans device pro. Actively uses a raised collar and two tethers to secure the driver's head. In other words, it's a shoulder collar that attached to both the car seats safety harness and the driver's helmet in the event of a crash. It keeps the racers head and neck properly aligned with the torso preventing the type of excess force that would otherwise result in serious or fatal neck and head injuries. But it took years for the Hans device to become a financial success. And unfortunately, it took the death of a high profile racer for NASCAR to take notice. When Dale Earnhardt senior was killed in two thousand one in a crash similar to Jack marts at the Daytona International Speedway the race and community including NASCAR finally took the Hans device seriously. Now, most recent organizations require the use of a Hans device for all drivers. The Hans device is specifically designed to prevent Basler skull. Fractures, those injuries are caused when a car suddenly decelerate s- in earnhardt's fatal crash Daytona. For instance, NASCAR determined. That he hit the wall going one hundred and sixty miles per hour. That's two hundred and fifty seven kilometers per hour and slowed by somewhere between forty two to forty four miles per hour about sixty seven to seventy kilometers per hour in just eighty milliseconds. This sudden deceleration is known as the delta v literally the change in velocity. A while. It's difficult to provide exact statistics on how many lives have been saved by the Hans device. We do know this NASCAR where certified hands are mandatory did not have one single driver fatality in the decade after earnhardt's death. Whereas there were one hundred twenty six deaths from crashes on drag strips and short tracks where hints devices are not required and hands estimates that of those one hundred twenty six deaths as many as twenty seven percent that's thirty four driver deaths could have been prevented by using the device, and no driver in an IndyCar or an any of nascar's major series has been killed by Basler skull fracture since it required. The use of the device. This episode was written by trees three wit and produced by Tyler clang for I heart media, and how stuff works for more on this and lots of other topics. Visit our home planet. Testif- works dot com. Hey brain stuff instead of an ad today. I wanted to tell you about another podcast that I think you might like dressed the history of fashion, join fashion historians, April Callaghan and Cassidy Zachary twice a week as they explore. The who what when and why of what we wear the history of fashion is a history of capitalism and culture, power dynamics in gender relations of politics, religion, and technology, full episodes drop on Tuesdays and beginning with season to April and Cassidy answer your questions in a fashion history mystery, Minnesota every Thursday find dressed the history of fashion on apple podcasts the iheartradio app or wherever you get your podcasts.

Nascar Dale Earnhardt Jack Marts Patrick Jack Mart Hans Jack Martin Jim Downing Cassidy Zachary Dr Bob Hubbard Daytona Ohio April Callaghan Daytona International Speedway Testif Minnesota Tyler Clang Indycar Apple
Why Do Flying Squirrels Glow Hot Pink in UV Light?

BrainStuff

04:40 min | 3 years ago

Why Do Flying Squirrels Glow Hot Pink in UV Light?

"Today's episode is brought to you by smart water twenty years ago. Smart water, reimagined, what water could be from thoughtful bottle designed to supporting smart people who are changing our world through fresh thinking. Like, you smart water has added electrolytes for taste and great tasting water helps you stay hydrated, feeling refreshed and ready to take on your day. Refresh yourself with smart water. Welcome to brain stuff from how stuff works. Hey, rain stuff, Lauren Vogel. Bam here. It's amazing. What you can find. If you shine a flashlight into your backyard trees, a biologist in Wisconsin have made a rather startling discovery that way in part startling because it apparently hadn't been recorded until now three different species of flying. Squirrels specifically southern northern and Humboldt flying squirrel, which are found across North America and into Central America sport light Brown for that when spotlighted with ultra-violet illumination lights up a hot bubblegum pink the phenomenon occurs on both the top and bottom services of the flying. Squirrels though, it's the underside of a flying. Squirrels carriage, including the flaps of skin that spread out when the squirrel glides from tree to tree really glows Jonathan Martin a biologist at Northland college in Ashland. Wisconsin made the discovery in the forest one evening just by shining a UV flashlight into the tree canopy he was looking for lichens, which are certain type. Of frogs and flora that light up in UV light. That's when he heard the church of a southern flying, squirrel as the squirrel glided by he shined the flashlight on it. And he saw a flash of fuchsia. Martin and his colleagues soon found themselves examining the skins of flying. Squirrels at the science museum of Minnesota. And the field museum in Chicago. They took photos of the skins under visible, light and ultra violet light all but one specimen of the gliders glowed pink that has been variously compared to bubble gum dayglo and lycra from the nineteen eighty s there is also the study republished in the January twenty third twenty nineteen issue of the journal of Malecki, the pink is caused the researchers say by the furs fluorescence, which is what happens when light is absorbed in one wavelength and emitted in another you may remember an episode. We did about how scorpions fluorescent bright green and ultraviolet light some birds also have this trait some fish too few mammals do though flying. Squirrels are nocturnal and are most active at dusk and dawn, no other squirrels in North America are known to possess this ability to floor s including tree squirrels like the eastern gray though, there are over. Two hundred and fifty squirrel species around the world and to be fair. The researchers have not yet tested other species for the next question is what purpose could this fluorescent serve. Humans can't see ultraviolet wavelengths except under special lighting, but other animals can one theory suggests the pink is used to confuse als, which as it turns out also have undersides that Flores a similar pink ELS prey on flying. Squirrels among other mammals, perhaps the squirrels evolved to mimic als. So as not to be eaten by them another theory, which is already being challenged is that the pink attracts potential mates a flying. Squirrels have mating seasons. But their flamboyant fluorescence is available for viewing year round. Anyway, it's not even clear that squirrels can see in UV wavelengths. Ultimately, the researchers point out that age old impetus of science, this is proof of how much we don't know and still need to learn the study concluded the ecological significance of this. Trait warrants further investigation. Today's episode was written by Jimmy Allen and produced by Tyler clang for I heart media, and how stuff works for more on this and lots of other topics. Visit our home planet has to works dot com. Hebron stuff instead of an ad today. I wanted to tell you about another podcast that I think you might like dressed the history of fashion, join fashion historians, April Callaghan and Cassidy Zachary twice a week as they explore. The who what when and why of what we wear the history of fashion is a history of capitalism and culture, power dynamics in gender relations of politics, religion, and technology, full episodes drop on Tuesdays and beginning with season to April and Cassidy answer your questions in a fashion history mystery, Minnesota every Thursday find dressed the history of fashion on apple podcasts the iheartradio app or wherever you get your podcasts.

Wisconsin Jonathan Martin Cassidy Zachary Science Museum Of Minnesota Lauren Vogel Journal Of Malecki Field Museum Humboldt North America April Callaghan Ashland Minnesota Chicago Jimmy Allen Flores Northland College Apple Tyler Clang
Karl May and the Winnetou series

Behind the Bastards

04:05 min | 3 years ago

Karl May and the Winnetou series

Carl Friedrich German Germany Lacy Saxony Robert Evans Genoa Italy Jake April Callaghan France Cassidy Zachary Writer Tinder Iran Hitler John Seinfeld DAN Sixteen Years Twenty Years