35 Burst results for "carnegie mellon"

Pittsburgh Wants You to See Constellations

Environment: NPR

02:03 min | Last week

Pittsburgh Wants You to See Constellations

"When astronomer diane turn shack move to pittsburgh in nineteen eighty-one she noticed. Something big was missing from the night sky. When i grew up in new england you could just walk outside and look up and see the milky way. But when i arrived in pittsburgh the sky had started to decline in quality. Still she says at the time her students at carnegie mellon university were very familiar with the milky way they knew about stars and constellations. That is not the case anymore forty years later. I have to explain what the milky way is and describe what it looks like in a show pictures and they think those pictures are fake. Because of light pollution major constellations can be totally invisible in cities. The pittsburgh city council is now trying to do something about it with the help of scientists like turn check. It passed a dark sky. Ordinance last week to reduce light pollution. This city is going to replace streetlights with warm tone. Led lights and they're also going to install shields so that late doesn't travel up what we're trying to do is cut out the light at the blue end of the spectrum because blue light scatters more easily than red light in the atmosphere rate. That's why the sky is blue. So blue light scatters everywhere. It doesn't stay where your lighting and to measure progress. She has some help in the higher ups in august. The astronauts on the international space station took some pictures of pittsburgh for on a clear night. And that's the before shot. The astronauts are gonna continue to take pictures of pittsburgh so we will have during pictures and after pictures. Terzic believes that as the sky's get darker more people will look up. In wonder that means more people more children will be able to see it and the benefits of being connected to half of our universe. I can't overstate that. It's a spiritual thing to feeling of connection with the universe she's hopeful it will peak young people's interest in the stars above and encourage them to pursue subjects such as

Diane Turn Pittsburgh Pittsburgh City Council Carnegie Mellon University New England Terzic International Space Station
Exploring AI With Kai-Fu Lee

The TWIML AI Podcast

02:31 min | 2 weeks ago

Exploring AI With Kai-Fu Lee

"All right everyone. I am here with kaifu. Lee chi food is chairman and ceo of innovation ventures the former president of google china and author of the new york times bestseller superpowers. And we're here to talk about his new book which will be released next week. A twenty forty one kaifu. Welcome to the tuomo. Ai podcast thank you thank them. It is great to have an opportunity to speak with you. I'm looking forward to digging in and talking more about the book before we do though i'd love to have you share a little bit about your background and how you came to work in the field of ai. Sure i started With my excitement in back in nineteen seventy nine. When i started my undergraduate at columbia i worked on language and vision at columbia and then i went to carnegie mellon for my team at which develops the first speaker independent speech. Recognition system based on machine learning actually Some the earlier thesis in machine learning in nineteen aba. I also developed a computer program that the world's fellow champion is all in the eighties. Very early years after mike graduation from Cmu i talked there for two years than i joined apple and led a a lot of apples. Ai speech natural language and media efforts later joined sgi and then microsoft where i started microsoft research asia in beijing in nineteen ninety eight which kind of became one of the best. Tom research labs in asia. Later i joined google and ran google china for four years between two thousand and five in two thousand nine. We did do a little bit for how they i mostly was Really developing google's presence in china in two thousand nine. I left google and started my venture capital firm assign ovation ventures and at san ovation ventures we invest in the bow for the ai companies. We were about the earliest and probably invested in the most companies we invested in about seven unicorns in ai alone and with a few more Yet to come so they're excited to be in the era i it's Was not so hot during much of my career. But glad scooby with the catch. The recent wave and participate in it.

Kaifu Lee Chi Innovation Ventures CMU Google Columbia China New York Times Tom Research Labs Microsoft Asia SGI San Ovation Ventures Mike Beijing Apple
Power Grids Feel the Pressure of Intense Storms

Environment: NPR

02:15 min | 3 weeks ago

Power Grids Feel the Pressure of Intense Storms

"Hurricane ida crumpled a major transmission tower. That survived katrina sixteen years ago building infrastructure. That strong enough is hard when the target keeps moving because storms are getting stronger energy consultant alison silverstein says utilities and their regulators can take planning cues from murphy's law. We need to assume that everything possible that could go wrong is going to go wrong. Simultaneously and murphy is always gonna win. President biden's climate plan includes a much bigger role for electricity electric cars. For example cutting carbon footprint says easier with electricity from emission free sources like wind solar and nuclear. But even those have to stand up to extreme weather putting wires underground may seem obvious but engineering professor destiny. Knock at carnegie mellon university says that won't always work in hurricane country where you might have under grounded. The lines to protect them from wind putting them underground makes them more susceptible to flooding knock. Says it's never just one thing that's going to keep the lights. On energy experts. We interviewed agree on a few basic ideas though. They say the grid should be more decentralized so the whole thing doesn't shut down at once. More generation out in communities such as solar power would accomplish that but new orleans utility energy has resisted calls for just that to the frustration of local activists at mit engineering professors. Or up. a mean says not all the fixes are technical. He says power companies also need to become more agile and do more when responding to storms the fact that some utilities are not able to sort of respond immediately is also another kind of failure which is perhaps as drastic as the infrastructure. Failures is assuming outages will happen. Amin says utilities should focus more on dispatching generators even before a storm to make sure important facilities and vulnerable populations get electricity restored as soon as possible. All this cost money that usually ends up in utility bills. Congress is working on major funding through infrastructure bills. That could address some of these issues. There also focused on president. Biden's climate goals including zeroing out greenhouse gas emissions from the power sector by twenty thirty five.

Hurricane Ida Alison Silverstein President Biden Murphy Katrina Carnegie Mellon University Hurricane MIT New Orleans Amin Congress Biden
"carnegie mellon" Discussed on The Academic Minute

The Academic Minute

01:52 min | Last month

"carnegie mellon" Discussed on The Academic Minute

"My research group investigates how energy poverty will be affected by energy transitions an creates methods for identifying who is experiencing energy poverty when people hear the word poverty they usually think of people who have trouble affording their basic needs and the energy space most people assume in individuals energy port if they spend more than six percent of their income meeting their energy needs. The problem is that this assumes everyone is spending all the money. They need to keep their house at a comfortable temperature cook and use all of the other electricity appliances. We have become dependent on this misses. The people who use space heaters and their ovens to heat their homes due to high natural gas and oil prices and what about the people who keep their houses really hot in the summer because they cannot afford electricity in my research group we have created an energy poverty metric called the energy equity gap which identifies the households that are cutting their electricity consumption to reduce their financial burden. The energy equity gap is based on the difference in outdoor temperatures which members of different income groups are likely to start using their a c. We find that. The energy equity gap between low in high income groups ranges from four point seven degrees fahrenheit to seven point five degrees fahrenheit meaning on average low income households. Wait seven degrees longer to turn. On their ac units. Some households will even wait until it is above eighty degrees. This puts them at risk of heat. Stroke and heat. Exhaustion foregoing air-conditioning also increases the humidity in the house meaning the occupants will be at greater risk from mold asthma and allergens. We hope this new dimension of energy poverty will be used in addition to traditional income based energy poverty metrics to reduce the number of people suffering from energy poverty.

Stroke mold asthma
Destenie Nock of Carnegie Mellon University on Fixing Energy Poverty

The Academic Minute

01:52 min | Last month

Destenie Nock of Carnegie Mellon University on Fixing Energy Poverty

"My research group investigates how energy poverty will be affected by energy transitions an creates methods for identifying who is experiencing energy poverty when people hear the word poverty they usually think of people who have trouble affording their basic needs and the energy space most people assume in individuals energy port if they spend more than six percent of their income meeting their energy needs. The problem is that this assumes everyone is spending all the money. They need to keep their house at a comfortable temperature cook and use all of the other electricity appliances. We have become dependent on this misses. The people who use space heaters and their ovens to heat their homes due to high natural gas and oil prices and what about the people who keep their houses really hot in the summer because they cannot afford electricity in my research group we have created an energy poverty metric called the energy equity gap which identifies the households that are cutting their electricity consumption to reduce their financial burden. The energy equity gap is based on the difference in outdoor temperatures which members of different income groups are likely to start using their a c. We find that. The energy equity gap between low in high income groups ranges from four point seven degrees fahrenheit to seven point five degrees fahrenheit meaning on average low income households. Wait seven degrees longer to turn. On their ac units. Some households will even wait until it is above eighty degrees. This puts them at risk of heat. Stroke and heat. Exhaustion foregoing air-conditioning also increases the humidity in the house meaning the occupants will be at greater risk from mold asthma and allergens. We hope this new dimension of energy poverty will be used in addition to traditional income based energy poverty metrics to reduce the number of people suffering from energy poverty.

Mold Asthma Stroke
Local Governments Promoting Incentives to Encourage Covid Vaccinations

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

02:06 min | 4 months ago

Local Governments Promoting Incentives to Encourage Covid Vaccinations

"According to the centers for disease control just a bit more than forty six percent of the entire. us population. that's everybody has gotten at least one dose of covid vaccine thirty five percent is fully vaccinated but things are slowing down. Millions of people are still hesitant and herd. Immunity is for now maybe not looking so great so local governments are partnering with businesses to offer free stuff in exchange for getting a shot incentives matter that we know but do they work. Marketplace's kristen schwab has more on that. The mission to get more vaccines into people's arms is starting to take on a bit of an oprah. winfrey vibe. west. Virginia is giving one hundred dollars savings bonds to adults under thirty. Five main is offering free hunting and fishing licenses and in new orleans a pound of crawfish. Incentives are nice. Because they're the bronx near leading people toward something in a positive way. Knoll brewer researches vaccination behavior at the university of north carolina. He says incentives appeal to people across party. Lines and studies show. They increase vaccine uptake by about eight percent. If the incentive is of value mario macho is a behavioral economist at johns hopkins. There are costs and benefits to any any action and a person engages in the action if her perceived benefits exceed her received. The costs costs can be literal like to and from a vaccination site. The biden administration has partnered with uber and lift to provide free rides but benefits can also offer people. Something they want. New jersey is running a shot and a beer program macho says this can make a needle in the arm. Seem fun ause you. They might go without with a friend or a group of friends and get vaccinated together and then go out and get their free beer and incentives. Like new york's free tickets to a mets or yankees game. Also whisper freedom like. Hey remember when we high five strangers after home runs without fear gretchen chapman who studies vaccine behavior at carnegie mellon says incentives usually work on people who only need a little push and researchers. Don't know if they'll work for the covid vaccine like to have for others

Kristen Schwab Knoll Brewer Centers For Disease Control Mario Macho Winfrey Biden Administration University Of North Carolina New Orleans Virginia Johns Hopkins West United States New Jersey Gretchen Chapman Carnegie Mellon Mets
Fairness Aware Outlier Detection

Data Skeptic

01:48 min | 6 months ago

Fairness Aware Outlier Detection

"I might mention prime. And i'm a student in much lending in public policy at carnegie mellon university. I might've said basically focuses on baton minding on this action and this isn't support systems. I think a lot of people have a vague conception of what anomaly detection is. You're welcome to give a formal definition or an informal one but to you. What is anomaly detection. A nominee addiction is typically. I'll give you a former left. Nation or infamous sense of what an effective is an omni is defined as anything which dates from the normal. So as against the definition of normal is again dependent on the application or the domain better. You are applying tim. Bontemps insolence example. If you're meeting at a classroom right. So it's you're looking under classroom. And if you're dusted regarding ages of the people present in the classroom on the students typically would have age range between say eighteen and twenty one and maybe professor has in asia injured in party fight. Bless or something. I'm just making this up right. So in that sense. The normal is defined because we are under guarding h defined by maybe the ages Drain so in that sense. The deter would be an anomaly in that sense because teachers age his on her age is like different from the nominal. It's in that sense. That would be anomaly in this case. Essentially a number is a field with strives to unusual activity or unusual observations in a given domain. And that's not a nominalization with and since it's about finding unusual things you typically find applications of anomaly detection intrusion detection save. Fraud detection are even in medical domains. Light say epileptic seizure detection on salon.

Bontemps Carnegie Mellon University TIM Asia
Oldest Texas Electricity Co-Op Goes Bust After $2 Billion Bill

All Things Considered

01:46 min | 7 months ago

Oldest Texas Electricity Co-Op Goes Bust After $2 Billion Bill

"11 bankruptcy protection today. Citing they said a nearly $2 billion bill from the state's electricity grid operator following the storm. Marketplaces and you'll reports. Those things can happen when you let the market dictate prices on a grid that's not connected to the rest of the country. Raza's Electric is a cooperative that pays the grid operator to get electricity to hundreds of thousands of Texans. The grid operator is called ERCOT there like a toll road for the electricity system. Costas America teaches environmental engineering at Carnegie Mellon, he says in the February deep freeze, brasses Electric ran up bills many times higher than they normally be. The prices are allowed through the Texas Electricity system to rise when demand is really high, and supply is low. That's kind of the theory of all this the theory behind the largely deregulated market, a system that many are now questioning. David Spence teaches energy law of the University of Texas, he says. In fairness, I don't know that anyone ever anticipated an event like this when they were designing that system. Now, this seems like a black swan event in that sense, But a similar event did hit Texas 10 years ago, and lawmakers decided not to winterize Emily Groubert and George Attack says there's an opportunity again to rethink infrastructure more generally. I think we need to be really, really thoughtful about when it is actually logical to spend a little bit more money here to make sure that these systems actually do what we want them to do for the next several decades. Brasses Electric said before the freeze, it was financially robust. Its bankruptcy family could be an ominous sign. As other Texas power providers success the storm's damage in Austin, I made a Euler for marketplace.

Raza's Electric Costas America Carnegie Mellon David Spence Emily Groubert Texas George Attack University Of Texas Brasses Electric Austin
Tech companies role in the attempted coup

This Week in Tech

05:17 min | 9 months ago

Tech companies role in the attempted coup

"As i see it we have three core problems related to what happened last week. They're all tech tech related so the first core problem dan mentioned we've got a relatively small group of people who are making decisions for all of us and that is true that that group of people is based on the valley. We also have a small group of people in washington. Dc making decisions that impact us and and that's the supreme court there's a tension inherent between the decisions that are being made in response to involving the evolving nature of our technology speech and society by technology companies and the static laws of the united states. Laws that are not intended to change. There's this tension between the two and resolving that tension. i think is is not just critical to get through. We are right now. But it's it's going to have to be the cornerstone of of how how law evolves over the next couple of years because if that doesn't happen the mechanisms by which we make a lot of decisions no longer makes sense. So part of what's happening right now is an indiscriminate use of terms of service The the the big long post that zuckerberg relayed the letter from twitter with. They are doing is trying to make legalistic arguments. Having to do with the terms of service and the problem is that there was a study from carnegie mellon a couple years ago showing that if we stopped to read all of the terms of service that that are presented to us it would take seventy workdays to eight hours a day. Fifteen at work weeks because the median lanes of privacy policies around twenty five hundred words. Now if you start you know and that's just so if you if you assume that you are reading the t. o. s. and you're thinking about what you were agreeing to write. You can even go further and show that you know in terms of work lost in exchange for us reading all of these terms of service. It's like hundreds of billions of dollars and my point is that tech companies are making up the interpretations of these terms of service as they go along which is in conflict with the laws that they are intended to respond to so indiscriminate application of terms of service to some extent is how we got to now and ultimately. That's what took some of these key figures off of the networks but in some way they don't matter because it's not just trump. Who is the problem here. It's algorithm determinism. It's the systems that are designed to pull content. Not just from him but now from all of these other places so trump may be gone in. Aws may have taken parlor off line but the problem is the infrastructure. Supporting all of this. And i will say one last thing and that has to do with world building because all of this reached a fever pitch and a past couple of days And again. I say this as somebody who's politically independent this the people surrounding donald trump has done a masterful job of world building They created something called antifa they created something called cunanan which may have been bubbling up here and there may have had little fits and spurts but certainly if created. They certainly fostered it. These this aunt have anti first of all. It makes me crazy that way that it's being pronounced as anti there is no long found in the word. Anti fa whatever. The point is short for anti fascist antifa aunt. Whatever it doesn't matter it's made up anyway. So here's here's why. It does matter. Because i was at the state department in twenty twelve through twenty sixteen as we're others talking about intentional misinformation and how this has significant next order outcomes and it would be good to read team some of this in advance to think these things through and it just didn't happen so we really have to think hard because it just taking some of these people offline and taking parlor and gabby you know out of the play store their amira sites already like somebody created a mirror site of a sub. Reddit that it gotten take down this. This doesn't it's virtually impossible to eliminate this stuff. That's right that's right so now we've three core problems that are unfortunately from my vantage point not going away and the compounding effect here is that we've got a transition of power It's cold in a lot of places where americans live and we have no holidays to look forward to Jewelries always sucks. So i mean but this tells us and we've got kobe. That's so so we have to really think through not just what happened last week in a vacuum but also how does the mechanisms that we have to deal with. Some of this no longer makes sense is the

Carnegie Mellon Zuckerberg Cunanan Supreme Court DAN Washington United States Twitter Donald Trump Reddit
A Detailed Discussion With Kim Chestne ON How To Use Your Intuition y

My Seven Chakras

05:45 min | 9 months ago

A Detailed Discussion With Kim Chestne ON How To Use Your Intuition y

"It's time to bring on our special guest today. Kim jesse so. Kim is the author of radical infusion of globally recognized in innovation leader and founder of intuition lab. Her work has been featured are supported by leading edge organizations such as out by southwest carnegie mellon university comcast and hewlett packard while working as a leader in the tech sector. Kim recognize that tremendous role that intuition plays in business and cultural progress and set out on a quest to learn everything there is to know about it and as of nearly two decades worth of research and practice she has developed a powerful system that anyone can tap into to access the inner wisdom in ordinary with so really really exciting and kim. Thanks for joining us. Thanks for having me excited to talk to you tonight. Yeah me too. It's supposed to be in our species night especially in india because it is valley the festival of lights and there's actually a transformation going on in india as well. This started many decades back because as you know india and the valleys associated with firecrackers people becoming more and more conscious as they let go off that external firecrackers and realized the light that is within them the lamp within the essence within. I think that's got me to do our own in to it absolutely. Is that inner light that intellect growing so strong. It's such a beautiful metaphor and it's a beautiful day for us to be having this conversation because it really all does tie together absolutely so. Let's start from the beginning. Where were you born and warm. Was your childhood lane. Well i was born in a little town called carlisle pennsylvania small town girl and You know i think i had. I had sort of your colonial white picket fence upbringing in one thousand nine hundred eighty s america which was really fun and if you remember the eighties and so it was really fun. Time to grow up. And i think that's it's those times it really started to develop my interest in intuition and i had a lot of intuitive experiences growing up so It all kind of stemmed from those childhood years amazing and work sort of influence. Did your family have on your intuitive or spiritual development. Yeah you know. That's a really good question because a lot of people we have this talk about intuition and when it happens to you intuition can be something that people can either accept or not accept right so when you're talking about kids and it's so important with kids because kids have such great in and they haven't really had it beaten out of the yet. It's one of these things still alive and still so connected with intuitive. Things starts to happen with children. Appearance can either encourage that or they can create fear. Be like oh my gosh. This is something to be afraid of or this is crazy. You know so it's You know working with intuition in my childhood it was challenging for me. Because i think coming from a really sort of traditional christian background. There's not a lot of room for intuition. Especially it was more of the protestant. I think in the catholic traditions. There's more of a place for the holy spirit in a lot of mistakes but in my experiences growing up in my little world there was not a place for intuition and so it was something i really had to come to terms with on my own and really facing a lot of fears and a lot of sort of judgment from the people around me and now they get it like my mom's very intuitive she inherited from her. I think it is something that we have a genetic propensity to. But i think there's just not that level of acceptance which in the east which i think is so wonderful about you know eastern cultures. Intuition is so much more integrated in daily life and acceptance right. Yeah that's that's very true. And i think like we were discussing before the india was india also is going to its own journey of realizing how abundant and whilst our own heritage is and going back to our roots realizing that wisdom about intuition and the mind and the soul and yes we're going through our journey as a country has But you know what what comes to. My mind is As i learned more about how children behave like a child always looking at his mom or her mom or her danna his dad for approval right. They're always looking at the so. It's not so much of words but it's also about how the bench reacts to. A certain situation are something that is happening on the word. Maybe that micro reaction that can make a huge difference right in terms of how the child approaches word even as an adult absolutely absolutely in those little foundational moments. They and this is talk a lot about conditioning. If you read my booker you hear me talk today. I'm probably going to use that word. A lot Because intuition is something that is really a counterbalance to this conditioning. That we all get and we get it from those very first moments with our family and with the people that we grow with you know. We're conditioned to think things. Like oh intuitions not real. Or we're conditioned thank like our imagination in our creativity isn't as important as our intellectual side so so part of really balancing these sides of our brains and really coming into our true being is stepping away from that conditioning in releasing it

Kim Jesse Southwest Carnegie Mellon Univ India KIM Hewlett Packard Comcast Carlisle Pennsylvania America Danna
"carnegie mellon" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

01:34 min | 10 months ago

"carnegie mellon" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Welcome to the site of accents. Podcast where we.

Uber sells self-driving cars unit to Aurora Innovation

Daily Tech News Show

00:58 sec | 10 months ago

Uber sells self-driving cars unit to Aurora Innovation

"And it's thomas car plans in deeds so this story broke right at the end of detainees s. Yesterday uber announced on monday that it so sell selling and self-driving unit advanced technologies group also known as eighty jim to aurora innovation. A competitor uber. The deal is expected to close in q. One well zuber given up on autonomous vehicles. Be nuts uber ceo dara khosrowshahi will join. Aurora's board an uber. At investors and employees will in forty percent of aurora following. The deal uber will also invest four hundred million dollars into aurora directly and errors. Autonomous cars will eventually operate on uber's ride hailing platform. Aurora was founded by google's former lead engineer for thomas cars. Chris urban along with sterling anderson. Who helped lead tesla model x. project and drew back now who ran carnegie mellon's research lab and worked on a thomas vehicles at uber.

Thomas Car Advanced Technologies Group Aurora Zuber Dara Khosrowshahi Uber Thomas Cars Chris Urban Carnegie Mellon Google Tesla Anderson Drew
David Lander, 'Squiggy' on 'Laverne & Shirley,' dies at 73

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | 10 months ago

David Lander, 'Squiggy' on 'Laverne & Shirley,' dies at 73

"Actor David lander famous for playing squeaky on laverne and Shirley has died after dealing with multiple sclerosis for decades he was seventy three I marquees are a letter with a look at his career David lander signature line was one word long comedy partnership with Michael McKean as students at Carnegie Mellon University they played Lenny and squeaky on laverne and Shirley from nineteen seventy six to nineteen eighty three lander hid his multiple sclerosis at first but said in a two thousand AP interview he went public with it to show it was not a death sentence not all crippling it doesn't mean it's the end of the world it doesn't mean that you can't lead a normal life now there are drugs to help you live that life and people should be aware of that

David Lander Laverne Shirley Multiple Sclerosis Michael Mckean Carnegie Mellon University Lenny Lander AP
"carnegie mellon" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

01:35 min | 10 months ago

"carnegie mellon" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Welcome to the site of accents. Podcast where we.

Sybil Attacks on Federated Learning

Data Skeptic

05:22 min | 11 months ago

Sybil Attacks on Federated Learning

"Hi. My name is clement. phone. I'm a phd student at carnegie mellon university. Welcome to the show thanks. I'm here so tell me a little bit about your specific areas of study. Yeah so at carnegie mellon. I'm a phd student in the school of computer science. And more specifically. I do research in. Let's say the broad category of computer security and if you wanna drill down even further i mostly work in security when applied to machine learning systems and the security of machine learning systems. I would guess the audience has at least some familiarity with security is being like denial of service attacks and very like rule based kind of system looking at traffic. Maybe not as much machine learning. How does security play into machine learning operations. Yeah absolutely there are many different levels. I think that you can approach the problem. There's the initial idea of just taking traditional security problems. Such as denial service intrusion detection and applying machine learning to those domains just gathering insights from data and learning about them. and then there's the more meta area of making the actual process of machine. Learning more secure has so there's been a wide array of work in the community that has shown how at test time you can perform different tastes of attacks during training time you can perform a tax on the model and pretty much anything in between. I'm sure you're familiar with this phrase that if you're not paying for the product you are the product and i guess. There's some wisdom in that i don't know if it's universally true but people are certainly becoming more aware of that and maybe the off the cuff reaction is. I don't want people having my data because its privacy. But in some sense i would like people to have some of my data. I don't mind having good recommendations on amazon for example. Because i can just ignore them. Where do you yourself. Draw the lines about data sharing yet. So i agree with you that this is a pretty personal choice when it comes to just the type of experience you wanna have with the products. I think i would be similar to you in that respect where nothing comes for free. As you've said you've got to give some data to system to use it and to use it effectively. I think it's a really big area of research in general about ways in which maybe you could provide assistance but do things in a more privacy preserving way so that's a very big area research these days i guess i am a user of most day things. So that's where i would slide. Hundred spectrum makes sense. yeah. I think that's most of us. Perhaps we'll the specific paper. I invade you on to discuss. Today is titled delimitations of federated learning in civil settings so some definitions questions to kick us off. What is federated learning. This is great because it kind of plays into the idea of privacy. A little more federated learning is this new idea in distributing machine. Learning came out in around twenty seventeen developed by google. And it's the idea that you can train machine. Learning models across distributed data sets over the network without actually transferring data into google domain. So previously you'd have the idea that i'm using a service and some server. Let's say that's owned by. Google would be collecting all the information in storing it somewhere on a database and then writing machine learning on that collected data federated. Learning is a different idea. Where instead of storing data on a database owned by google. They actually just do the model training kind of live as it's occurring and there's no transfer of data is just machine learning occurs over the network and that might sound like it's kind of the same thing but when it comes to the problem of data ownership and privacy there's a bit of nuance there in terms of both the privacy and security implications federated learning which is one of the big topics of our paper and when the models being trained. Where does that training actually take place in the situation of federated learning. I guess you could think of the machine. Learning process is kind of just an iterative summation of values. So the training still takes place at work in the sense that you're taking updates to a model like you're learning it by adding values but the values are passed over the network directly so it's still lives in the service domain. Just the data used to supply those updates does not it still stays on the client devices. Gotcha so maybe we take a simple case of something like the logistic regression which can be nicely summarized as just it's beta values just the parameters that were calculated machine learning. Would it be corrected to saying like my phone or my local or whatever looks at my private data calculates that model and instead of sending my data just sends those parameters off to google. Yeah that's exactly right. That's like a really good way. Just gotcha okay. So we're seeing that then. Don't i still have some sort of privacy risks though because someone could kind of invert that and say well. If you're sending us these parameters what's the data that would have arrived at this answer exactly. So there's a whole field of research on privacy attacks on federated learning. We discussed this a little bit in our paper. But it's not really. The focus of our paper ends the idea behind. All these attacks is very much what you just said which is maybe. I can't observe the data used to train the model directly and that provides some sort of privacy but if i can observe the model updates or the beta values as you're saying and observed multiple instances of them i get a pretty good idea of what your data looks like there's some you know mathematical theoretical bounds on how much you can do but in practice. That might already be too much for certain context.

Federated Carnegie Mellon University Google Clement Amazon
Algorithm spots 'Covid cough' inaudible to humans

Daily Tech News Show

01:24 min | 11 months ago

Algorithm spots 'Covid cough' inaudible to humans

"Mit scientists have published a paper. In the i tripoli journal of engineering and medicine and biology describing an algorithm they developed the can identify whether you have covid nineteen by the sound of your cough. That's true if you're asymmetric. In other words if i mean a coffee is a symptom. But you don't have the classic symptoms of covid nineteen because a cough could be a symptom of anything. Covid changes the sound you produce. Even when you're a symptomatic intesting. The algorithm was ninety eight point five percent accuracy on patients with a positive covid nineteen tests. So they were able to use coughing to detect ninety eight point five percent of people who were definitely positive with covid nineteen and a one hundred percent accurate for those with no other symptoms. The algorithm was trained on a data set of seventy thousand audio samples with multiple coughs. Twenty five hundred of which were from confirmed covid nineteen cases. So that's how the algorithm was able to go. Okay that's somebody who doesn't have it that somebody who does and figure out the patterns that it would listen for the site just hope to get regulatory approval to use it as a way to take quick noninvasive daily screenings and for pool testing to quickly detect outbreaks in groups pulled. Meaning like a group of people a test. A bunch of people once cambridge university carnegie mellon university. Uk health startup called novo. Eric are all working on similar projects. So it's not just mit. But they're the most recent to publish a paper on it.

Tripoli Journal Of Engineering Cough MIT Cambridge University Carnegie Mellon University Eric UK
Building AI Products That Clients Actually Use - with Dr. Nick Pilkington

Artificial Intelligence in Industry

05:08 min | 1 year ago

Building AI Products That Clients Actually Use - with Dr. Nick Pilkington

"So Nicholas glad to have you back on a making the business case episode. We're GONNA talk about kind of ease of deployment at finding ways to integrate into existing enterprise workflows. Before we do that, you know your work, a drone deploy vary some clients. It's a much more robust kind of integration of the client's talent in your your talent of the clients tack and your tech others are plugging in playing it as a software. Can you address that gradient for folks that aren't familiar with your? Business. Absolutely I think when it comes to machine lending, you've got this kind of spectrum of sophistication among our customer base. There are some customers that have their own in house machine lending teams in training their own models they're got these models in hand and they're coming to join the boy saying, Hey, we need to plug this into our existing workflow. And in those cases, our role is a company is to make sure that we're providing the flexibility withdrawn deploy software that we can plug into accustomed existing workflow without disrupting, everything and bring that kind of machine learning intelligence and efficiency gains to their whole workflow. On the other end of the spectrum, there are customers that less familiar with machine learning they still want to benefit from those those machining products and there are role is is actually take on the machine learning. Task and to provide new machine learning based tools within drone deploy that just surfaced to those customers so where they would ordinarily just be performing vigilant SPEC with drums. Now, vision inspections are machine learning powered and they're much more efficient than they're highlighting issues automatically. So we WANNA service on both ends of the spectrum there and I think the reality is still in twenty twenty production sizing machine learning tools is still a challenge is software that kind makes it easier and making. Things more commodities, but it's not just about training the model. It's not this kind of fire and forget process. We set something up once and then it just works forever. It's really this kind of its ration- of getting something working, adjusting retraining, and it's all of that kind of integration work and the support for that whole model running in production that we want to provide to make it easy for our customers and I wanna go into what those elements are of making. That production model work because that's the nitty gritty I think the business crowd who didn't go to Carnegie. Mellon. For Data Science they might have gone to you know working for business could really use some detail on but just just to flesh this out and put this in context drone deploy obviously you folks use drones is it primarily for Infrastructure Inspection Nacre? Should we frame your company in sort of a little bit of a wider sense here? So people know what you? Yeah, we actually operate across industries. I think Lodges Three Industries Are Construction. Agriculture energy but there's this huge long tail of use cases in drums. There is vehicle infrastructure this session rescue operations mining in aggregates just I think at this point, we're finding that almost any industry in some way benefit from aerial imagery. Got It in that context of training algorithms and deploying models in that world, you know we we could talk about you know inspecting some kind of oil and gas equipment. We could talk about inspecting crops. Imagine you folks work the whole gambit there what are those real considerations for deploying models? Again, we want to make this as easy as we can. Especially, you know you do you're selling the stuff. So you WANNA be able to get this up in working for clients as quick as possible. What are the factors that really have to fit into play that are sometimes quite challenging but you gotTa. Work through them. To actually make deployment work. Absolutely I think the I is the is typically the machine learning problem that you're looking to solve how bespoke and how customers is there a bunch of very common patents in machine learning. If you're looking for objects in an image, you're looking to classify an image as good bad or exhibiting a problem or not exhibiting a problem. There are kind of cookie cutter approaches to those sort of tasks in machine learning I. think that's withdrawn. Deploy can do an excellent job off the shelf by providing a bunch of machine learning technology that appliance can just plug into straightaway and reap the benefits of. On. The Mole bespoke side if you're digging deeper into these different verticals and more specific problems in more nuanced machine lending. Solutions then I think it's much more of an iterative process and that's where. John apply will typically deferred those customers to really understand that the main that trying to solve this problem and how to bring machine lending solution into production, which usually involves getting a model up and running running on some type of infrastructure which drawn deploy can take care of, and then working to improve what that typically means is letting it run assessing the outputs, making corrections and retraining it and I think that's one of the pots of deploying machine lending solutions in production as typically overlooked. A lot of people think that it's it's a one off process whereas it's an ongoing investments to build and maintain improve machine learning solution and I think that's where having let drone imagery in one place making it accessible to these customers. Machine learning models plugged into the workflow from the beginning. Makes that a lot more compelling a lot

Lodges Three Industries Are Co Nicholas Mellon John
Interview with bio-mechanics expert Lisa McFadden, PhD

Moving2Live

06:35 min | 1 year ago

Interview with bio-mechanics expert Lisa McFadden, PhD

"Welcome back to another edition of moving to live our ethos movement is a lifestyle notches activity. We tried to interview professionals across the movement spectrum because we understand at the end of the day, anybody who is involved in movement either wants their clients patients or athletes to either move more or move better whether it's to move with less pain or to move more efficiently. Some of our best guests come from recommendations from other guests and a big. Thank you to Andy Gillam who recommended today's guest Lisa McFadden they arresting thing with podcasting is i. now have lineage of three people in a row starting with Brian Gary To. To Doctrine McFadden today hopefully two or three more as far as I can trace it's not who you know is who you know who knows somebody. So Dr McFadden thank you for taking time to talk to moving to live this afternoon. Absolutely thank you for having me. My favorite question I always ask on moving deliver the first one I. Always ask is to get an elevator. You get to talking because the elevators really slow because somebody's pressing all the buttons and they say, so what do you do what your thirty second? Not In a negative way elevator spiel my name is Lisa McFadden and I. I'll man and this one's a Turkey one I wear lots of different hats But yeah so. The way I look at what I do is I really put science into practice whether it's with athletes or with patients and Meyer expertise is in bio mechanics. So I like to used by mechanics to help people move better and then I also liked to inspire whether that's inspiring communities around science or whether that's inspiring. Students through mentorship in education. Right. Now, if I'm correct your in South Dakota. Yes that's correct. I work at Stanford Health See Falls South Dakota. And I know we were chatting a little bit before we started recording and both of us grew up in upstate new. York and I have to be honest I never thought I would end up in Pittsburgh. Pennsylvania, I never thought I would go to Grad School in Alabama and I would imagine that there's an interesting story going all the way from New York state with multiple stops all the way to South Dakota and I would imagine if you're anybody else like anybody else in the movement field is probably a few more stops along the way before you retire. Well, it's funny. I almost ended up in Pittsburgh. Along my way and I've spent some time in Alabama on a couple of different business trip. So it sounds like we've got a similar. Set of journeys But yes I I grew up in upstate New York in a little town called the sweet go not quite as little as where I heard you up. But? Yes. So I grew up on Lake Ontario My Dad was a doctor in I. Always always wanted to be a doctor specifically pediatric Orthopedic Surgeon, and my dad always told me no, you do not He said you really WanNa be an engineer and I said, no, No, no dad engineers are big nerds. And he said you're really good at math and you you have passion for this and I. Really suggest you become an engineer. So I very boldly went to the University of Rochester Pre and applied math saying you're wrong dad. But you know had a had a moment of clarity probably after my first year I did realize and did some self reflection and thought you know the type of. Mother that I wanted to be in the type of you don't grown up that I wanted to be really do not not focus around having call and prioritizing patients, which is absolutely something that you have to do but really being able to have a little bit of flexibility in In my lifestyle and so I finally listen to my father after a long time of not and. decided that I would actually transfer into biomedical engineering where I ended up focusing on bio mechanics as my concentration with minors in mechanical engineering and applied math. throughout my Undergrad I really really enjoyed all of that and so as I started thinking about what was next I started getting really interested in robotics and in two that feel that was emerging back. Then decided that I really wanted to go and get a PhD in that. So I had been at ski resorts I grew up ski racing and I was in Montana with our family on vacation and watched a bunch of ski. Racers who had disabilities whether they were in a sit ski or whether they were missing leg skiing and I was just very inspired I looked at them versus like while they're amazing. They're they're better skiers than I am and then you could see that as soon as they were off the hill where they were excelling the rollout of daily life challenges. So I started getting really interested in prostates wanting to kind of help people that you needed additional help outside of. Being Super, rockstar athletes to help them in their daily lives and so robotics was sort of that pathway for me. My senior design project ended up being a surgical robot and then I ended up getting into Carnegie Mellon at the Robotics Institute which is where I almost went to Grad School and then the University of Utah in my husband and I. Boyfriend at the time looked at each other and said, we should go skiing. So, Kinda took that wildcard robotics institute was number one ended the US at the time but decided to go out to Utah where they had just one anger from the NSF in robotics, and so I was in the bio engineering department and kind of hybrid into mechanical engineering. So I really took courses and had faculty the Committee from both worlds and I was able to do there was. My my PhD was focused on spinal cord injuries and what we were working on with functional electrical stimulation, supporting an array of electrodes and putting them into the peripheral muscles, and then stimulating those and my job was to figure out what the mechanics looked like. So creating models of the limb and then creating control algorithms to figure out how we can control this limbs yet somebody to go from sitting to standing. And to do it in a way that they didn't get tired while they were standing because the way our muscles work. If you contract one all the way, you might get yourself to go into a specific movement but then that muscles eventually wanting to fatigue and you can't can't sustain it. So what does that look like as well?

Lisa Mcfadden South Dakota Pittsburgh New York Engineer Alabama Grad School Andy Gillam Brian Gary To Stanford Health See Falls Robotics Institute Lake Ontario Carnegie Mellon University Of Rochester Meyer York United States
Yahoo's Ugly Death

Malicious Life

05:59 min | 1 year ago

Yahoo's Ugly Death

"The name is synonymous with a time when all of our lives were simpler when facebook was an actual books full of students faces computers made weird sounds when the connected to the Internet and downloading a one minute long video can take all night. Eddie tight yet who was one of the four or five most popular websites in the world with billions of views, every month and evaluation well, over one hundred, billion dollars. But as the two thousands turned into twenty tens, the web changed massively and your who was faced with the difficult task of changing with it. Their web portal service model was going out of fashion. We all moved to g mail and Google Search, McCain the front page of the Internet. Despite the fact that ask Jeeves was obviously way better. Many of Yahoo's services remained relatively popular, but they were no longer trendsetting no longer growing and the company's market capitalization dropped to a fraction of what it once was any remnant of the mindshare or what we might refer to as v Cultural. Capital they once held fell off. So to those of us on the outside yeah, who's fall seemed utterly quiet gradual and most of all inevitable but was it really Forget what you think. You know at least for a moment and consider this from the peak of the DOT COM bubble. Some say the beginning of the end for Yahoo to two thousand, eight, their revenue increased tenfold that success was no fluke either as print publishers struggled with the incoming revolution of online advertising, Yahu was very much on top of it. They were positioned Willie enough that when Microsoft attempted to buy the company for forty, five, billion dollars in. Two Thousand and eight CO founder and CEO Jerry Yang swiftly rejected the offer it was over the following few years that things would start to ten at the company transitioned through five different CEOS in just four years, and in the meantime Google took over the Internet. This would seem like the end of the story except in two thousand and twelve yen made arguably the most significant tire in its history and new CEO who could finally get things going again. Marissa Mayer. was distant for such a role from the beginning. Some college students have hard time in the job market, but after completing her degree at Stanford, Marissa was offered fourteen different jobs including teaching Gig at Carnegie Mellon One of America's leading engineering schools and consulting role at Mackenzie. Arguably, the world's premier consulting for the Young Maria turned down both those offers to become the twentieth employees at a fledgling startup called Google. At Google, she was star in fact, there's hundred percent chance you've run into her work. She oversaw the design of Google's homepage. You know the one you use probably ten times a day she was also one of the three people behind Google Edwards. It's difficult to overstate the importance of Edwards to the Internet as a whole and to the company itself to give you some sense of it. Though, at one point Edwards provided ninety six percent of Google's entire revenue. In fact, you could argue that Edwards and by proxy Melissa Samaya was at least partly responsible for the fall of. yahoos revenue multiplied tenfold between two thousand and two thousand and eight in no small part because of their online advertising. But he declined even faster when Google they're smaller competitor designed a better wage, you connect advertisers with users based on search results. Edwards. So, by the principle that if you can't beat him, you should join him Yahoo in two thousand and twelve hired Marissa Mayer. It was bald and popular choice. The company's stock rose two percent. The day of the announcement Meyer instantly became an icon for women in an industry dominated by men. Then, she got to work changing the company culture. She opened an online portal for employee complaints a system whereby any office problem given sufficient votes by employees would be automatically investigated by management. She oversaw a personnel shift which brought remote employees back into the company's offices Fortune magazine put her in their forty under forty list and ranked her as the sixteenth most powerful businesswoman on the planet. In short things were finally looking up for Ya. At least from the outside on the inside, however, the really really inside a very different story was about to be reading.

Google Edwards Marissa Mayer Yahoo Facebook Marissa Mayer. Eddie Marissa Jeeves CEO Fortune Magazine Jerry Yang Carnegie Mellon Microsoft Maria Mccain Willie Yahu Co Founder
Gold just hit $2,000 an ounce — but that could be a scary sign for the economy

Afternoon News with Tom Glasgow and Elisa Jaffe

00:14 sec | 1 year ago

Gold just hit $2,000 an ounce — but that could be a scary sign for the economy

"The price of an ounce of gold is now up to $2000 but analysts say this could be in people are losing confidence in the stock market. Carnegie Mellon Finance professor says people are buying gold during the pandemic has a safe asset, but the price is not

Carnegie Mellon Finance Professor
Using Your Brain Without Thinking

Developer Tea

07:38 min | 1 year ago

Using Your Brain Without Thinking

"What does it mean to use your brain? And how is that different than just thinking? As developers engage in thinking all the time but here's a entirely separate part of our brains that we might be missing out on using. That could be better at solving some of the problems that we face on a day-to-day basis. My Name is Jonathan trailer listening to develop for T and my goal on the show helped driven developers like you find clarity perspective and purpose in their careers. One of the amazing things about the. Human. Brain. Is Its ability to process complex topics. This is why we can write code that is abstracted so many levels. Away, from a physical reality that we have to tangibly think about. We can imagine entire. Kind of universes where we can create stories and. keep track of those stories while we read a book. A book that was written with a bunch of characters that are enough themselves abstractions. These are characters that we may not have ever even seen that specific character that specific size before. But somehow we are able to process all of this information and create meaning out of it. This is an incredible feat and part of our kind of intellectual superiority that we are aware of the domination that we have over the world around us. Has Given us. A somewhat distorted picture of what the brain is actually capable of more importantly where the limits are. And it's very simple to see the limits of your brain and specifically limits that we're gonNA talk about today. If you want to test these limits you can. Try to brute force memorize the first twenty digits of Pi. This isn't a lot of information. It's just twenty digits in after all we can process a lot more. Information than just twenty digits, we can read entire books with thousands of pages and understand them. So what is it about remembering twenty digits? Makes it difficult? Here's another exercising might want to try. that. You've probably faced already in your career, go and look at the features of what say three or four different libraries, popular libraries or three or four different languages and try to decide which one is best. This kind of information that you have to process. It's really difficult to do because the number of variables and that's the critical factor for today's episode, the number of variables that you have to weigh against each other. Can Be really large temper variables. You can imagine for example. That you're trying to deduce which which language should you learn next let's say you're a beginner programmer and maybe you're trying to decide which language to learn. You can use variables like the market size. You can try to quantify how much you enjoy that language or. Even how much you expect to enjoy it in the future, you can imagine you would use measures like the number of available repositories on get hub or get hubs own report of the trends for a given language. How do you decide what trend to use or how far back to look? These are all different questions they you would have to try to answer and then compare between the different languages. And so now you have this very large list of pros and cons and. You sit down and try to look over that information, but this is. Where we hit our limit. Our ability to cognitively process or think about something on purpose. We only have so much capacity to think in parallel. This is critical factor remember again, the number of variables were very good about thinking about one thing. At a time. In fact, most of the advice that you receive on this podcast is an attempt to get you to think about fewer things at any given point in time and reduce the things that you are working on to the simplest form. So you don't have to keep a lot of information in your head. But if you are trying to make a decision complex decision with a lot of variables. There is another part of our brains we can tap into what's interesting is that as knowledge workers, we are paid for using this one specific part of our brain, this prefrontal CORTEX. The part that's responsible for thinking very deeply and thinking very focused manner. But. There's another part of our brains that can help us think more abstractly. And without the same limits of the cognitive processing limits, the would find in the prefrontal CORTEX. Lots of studies. For example, one from Carnegie Mellon support the idea that the rest of our brain is working on the problem. In parallel to us focusing on other things. For example. If you expose yourself to all of the information about the various programming languages that you're considering let's say you have four of them. Then you can go and do something totally unrelated to that. Your going to keep on working on that decision problem. Now, we're not really consciously aware of this and there's no way to become aware of it but once we return to that problem at a later point in time we may have a different sense of clarity and we might even have. We might feel is a gut intuition, but actually it's an intuition that was given to us by that unconscious processing that's happening in the rest of our brain. So. Here's the critical thing to to take away I. We said the the most critical thing is to remember that this has to do with the number of variable. So if you can reduce the number of variables that you're thinking about, then you can actually process those entirely in that prefrontal. CORTEX. For example, if you're working on a math problem, this is a perfect example of processing in the prefrontal. CORTEX. But if you're working on something that requires much more evaluation much further a can of discussion about multiple variables or a comparison between multiple things, and that's not something that you're going to be able to hold in your prefrontal Cortex, the working memory for of a better explanations too small. So the prescription to fix this problem is to expose yourself to the information all the relevant information for making a given decision and then go and do something else. Maybe take a walk give yourself something that's totally unrelated that won't allow your mind drift backing and try to process that information again, on purpose in that intentional and conscious way.

Cortex Carnegie Mellon Programmer
"carnegie mellon" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"carnegie mellon" Discussed on KTRH

"I met him at a UFO conference in Washington DC, just an amazing guy. He passed away recently at the age of eighty five years old his academic background included a bachelor science degree in industrial management from Carnegie Mellon University. A bachelor science from the US naval postgraduate school a doctor of science and area. Nodding astronautics from MIT. And he was a staunch believer that this planet was being visited by extra terrestrial head girl. Pleasure, my friend. How are you George? Nice to be with. It was morning. Likewise, likewise, you've been busy lately since we last talked stay. I stay pretty busy going on. Well, I had an opportunity to meet the Buzz Aldrin. I was king show several weeks ago. And what are the the light full guy? He's he's tough. Now is he probably was then at her. Well. All right. He does not believe in extraterrestrials. Did you ever talk to them about that? Briefed. I've talked all developed about what they thought face. But. No, not obscene pretend experience for the Apollo program. Nothing in space was subsequently validated. Are understood. Good,.

Carnegie Mellon University US Washington MIT George eighty five years
"carnegie mellon" Discussed on Recode Decode

Recode Decode

03:35 min | 3 years ago

"carnegie mellon" Discussed on Recode Decode

"Yeah. If you look at the meteor, it's like between learning this and intelligent agents that right, whereas now as a people are going back in the hands to the electrical, computer engineering, this happens at Comey amount on its books in EC primarily helping us solve the sense our. Yeah, that's that's one end. Yeah, there's another end above machine learning. If you go something which can spot patterns or notice that your elbow is in is in an image and stuff like that. You still going to want to put it in its system which makes decisions. Right? And that really is the original dream of official intelligence of the dominant conference these things which can observe think about what they observed and then act. Right. And so making the action decision is really important, and it goes into ways. One of them is a little bit like warrior talking about with. Google. The early days of this is a human has to make a decision and as much too much information around for them to actually really be able to just look at all the source information themselves, how can you support that? And that goes from everyone doing stock trading to helping decide if a medical claim is legitimate through to people. One of our professors for instance, is interim instrumentation classrooms, so that teaches can notice if they've accidentally got some unconscious bias, which means that they're not attending to kinds of students and say full. So that's great. That is human assistance. In my opinion, many folks in the official industry intelligence industry. By the way, I'm a minority. I not speaking for the whole discipline focusing on that because it's so much more palatable less scary than the other thing at the top of the stack, which is autonomy. Right? And. Nope. Meaning to him. Ever ever write us robots, don't care about. That toasters toaster is one of the other. They don't. We don't. They don't care. You know, oddly ahead, it didn't in a good deal on must have been using. I thought he was quitting tells you that they're going to think of is like house cats. Like, why did they want to kill us? It's kind of useless to wanna get like it was really, I was like, oh, yeah, you're right. We're. So we're so obsessed with ourselves into science fiction feeders territory. The reason they don't care about us is then thinking about us, they are simply machines every row books, computer that you can see is just a set of. We only have just a few minutes just two more minutes. I just love to know why we're self-driving is because that's where community you were all involved. Lots of people left Carnegie Mellon. They set up different shops. Where do you see that right now self-driving Thomas vehicles. This is me speak yet myself. Yeah. So my personal understanding is that every year now in the major self-driving experiments, the metric of success to track. Is what fraction of the time do you need a safety driver? In other words, what fraction of the time does the human need to take control? And if we were shooting for the early two thousand twenty s for us to be at the point where you could launch autonomous driving, you'd need to see every year at the moment more than sixty percent reduction every year to get us down to ninety thousand nine point nine, nine, nine, nine, percents safety. I don't believe that things are progressing anyway near that fast, right?

Carnegie Mellon official Comey Google sixty percent
"carnegie mellon" Discussed on Recode Decode

Recode Decode

04:25 min | 3 years ago

"carnegie mellon" Discussed on Recode Decode

"So there are many creative things that can be done to reduce the cost of these kinds of of education, Georgia techs, mostly online system. As an example. That's I think that's a place where I can demand has to go now is to actually value engineer. It's expensive master's programs creatively so that people can afford domestically. Take me. Get you have all this demand who people who can pay in. That's where you have. So I'm gonna finish up talking about the concept of where the big trends in academic sir, going around computing. What do you see is important you obviously robotics and. Missing saying that Cardi Mellon was a big player in Uber's Uber, a lot of self driving cars, a lot of robotics, a lot of things like that that had sort of rocky ten years. Let's play mover for that, but talk a little bit of where it's going, Carnegie Mellon where overall, you see the most important areas of computing going. The huge change. Of course, we will seen in the last ten years is being machine learning and the the real push on these convoluted neural networks, ton outs to Bill to solve problems that we haven't been able to solve using most of his super AI in Silicon Valley. Now, whatever the new marketing turn on the radio. But if if we went on the radio, you'd have seen me, I rolling. They have all kinds of names for it. Go ahead, just marketing, I don't mind. So he's, he's the important thing that machine learning component fits in a slot of all the technologies. You need to build an a system. So one of the things we've really been pushing on both in our developments of education and in our recruiting faculty, the other slots adjacent to machine learning. Right? So important one, which I've usually withdraw before machine learning because machine lending depends on it is all the sense work sensing work this necessary to be able to understand the world, right? So that that's an astonishing area, but exactly. So if you're using robots to fight a fire, they absolutely need to understand what's really going on in the building. And so creating devices and robots, which can actually understand what's happening right now is I think if. If I only had one research topic that I could work on, I would regard that as much more important than improving the algorithms which is going to take that sensory data. It's going to be amazing when they figure it. I was talking to someone one of these future. I like to talk to a futurist and they were like at some point. And I think it's actually being created, say there's a nuclear spill or so the chemical spill or something like that that they would have sensors that were small as like grains of sand and they throw them on like from faraway, they'd spray them onto something in these sensors would pull in and the information of what spilled and what to do about it. And it was, I love the concept of it like, I'm sure it's not. Possible at this point, but that's the idea. It's like it's there. So sand is the way I looked at like they're so pervasive. They're almost like in the air without knowing their there. Yes, I do think we're moving in that direction. It actually totally makes your totally making this point. The. The idea of just trying to really focus on machine learning without being able to get hold of the killer one really important part of that turns out to be power and actually having it so that a sensor which is tiny is purchasing high-definition video. You can't have it sitting next to a big GPU of the now putting in. 'cause because that would be all the weight for a mobile platform and so forth. So for me, a lot of the stuff that we mathematicians like me doing in the middle of it movie stalled without that huge growth of book in the which he had our sensing and sensing everywhere going out to space going out inside of people. I mean, I remember that movie where they've traveled inside a human being. I'm like they're going to have sensors all over human beings at some point if we can deal with these things. So a very interesting aspect of that is, in my opinion, electrical and computer engineering departments, which. To some extent of had to watch computer science, getting older blurry that hopefully coming up. Oh, man. With friends, but still wrenches going what the hell if you used to be cool..

Bill Carnegie Mellon Cardi Mellon engineer Georgia Uber Silicon Valley ten years
"carnegie mellon" Discussed on Main Engine Cut Off

Main Engine Cut Off

04:31 min | 3 years ago

"carnegie mellon" Discussed on Main Engine Cut Off

"Welcome the main engine cutoff. I'm Anthony clans low and we've got some special guests here. We've got Andy and Mike from cube Rover, I ever Andy. Thanks for Anthony. Thanks so much for having us here today. We're really excited to be on your podcast for the first time and hopefully give it a little bit more information about what moon companies are doing. This is we've vaguely touched about moon stuff, mostly policy related on the podcast in the past, but not a lot about actual payloads going to the moon and things like that. So I'm pretty excited to dig into it. So before we get into the technology stuff, that design of cube Rover itself, all that fun stuff. I would really like to hear the roles that you have on the team, and you know what you're working on day to day. So Mike, you want to start. Yeah, sure. So I'm the president of the cube Rover division here at Astra botic, and we're soon spinning out as its own company cube Rover, and I'm the principal investigator on NASA contract under which the key. Rover is being developed in collaboration with Carnegie Mellon University, and that's the small business innovation. What is it was the are. They are. Yeah, I forget what the are is the type of contract used to develop technology focused Pacific toward small like Astra body, and that was a twenty seventeen award. But that came pretty recently. Is that right? Yeah, there is these these phases. So we had a phase one, and then we re proposed for phase two for more dollars and much more. Exciting and bigger development on the project. Leading to that point is kind of interesting because you mentioned that cube Rovers soon to roll off on its own, and you've got these cube Rover, small awards coming from NASA now. So it's seems like an interesting history there. I'm curious to find out how did the project itself start and maybe now the full company, like what is the origin story there. Yeah, I can. I can take that Asser botic and Carnegie Mellon have been working together for ten years since the astronautics inception. And we've developed a lot of Rovers over those years. CMU students and professors have developed their own plant a Rovers over the years all mostly targeting the moon, and it's only been recently that our government has switched its focus, much more towards the moon and started investing in development of technologies, including Rovers to go towards the moon. So what we do is heavy Klabin with with seamew students to develop this Rover is very challenging because of the small size that we're developing. But we have a lot of heritage and learning over the years to lean upon. So what phase would you say cube Rover, both the actual technology, but the company is in at this point in time? Yes. So we're, we're pretty far along with technical progress. We're at what you'd call tier all four going into KIRO five technical technology readiness level. So we have a prototype working driving around in the lab. What we're doing right now is we're trying to build that up to be a flight qualified Rover. So by the end of two thousand or by the middle of two thousand and twenty, we're aiming to have this Rover be ready for flight tested for all space, environmental testing, and ready to send off to NASA if they decide to file it on the company. And we're incorporating right now, we're looking at our location which I can't say where we'll be incorporating, but it will be very soon and we're hoping to have more information on that by the end of the summer. But yeah, we're actually on that note. We're going to be hiring four qb Rover. In probably November or December timeframe. So check out our website for updates on that. Could you talk at all about the decision to roll out as its own standalone enterprise of sorts? Because it seems from from someone like me who's a little bit outside looking in, it seems like a good fit with what Astra botic is offering that you could extend these services to not just Lander, but then have some ability on the surface. So it seems like a good fit there. It is a good fit. It really does align well with us.

cube Rovers NASA Astra botic Carnegie Mellon University Mike Anthony Carnegie Mellon Astra Andy Asser botic KIRO principal investigator president qb Lander ten years
"carnegie mellon" Discussed on Grumpy Old Geeks

Grumpy Old Geeks

03:25 min | 3 years ago

"carnegie mellon" Discussed on Grumpy Old Geeks

"That's where they got all the people from carnegie mellon yeah when they when they pulled them away it's looking more and more like oprah's just gonna pull out of the the rnd on this and they'll probably just rent a fleet from tesla or waymo or waymo after you know after that whole thing happen with knowing well we had tech we couldn't make it work so i guess we'll just lease your car's maybe that'll be yeah we'll see how that that pans out because i guess they're really trying to make nice now this new ceo from peres really trying to make nice with google because you know they need them there's yeah there's no way they're going to get you somebody they're not gonna do it by themselves anymore that i mean that's that's become clear so yeah it's either going to be you know waymo tessler gm i this is like the top ones that are going to going to make it i think but we'll see how that plays out but yeah it sucks for these people than in pittsburgh for sure but it doesn't say that they're actually laying off any of the engineers yet so no so far is just the people that were sitting in the cars so yeah tough job yeah now this one this one got my goat i wanted this last week but you weren't around so i waited on it court rules copying photos found on the internet is fair use everybody is pissed off about this one well basically it just says there's no such thing as copyright then like we don't own anything like nobody owns a damn thing and if you put it up on the internet it's now a free for all that's kind of it so how much money to pinterest pour into this thing yes seriously you know their lobbyists were in the back i five in each other when this game down no shit basically gives them a business model which has been lacking for the inception of interest yeah virginia federal court has made a decision the photographers won't be happy to hear no shit the court ruled that finding a photo on the internet and then using it without permission on a commercial website can be considered fair use how okay but how does this not then slippery slope to well i found music on the internet it's fair use i found video on the internet it's fair use i don't understand any differentiation between a photo or any other version of media if you find it on the this to me this ruling will obvious is going after the supreme court and get shut down there's no way we can have diety with this rule in place we can't yet i mean it's a seven page ruling you can go read it if you want the link will be in the show notes it said the use was transformative noncommercial which if you're putting a photograph on a loaded commercial website that's bullshit the use was in good faith oh no god no it wasn't good faith they stole it fuckers in the use was of a factual photo and instead of creative photos in the use was previously published photo well anything on the internet is previously published photo at that point the use was only a crop rather than the whole in the houston hurt the potential market for that photograph well okay there you go there's your loophole but i mean you now you're now you're in the opposite case you're you're you're guilty until proven innocent because now you have to prove that you could have made money off that photo and how do you do that and how do you do that and how are you going to take somebody to court every single time that they use your photo that's ridiculous yeah it's it's not good it's not known so this is going to have to get overturned it must it must which means it probably won't that's good that's a good point welcome to our society can this awesome isn't it this.

oprah tesla carnegie mellon
"carnegie mellon" Discussed on Part-Time Genius

Part-Time Genius

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"carnegie mellon" Discussed on Part-Time Genius

"Skyrockets and if you can't pay that they get your car or take away your license which then makes it harder to get to your job to pay that ticket and that's what she'd been driving a ton of bankruptcies in the city i mean i guess if you're desperate and you're looking for a fast fix for your financial troubles like playing the lottery seems like the quickest way out at least that's how i think about it but it sounds like you're saying it's more than that like these people are actually being misled or maybe do or something and you know this actually goes back to two thousand eight study like the number of studies i'm quoting today on all these studies i come came with them but this was a group of behavioral economists there at carnegie mellon and so what they were looking to is is is it really like the reason why poor people are so much more likely to play the lottery than those who are better off and what they found was that a lot of the desire that drives these low income players isn't so much from being poor as it is from feeling poor so here's how the study's authors broke down their findings it says in experiment one participants were more likely to purchase lottery tickets when they were primed to perceive that their own income was low relative to the implicit standard and then an experiment to participants purchase more lottery tickets when they considered non lottery situations in which rich people or poor people receive advantages implicitly highlighting the fact that everyone has an equal chance of winning the lottery so basically when you make people feel poor they played the lottery more and when they feel like it's equal like that then they wanna put money on it because they feel like it's a fair game i mean it's kind of heartbreaking when you think about how low their chances of winning actually are though right.

carnegie mellon
"carnegie mellon" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

02:21 min | 3 years ago

"carnegie mellon" Discussed on Science Friday

"Stop moving she's like losing just like as an exactly exactly like us thank you this is fascinating thing we wish we had more time thank you both for joining us not only is an artist and obama that nvidia research fellow carnegie mellon at the frank ricci studio for creative inquiry henny nonni is a psychologist and assistant professor in the robotics institute at carnegie mellon and director of the human and robot partners lab thank you you can see videos and photos of my guests throw botox work on our website at science friday dot com slash robotics picking us to the break our musical guests for the night pittsburgh's very own townspeople after the break we'll talk about computers that compose their own music and we'll let you hear a pop song written by eight is they would do us and can barely see old bed rooms i am the last son of to smile this is science friday replayed coming to you from the carnegie library music hall in pittsburgh yes and the theme of our show is no assembly required and we've been talking about robots in a i but we have to remember that that behind every robot as we've been talking about it is a piece of software that runs it every row by technology we've been talking about and you'll see tonight is run on some sort of bits and bytes with one exception and that's what we're going to talk about now different kind of robotics my next guest programs the stuff we wear stuff we sit on and now with software she uses bacteria and chemistry and if you wonder what that's about that's what we're going to talk about now she takes actual biological makeup of something let's chair for example and programs that do something it didn't do before like if you like stuff she programs a chair to put itself together.

carnegie mellon henny nonni assistant professor director pittsburgh obama nvidia research fellow frank ricci carnegie library
"carnegie mellon" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

Stuff You Should Know

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"carnegie mellon" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

"Sorry yeah right so colon in parentheses either way is a smiley face or frowny face and that we can point to this is so cool that that they know who did this but a guy named scott fallen and he was either an admin or a frequent user or whatever had something to do with the message for the electric message board which was a very very early like chatroom forum prototype back in nineteen eighty two for a carnegie mellon university yeah which we did some time there we served out of sentence there we did we did a little little short video carnegie mellon for days yeah short video days but yeah nineteen eighty two he i don't even know if you said specifically but september nineteenth actually the actual date right which is amazing and he said on this bulletin board if you put a smile efface using this actually even gussied it up with the dash is the knows that they lost the dash pretty quick i like the dash do you overdone do you know what i like or like it's a horse face what i like the people that are can do like a whole picture i out of typing things oh yeah like the shrug guy yeah i mean like this whole page would be a big rooster it's like the kids in me you and everyone we know yeah exactly they had like the book was the cutest touch yet good movie that is the one movie that has ever done whimsey.

carnegie mellon scott carnegie mellon university
"carnegie mellon" Discussed on Inside the Hive with Nick Bilton

Inside the Hive with Nick Bilton

01:58 min | 3 years ago

"carnegie mellon" Discussed on Inside the Hive with Nick Bilton

"Well i think it's hard to generalize about a company with like twenty seven thousand employees right like they're obviously all kinds of people there but i you know i spent a lot of time reporting on young bankers in the wake of the financial crisis and the thing that they hated most about their jobs was actually like not always the long hours and the you know solis spreadsheet making it was like the fact that when they told people where they worked it was like embarrassing and you know parties they would say you know oh i work in finance and they wouldn't say like i work at golden sachs because you know it was not a cool thing it was not cool to work there in two thousand ten and so i think that's the danger here is that you know if you're an engineering student coming out of stanford or coming out of carnegie mellon mit and you're getting recruit routed by facebook and a bunch of other places you might just say to yourself like i don't wanna go work for facebook because i don't wanna like have to answer all the questions from my friends about like why i'm going to work for the giants valence company like you might just say oh i'm gonna go work at you know at slack or at you know some blockchain start up or or some other company that has a better reputation because not because you know it's a bad job not because you won't get paid well but like because it's just a social cost it's like i don't want to spend you know years of my life like apologizing for where i work people wanna feel good about where they were so i think that's a real risk is that facebook becomes you know a less cool place to work it's not as impressive it's not as widely respected and i i think that's what.

golden sachs stanford carnegie mellon mit facebook
"carnegie mellon" Discussed on From Scratch

From Scratch

01:49 min | 3 years ago

"carnegie mellon" Discussed on From Scratch

"This might never have been and it's always hard to think of counterfactual 's and you might have gone on to create something else that's innovative but funny how things happen through happenstance like this kinds of things i mean i also i was torn about whether i should go get my phd honey melon or whether i should go i was considering the time going to berkeley or stanford and it wasn't clear so yeah there were all kinds of happenstance there lie did you choose carnegie mellon over stanford or berkeley because of becau because i wanted to work with with my adviser manuel i mean he was this guy wanna turn a word which is kind of the equivalent of the price for computer science and he was you know we hit it off really well i met him so i chose carnegie mellon over all the schools because i could work with him and by the way we mentioned during you tell me exactly during during his widely considered the guy who you know the the father of computer science there's a movie about him the imitation game i mean he was in the you know he was a mathematician in the middle of the century british mathematician in the nineteen forties and nineteen fifties the the british government contract that him to break the 'nigma machine but in amongst other things that he did he essentially started the field of computer science he had all kinds of ideas on one of his ideas was you know he thought well at some point computers are going to be probably about as intelligent humans and one of the questions that he address was when will we know that computer is as intelligent as a human and he came up with this idea of what's the test imagine that there's a human judge that is talking over texting with human computer and if the human judge cannot tell which one's which then we'll say that that computer has passed attorney test.

carnegie mellon stanford berkeley manuel i british government attorney
"carnegie mellon" Discussed on Intercepted with Jeremy Scahill

Intercepted with Jeremy Scahill

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"carnegie mellon" Discussed on Intercepted with Jeremy Scahill

"And influence public opinion on shape elections i mean let's not forget carnegie mellon university did an interesting study that found between nineteen forty six in the year two thousand there were i think of uh about a hundred consequential elections worldwide uh that were influenced by either of russia or the united states the united states influence through penetration disinformation bribes and funding seventy percent of those elections influenced by foreign powers this was part of the apparatus of us global power during the cold war and now that our power is weighing once a superpower we manipulate are the people elections now as a fading declining power our elections get manipulated like other countries i know last time that we had you on the show we talked a bit about trump being up with tariffs symptom more a symbol of the decline of the american empire have characterized it as trump grew out of this red other than uh trump pushing this decline at a faster rate as the primary factor that were discussing how do you see the trump presidency in the broader context of the scholarship that you've done on american empire and your thesis that states that that it is in decline and that it will actually declined to the point that it's recognizable to ordinary people and across the world who is the trump figure in past imperial decline a sir anthony okay sir anthony eden was a british aristocrat uh he was winston churchill's acolyte he worked his way up through the conservative power a party and although he was fluent in persian he became obsessed with nassar nassar threatened him angered him upset him and when nasser nationalized the suez canal anthony eden freaked out he lost and he launched one of these desperate dangerous military operation.

carnegie mellon university russia united states trump sir anthony eden nassar nassar suez canal anthony eden winston churchill nasser seventy percent
"carnegie mellon" Discussed on The Schmidt List

The Schmidt List

02:12 min | 3 years ago

"carnegie mellon" Discussed on The Schmidt List

"If you were talking to somebody fred who's interested in getting involved in the user experience as a craft maybe they're a designer graphic designer maybe their developer maybe there a product owner or something and they wanna move into that right what what would be your would you i'm guessing you wouldn't tell them to go to get a masters degree in you x what would you guide them towards well i am a u x designer so i wouldn't actually answer their question that's right yes i would begin by asking them questions about you know what their current situation is what their background is what their goal is for example one of our family friends is a graphic designer she is really not feeling the profession anymore she sees what's going on out there in the u x world and has and we've been talking about what sorts of opportunities are out there for someone like her and we talked a little bit about what user interface design was versus user experience design and it turns out that what she's more interested in is the user interface side than the user experience side so i'm not going to say oh you know you need to you know go away from your family for two years moved down to pittsburgh and get a masters degree from carnegie mellon it's not that that's not really vice that's going to help anyone so my approach is always understanding their needs and their goals and things like that had another gentleman who i talked with recently who was debating whether or not to go to a local boot camp school and he told me about some of his background about his his personal situation in life because i mean that's a really yeah like my my friend who wants to become a ui designer she can't just move i mean she's got no three little kids at a mortgage.

developer carnegie mellon pittsburgh two years
"carnegie mellon" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

02:02 min | 4 years ago

"carnegie mellon" Discussed on Here & Now

"And so there's already a lot of remotesensing in the robotics and a lot of collaborative effort in mining is very complex pedayue framing if there's tied at the height of the people you work with their maybe even your own having worked with you know your hands on the earth your now sitting at a desk as part of the common out you actually no we say it in in the cavs of machinery your we uh sit at workstations at the mind and concentrate on the task they'll for prolonged periods of time so that's actually won things in common new sierra learn something to quote a friend jeff about made from carnegie mellon uh mining and and tech they're not hard they're just complicated than so uh jeff of a visit to the smiling operations in and the got to see that first highend there are so many miss conceptions about appalachia you know i just think we live and probably the most misunderstood part of the country and so often people try to do things here that are wellintended but the because they don't understand the challenges in the culture that fits it maybe has counterproductive results and so we seek take is one thing as a part of solution to change some of these longstanding problems that we have here in central appalachia were you obviously syrup and i'm wondering if you're watching other people realize it for the first time yes it's a it's an internal and external challenge getting people to reimagined themselves that's when jeff the group that we travelled around for three days we call it the reimagined appalachia to her we just name that are say off but the getting people to see a different way you know that's our logo it uh slow our slogan at bit source a new day a new way and so getting people here to realize that uh there is a new way that we can stay here and and earn a good living the second challenge is to convince the outside world that we are capable of doing this for what kinds of things are you quote unquote making at pitiless we do uh augmented reality.

jeff carnegie mellon appalachia central appalachia augmented reality three days
"carnegie mellon" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

02:03 min | 4 years ago

"carnegie mellon" Discussed on TechStuff

"This actually dates to the 1980s in a computer lab at carnegie mellon university it's amazing that we can actually tracked down the birth of the moada khan as it is used today often these sort of things end up being buried in legend in lower and we never really understand where something came from it just we can can of point when it became popular but anything before that tends to be a mystery not so in this case because things that existed online have a habit of sticking around even if that online was just online in the case of a of a local network and not the internet at large because we're talking about 1982 most universities didn't have access to the internet carnegie mellon probably in exception to that but this was not a internet mean this was very local on a bulletin board system so we can pinpoint the date of a motaqawi creation to september nineteenth nineteen eighty two so here's what was happening computer science students and other students who had become interested in computers uh were using a school electron bullet electronic bulletin board system or be be asked to post messages to one another so this was a predecessor to the news groups and forums that you would find over the internet but this would be a decade before the world wide web ever existed to access abebe s typically you would use a dial up modem and you would call a phone number that would be connected to a specific computer that hosted the bulletin boards system uh some of these bulletin board systems could only have one connection at a time so you might try and calling get a busy signal and you'd have to wait and try and call later you also had la bolton board systems that tried to regulate traffic by charging per minute of use and that way you could cut down on someone just hogging the bulletin boards system just for him or herself.

carnegie mellon university carnegie mellon bulletin board system world wide web computer science bolton