36 Burst results for "cancer."

Fresh update on "cancer." discussed on Radio Surgery

Radio Surgery

01:51 min | 1 hr ago

Fresh update on "cancer." discussed on Radio Surgery

"In fact, he had To cancer is one of the forehead, one behind the ear. And he trusted us and we treated him and his cancer went away. And he's very, very, very happy. No cutting, no bleeding for his skin cancer. We see many people with spatial sound, squamous, so and other cancers. This is the work that we do every day. We have a book that to send you where he can pick up and many people who have cancer who want to learn about skin cancer. Read through the book that which is very informative, Asi unique booklet. You will not get anything like it anywhere else so come into our office. Many people do come into our office to pick up information right into the heart of New York City. There's a half a million people in our neighborhood. Every day between Penn Station and Grand, Central and Times Square, Macy's in Herald Square and Bryant Park, so walk over to 38th and Broadway and meet our staff and get information and pass it on. It's so important that we talk about a man who came to us from Poland. He's 69 years old. He's married, has four Children and he came with prostate cancer is followed six years with this piece, a going up and well. He had a Gleason six cancer six and he was just being observed It was tired of being observed he wanted the cancer to be treated. And he wanted to be cured. And he knows with us for the police and 66 cancer. We have a 95% success rate. Very high success rate for Prostate cancer, and he also had a cancer on his cheek. He had a left cheek, basal cell cancer, and they're going to do Mose surgeon. It had Moe's surgery on his Knows before most is the kind of excavation of the body had an excavation of his nose and his forehead before and he just did not want to lose more of his body. So it came to us for two reasons. The prostate cancer Gleason 66, and he came Why? Because he heard about our high success rate men come for five reasons for prostate cancer want us to get the best results to avoid radical robotic surgery? Keep the sexual life to keep the urinary life and to avoid the Penis shortening of radical robotic surgery, So it came for that was one reason the prostate cancer. The second was being fed up with surgery on his face for skin cancer..

New York City 95% Bryant Park Poland Six Years Penn Station Herald Square Times Square Broadway Grand Central Five Reasons SIX 38Th One Reason Two Reasons Half A Million People MOE Four Children 69 Years Old
Hara Allison's Powerful Personal Story

Taking Her Lead

02:02 min | 1 d ago

Hara Allison's Powerful Personal Story

"Talk about some of the work that you do some your series and then some of your experience in the past in graphic arts share actually my twenty four year old daughter at the time had an idea. She follows this site on instagram. Called be more and it's about you know. They hold up signs where they say. I'm more than my diagnosis. And so she suggested. I paint words on her back of who she thinks. She is not necessarily what she looks like. But that photograph sparked a series. And i had twenty eight women take part and the words were just amazing and beautiful and each person that came over. We sat down and talked about the words. We discussed them. One person was survivor of domestic abuse. And her words are strong loyal safe. Just it ran. The gamut one lady has stage four cancer. It was really really emotional and beautiful and watching. The women claim the words that they were beautiful. You know most of the women were overweight. I just to see them claim who they were and not what they look like was really really beautiful and powerful specify the series it after that i did one for men called real men real man. Something like that anyway and it's so interesting who feels called to participate. One of the men was a transgender man. And that was so cool. And another was paraplegic. I just really love who feels called to say. Seaney notice me and hear me. It's really lovely experience. Wow how moving for you and the individuals partic- yeah. I feel that connection. Yeah what a connection that you're creating and i'm sure that comes out in the artwork right and i think so. They feel really empowered. Most of the women in the seamy series bought a print to put up in their room or the one who was domestically abused. Has it on her bathroom mirror so every morning she can remember those words

Instagram Seaney Cancer
High Temperatures Close Schools, Break Records

AP News Radio

00:51 sec | 3 d ago

High Temperatures Close Schools, Break Records

"Millions of Americans are sweating in the heat and humidity for many in the northeast it's been days of blistering heat cancer patient the reticence to low in Medford Massachusetts wanted her landlord to turn on the air conditioning I have a hard time very intent and I can breathe and I know I'm going to die some people it's you know please be decent amount of GM thing on so we can have some may have her AC is on now she talked to WCVB TV the National Weather Service is promising a cold front will cool things off in the northeast by tomorrow and especially on Friday but they say it'll stay hot and sticky across parts of the south and central U. S. with highs running maybe fifteen degrees above average or even higher I'm read off Ole

Wcvb Medford Massachusetts Cancer National Weather Service GM
Interview With Life Coach, Beth Gardner

Recovery Survey

02:18 min | 3 d ago

Interview With Life Coach, Beth Gardner

"So what i'm currently doing. I'm working as a life coach on two different paths. Incidentally similar In the approaches. That i use i'm working with non addicts so these are people that have not had Addiction within their lifetime but have been surrounded by beat through were core Extracurricular activities in the educational environment Corporate america it's a wide variety. And i'm working with these people to provide them nine non-judgmental confidential sounding board For them to actually speak freely About their questions. Their concerns and to provide them solution. Serve a paths for its healing map if you will so that. They can towards our own past excellent. And i'd read some of the notes that you had sent me before the episode and you alluded to the fact that Your your parents struggled with with Some chemical dependency issues. Do you think that that's part of the reason that you got into. This is what what drew you to researching and finding out more about The the role of the support people play and what What kind of help that. You might need as someone that is affected by someone in active addiction correct while would actually stem from was back in two thousand november. Two thousand. i was training for. What would have been my first marathon. First and only marathons a year prior to that i had Retired from the elite sport. A rolling. So i had been training with world class athletes many of which were previous olympics. I had not earn berths on the national team at that point nor had been to the olympics. But i I have retired from that sport. In ninety nine and november of two thousand after going to a breast surgeon. I would stike nerves with stage three breast cancer and it was a non genetic

America Drew Olympics Breast Cancer
The Biggest Threats in the Republic Right Now Are Backed by Liberals

The Dan Bongino Show

01:37 min | 5 d ago

The Biggest Threats in the Republic Right Now Are Backed by Liberals

"This morning. I'm going to mention it today because it could become the bedrock of the show. Liberalism is a cancer to forest fire. If you're a liberal listening, I'm sorry. You believe in that? I really hope that you will are genuflect and repent for your ideological stain You're trying to impose on the rest of us. If that sounds harsh to hear, I don't give a damn not even a little bit because it's true. The biggest threats to the republic right now are all backed by liberals. Threat number one critical race theory. I mean, think about it right? The United States is such a powerful, incredibly prosperous country, not only the most prosperous country in the history of humankind, I would guess the most prosperous country in the history of any Cynthia being anywhere in the cosmos because we've yet to find another one yet. We can't be taken down from the outside the United States. I mean, we could, but it would be very hard. Never like to say Can't We have the most powerful military, the most powerful economy. Most entrepreneurial, hardworking workforce anywhere in the world. So liberals a lot of them who absolutely hate this country. Everything it's about. I'm sorry. I have to give you the bad news. But it's true. They figured out a long time ago. The best way to dismantle and burn this place from the ground is not from the outside, but from the inside. And what better way to do that? And to cause chaos on the inside by getting all of us to hate each other. For the most superficial of

United States Cancer Cynthia
Surviving to Thriving With Anne Crook

Breast Cancer Conqueror Podcast

01:45 min | 5 d ago

Surviving to Thriving With Anne Crook

"So thank you. Thanks for joining us. I'm excited you are still thank you. So much dr vm. So glad to be here. Yes so this is really a full circle. I remember you from the retreats and We exchange a few words branch and your with a french fan. And also we have that connection and you were there because you were dealing with breast cancer. So let's start there. You know what happened where led to that and where today. What a journey it's been. I'm so happy to say. I'm driving now after three years from that diagnosis But i'll start back with that. The diagnosis so i was diagnosed stage. One breast cancer back in april of twenty eighteen. It was about a week after my birthday. and it was Estrogen progesterone receptive her. Two negative and it was a huge wakeup call for me. Because i'm certified health coach. John i live pretty clean healthy lifestyle and really prayer ties myself care and it was just like wow. We're how did my body create that lump and backtrack back twenty ten. I had been diagnosed with hypothyroid and You know now later. Find out. I've had a mild case of hashimoto's i had elevated tgi. Antibodies but my you. Antibodies were always in range But i really feel like it was kind of the perfect storm of dealing with the hashimotos and leaky gut. I later found out. I had can dida. And estrogen dominance and so that kind of brought me to your retreats in september of two thousand eighteen.

Dr Vm Breast Cancer Hashimoto John
Clarence Williams III, 'The Mod Squad's' Linc, dies at 81

AP News Radio

00:47 sec | 5 d ago

Clarence Williams III, 'The Mod Squad's' Linc, dies at 81

"The veteran actor who is in a ground breaking old school TV series has died no matter the generation of the medium Clarence Williams the third left his mark his first big break through was as Lync haze on the mod squad one of three undercover cops one black one white one belonged his appearance as a member of a team of equals back then was an inspiration at a time when there were relatively few positive black role models on TV Williams also played prince's father in purple rain and more recent TV audiences will remember his work in Williams manager says the actor died this past Friday at his home in Los Angeles after a battle with colon cancer recurrence Williams the third was eighty one I'm Oscar wells Gabriel

Clarence Williams Williams Prince Colon Cancer Los Angeles Oscar Gabriel
Understanding Endometriosis

Precisione: The Healthcast

01:55 min | Last week

Understanding Endometriosis

"You tell us a little bit about what endometriosis is house diagnosed and how it can affect somebody in how they feel yes so and in trio says is a genetic condition. That's also inflammatory. And they're in. My opinion is in autoimmune component. Although that's debated in the literature and essentially what is is a series of growth that are noncancerous but can in some cases predispose people to having pelvic cancers and these growths are made of tissue that is very similar to although not exactly like the tissue inside the uterus which is called the end of meacham so these lesions grow throughout the pelvis abdominal cavity can be on the bowel on the bladder intestine ends diaphragm ovaries being tubes outside the uterus. It can beyond My official structures like Musco skeletal structures like ligaments and fasha and these leaders have been found as far flung as the knee or the nose. Lungs that sort of thing. So it's a systemic disease. One of the earlier theories about it was that was related to retrograde menstruation. And it was like these. The tissue the menstrual tissue instead of leaving was growing still in the pelvic cavity again. That's found not to venture we now find. That in studies done on fetuses. Nine percent of female fetuses have an betrayal regions. You know even pre birth and ten percent of the people with uterus. The population of people with uteruses around world have dimitrius so there is some kind of genetic factor that has not yet been fully elucidated.

Pelvic Cancers Musco Systemic Disease
Breast Cancer Pill Reduced Recurrence, Death in Early-Stage Patients

Red Eye Radio

00:32 sec | Last week

Breast Cancer Pill Reduced Recurrence, Death in Early-Stage Patients

"Promising new study results on a pill for early stage breast cancer. The pill called Lin Parcel was found to help breast cancer patients diagnosed with harmful mutations to live longer and without disease. After cancer treatments in Parsa was tested in over 1800 women and men with early stage breast cancer. They were given pills for a year after surgery and chemotherapy study found about 82% of patients had triple negative breast cancer. Three years later, 86% were still alive without cancer patients also had the BR Lined by the

Breast Cancer Lin Parcel Parsa Triple Negative Breast Cancer Cancer
Pill Shows Benefit in Certain Hard-to-Treat Breast Cancers

AP News Radio

00:55 sec | Last week

Pill Shows Benefit in Certain Hard-to-Treat Breast Cancers

"Researchers are reporting promising results from a medicine that appears to help keep at bay certain early stage hard to treat forms of breast cancer it's a pill called Lynparza marketed by AstraZeneca and Merck and already in use to treat some widely spread cancers but a study released by the American society of clinical oncology says Lynparza appears to help breast cancer patients with harmful mutations live longer without disease after their cancers had been treated with surgery and chemotherapy it was studied in patients with mutations known as BRCA one and two which can predispose people to breast cancer out of nearly two thousand women and men with early stage breast cancer eighty six percent were still alive after three years after taking the pill compared to seventy seven percent in the placebo group I'm Jackie Quinn

Breast Cancer Lynparza Cancers Astrazeneca American Society Of Clinical O Merck Jackie Quinn
'Next Big Wave': Radiation Drugs Track and Kill Cancer Cells

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | Last week

'Next Big Wave': Radiation Drugs Track and Kill Cancer Cells

"Doctors reported promising results from an experimental cancer drug that delivers radiation directly to tumor cells an emerging class of medicine called radio pharmaceuticals may become a new way to treat patients with hard to reach inoperable cancers in a study involving over eight hundred men with advanced prostate cancer released by the American society of clinical oncology a tumor targeting radiation therapy from drug maker Novartis kept cancer at bay for nearly nine months compared to three months for people receiving standard treatment and survival was better to fifteen months versus eleven months the drug is administered through an IV in each dose contains trillions of engineered molecules a tractor portion of the molecule hunts down cancer cells the payload portion is the radiation experts say radio pharmaceuticals maybe the next big wave of therapeutic development I'm Jennifer king

Experimental Cancer Inoperable Cancers American Society Of Clinical O Prostate Cancer Novartis Cancer Jennifer King
FDA Approval of New Alzheimer’s Drug May Boost Prospects

The Readout Loud

02:09 min | Last week

FDA Approval of New Alzheimer’s Drug May Boost Prospects

"Today. I think really take this week on reading. The the fda tea leaves of drug approved ability. We'll thank you. Say but yeah. I think you know we are basically on the eve of what is expected to be. This momentous decision by the fda on canyon have the controversial alzheimer's disease treatment from biogen and because there isn't really much to do in terms of trying to predict that decision. There isn't much information to pick apart. I think people you know resort to to what we all would which is maybe not quite tinfoil hat but we look at whatever evidence there is and try to construct a take and so for months. I think there's been this. Focus especially in the investor community on parsing each individual. Fda decision for clues as to some sort of like meta take on how the agency is thinking about new drugs. Yeah i mean you know. There's this idea right like you know is the fda being more conservative would drag approvals. Is it being more flexible. Which approvals right and it has come to feel a little bit absurd so if there's a run of as there were a few months ago surprising decisions whether it be Rejections or you know. Advisory committee hearings called where they weren't previously expected then. Suddenly the vibe is oh well. They're really cracking down. And then recently we had to Drug approvals in consecutive weeks. That came through. Let's say favorably to the drug companies and sort of undramatically so then the vibes us the fda in fact. They've kind of taken their foot off the brake when it comes to this and i think you know everybody probably knows this. But the is comprised of thousands of people And even the drug review arm is separated into individual fiefdoms focused on you know different aspects of biology and science and types of drugs etc and each one has its own internal politics. Each one has its own personnel changes in its own kind of regulatory philosophy. It's different between cancer than it is from neuroscience for example and so i guess it's one of those things where reading these tea leaves has kind of maybe run out of clues to offer us and maybe we should all just kind of respected. It's a giant organization and we are on the outside of it.

FDA Alzheimer's Disease Biogen Advisory Committee Cancer
Caller Defines What It Means to 'Get off Your Caboose'

The Dan Bongino Show

01:24 min | Last week

Caller Defines What It Means to 'Get off Your Caboose'

"Hi, Dan. It's an honor to speak with you. You know, I called him to say thank you because your continuous assertion that the do matters on your podcast and inspired me to get up off my caboose earlier this year to finally become the hero that I've been waiting for. I start showing up Tarkett school board meetings and making public comments. And actually recently got elected to one of those boards. I joined a local parent organization that standing up in force against critical race theory, mass mandates and vaccine propaganda towards our kids. And I've also been regularly writing and calling my representatives asking and tough questions and seeing what I want from them is a constituent and they're listening. I just want to tell your listeners that they don't have to feel helpless. I hear it in their voices when they call and it makes me so sad. We all just have to get up off our laurels. And be the voices for truth and change where we lead like you say it starts there. Wow. Lisa! Mikey, Please don't hang up on this here. Sometimes. You know, we have to get rid of calls. Lisa, that's ah! Get me a little emotional. I'm Homes. That's weird him. I don't know if I said I was talking about the cancer, and now you're talking About things that really matter to me. Oh, God. Give me a second. You're an inspiration, Dan. And I appreciate it. Yeah, I never intended to be. I mean that I'm not kidding. I always was the guy behind the camera. I mean, it was a secret service guy. You never in front of the camera. And I just like you just got pissed

DAN Lisa Mikey Cancer
Chemical Linked to Cancer Detected in Dozens of Popular Sunscreens

The Gee and Ursula Show

00:36 sec | Last week

Chemical Linked to Cancer Detected in Dozens of Popular Sunscreens

"School kids, because right now the workforce desperately needs them. What's in your son's grain test by Val ashore in online pharmacy and lab show dozens of popular sunscreens and after Sun products contain a chemical tied to blood cancers. Benzene, a known carcinogen was found in 27% of this phrase and lotions. Test it That includes products sold by Neutrogena, Banana Boat and CVS. The problem with benzene is it can cause leukemia, anemia, things like this, CBS chief medical correspondent John Luke Luke says. One of the things the FDA will look into is how the chemical is getting into the

VAL Cancers Banana Boat Neutrogena SUN CVS John Luke Luke Leukemia Anemia CBS FDA
Justices Reject Johnson & Johnson Appeal of $2B Talc Verdict

Here and Now

00:14 sec | Last week

Justices Reject Johnson & Johnson Appeal of $2B Talc Verdict

"Brody. The Supreme Court is leaving in place a $2 billion verdict in favor of women who said they developed ovarian cancer from using Johnson and Johnson talc products. The justices did not comment today in rejecting Johnson and

Brody Supreme Court Johnson Ovarian Cancer
Johnson and Johnson Asks Supreme Court to Void $2B Talc Verdict

Lifestyles Unlimited

00:53 sec | Last week

Johnson and Johnson Asks Supreme Court to Void $2B Talc Verdict

"A major drug company wants the nation's highest court to review a verdict over it's talc products. The Supreme Court could decide tomorrow whether or not to get involved in a nearly $2 billion lawsuit against pharmaceutical giant Johnson and Johnson. Johnson and Johnson wants a verdict in Missouri review that initially resulted in a nearly $5 billion verdict in favor of 22 women who developed ovarian cancer refereed using talc products. An appeals court cut that verdict in half but upheld findings about the products containing a specialist lace talc. Johnson and Johnson says that verdict is at odds with decades of scientific evaluations. Just the Samuel Alito is expected to recuse himself from consideration after reporting he owned Johnson and Johnson stock. Cox is Jared Helper, and Johnson and Johnson has faced hundreds of lawsuits across the country over tell products with mixed results.

Johnson Supreme Court Ovarian Cancer Missouri Samuel Alito Johnson Stock Jared Helper COX
Biden Commemorates War Dead at Arlington National Cemetery

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | Last week

Biden Commemorates War Dead at Arlington National Cemetery

"President Biden observed his first Memorial Day as commander in chief calling on Americans to commemorate their fallen heroes by remembering their fight for the nation's ideals remember those who gave their all in the service of America into replaying ceremony at Arlington National Cemetery president Biden stood with his head bowed made the sign of the cross as he stood at the tomb of the Unknown Soldier and later in remarks extolled the sacrifices of the fallen for the pursuit of democracy we were built on an idea the idea of liberty an opportunity for all never fully realized that inspiration of our founding but every generation is open the door a little wider this Sunday marked the sixth anniversary of the death of the president's son beau Biden a veteran who died of brain cancer I'm Jennifer king

President Biden Arlington National Cemetery Biden America Beau Biden Brain Cancer Jennifer King
Lorena's 'Alcance' During the HIV Outbreak

Latino USA

01:55 min | 2 weeks ago

Lorena's 'Alcance' During the HIV Outbreak

"Originally from a small town in the coastal state of mexico. Lorena arrived in the united states in may of nineteen eighty-one just a few days before her twenty first birthday less than a month later the centers for disease control and prevention announced the first recorded case of a new and lethal virus spreading in the united states which shows the lifestyle of some male homosexuals has triggered an epidemic of a rare form of cancer. This newscast from nineteen eighty-one and the media large portrayed hiv and aids. The gate illness some reporters even calling it gay cancer but even as the death toll from aids grew in the following years little was being done to provide much needed treatment. The demonstration was carefully choreographed by. Act up a two year. Old coalition of gay groups set up to fight. What they called the government's inaction and silence on aid. We have to let people know that there's an age crisis. The people are dying that we need money that we need healthcare while the aids epidemic is recognized as a catalyst for being in the lgbtq community trends immigrant. Women are often left out of the narrative in one thousand nine hundred ninety five at the peak of the epidemic noronha. hiv positive began. What she called her alcon say. You're her outreach. She was distributing condoms to trans immigrants. Sex workers in queens new york. It was a means of not only addressing the spread of sexually transmitted diseases but also a way of connecting trans immigrants to critical medical and legal services

Centers For Disease Control An Aids Lorena United States Cancer HIV Mexico Government Queens New York
How A Tiny Dog Helped Me Find My Way

Does This Happen to You

02:16 min | 3 weeks ago

How A Tiny Dog Helped Me Find My Way

"My dog's name is pepper. And i got him in the spring of two thousand six which is also the year. Both my parents had cancer. I was almost old enough to rent a car. But not quite. I lived at home with my parents. Well i lived with my dad most of that year because my mom was receiving cancer care out of state but more on that later. My dad also had parkinson's disease. I had graduated college three years before and in the inbetween time. I'm not sure exactly what i did. Other than quitting law school after six weeks checking out books from the library and surfing the internet which must have been boring. Because i probably had a super slow connection and there was no twitter. I also started working at a tennis club. Maybe ten to twelve hours a week. I was existing. But i didn't have anything close to a clear direction. Then my mom got diagnosed with a serious type of cancer. My dad got diagnosed with a less serious type and everything suddenly felt super dark. Like hell the florida skies become ferociously black when the massive summer thunderstorms descend. I don't remember what was going through my head during that time. I didn't keep a journal. And the only thing i'm good at remembering is random sports stuff but it seems likely. I felt scared and isolated while my mom was away undergoing multiple surgeries my dad and i- cohabitated in our traditional fashion. We mostly kept to our respective of the house and bumped into each other at mealtimes and when he wanted me to drive him to lows or the driving range so maybe. It's not so surprising that i decided i needed a dog to keep me. Company the chihuahua. All my parents got me. When i was five had died three or four years before so naturally the only type of dog i considered getting was a chihuahua

Parkinson's Disease Cancer Tennis Twitter Florida
"cancer." Discussed on Talking Cancer

Talking Cancer

05:34 min | 7 months ago

"cancer." Discussed on Talking Cancer

"To pharmacist. Availability some really useful. Tips from rue des. Now one of the wonderful reasons why matt millen is able to do this. Please wonderful things that you mentioned is because you work in partnership with a number financial organizations to support customers. He may be impacted financially following the concert diagnosis. What can these partnerships that you guys. I know works so hard to maintain and and to create. What can they offer for people living with cancer while we're really proud of all partnerships and particularly our partnerships with some of our biggest banking partners so for example the lloyd's banking group. This is a really fantastic partnership that helps us get help to people with cancer as soon as possible when they end to the bank so this is a dedicated team at lloyds banking group not to refer people with cancer to macmillan support line so as soon as they come in and show that they've had this considine gnosis all that struggling with whatever it may be whether that be debt all their mortgage all potentially losing their income the partners at lloyds banking greet notre refer than over to was and we can help them through it we've got partnerships as well for example with scottish widows and we know that people with khansa sometimes struggle to get their insurance paid out when they need to so again all brilliant macmillan nurses work with scottish widows to ensure that we can verify the claims and get that those insurance claims paid out was quickly as possible. Won't you've talked about that. From from lloyd as an incredible setup all that any other partnerships for those people listening who don't pops back with lloyd's yes. If you bank with the nationwide building society you can call and speak to the specialists support team and the service can help you if you've got money problems or if you're struggling to keep your mortgage loan or credit card repayment and similarly if you've got a bank account a mentioned lloyd's but also how the fact some bank scotland you can speak to that dedicated cancer support team and ellen show that they can help you with whatever questions that you've got an all of the numbers and all the details of operating partnerships are on the financial support and corona virus page of our website. They're always through this. Just you know. Just make sure that you pick up the phone and speak to somebody. That's me. I love that partnership with lloyd's it's just it's so banks can be scary the best of times but with a cancer diagnosis and going through what we're going through at the moment. It's an absolute lifeline. To know about that partnership that there's a lot of information and and i guess for some people listening it's all good information but it might be quite nerve wrecking about. If you've just been recently diagnosed where do you start And if you have been affected financially how do you. How do you start doing that. How'd you start organizing and planning your finances during this time. What's your best advice. 'have course and it's such a anxious time for people with cancer when they get that diagnosis a million things going through people's minds whether that a tweet men all work or where to start so i'd encourage anyone who's listening to take the time to know that mcmillan's there but also to know that there's lots of steps that they they can take so You could start. I completely budgets. Really having a good understanding of what's coming in Money wise but also. What's going out that would put you in a radi. Good position to start having those conversations whether that be with your buying coal with macmillan to help you understand what type of support is out there you could check your insurance and what insurance protections that you've got of course you can contact your bank..

lloyd cancer matt millen scottish widows macmillan lloyds banking ellen mcmillan
"cancer." Discussed on Talking Cancer

Talking Cancer

05:09 min | 7 months ago

"cancer." Discussed on Talking Cancer

"We've got the right people there to help people with those questions. I do say this in pretty much every cost. Because i know that there are one of the things that we've been highlighted during the pandemic. Is that not. Everybody has got a lovely new laptop and not everybody is tech. Savvy is confident you know on the internet and although there is this huge amount of information there it is really important to know this. You can pick up the phone to you is there. Are there are people you can talk to. That's absolutely right and we're hearing from people all the time saying you know. They missed the face to face contact from having someone to talk to so in the absence of that. The off support line is fully staffed. It's been seven days a week. I'd encourage anyone who's got a question about cancer. All who struggling with the pandemic to give us a coal to help answer questions and support people through this so similarly people in active cancer treatment or shielding we mentioned miss might be understandably reluctant or unable to go too busy places like banks to see countback financial support. So what's what's what are their options. That's right and of course. A lot of people are really worried at the moment about going out going too busy places. The good news here is that there's lots of online support available for people to do that by king so online banking mobile banking and even video banking f people to have video calls with that buying. So there's lots of solutions out there and alternatives to actually physically going into your bank branch an also lots of support from banks at the moment to help people with setting up online banking particularly for those elderly people at the moment who may not have online banquets before i used to going into that. Brian show speaking to someone face to face. The rededicated teams that banks providing at the moment to support people to set up accounts..

cancer Brian
"cancer." Discussed on Talking Cancer

Talking Cancer

08:11 min | 8 months ago

"cancer." Discussed on Talking Cancer

"With cancer will all touch on the latest government guidance and what it means in practice for people living with cancer. If you are asked to attend an appointment, please do keep it and feel confident in doing so we'll also be hearing some updates from Mandy things that keep you connected with people. It's not the same as in person, but it is a good substitute if these are your circumstances now, we know that these recent changes page. Make some people feel very anxious and worried. Please have a listing back to episode 2 of the podcast if you're looking for some guidance and helpful tips about managing your mental health during the pandemic. We're McMillan and we're kicking cancer Rosie and Mark welcome back lovely to have you with us now as in the other episodes we've recorded. I'm going to time stamp this and we're recording this on the 23rd of October 2020 and all the information that we talked about is correct at the time of recording in episode one we discussed what people can do if they're struggling with the new often virtue of two ways of interacting with GPS Specialists and Healthcare professionals, the millions support line team are still receiving some calls about this. So I'd recommend that anyone worried about that particular issue liquid back to episode one for more information loads of great advice there. However, for some people physical appointments and treatments in hospitals GP surgeries and pharmacies are going ahead but Standardly people may be feeling very anxious about the safety of this while covid-19 is still very much present Rosie what precautions are in place in hospitals and Health Care settings at the moment and how are they making these environments as safe as they possibly can for patients? Yeah. Thanks emigrate to be back. Thank you very much. And as you say we talked about some aspects of this last time obviously, it's totally natural to worry about going for appointments. All of us are anxious at the best of times where when doing this but of course now, there's all the added concerns and Logistics on top of that but you know, he was telling me that actually they're really reassured by all the precautions that they see once they arrive. So again last time we did talk about that shift from not quite so many face-to-face appointments and some telephone or video. So that does actually help because that means there are actually less people going through the hospital and of course when you get there, you'll might have a timed entry you might be asked to log In your vehicle until your appointment time and some places are even giving page or alerts out. I know one of our McMillan information centers that same close to one of the hospitals. In fact, right next door. They've opened up their car park to allow people to part there and indeed if you aren't traveling by car, they're also allowing people to wait inside and the hospitals just buzzing straight across when they're ready for the patient off. And of course, there's all the cleanliness precautions Jetta at the doors PPE and for the staff in particular and then the red and green channels in the hospital so areas where cancer patients would be kept well away from potential infection risk and deep cleaning is just going on relentlessly. So I suppose I'd say there are so many precautions in place. The most important thing is that if you are asked to attend an appointment, please do keep it and feel confident in doing so and one last thing just following up on some of the conversation we had last time about the challenges of not being dead. Take someone to your appoint. Yes. Yes. Some of that is lightning up a little bit in some particular circumstances not across the board, but it it's really important so do ask because it might actually be possible that you can take someone to some of your appointments actually from a personal perspective a friend of mine one for her yearly check-up post treatment for breast cancer yesterday and the situation about taking a couple had changed so so she was able to take somebody with her not all the way. That's great. You make sure you ask. Yeah. Absolutely you did just touch on that lightly not everybody is able to be picked up from the front doorstep and dropped at the at the door of the hospital her many people public transports. The only way they're going to get to these appointments and that has its own level of risk and its own level of anxiety as well. What steps can patients take to ensure they are traveling safely themselves really understandable that you're going to be worrying about this and actually you might be worrying about it and feel I really can't bother people. Hospital or my health care teams to talk about this but actually you absolutely should it may well be that there are options that they can do to modify something simple like Changing Times of appointments. So you're not traveling that busy times and might be able to actually organize things so that for example a blood test might be closer to home. So so please do ask if there are any options to explore if you do have to travel then definitely follow the guidelines travel in a bubble where possible if you've got to travel in a taxi, for example where a mass can open the window and not follow the guidelines which you will find online and I know also that some of our McMillan information centers have been linking locally to see what transport services are available. So again, just whereas to assist with this if you're worrying about this ask there's so much talk of what's online and there's so much information online and I know for for some people who maybe don't have access to computers job Or a little bit older and there are people on the end of a phone on there at the hospitals at appointments that and people are willing to talk and explain through the processes that you might have to that. You might expect them very definitely again. I can only reiterate that on that men and support line. Is there also and we'll be able to answer these queries a direct you to any of our local services. So absolutely people are available at the edge of a phone be that your health care team or indeed the mcmillans support line. So absolutely you don't have to go online that there will be someone at the end of a telephone line. And so please pick up the phone and asked I think you know, when you have a cancer diagnosis, it's again creating levels of anxiety. Very basically though. How does the shielding measure that one place in lockdown Mary with these the the new three-tier system that's been introduced by the government recently. So, I think the most important thing is that you do need to check the local restrictions and guidelines. For your area and if you've got any specific concerns about this, then do check in again with your health care team. They might be able to advise about any adjustments and be able to reassure you about precautions. We are advised that there will be a letter coming from the government to people who are on the extremely vulnerable list and to explain to them what advice they need to take and that length is is immanent but I think it's really important at the moment with the rapid change. We're seeing and different geographical areas that you make sure that you're up to date on what the local advice is Margaret. Yes, Rosie mentioned obviously for pharmacies across the UK the changing restrictions and tear system is meaning that you guys as well having to be quite reactive quickly to to make the experience of being able to get along bonuses or access to information from you guys available quickly and safely. Yes. I am I Rosie it is confusing isn't it? And t as in England firebreaks lockdowns in in school? Northern Ireland and Wales. It is very important that you stay close to the local guidance and guidance on travel but for pharmacies are open as as they have been all along through this pandemic and and we continue to be open for advice and you can access your medication and there are rules and support on on doing that. So so feel free not only need to access them physically on the High Street, but also ring ahead and to Rosie's point, you know pharmacies are available to advise. If you have any questions on on how to access medicine or get them delivered or how to help order your prescription with your GP too. Lovely. Thank you. If there was one starting point that people can go to what's your advice about.

McMillan Rosie government cancer Mandy Standardly Mark GPS Specialists Jetta England Wales Ireland UK Margaret Mary
"cancer." Discussed on Talking Cancer

Talking Cancer

12:04 min | 8 months ago

"cancer." Discussed on Talking Cancer

"Guidance on shielding in August of this year, which means shielding has now been paused so that means in practice you can go to work and if you cannot work from home as long as there's business is what they call covert safe now and it's important to note that this guidance is advisory. So what I would suggest, you know, the first step really is you should just first of all have a discussion wage Employer and agree your plan for returning to work. Now where you work is a question mark you know, so as I've said with the previous series, you know under the equality act which applies in England Scotland and Wales and the disability Discrimination Act which applies in Northern Ireland. Your employer has a legal obligation to make what we call reasonable adjustments to help you assemble with cancer to stay home work and that could be a variety of different things including helping you to work from home. So I suppose what to say to people if people are not feeling safe have that discussion with the employer employer particular with your line manager as your first point of contact and discuss the situation discuss what they're doing in the business what measures they're taking to make the workplace code would safe and if you're still not fitting that that's a safe environment for you, then I'd suggest, you know, you talk to your employer about alternative working Arrangements if that's possible. This is all in an Ideal World with a reasonable employer wage. And a job that you can drive to and get out of the car and get you know and get straight into the office. What about for those people who are contacting that Millions support line because they're they're genuinely worried about returning home after furlough. They might not be in such an accommodating place of work or a practically easy place of work to get to having to use public transport, for example, so what page first of all is actually really try to understand the risk and my first suggestion would be if you're speak to your clinical team. Now if somebody is going thru cancer treatment and and hopefully they'll be able to talk to their Consultants or their nurse specialist if they have access to one and the clinical team should be able to advise you on your health risk based on your condition and you are treatments and everybody's going to be different and this is something that's important to understand just because you have cancer doesn't necessarily mean that you're all automatically at higher risk. It depends on your type of cancer where you are in your tree log. Journey so it's important really first of all, I think to you know, find out the right information. So you understand the health risk for you. If you don't have access to your consultant or a nurse specialist also, you could find your g p and thought you to be about your condition and what you know things you need to be concerned about because again, not everybody will be in the same position. So it's really important to try and for yourself find out what the risks are for you then I would suggest that the next step then would be to go and talk to your workplace. Now. Your first point of contact is always your line manager there there the person that you know are responsible for you. And so you should talk to them about, you know, the information you get from your your clinicians your GP about the risks that you face and then talk to them in detail about you know, what measures they're taking in order to protect you as a worker in that business now, they have a duty and an obligation to provide, you know a safe environment for you as an employee. And so they need to take that very month. Seriously now, you know, there are also other people that you could talk to in the business as well now depends very much on the size of the business and the type of the business but there will be some businesses that would have health and safety officers that you can speak to they'll be others where you have access to what we call Occupational Health which are you know health services that are attached to a business and you could ask for a referral to your Occupational Health practitioner and they should be able to then advise you and the headline manager about what sort of adjustments would need to take place in order to help you to get back into the workplace. So there are some steps that you can take I'm not saying that everything I say here is going to absolutely help every single person out there with their own scenario, but I'm hopeful that it will help people to know what steps to take in order to be able to take control of the situation for themselves so that they understand the risks and what they can do as an employee to support themselves. I guess that you know birth. Taking back control thing is is is comes back again and again and again when we talk about cancer diagnosis and and arming yourself, I guess with the facts as well. That was there's really interesting thing that you said about, you know, making sure that you are in, you know in possession of your risk level and so it's not kind of something that's a bit amorphous for your employee. It's actually you know, here we are. This is it and it makes life a lot easier. If you go as informed as you possibly can to that conversation, it seems yeah, absolutely, you know, the more you know about what you need to protect your health the better position you'll be in to be able to have a conversation with your employer and hopefully your employer will be reasonable and we'll try and support you every you know, every worker has a value and and nobody wants to you know lose people unnecessarily and I'm sure there are lots of lots of efforts that are being made by employers. You mentioned reasonable adjustments. Can you just sort of pick that apart a little bit about what else that might look like a part-time job? Social distancing in an office space and hand sanitizer everywhere. What else might you be able to have a conversation about? Yeah. Well again just to State again. There's the equality act in in that applies in England Scotland Wales and disability Discrimination Act in Northern Ireland and those pieces of legislation say that your employer must make reasonable adjustments when would work place or work practices puts you at a substantial disadvantage because you have cancer and now and that is compared to other colleagues who do not have cancer. So what this means practices that your employer needs to think, you know creatively and you can think as an employee creatively about what sort of changes could be made to allow you to stay at work. Now the context of coronavirus these can be you know, flexible working arrangements. So for example, you know, let's think about if you were traveling to a job, but you didn't want to travel at rush hour because there will be more people. On and increases your risk then a flexible working arrangement might mean travelling later in the morning or coming back late earlier in the evening or later in the evening. Whatever works for you in order to be able to walk to do your job. There's also very good scheme. They're out there called access to work. It's a government scheme and they can pay for certain types of adjustments and it's called government jobs. Best kept secret in many ways because it's a it's a scheme there that the employer and and use an employee can look into to see if it can cover things like travel you might be able to wage claim for maybe first class train travel for example, or pay for taxis to and from work. If you're feeling that that will protect you and give you more security and that is a reasonable adjustment to suck you to stay in your employment changing work patterns shift patterns providing access to things like software and equipment from home so that you'd be able to do your job from home giving you the song. The computer is everything else that you might need in order to be able or even Wi-Fi access to Wi-Fi. So I suppose the important thing is to remember that anything could be considered an adjustment anything that allows you to keep a job could be considered but it must be reasonable what's reasonable for one employer might not be reasonable for another employer. It kind of depends on you know, how big is your business? You know, the finances the sort of adjustment that you're actually asking for so it's it's it's very like it's very specific to that kind of situation that you're in. So again, you know your relationship as an employee if you have cash with your line manager is so important but knowing your rights I think gives you again the confidence to know what you can approach and what you could talk to your employer about and that's hugely important choice. Absolutely, I guess as well the reality of coronavirus and the pandemic is that not everybody will be having as positive and experience in the workplace. We would hope and if people do end up having money worries, they are there other places that they can turn to what should they be doing initially now McMillan has a range of really great services that can support people with cancer. We have a wonderful team of financial guides and they can explain lots of options available and things that need to think about and things that you need to do so they can cover things like your budgeting and you're planning mortgages what to do with mortgages. Maybe you need to take a mortgage break for a while. They can support you about what song versation so you need to have with your building Society or your bank. They provide you information on your pension. For example, if you want to take early retirement Insurance options issues around Financial products is overdrafts. And also if you have debt and how you would manage your death in the unfortunate outcome that you lose your job. We have a team of fantastic welfare advisors who offer home Ice on benefits and other types of support that you might be able to Avail on such as you know council tax breaks as well. And then we've a team a small team of energy advisers who can talk to you about you know, how did you pay your gas or electricity or water bills, you know, and they're really really great team as well to to call and all of these services are available on the Mac Miller and support line, which is a free confidential find that anybody can call. I think there is some tangible Rising tension as well about the the job retention scheme finishing the end of October at people might be terribly worried about a thousand C's at this time. Oh, absolutely. So well the job retention scheme as as you said or the further scheme it's as it's known ends on the 31st of October 2020 now to end for a low employers should give stuff notice in writing if they're going to end the first game and there's no minimum notice. For furlough but employers they should talk to staff about The plant stand for as early as possible and they need to encourage staff to raise any concerns. They have about or problems around returning to work. So that's that's hugely important. Is there anything replacing it that's planned? Yes. So there's a new scheme called the job support scheme. Now, this is a is a scheme. It's designed to protect what they call viable wage jobs in businesses. There are businesses who are facing a lower demand over the winter months because of covet and it's there to help keep their employees attached to the workforce. Now the scheme is on the 1st of November and it runs for six months so over the winter. So what happens in that scenario is that the company will continue to pay the employee for the time worked but the cost of the arrows not worked. So there's not that they're not working. They will be split three ways between the employer between the government and the employee so the government will wage. Up to I think it's about a third but to a certain cap and the employee would obviously pay a bit too through wage and reduction but the whole point is trying to enable the employee to keep their job. Now the scheme isn't as generous as the previous job pretentious game, but you know your employer may be may try to take advantage of that, you know, if they're facing difficult because of covert over the the next six months. It's a really really difficult time isn't it? And I think in you know where so much is in certain and there is so much with worry and concern on top of a cancer diagnosis having such clear.

cancer Northern Ireland consultant England Scotland Occupational Health Wales England Scotland Wales Mac Miller McMillan
"cancer." Discussed on Talking Cancer

Talking Cancer

01:34 min | 8 months ago

"cancer." Discussed on Talking Cancer

"Welcome back. It's so lovely to see you again as any other episodes we've recorded I'm going to time stamp this we're recording on the 9th of October 2020 and all the information we talked about is correct. As of today Now ladies we've spoken before about your rights at work if you're diagnosed with cancer and for anyone who would like to hear more about this, it's just it's really brilliant. I would really recommend going back to series one and listening to our work and cancer episode Soul is what's changed apart from everything for people living with cancer..

cancer
"cancer." Discussed on Talking Cancer

Talking Cancer

03:44 min | 9 months ago

"cancer." Discussed on Talking Cancer

"Find the support line and and help us there. You you just mentioned their daily the telephone buddy system which roses much in and I love it. Can you tell us a little bit more about how that works? Yeah. So our telephone buddies are our usual volunteers who obviously can't support people in the way that they normally do because of a distancing. They're basically at the end of the phone to support people with advice practical needs and just to be a listening ear. I think it's really important that you've kind of just really took office eyes that there is something for the super tech-savvy right through to you know, people who who it's a computer I can't do it because it is important because job Not for a lot of people, you know doing a zoom chat with somebody they've never met before it's not great. You know, it's not a great option for some people and I love the telephone buddy system that you've got to go. I think it's really cool. So there's there isn't there's an access point for everybody along the tech scale isn't there there is saying that picking up the phone for first time when you have decided and made that call that you are struggling a little bit is is a big step, isn't it? What would you say to somebody sitting there going after I don't know am I making a Fast I'd really don't know whether I should do this or not. I would say they've absolutely taken the first step in acknowledging that perhaps they need help. And so maybe the first thing to do is just talk it through with someone that they feel comfortable with whether that's a friend or their GP or even their their cancer team and just to talk it through and certainly having been a cancer nurse. Nothing is ever too slight for you to listen to them. People often think or why don't want to worry them or this is really silly but it you know, but if it's constantly on your mind the best thing to do is to talk somebody about it and make that first step then to find out where to get help absolutely. Brilliant as always stay there. Don't move. We're going to be speaking to you shortly. Questions about cancer boots and McMillan are by your side from the moment. You're diagnosed through your treatment and beyond our boots McMillan information pharmacist. So on hand with Specialists support from helping you make sense of your diagnosis to advice about living with cancer. You can find them in your local boots Pharmacy or online via video appointment. Visit boots.com forward slash McMillan for more information subject to pharmacists availability. Hi, I'm Carol. I'm thirty-eight and from Manchester. I was initially diagnosed with primary breast cancer in December 2019. And then with secondary breast cancer in February this year lockdown was massive anxiety inducing so much with outside of of all of our control. So I dealt with my anxiety by trying to focus on the things that I could control like, you know the next few hours. So the next few days, I found it quite helpful to limit my exposure to all the Doom and Gloom in the news. I focused on things that made me happy, you know, like catch up with family and friends virtually like that started learning Italian during the lockdown randomly. I exercised and threw myself into things like campaigning for MacMillan. I also found edit ation really really helped as well. I found that was really helpful in trying to make me focus on the present a.

McMillan cancer MacMillan Manchester
"cancer." Discussed on Talking Cancer

Talking Cancer

01:44 min | 9 months ago

"cancer." Discussed on Talking Cancer

"Them themselves in their family need to take a particular part of the minimum website which is corona virus hub, and we try to respond to the content on there in response to the questions that come through the support line I'm won't and. Dating on a very regular basis. However, we do also make sure that we've got the Gulf Dot UK links on there because you know sometimes as we now announcements made on a Saturday evening and again, coming back to you and your individual care be guided by your healthcare teams and the information that is being sent to you about any specifics and that relate to you. and. So I I think those would be the things that I would suggest in in terms of making sure that you have got absolutely the right information that is personalized for you. Rosie Mark Thank you so unbelievably helpful I really you know there's so much in there to take away it's been a pleasure speaking to you both take care. Thank you. Thanks. Thanks summer. Thanks again to rosy mark for taking the time to speak with me today for more information on the topics discussed in this episode, make sure you head tone website, McMillan dot org dot, UK food slash talking cancer for resources advice and support. It's also where you can find out more about donating to Macmillan in our next episode talking about managing your mental health through the pandemic subscribe. If you'd like to hear that an every new episode whenever it's ready and if you enjoy the series, why not give it a rating or a review, it helps others find the podcast more easily I'm GonNa be and talking cancer is Macmillan cancer support..

Gulf Dot UK Macmillan Rosie Mark UK
"cancer." Discussed on Talking Cancer

Talking Cancer

04:12 min | 1 year ago

"cancer." Discussed on Talking Cancer

"My mom came with me to every single appointment. She's driven me to hospital. She's hey with me today in. London says dishes so she's got involved. She wanted me to move in with them. I've got a dog who sometimes I can't walk because of the chemotherapy the Amazon and the side effects got the looked after the dog. So they've got involved wholeheartedly. Really did you feel as well? I mean it's something that's kind of coming through. It's quite common taking somebody with you. Indifferent pair of ears really helps to to properly understand what's being said exactly some of whom turns up. She's got little notepad that she writes. She writes down in the Middle Pad and then with the departments that have had you have the appointment with the doctor and also you McMillan. Nason there as well. The the doctors doctor talk she kind of understand but not everything. Then go to another room with Melanin. Andy McMillan nist gives to in Layman's terms makes it more digestible already. Bite size and then minimum our notebook and says this in Comanche about Mason. What could this mean another last year? It's good to have somebody else there. I mean you know this. This is the thing though. Isn't it a New York you know you're used to these environments your the new vocabulary that comes pouring out when you had your first meeting with your oncologist? That was to confirm your diagnosis and to start talking about how they wanted to treat it. Yes so what was said at that first meeting about how they hoped to treat it so by that point at. Hutt my foam diagnosis. So I knew there are definitely cancer and the meteorologist. He basically just explained the type of Kmart. Beyond and what that chemotherapy medication consisted of. And what side effects had probably encounter is just a barrage of information. And it's it's funny until you either have. Cancer are some media? Family has cancer. Are you work in an environment or company that million the involved in cancer? You don't really realize how many chemotherapies the out there you just presume. It's like that's a mall. Everybody has chemotherapy. How did you find out that there were different forms chemotherapy? We told or was it something that you observed found out a thing. Yeah just research online really and also when you go and chemotherapy you in obey with a number of the of the people and above them is a whiteboard with their name and what chemotherapy that on and you look around and nobody is on the same thing and he was like. Oh my gosh. There were so many different types obviously because it needs to be specific to the person and specific to the cancer. You just don't realize it is so I open is yeah. I didn't know that either I did. You know you just wouldn't know exactly so is so eye opening and is partly consideration of the treatment. The you know the kind of person that you are obviously age. What you do you know can we? Can You keep working? Can you know keep working? Are you moving around because tell me tell us then about the treatment that that you eventually agreed on view? The chemotherapy that I'm on is called Flt L. O. F. Teams Ninety for that type of sorry and basically it's an acronym. Epilepsy is mid perform different medications. And I get every two weeks for two days and I have a four times. So it's a period of eight weeks 'em and basically going to hospital on day one and have three medications and then because the chemotherapy that I'm on I come home with off which is in a pump. Which is we expect it to be full of cogs and battery operated or plugged in. But he's just looks like a baby's bottle okay. There's a balloon inside of it yet fully medication and basically the balloon slowly. I guess deflate and push easy medication now. So how was it administered to you? So I've got a pick line in which is basically a Catheter. Straightens in my vein. Okay which is there the whole time. Okay and I'm just so it's just above my elbow a bit. Different to be higher than you would hubbard taken from. And yes. He basically carrying around this baby's bottle full of chemotherapy for twenty four hours and then a district..

Cancer Andy McMillan Nason Amazon Flt L. O. F. Teams Ninety London Kmart Hutt hubbard New York Family
"cancer." Discussed on Talking Cancer

Talking Cancer

12:58 min | 1 year ago

"cancer." Discussed on Talking Cancer

"We're talking cancer with Ben. There was a nurse that came over to me introduce expecting along things on a look down a name Badge and seven Macmillan on it without my God things to start really really real really quickly. Two days after his fortieth birthday benzedrine was told he had cancer of the esophagus. The tube that connects your mouth to your stomach and for someone who loved his food like Ben. It was a devastating blow. We all eat together and I was suddenly taken away from not everybody else would be finishing and it would really highlight to me. I'm not well and I'm not normal anymore. Physically Ben who is a nurse himself is now on Chemo. At the end of which he's going to have surgery to rebuild part of his esophagus. You don't really realize how many chemotherapies the row out there. You just presume. It's like a Paracetemol. We talked about the INS and outs of his treatment. The information he received beforehand and we talked about living with cancer and all the things that keep him going like cooking and baking and later Dany one million professionals is joining me to talk about the treatments available when cancer is diagnosed is mind boggling but they are fairly standard treatment regimes for different types of cancer. Women Millan and we're talking cancer Ben Welcome..

Ben Women Millan Macmillan Dany Chemo Paracetemol
"cancer." Discussed on Talking Cancer

Talking Cancer

11:24 min | 1 year ago

"cancer." Discussed on Talking Cancer

"Being so honest with us. It's hugely appreciated. Thank you Bob Dany Fabulous McMillan. Professional is back with me. First of all Dina Max. What a what a story what do you make of how him and his family have dealt with it I mean so many practical tips in there from things that they've done that feel like their original that you could put different slot tone but absolutely amazing How how they dealt with as a family and again experiences very different for different individuals for different families. What are the most common questions that you get About end of life so I think A common question people often ask themselves And family members often debate is how long how long have I got left to live? When they know their time is limited and and that's very difficult because some people ask the question on perhaps they don't really want to know the answer and I think it's always very difficult to give a very specific time And I worked with Palliative care consultant. Who was very good at doing this? And she always used to double check that they actually wanted the answer but then she would say whether she thought they had weeks or months and she So she didn't say you have two weeks or you know she just say. I think it's going to be very few weeks. And I think that gives a good indication without being specific so people are taking the days off on the calendar and getting very upset anxious in those days as well. Max described very eloquently This pre grieving process that I completely related to Give some explanation of what that is. What what he meant by that. I mean he really articulated it. Really well Will you know you're going to lose someone but you don't know when and so you you start the grieving process in in essence and that's different for for everyone in terms of shock. Fear Anger acceptance. There's very good literature around the grieving process. And some people experience all of that some people only one of those things but in essence. It's about you coming to terms with the fact that you're gonNA lose your loved one owner on a practical level. I think because we've mentioned you know when you're in this huge emotional turmoil. Structure is is helpful. What if somebody's just received an end of life diagnosis? What sort of kicks in? How what what steps should people expect? on what would happen. Generally to kind of help them through that I think the most important thing. And that's why Max story is just so important is is being able to talk and I know they were a close family. And some people don't feel that they can talk to friends or family Up about it but understanding what what you want. If you're in the situation where you're facing end of life. When do you want to consider having no treatment? If you're still having treatment where where do you want to be? Who Do you want to support you? Support is out there and you can have those conversations with your gp or even your clinical team that you can have them. You can have them and you can actually undertake something called an advanced care plan where you can document those things so that all those people caring for you like the GP will understand what your wishes are and you can share that with family members. I mean obviously including family members in those conversations is really helpful to talking about including people in the conversations maxes story about how his family filmed conversations with his mom. And just you know they just put the camera on so they've got a lot of normal That they've that they've recorded as well stuff that they've they didn't even realize they were recording quite a unique approach but served as a great example. About how you might approach those final weeks or months I just. I thought that was such an amazing idea. I think one of the things when you're going to lose someone that feels really important. Most people is making memories So reflecting on past memories and often you know you talk about things that happened historically that you remember what Happy Times but also creating memories that you can keep hold off once The the person's no longer around and that's was such such a good idea and Unfortunately because often people don't talk about things openly an half those open discussions they lose that opportunity to make those choices make memories which does seem such a shame. If you've never been in the situation. Contemplating death is a huge psychological Minefield it's how do you? What what? What is your advice if you are? Really Johnnie worried about the physicality of it about the the you know the psychological effects about how you're dealing with it links back to your first question about what people expect There's lots of things of the things they sometimes ask is. What will it be like? What can I expect Named reality some some people Active and doing things right up until the last few days whereas other people are much weaker. I'm perhaps the last couple of weeks are very tired and and in bed and I think that they're very individual things will say based on what's causing you to So so what type of cancer you have. What type of treatment? You've had generally how you've coped through. That might be an indication an and actually if people worried about symptoms you can just talk through some of the common symptoms that that that people can have when they're approaching end of life and what you can do to actually alleviate those so people don't have to be in pain they don't have to feel sick and sometimes people get very worried about people eating and drinking yes And there's this need to try and feed their relative or the left one and make sure they they drink to keep them alive and in reality. It's a natural process. I'm people won't suffer through that. So if they're hungry and they want to enjoy something let them half it if they're not hungry I it doesn't matter We'LL IS IMPORTANT. Is that obviously? You keep their Their mouth comfortable and moist You know because obviously if they're not drinking their mouth will dry. It knows Final few days Max and his family planned His mom's funeral meticulously is quite an undertaking. It sounded like a A really special day. How would you recommend people approach funeral planning because it's not easy? It's not an actually doing. After the event is is can be quite traumatic. I mean I I think that's a fabulous example where they had time where they were able to talk and they were able to planets and actually there are lots of schemes. Now where you can do that while you're well and Y which feels much healthier And in a way Takes the burden of you know sort of how many families though taught tweet other about you know what would you do? It isn't and that would be a really good thing to do. You know if you've got the opportunity as a family and you've gone out. Only relative is to try and help those sorts of conversations but but people don't say you know. I think they are a good example of how they approached it. You can still do it. That way. even after somebody has died so think about the person and the essence of the person and what they would have wanted because in reality you probably know anyway. So I think there's lots of ways that you can approach and there's lots of websites out there that give advice I'm we will have on our website. Marie Curie have advice on their website. There's lots of places people can go to think about how you plan a funeral when you do it. Words of advice for people who have lost a loved one resuming their lives. It's a very strange period. After somebody has passed away the friends and family want is your advice in that period afterwards. How do you get back to any semblance of a normal life? I mean yes. Life does have to go on. But actually the the pain of losing someone can be quite physical as well as emotional And talking talking is a really important thing and if you can't talk amongst people that you care about you know talk to your gp about how you feel. Potentially I loved a maximum sample about texting. Mind and and looking online. If you can't kind of pick up the phone All of that applies are after the event. You need just to be very aware of your feelings and know that it's okay to be sad and if you're struggling to pick up the pieces and carry on without that person around then there is lots of support out there. I think I slept for a month. I was exhausted. I think those are you because you you don't realize how much you're coping And the the energy the emotional energy physical energy that that takes up. I slept for a month. It was. It was incredible. And it's okay to cry. When a particular song comes on the radio you know oil in a place you think. Oh they say would have loved to be here I. It's okay to cry. It's a normal reaction. It totally I used to go into. Mum used to perfume. And every time I go into like DEM's or more like that and I'd get a whiff of it for a long time. I just so and it does take you by surprise abated. And it's good to know that that's okay you know. I've still got the bottle of aftershave that my dad was using before he died and now and again I have and it just reminds me of him. It's just so nice. Oh Dany I could talk to you all day. Thank you so very much again and my thanks. Our thanks to Max for coming in to tell a story if you've been affected by the very sensitive topics we've discussed in this episode. Please contact on McMillan support line on. Oh Eight oh eight. Eight eight double zero w zero open seven days a week. Eight till eight next time. We're talking work and cancer with Helen. The night before I went in to have surgery my boss said to me. I think we'll get somebody else in. I ended up two days after my surgery between payroll from my hospital bed in hospital. They actually confiscate my laptop. I should think so. Subscribe if you'd like to hear that in every new episode whenever it's ready have you enjoying the series why not give it a rating or a review? It helps others on the podcast more easily. I'm a maybe talking. Cancer is cancer. Support podcast.

Dina Max Cancer Bob Dany Fabulous consultant Marie Curie DEM Johnnie McMillan Helen
"cancer." Discussed on Talking Cancer

Talking Cancer

09:01 min | 1 year ago

"cancer." Discussed on Talking Cancer

"Absolute pleasure to speak to you. I will thank you so very much. Thank you Dany Bell McMillan Professional. Hello Lovely Lady. It is great to have you back again. What an inspiration errol is. Would you make of his story? Oh absolutely an inspiration. I think For men they're not great at talking of a now. We talked to him about life after cancer. Can you please explain remission versus cancer free? Okay so they are very different things But unfortunately sometimes professionals or public perception intertwine them so when somebody is in remission and you can be impartial remission or complete remission And it's really that remission is really that the Kansas not active partial remission is where maybe you've still got some cancer cells but they're not causing you any problems and complete obviously is the Kansas being held at bay or clear. Tends to come when you've been in remission for period of five years with no active cancer and then your condition may be enough to say you are all clear at that point so it's really important to understand that during this remission period from the moment that you'll cancer treatment stops through those partial remission to clear what are the kind of what does recovery look like You've had this incredible trauma the treatment. Whatever that has looked like for you individually What can period then begin to look like so? It is very different for different people. And we've talked about this. Before different types of cancer and different treatments have different impacts so that makes it very individual but there are common things that people struggle with energy I'm fatigue is a is a big one And that can take some while to actually recede but some people struggle with it long-term anyway. Some people have problems with pain as a result of treatment and unfortunately some people will have long term problems With pain just because of the impact of the type of treatment. They've had on their body. And and pain fatigue can be quite intertwined and then unfortunately have a knock-on effect on your emotional wellbeing. Well I was I was GONNA say because they will talk quite quite openly about the effect that his cancer had On his sex life. How do you maintain your emotional health as well through this other places to go? Is it an again something that you should you should talk about when you go back to see your? Gp OVER YOUR CHECKUPS. I think GPA is a really good starting point. Sometimes people aren't necessarily comfortable with talking openly about things that they find embarrassing would prefer to talk to the GP about two and GP's are Used to talking to people and helping people that have like arrowhead erectile dysfunction after Treatment so certain types of cancer treatment have a physical impact on how your kind of sexual activity happens but also some people have has psychological impact on their body image and so there are lots of different reasons. Why my impact on your sexual health and your sex life which actually has a massive emotional impact and there's there's all the people say that GP can refer counseling you join groups where people who've experienced the same thing and learn how they've overcome some people find that very helpful to once you're in remission you own sort of send out into the big world and let go there will be checkups. What does what what do they look like is that is that a visit to the GP say how you feeling a return to the oncologist for Something a little bit more invasive so that's a really good question because historically people always went back to the hospital for a clinic appointment and then they would have their surveillance tests but things have changed and we recognize that actually for some cancers particularly Kansas that very low risk. Gp's manage and monitor them and so you may just go and have a blood test regularly and the GP let you know the result of that and actually we even have electronic systems now where I can actually look up their own blood results. And there's lots of information that goes alongside that so they know how to interpret them so PSA which is our talks about is one of those where they're in some areas. They have a remote surveillance system that patients themselves have access to for other people is going back to see the specialist on every sort of You'll find it will be three to six monthly the first year and then actually wants your kind of two years with stable disease. You'll have an annual check. So you know the the longer you're in remission so to speak that the less frequently you go but you will always have an annual surveillance tests and that can be a scan a blood test or both whatever is needed all just absolutely overflowing with positively such great guy to be around but he he he has worries that it might come back at so. There are emotional scars that it leaves as well. I think that's what we highlighted is a very common problem and you'll often hear people say once you've had you always have cancer even when you don't have active disease because it's always in the back of your mind and You know when a scan or an appointment coming up people will get more anxious than normal and and that's understandable in reality. You know that fear of the cancer coming back is very genuine and people need to find their own ways of of dealing with that for some people it might leave hypersensitive to any ailment. That might be you know a around Wendy you. When do you know whether it's something serious that you know? It's not just it's not just a cold. It's something you need to go and get checked out as a hard question. No no no but actually There are indications when you've had a particular cancer what the likely recurrent symptoms will be I'm people should be informed of those by their specialists team and the GP should be aware of those as well so You can be more vigilant about those and of course obviously if you have something persists for three to six weeks then you shouldn't hang around really it's always best to get it. Checked out was most. Mina almonds will recede within that time. And it's just you know so if you have a back ache because you've heard you back it shouldn't last for a protracted period Unless you've done some damage but then you would need to seek help anyway but so You know so if you have a back ache and you have had cancer where Secondary Bone cancer risk. Then you should know that if if that back pain persists you should go and seek help. So he should be given information so that you could monitor but equally put get very anxious about every ache or pain A maurienne someday. There are lots of telephone support services now so even the specialist teams the cancer nurse specialists would much prefer somebody just ringing and checking and mortar. Not they can relieve anxiety over the phone. Finally Dany if you're a friend or a relative of someone who was recently in Remission. They can still offer support if there's somebody listening. What's your advice to friends and family? I think I think the biggest advice as to carry on Life with that person you might need to make some adjustments if they're fatigued but tight make big delivered be understanding and still do the things that you enjoy doing together equally some people with cancer CEO. No one more talk about it. You know and I'm struggling with all this. I look okay. It's okay to ask people if they're all you. Okay today you know. Is Everything all right so An most of is normal behavior. So don't be afraid to have the normal conversations that you would you would have and do do the normal things that you like doing with your friend or your family member. Danie thank you so very much and my thanks to Arrow for coming in to tell a story to get more information about what we've talked about in this episode go to our website. Mcmillan DOT ORG dot. Uk forward slash talking cancer. Next time we're talking about dealing with the end of someone's life with Max we're sitting Rhonda hostile bed in Coventry are then one of the start cry and immediately do the same thing that lows Boudin. Sorry Straightway I think as my daddy said no it's gonna be rubbish is so we cry together. Subscribe if he'd like to hear that and every new episode whenever it's ready and if you enjoy the series why not give it a rating or a review? It helps other spun the podcast more easily. I'm an obey talking. Cancer is a cancer support podcast..

cancer GP Dany Bell Kansas Gp errol Coventry Uk Wendy Danie CEO Boudin Max Rhonda
"cancer." Discussed on Talking Cancer

Talking Cancer

10:13 min | 1 year ago

"cancer." Discussed on Talking Cancer

"But he said you need to read this letter. When I looked at the letter that he had he had twenty five percent cancer. And he's prostate. Oh my you are kidding me. But he was the first of forty eight guys that walked into my Garrett was diagnosed with prostate cancer of which two are no longer here. I am so journey. My journey for me you know and dealing with prostate cancer is by talking about every day. Yeah and I decided to set up the mckellar foundation to get mental can and the reason why did that was you know by one hundred of my lady customers in mcgarry and said goals. When when's the last time you went to see a doctor in a year and eighty nine out of the hundred doctors I also same question to my male customers and one and what was frightening about him is not only wind because his wife was moaning. Amy Said and she's decided she's not going to give him any more sex until he gets himself. Checked out Larry's smart journey now to raise this awareness and that's how I've had to deal with the bits and pieces that goes on with it and that and this is I suppose. Lots of people talk about their new normal. Your Journey Newell. The projects that you have in the foundation. The talking that you do is is that the new normal for us this errol now. I think it's just amplifying the stuff of done before but it has to be very direct because not helping people to pursue a career. I'm hopefully helping to save lives and you know and and I can't do that on my own. It's great people like yourselves. The fantastic support I get from my wife Sharon and also family and friends because I found out about prostate cancer by accident while I say to people now is is reading lots and lots of reading to find that because so many different different conflicting things that people talk about. But the most important thing I've learned from the reading I've done is. The numbers are very very high and getting higher one. In eight European men get prostate cancer. One in four effort cabin men get prostate cancer. It's important to talk. This is important to talk it out also as well. Can you explain what? Psa stands right. Psa stands for prostate specific antigen. So that is what is produced inside the prostate in order for you to help with your reproduction and exciting things that men have and dream about so yes so the. Psa We know. And that's the count and that's how they measure whether or not there is something going wrong. This is a simple blood tests and it's important that all men make a point of getting himself tested whether the doctors happy to do or no insist on getting it done because this is something if you try and catch early. You're more likely to stay alive with it. Do you think that what's the work that you're doing in and around prostate cancer in Bringing bringing the discussion to the table getting people to talk more about it has been helpful to you in dealing with the experience that you went through personally often. I think the help has been absolutely massive and I didn't realize how big an issue this was until I started to be involved in and you know and why it's important to talk is because I'm what I've learned from talking. Is that if it's in your family. Then it's very important that the generations know about issues because my dad. When I had the conversation with my dad when I was diagnosed a turnaround to mainly suggests on. I had that issue five years ago. Oh my goodness mainly reaction. Oh my goodness May. That was angry. Upset couldn't speak to him for nearly six months. I'm sure that. What have you come to any conclusions throughout this about why men aren't very good seeking help or being aware of their bodies? Yeah Yeah I have two issues with that. The problem with men as opposed to women is that we suffer with two things ignorance and silence. You know so if we have this issue. We go into denial. We find every excuse to accept that it's not happening and then on top of that we completely shut down. We just go into silence. Women I mean you know. Women are very very good at snagging. Whatever time or do you WANNA put it. You know when they have something wrong for me as a mechanic. If they got problem with their cars they come in straightaway with men we wait. The car breaks down but it is interesting. Isn't it nothing women as well? We can. Because we whether that's to do with puberty and starting periods right through to pregnancy. I think we're much more used to our bodies changing. There's a lot more. We talk about a lot more I am more proactive. But but this is. What you've been doing is made such a huge and significant difference. This is not gone unnoticed. Has IT I hope you hope our can make a difference but I always used the word we because one person's not going to make this change. I know you say way. There was only one and h s hero. Would do I rec- when I when. I told me that they were GonNa give me this award. As I said to them. I will only accepts award. On behalf of all the people at the going through the battles with prostate cancer older people that we've lost fruit issue and for me really. I wouldn't have accepted of the not because I felt that I was taking it on behalf of all the people that are involved in this campaign as well so it's People's award for me more than his personal. I'M GONNA come back to you personally just for a second. Because there's this this is amazing. Work that you do this fantastic foundation. Clearly this work is helping you. Arrow and looking forward into the future. When you were going through that who did you look to for Support? Was THAT FAMILY FRIENDS. Was there any outside? Organizations will else's out there for for for young men in your situation fortunate people at the melon prostate cancer UK but it's forums forums more and more foreign online forums. Yeah see that's a really common thread that we're to WIG IT and you know. Actually there's a lot of very valuable support you get from other people in the same situation. Your in House mustering came from my wife and family. They realized a long time ago that they were happy to share me with everyone so I wouldn't couldn't and wouldn't have got fru. I've got to now without that help and that network and the treatment that you had has there been any lasting impact on you and your health. Yes there has been lasting impact. My situation is that You know I have probably less than twenty percent. Feeling BELOW MY BELLY BUTTON. Erectile function is probably non existent. Okay right but what? I've learned through modern with this. Is that some people will get a lot more than that. It's how you manage what you have. I mean and housed on a day to day basis. I mean you know. That's you love. Your wife is that that's complicated and difficult. If it only difficult if you sit down and and decide to do nothing about it I may not be. What call you same boat. I can still be Mo Farah because that makes sense so you have to you have to improvise the best way possible. But you can't beat you. You know what you have to do is and that's comes to. Why South the charity I say is because by talking drought? You realize that you're not the only one going through this challenge you know and somebody you know a lot of times. People say things to me that our massive help you know so. I'm learning every day to do and I think he's well particularly with with prostate cancer. An with men and they're reticent to talk about talk about things that there are. I'm sure all lots of lots of medicine. Lots of concerns about. What makes you a man that may be gets in the way of of of of going to the doctor and do does that make sense a great great question and I'm glad to have asked the question because a lot of men told me that raw not go through this because if it means they're gonNA lose erection then more issues with continents? And what would you say to those because it is real? That's a real concern. I've had the question and what I have said very frequently is look if you have a chance of being alive and maybe helping somebody. It could be your children. Your grandchildren isn't that more important. Do you ever worry about it coming back. I do worry about coming back. I don't have a prostate now. So you know if the cancer comes back it would be probably more aggressive somewhere else but my challenges is to save somebody from having to go through the battles the ave to go for every day. That's more challenge so I try to be positive and give give the love to other people. You're a magnificent human being. It's been an.

prostate cancer mckellar foundation Newell Amy Garrett Larry mcgarry errol Mo Farah UK Sharon
"cancer." Discussed on Talking Cancer

Talking Cancer

14:49 min | 1 year ago

"cancer." Discussed on Talking Cancer

"Hello I'm Annabi and welcome to talking cancer a podcast for Macmillan where I'll be meeting real people to have honest conversations about living with cancer in this episode. We're talking cancer with Adam. Let that if I decide in your brain but we turn away is going to have to operate need some and then the Black Sonya I knowledge is looking at Solomon Lipset. And when we're talking potential BRAINTREE RATIOS WENT. Yeah potentially thirty one. Adam Carroll was enjoying life and enjoying a job that allowed him to work in New York.

Adam Carroll Solomon Lipset Macmillan New York
"cancer." Discussed on Talking Cancer

Talking Cancer

12:46 min | 1 year ago

"cancer." Discussed on Talking Cancer

"We're talking cancer with Khloe. Once you hear the word she thinks. This isn't good in twenty seventeen. Khloe Dixon was extremely tired. After the birth of her baby girl I she thought nothing of it but it kept getting worse than I start having these headaches and that was like an elastic band around my head. So then I thought right I better go to the GP blood test revealed. Khloe had chronic myeloid leukemia or C. L. Which is a type of cancer that affects her white blood cells? I'm talking to Khloe about her cancer but particularly her diagnosis. What does it feel like waiting for the news? How do you tell your family? And how does having cancer affect your daily life was horrific? I mean holding my girl and thinking I'm not saying thanks year. Awful plus later in the podcast. I'll be having coffee with Dany. One of Macmillan's fantastic professionals to give her thoughts on what to do when someone says those three fateful words you've got cancer you could actually have a conversation with someone and even if they seem silly questions to you. The professionals at the end of the line will not mind in the least women melon and we're talking cancer lowy. Hello.

cancer Khloe Dixon Macmillan
"cancer." Discussed on Mayo Clinic Radio on Cancer

Mayo Clinic Radio on Cancer

04:01 min | 4 years ago

"cancer." Discussed on Mayo Clinic Radio on Cancer

"That's true for any screening test for colorectal cancer. Alright so use easy you Put a sample into a box have the ups guy come. Come pick it up and you're done it. And how long does it take to get the result Once it the sample gets to the lab. The turnaround is less than a week Several days. Yeah You. You put the sample in in collecting device. That's that's well said Tom. Yeah yeah no it's. It's it's from a patient standpoint. The the kit has a very simple collection device. That mounts to toilet sample is is put into the container. The LID is screwed on and it's shipped in the same container to the lab. I would imagine. Though as the case incidences of colon cancer continued to rise that their family members that say. I'm I'm all in testing where we're going to start in. They don't even care if it's color guard or colonoscopy that has to help with people's willingness to go through testing or is that not happening. Well we we looked at the first one hundred thousand color guard tests that were offered post-approval forty two percent of those patients had never been screened before and that was across all ages. That was exactly what we're hoping for And so we. We hope that having access to to attest that does not disrupt work. That doesn't require. Change in daily activities will make a difference in compliance and at the end of the day. It's participation rates that. Let's say you do a thousand tests. How many are going to end up being a positive? Yeah that's That's the positivity rate is about thirteen percent wow But many of those patients have real disease mostly polyps are common and the test detects the large polyps out of thousand patients five to seven. We'll have curable stage colon cancer without symptoms trouble stage pre-symptomatic let's say that Unfortunately it is diagnosed as being cancerous whether it's through color guard testing or a colonoscopy what Howard patients patients treated. Yeah well if it's detected at the earliest stage before symptoms some of those cancers are actually in polyps and they can be treated and discuss publicly without congressional so you read through the Columbus through the connoisseur. Yes conventional surgery. There are many approaches. They're depending on where the tumors located It doesn't in. In most cases it does not require a colostomy fewer than ten percent of patients with colorectal. Cancer require a colostomy. That's that's a myth. That's out there in. Most patients ball function is the same after surgery before and if the cancer has spread is they're usually there are other modalities involved. Chemotherapy may aviation but chemotherapy the mainstay of of of metastatic or colon cancer. That has yes. Yes and there's a lot of progress along those lines in even with metastatic cancer if if it if the spread is early and localized that can be cured also by surgery for example a solitary metastases to the liver or the lung Va. If that's all there is that can be cured with additional reception outside of the Colin boy. There's so much reason for hope but obviously the key is defined at early times it's our. It's our goal. It's our hope to see colorectalcancer. Become one of the least common cancer killers in this country and I think with accurate tools. Broadly in widely used. That's an achievable goal. Dr David Aqueous gastroenterologist colon cancer expert at the Mayo Clinic. Thanks for being with us. Thank you for the latest in health and medical news go to news network DOT Mayoclinic Dot Org..

colorectal cancer Cancer Dr David Aqueous Tom Mayo Clinic Va Columbus Howard
"cancer." Discussed on Mayo Clinic Radio on Cancer

Mayo Clinic Radio on Cancer

10:41 min | 5 years ago

"cancer." Discussed on Mayo Clinic Radio on Cancer

"That's a big number. Although pediatric cancer deaths have declined by nearly seventy percent over the past four decades cancer remains the leading cause of death from disease among children. September is Childhood Cancer Awareness Month and here to discuss the topic is Dr Corolla. Aren't Dr Arndt is a pediatric hematologist oncologist and the principal. Investigator for Children's Oncology Group at Mayo Clinic. Welcome to the program. Dr Aren't Nice to meet you. Thank you good to be here. It's just the most terrible topic. The saddest things children getting cancer and luckily the rates seem to be declining or are they accelerating well. The rates are probably approximately the same as they've been we do. Have as part of the children's oncology group research something called Childhood Cancer Research Network which is an attempt by the cooperative. Group Children's Oncology Group to get information and create a database of every child under age twenty one diagnosed with cancer in the United States to be able to determine just that whether in fact the incidence of cancer is increasing or decreasing. You've you'll hear some times that someone was diagnosed with childhood cancer even if they're an adult. Are there specific cancers that are indeed just childhood cancers or are there are king adults diagnosed with those types of cancers? Or what makes it a childhood cancer? I guess so. Certain kinds of childhood cancer are or certain types of cancer in children are most commonly seen in children but can indeed be seen in adults for example neuroblastoma is typically thought of as a childhood cancer however adults can get neuroblastoma. It's much much rarer in adults but they can get it. Similarly there are certain tumors in particular bone tumors like OSTEO Sarcoma or Ewing Sarcoma which are commonly seen in teenagers and young adults but they can also happen when they're in their twenties or thirties so the Toronto as a as a parent of young children cancer is the last thing I'm thinking about when I when I see my kids but parents out there. What are the sort of typical signs and symptoms? That should alert them in the back of their mind that something untoward may be going on. Well there's no one particular sign or symptom that should bring up the diagnosis or thought of cancer. In contrast to adult cancers that for example appear in the breast colon or prostate childhood cancer even certain kinds of cancer can appear in lots of different areas in the body The most common form of childhood cancer is leukemia. Leukemia often presents as persistent. Fevers or power or bruising or swollen lymph nodes but sort of vague nonspecific symptoms and. That's not the first thing pediatrician thinks about. When a pediatrician sees a child with fever but unexplained fever unexplained joint pains? Make you think about that law last for a while make you think about something more serious such as cancer for bone tumors in my area of interest and expertise bone sarcomas and a lot of times? These are considered to be so called. Sports tumors because teenagers are often very active in sports. And it's perfectly normal for normal child to have an injury or a sprain or strain and I would say that if pain from a strain or a strain doesn't go away with conservative management. After a couple of weeks then you need to start thinking about more sinister in serious causes such as cancer. So I would say unexplained symptoms Or for example weight loss. Fevers night sweats lumps bumps. Those kinds of things is there because there's so many different types of cancer that there can be from top to bottom. I guess you know when it comes to children or kidney cancer you know whatever bone sarcomas like you mentioned. Is there a certain cause of cancer in children? Is it more likely to be a genetic issue so most of the time? There's really no explanation as to why a child gets cancer. It's just one of those freak random things and I often when I meet a family one of the first things. I make sure that they understand is that there's nothing they did or didn't do that. Caused their child's cancer which I think is very important in terms of genetic causes there are. There is a particular syndrome called Lee from any syndrome which is a family familial cancer syndrome which the Classic Syndrome is cancer diagnosed in two first degree. Relatives Prior to the age of forty five in those typical cancers. Typical sort of classic case is a child with Rob Demise Sarcoma whose mother might have had breast cancer diagnosed at very early age or Osteo Sarcoma and breast cancer so there are families that do have a predisposition to get cancer there are certain cancers that do show up as I mentioned. Us juicer coma grabbed my breast cancer. There are also other more rare kinds of syndromes that can predispose to childhood cancer but most childhood cancer is not considered to be genetic given the advances that we read about every day in in cancer other any new treatments on the horizon that you can talk to us about well. That's such a broad question Certainly immunotherapy is a hot topic. car T. cells for refractory. Leukemia are things that are being investigated. Probably one of the most striking advances that have been made his been immunotherapy in high. Risk Neuroblastoma So we are exploring new agents. Chemotherapy drugs but also new approaches such as immuno therapies. Why is it that children get neuroblastoma? More than adults. Probably because NEUROBLASTOMA is considered to be one of those tumors that one could call an IM- Brian all tumor which excuse me arises from so-called embryonal rests in the body that are there at the time of birth and something just goes awry and the immunology is something on the horizon. A bright spot on the horizon for children with neuroblastoma correct explained a little bit more so one of the recent studies that actually led to approval of a drug that was specifically developed for treatment of children with Neuroblastoma. There's a drug called dinner toxic map which is an antibody specifically directed against the neuroblastoma cells when given in conjunction with other drugs that stimulate the immune system. We did a randomized trial. In the children's oncology group which demonstrated that those patients treated with very aggressive therapy plus immune therapy specifically including the dente. Cab had a significantly improved survival rate an event for survival rate and better outcome than patients that did not receive dinner Tux Map. So that's very very exciting in that led to approval of that drug by the FDA this year so Dr Arndt myth or matter of fact since nineteen eighty only. Three drugs have been developed specifically for pediatric cancers. That's not very many. Is that a myth or is that a fact. That's actually fact. Wow they're the three drugs have been the dinner toxic. Mab that I mentioned previously. Which is the antibody to treat Neuroblastoma Cofer Bean which was specifically developed for treatment of recurrent childhood lymphoblastic. Leukemia and Irwin as Which is a form of disparage. Ace used to treat children with leukemia. Specifically who are allergic to the standard form. Which is e. Coli Spare Giannis. It doesn't seem like that's that's not a lot of advances in night since nineteen eighty y such a shortage of it or is it a shortage. Well the problem is that as we've mentioned earlier. Childhood cancer is relatively rare compared to cancer in adults and so it's really not on the priority of industry to develop drugs specifically for the indication of pediatric cancers. Most drugs that we use in pediatric oncology are not specifically FDA approved for treatment of a particular childhood cancer. They get approved for adult cancers first and then we use them to treat childhood cancers so we certainly have drugs they were not developed specifically for childhood cancer. Like the three drugs that we mentioned now. The the good part is that Congress passed a law a number of years ago called the best pharmaceuticals for children. Act which was an act that allows drug companies to have six months additional of exclusivity before the drug goes to market and is the the a patent is expiring allowed to be marketed by other drug companies if they do studies and children and so that was that was something that was a glimmer of hope in drug development for children that if the industry or company decides or agrees to develop the drug for children or look for childhood indication they get an additional six months of equis exclusivity so given these medications. Are they freely available or they best administered in for example cancer centers in the country? So it's important it's in the best interest of the child. I think for them to be treated at a cancer center or at a place that has access to randomized clinical trials which is really what have significantly improved the outcome of pediatric cancers over the years and to be a center..

cancer Childhood Cancer Awareness kidney cancer breast cancer neuroblastoma Oncology Group Leukemia Fevers Dr Arndt FDA Dr Corolla Investigator principal Mayo Clinic Congress United States Toronto Ewing Sarcoma Osteo Sarcoma
"cancer." Discussed on Mayo Clinic Radio on Cancer

Mayo Clinic Radio on Cancer

13:58 min | 5 years ago

"cancer." Discussed on Mayo Clinic Radio on Cancer

"Mayo Clinic Radio. Presents conversation about gynecologic cancers with gynecologist Doctor Jaime Gomez the show hosts? Are Dr Tom Shives? And Tracy McRae. This podcast was recorded on September thirteenth. Twenty sixteen. Welcome back to Mayo Clinic. Radio. I'm Dr Tom Shy. And I'm Tracy mccray Tracy the PAP test you've heard of that. Probably had fewer near day should have and that was developed by a Greek physician by the name of George Patton Nicolau. My wife is Greek. And she's going to really like me for this. So it came into use around the nineteen forties. But actually he had discovered that you could find malignant cells under the microscope. Actually in the twenties or early thirties but nobody never got credit for it. Nobody believed him. Dull around the nineteen forties when it finally came into use. And of course that test is called the PAP test or the PAP smear and is now used worldwide for the detection and the prevention of cancer of the cervix and other diseases of the female reproductive tract. What he did what he showed. Was that by gathering just a few cells from the vagina inside the vagina vaginal tract and looking at them under the microscope. You could actually tell whether or not a woman had cancer of the cervix pretty amazing breakthrough. Absolutely the PAP test changed the lives of millions of women and now researchers are working on a screening test for endometrial cancer. Also known as uterine cancer research funded by the National Cancer Institute and Mayo Clinic is developing a screening method using DNA from a Tampon for early detection and screening of endometrial cancers now unique is that DNA from Tampa. How so and and we're talking about uterine cancer as opposed to cervical cancer and the two are connected but the cervix is just the opening of the of the uterus with baby-boomer is now in the age risk category for endometrial cancer. The number of women diagnosed each year is increasing here to discuss this new minimally invasive screening method for endometrial. Cancer is the woman leading the research. Director Jamie baucom Gomez. Welcome back to the program. Dr Beckham Gomez thank you. Dr baucom Gomez Pretty Exciting stuff and truly unique tell us about this using a Tampon to diagnose endometrial uterine cancer absolutely. We're very excited about this. We've known for decades that abnormal cells from inside the uterus can be picked on picked up on PAP smears but it's not very commonly picked up that way there are other markers that are not naked That are not necessarily visible under the microscope. Such as molecular markers that we can actually now test for these are changes in DNA so DNA mutations DNA methylation which is where the gene is actually turned off because of a change to. What's kind of hanging onto the DNA called methyl groups And we can pick those Those changes up not only in the actual cells that are the cancer cells but when those cancer cells shed and flow down through the cervix into the vagina they can be picked up Those those signals can be picked up on PAP smear and we're actually taking it to the next level of Trying to pick them up on the fluid in the vaginal canal because it's in that fluid it's in that fluid and And the reason that we're focusing on detecting this using a Tampon is data. Tampon is a common hygiene product that most women use in fact The tampon business in the United States in two thousand fifteen one point five billion dollars so we know using using that as a surrogate that this is a very common while accepted collection prod collection device. It's not a special Tampon by any means the kind you just buy it the convenience store. Well we're doing from from the research standpoint we're just using the common over the counter regular about Tampon As we develop this test further a likely be something a little bit more specialized so tell us how this works a you you tell the woman To use a Tampon put a Tampon in and then take it out when and then bring it to you is that how does it work so right now. We have clinical trial open In which we are collecting Tampon samples from women who are coming in with abnormal uterine bleeding That are paramount of puzzle or postmenopausal. So it's still in the research phases And before they have a biopsy to determine whether or not there is what the cause of that admirable pleading is on. We're asking them to collect a Tampon They're doing that in the clinic. We time how long it's been in the vagina because that's also part of the test need to figure out exactly how long it It needs to be in the. What's the minimum amount of time? And then the then the Woman goes on to have her clinically indicated biopsy in. How's it doing so far Well so far we've enrolled almost a thousand patients to that to this clinical trial And we're working on the combination of markers DNA methylation mutation Markers a table a test in prospectively in those in those samples with this sounds were some somewhat similar to Coa guard where you take a stool specimen and look for abnormal DNA DNA. That will tell you whether or not the patient has colon cancer. Same principle absolutely. So guard is a combination of mutations. One mutation and Three methylated genes. And they're all they also look for fecal called Hemoglobin so much a colt hemoglobin doctor. Yep exactly so fecal a call him Gordon. They're looking for blood as well. So but it's a multi target DNA test that is self collected and exactly. That's exactly what we're trying to To do with this type of a test. is develop something that is highly patient accepted something that provides women with high access meaning. They could collect the sample at home and potentially mail it in. That's our ultimate view or ultimate vision. I should say that would make I would imagine. Make a big difference for anybody could take part in that. I mean it could be that someone notices that they're not feeling writer. They've got some symptoms but they don't end up going to see a physician. This would be a good step to get that ball rolling absolutely. We know that decreased access to healthcare Does worsen survival in certain cancers. So that's that is something that we are hoping that ultimately we impact so uterine cancer itself. What are the symptoms? Who's WHO's at risk for this particular problem? Yes so there are very well known. Risk factors for uterine cancer. Obesity is probably one of the largest risk factors for wearing fur and mutual cancer Also having diabetes hypertension Those are also hyperloop. -demia those are risk factors having a family history of Uterine Cancer Colon. Cancer Stomach Cancer Those symptoms those cancers tend to If there are families where you can actually see high numbers of those cancers and that's consider Lynch Syndrome are some families are diagnosed with Lynch Syndrome? Which is a genetic condition that puts women at higher risk for uterine cancer? You don't hear about very many women. Dying of uterine cancer. I know it happens but it must is not all that common so it must be very treatable if you can. Just make the diagnosis right. It is It is fairly treatable especially in early stages early stages typically the treatment surgery alone Even in advanced stages There are potential cures but usually it requires extensive surgery radiation and chemotherapy and the side effects of those are oftentimes long lasting. And what are some of the symptoms of endometrial cancer? Yes so symptoms. Ninety percent of women with endometrial cancer will present with some sort of abnormal bleeding or abnormal vaginal bleeding Postmenopausal women I About Even though ninety percent of women with cancer will present with abnormal vaginal bleeding. Only ten percent of women who come in with postmenopausal bleeding will actually have a cancer. Well that's a good thing. It is a good thing it is but also all of those women undergo an Mitchell biopsy which is an invasive procedure and. We're looking to try to help void that as well. It's it just as interesting just as an exciting just as incredible caller of art so We wish you all the success in the world. But now we'll expand our discussion to other reproductive system cancers because September is gynecologic cancer awareness month so Dr Gomez why Why is Ovarian Cancer? The the worst of all of these so ovarian cancer has kind of a long standing nickname. And that is that. It's the silent killer The signs and symptoms of ovarian cancer can be very vague. Despite the fact that it's already in its advanced stages the signs and symptoms of ovarian cancer typically fall into four categories or for For symptoms and that as abdominal bloating distension Change in appetite or society basically getting full fast when you eat Bowel changes Whether it's swinging constipation or diarrhea And then bladder changes Frequency a frequency of urination or urgency. So let's go over those. What's more loading Just WanNa make sure that that all of our listeners have. These bloating is one but that everybody has that at one time or another and you sort of write it off yet. We're talking about something that's constant that's persistent for. You know. Probably more like two weeks or so rather than an intermittent type of process But you're right. That's why these scientists. These symptoms are quite vague. All right and then you had bowel changes Bladder problems and a number two and I had to do with eating society full fast. So is ovarian cancer in a sense somewhat. Like cancer of the pancreas in that because the the ovaries are so deep-seated that tumor has to get fairly large before it does cause any symptoms and by that time it has often metastasized or spread elsewhere. Yeah there are different patterns As far as the spread of ovarian cancer but most often the GI type of symptoms the bowel changes and even the early Feeling full early in a meal. are probably related to the Matassa metastatic deposits that are on the surface of the small intestine large intestine and sometimes even the stomach. So what's this a five year survival rate now for women with ovarian cancer and compare that to? Let's say a decade ago. Are we better? We're better yeah. We've definitely made a lot of progress. I think it's it's hard sometimes to go through to actually dissect what the Five Year. Survival is for ovarian cancer in general because most ovarian cancers are diagnosed at an advanced stage One of the most important prognostic aspects is thorough surgery In the beginning of the diagnosis out. Good you can get it all out. That actually improves five year survival And some studies have actually shown that at five years More than fifty percent of women are still alive who were diagnosed with advanced stage disease. Where is it usually go to from the ovary it starts there? Then where does it spread? it likes to go to an organ that's inside. The abdomen called the mental It is an organ that hangs down off of the stomach and large intestine. So it surgery if you can if it's a metal to the surgery hasn't spread to too many places or too far away from the ovaries chemotherapy. And what about radiation is it? Ever part of the regimen radiation used to be part of the regimen for ovarian cancer but it has It has fallen out of favor. Because we've shown that chemotherapy is actually more effective so treatment for ovarian cancer is a combination of surgery and chemotherapy. Sometimes we give chemotherapy first and then surgery in between two courses of chemotherapy. And what's the average age of the woman diagnosed with ovarian cancer most often? The woman that segments with cancer is going to be in her early sixties so it is yes. September being gynecologic cancer awareness month. We've talked about endometrial cancer and ovarian cancer What's up next cervical while cervical cancer? Also one of our specialties. How deadly cervical cancer so cervical cancer actually the mortality in the United States as well as in other developed nations has dramatically decreased with the introduction of the PAP smear Back in the nineteen forties We also now have the vaccine against the Human Papilloma virus which causes most of most cervical cancers That vaccine or those vaccines. I should say because there's actually a series of them that are that are available those vaccines. We don't think we've seen the impact of them yet. because those are vaccines that are currently indicated for For Young Women Ages Eleven and twelve and men too and Manitou. Yup exactly if enough people love of young people get vaccinated weekend pretty much. Wipe out cervical. What percentage of cervical cancers are caused by this virus ATV? Almost all of them are caused by high risk type of virus. Seventy percent are caused by two specific viruses. Hp Sixteen at HP eighteen in the vaccine. Good against both of those. It is all three. Vaccines that are available are include. Hp Sixteen Eighteen. What's hard to believe but women can also get cancer the vagina often. Do you see that so vaginal cancer is much more rare than than cervical cancer but it is also most often caused by those same viruses the HP viruses the key of that HP. It's it really is a cancer vaccine. I think people tried to diminish it a little bit saying Oh it's a sexually transmitted disease thing but it's it really is a cancer vaccine. Yes it is all three of the vaccines that are available are against The include HP sixteen eighteen As.

Cancer Ovarian Cancer uterine cancer endometrial cancer colon cancer National Cancer Institute Dr Beckham Gomez PAP Doctor Jaime Gomez Mayo Clinic United States HP Tracy mccray Tracy Mayo Clinic Radio Dr Tom Shives Dr Tom Shy Tracy McRae Dr baucom Gomez