17 Burst results for "burroughs wellcome"

"burroughs wellcome" Discussed on The Charlie Kirk Show

The Charlie Kirk Show

04:14 min | Last week

"burroughs wellcome" Discussed on The Charlie Kirk Show

"Cca dot org. And i think it's right there on the website. I'm trying to find out where it is on the website. I asked him the other day where it is. It's pretty pretty easy to find right on there when you go there. And by the way if you guys just go to charlie kirk dot com by the way at charlie kirk dot com. We are going to post all of these stories. All the resources for you. A lot of people are asking. Charlie how do i file an exemption. How do i fight against this matt. God bless you. My wife is a federal employee. Vhs how do we fight. Back against the tyrannical vaccine mandate. We will give you the best resources that we have at our disposal to allow you to fight back against all of this and try to give you the tools the ability to not have to get vaccinated against your will okay. I want to get to some more sound here in the couple of minutes that we have remaining. Msnbc again has just gone full corporate tyrannical. And this is the one that's going to be very interesting for us if they actually mandate for travel. We might not be able to travel soon. On airlines cut forty-six the federal government may be able to impose vaccine requirements on air travel. And we'll be able to back local and corporate mandates cut forty six. So what more can the president say one more pressure. Can they put onto mandates. Maybe an air travel for example or in other places like that. So you mentioned air travel. That's kind of the big one out there that medical experts and said the federal government probably has some legal authority to mandate and one thing that experts say the federal government can do is say to those institutions. We've got your if you're a big company and you put a mandate in-place the federal government will support you. If it's challenged same thing to state government the big problem. They have air travel and first of all they keep on trying to convince you. They know the vaccine is not working. The way it's supposed to. They know it actually might be helping to spread the virus. They're going to ask for boosters and all that they know all that they're just lying of course but the thing about the airlines is the flight attendants and the pilots. That don't want to take the vaccine. They're not gonna be able to run an airline if they mandate the vaccine that it might just might collapse the entire airline altogether. Msnbc continues who calls that regular testing instead of vaccinations. That's a loophole. Who cares if we actually know if you have it or not. Instead we have to know that you have bent the knee and that you obey our commands cut fifty six. The president biden is going to be signing an executive order mandating vaccinations for all federal employees and millions of contractors who work for the federal government the president had previously mandated this earlier in the summer but there were some loopholes there for employees who did not get vaccinated to have a regular testing process that they would undergo now. This is going to be mandatory for all federal employees and as we close out this hour. I wanna play a clip from about thirty years ago of dr robert wilner who accused pfau chief of genocide for putting out a killer drug noling knowingly related to aids. This is from thirty years ago. And we'll be posting this on the charlie kirk show if you wanna email this to all of your friends and senate around to cut forty three. The great lie of hitler. I think he would envy the job being done by members of the national institutes of health and even the especially in this country and i will put the lie to the individuals of the nih particularly gallo and faouzi and hazel time. And that's and the rest of these scoundrels of the worst daughter. Criminals guilty of genocide without a doubt. I invite them to take me to court. I wish burroughs wellcome with technical work because they have been putting out a killer drug knowingly you check out that entire clip at charlie kirk dot com. So make sure you check it out. Charlie kirk dot com. And there's a lot going on that. I think people need to know about. Thanks so much for listening everybody. Email us your thoughts freedom at charlie kirk dot com and. Thanks so much for listening. God bless you guys speak to houston..

charlie kirk federal government Msnbc Charlie matt dr robert wilner pfau biden nih faouzi burroughs wellcome aids gallo senate hazel Charlie kirk houston
"burroughs wellcome" Discussed on American Innovations

American Innovations

07:53 min | 11 months ago

"burroughs wellcome" Discussed on American Innovations

"Six weeks later it's official. Contaminating has become the second drug after. Act t to win fda approval for treatment of aids and aids related conditions. It's also the first drug ever approved by the fda based solely on independent research gathered by practicing physicians not by government-sanctioned clinical trial for callan and joe sante benz community research initiative and a growing network of similar organizations and other major cities. It's a huge breakthrough and it paves the way for more drugs. Starting with ganciclovir. The drug used to treat aids related blindness at the national institute of allergy and infectious diseases. Anthony fauci is still trying in vain to enroll patients in a gang cycle of your trial now seeing the fda approval of contaminating. He calls fda. Commissioner frank young with an idea. I've been looking again at the data from these. Scans cycle of your community trials. Unless you've got some new data. I don't know about those. Trials are no good be. Advisory committee rejected them last year. That was before this pentameter and approval. I think we have to resubmit the data. I don't control the committee tony. If they rejected at once rejected again humor me a lot can change in a year. Sure enough on. June twenty seven. The fda advisory committee recommends approval against lavar for treatment of cytomegalovirus in people with eight once again decision is unanimous and based entirely on data from community trials. Contaminating and consecutive year represent another breakthrough in the fight against aids. They're the first drugs approved to fight some of the many opportunistic infections that company aids rather than the underlying disease itself with their approval comes a broader shift in thinking in the medical establishment. A belief for the first time that aids is not inevitably fatal but can be managed with the proper treatment in a press conference announcing the approval of ganciclovir fda. Commissioner frank young sums up the new thinking a few years ago. An aids diagnosis was a death sentence. But now there's significant hope and more therapies are coming to treat the disease early for currently investigating over a hundred drugs as possible treatments for aids and aids related conditions. Were turning the tide. But for many aids activists given the increasing death toll. The tide is still turning to slowly. Nine hundred eighty nine the total number of aids cases in the us tops. One hundred thousand. More than seventy thousand have already died from the disease and the death rate is tripling every year and infuriatingly. The one drug that directly treats the underlying cause of aids. Act is still unaffordable to many even after the act of occupation of their headquarters burroughs wellcome refuses to lower the price so act up leaders devise another way to put the drug companies greedy behavior in the national spotlight wall street. September fourteenth nineteen eighty-nine peter. Staley out on bail still facing criminal trespassing charges for his earlier action steps onto the floor of the new york stock exchange. It's a chaotic space. With high ceilings and tall banks television monitors on which constantly updated stock prices. Scroll by men in suits tap away at computer terminals shouting orders to buy and sell into their phones the last time he was here nearly two years ago. Steely still worked as a bond trader. Today he's act up infiltrator. once again decked out in executive drag the dark suit and brightly colored tie with a forged treater badge clipped to his lapel. He turns to his fellow activists and points to a balcony overlooking the trading floor up there. That's what we'll get. Maximum attention staley and four other. Act up protestors. Make their way upstairs to the balcony. Just before the opening bell is set to chime looking around to make sure no security guards nearby. They handcuff themselves to the balcony railing. Staley checks his watch. He wants their timing to be perfect. Wait we okay. now seconds. Before the opening bell the protesters unfurl a banner that reads sell welcome. Then from staley's briefcase. They pull out a set of air horns which they used to drown out the opening bell. Now we've got their attention. Okay throw the money. The activists pull stacks fake dollar bills from their pockets and rein them down over the trading floor. The bills are covered with slogans. Like burroughs wellcome blood money and we die while you profit on the floor below the traders yell anti gay slurs protesters staley response with a mocking wave in his bond trader days. He used to hear such words muttered behind his back. It feels good to come back here and confront them. Head on as at burroughs wellcome staley and his fellow protesters are hauled off in handcuffs. But this latest act up's not proves even more effective after the wall street action the new york times and other papers published editorials critical burroughs wellcome congress announces that it will investigate whether the company is guilty of price gouging under mounting pressure. Burroughs wellcome finally gives in to the protests it announces a twenty percent price drop for. Act quite the full amount act up demanded but enough for them to claim victory. Burroughs wellcome has diffused the azt pricing controversy for net. But it's access to the drug grows doubts about it due to for all the hype of azt as a miracle drug people taking it are still dying and some critics are beginning to wonder if what's killing them is an aids but the side effects. Now there are more ways to be a team with microsoft teams. Bring everyone together in one space with a new virtual room. Collaborate live drawing sharing and building ideas with everyone on the same page. And make sure more of your team is seen and heard with up to forty nine people on screen at once. Learn about all. The newest teams features at microsoft dot com slash teams at yen is the future proof payments platform. That helps your business. Grow from online and in-app purchases to touch free in-store payments agian makes it easy to accept payments all on one powerful platform with adnan. Your business has the flexibility to accept any payment so you can connect with any customer. No matter how they wanna pay at jens. Technology also gives you in depth insights revenue optimization. Real time reporting and more so you can keep your happy and your business. Growing agian built their payments platform to help businesses like yours. Get ahead and stay ahead. Start your journey today at eight yen dot com. That's a d. y. e. n. dot com ad yen business not boundaries of easy itself greenwich village new york nineteen ninety nine years since he saw his first aids patient. Doctor josina ben still practice medicine here out of a small set of offices on the ground floor of a nondescript brick high-rise my deep breath now turn your head and cough.

Staley fda ganciclovir Burroughs microsoft bond trader Anthony fauci national institute of allergy official Commissioner frank young Advisory committee new york times us callan Commissioner new york joe sante frank young jens
"burroughs wellcome" Discussed on American Innovations

American Innovations

07:31 min | 11 months ago

"burroughs wellcome" Discussed on American Innovations

"The morning of twenty fifth nineteen eighty-nine a white rental van full of act up pulls out of the parking lot of a cheap motel in durham north carolina where they spent a late night. Finalizing plans for today's action. Their driver heads for research triangle. Park all of the corporate headquarters a burroughs wellcome the company behind the outrageously expensive. Azt on the way he listened to the news on the radio though. It's all too familiar with no projections. The number of aids cases will double in the next two years. There is near panic. Among experts already see hospitals pushed to the limit the problem especially acute in california and new york. There's gonna come a critical point in. Its arriving at that now where there will not available dead in the city of new york. You will have people waiting in line to get into those beds before long. The van pulls up alongside burroughs wellcome. The company's main building is an imposing slab of modernist architecture. Straight out of a science fiction movie inside the van. Six act up activists look up at the building then each other eyes wide with adrenaline. Everyone ready. let's do it for activists. Get out of the van in business suits and carrying bulky briefcases the other to drive away to set up a command post across the street. The group's leader. Peter staley whispers to his accomplices as they walk the long walk to the building's main entrance or member if anyone asks or here for the sales rep or don't worry peter. We got staley adjusts his tie and tries to get his heart rate under control. He knows his team is well prepared for this action. They've been planning it for months in the lobby. Staley head straight for the guard desk. We're here from premier pharmacy solutions here. That sales meeting with them. Stra jacobs shakeups. I don't think we have anyone in the building by that name but let me check. Thanks say we've been on the road all morning. Mind if i use your restroom. Sure it's just past the elevators on your left while the guards looking down at its directory. Staley's fellow-activists nonchalantly. Follow him towards the restroom but as they get to the elevators they quickly duck into the first one that opens. The guard looks up just in time to see the doors closing on them. Hey excuse me. They take the elevator to the top floor. Then steph out into a long wide corridor which way whichever way is west. So we're facing the highway this way. I think walking briskly but not so fast as to draw attention they head down the corridor stately smiles politely at every boroughs employees. They pass so far. Their business suit disguises be working executive drag. They called it. No one gives them a second. Look at the end of the corridor. They find a vacant office overlooking the highway. That runs along one side of the. This will work. Can we lock the door. No lock getting brought. My power tools as one activist uses small steel plates and power drill to seal the door. Shut the other three. Pull the rest of their gear out of their briefcases a fax machine. A new piece of technology called a cellular phone. Roughly the size and weight of a brick water and sandwiches in case they're here for awhile. And lastly a large reading as e t pay or die. Their plan is to occupy this office inside burroughs wellcome for as long as possible with their banner hanging in the window for all to see the cell phone and fax machine or so they can communicate with reporters and with their accomplices in the van. Peter calls to give them an update. We're in on the fifth floor western side of the building. Start calling the media will have the banner up shortly. Staley was diagnosed with aids in nineteen eighty-five back when he still worked on wall street at the time he had to hide not only his disease but also his orientation. The trading floor was a macho locker room like environment. men taunted. Each other with folks lers a thousand times a day when he first joined act up. You lead a double life passing for straight at work and attending meetings fundraisers at night in nine hundred eight doctors gave him only a few months to live. He decided to quit wall street and dedicate whatever time he had left to act up but that was over a year ago. And he's still here still fighting out of there. Please not until you meet our demands. We want the price of easy t- lowered by at least twenty five percent and free to anyone who's uninsured and too poor to afford it. The police are on their way. Good so is the media for the next forty five minutes. It's a standoff as the guards and the police try to drill their way through the door. St louis and his fellow activists field phone calls from the press and facts their list of demands to anyone who asks for peter. I think they're coming through the wall. Quick get the handcuffs using four sets of handcuffs and a long linked chain. The four activists locked themselves to a radiator in the corner of the office minutes later. Officers from the durham county. Sheriff's department bust through the drywall from an adjoining office. The first sheriff's deputy into the room grab staley and tries to drag him to his feet then quickly realizes he's chained to the radiator. Dammit somebody go get some bolt cutters across the street. Staley's fellow activists talked to reporters. Our team has stopped answering their phones. So we're not sure what's happening inside a look. They're coming out. Sheriff's deputies lead staley and his team out of burroughs wellcome still held together by the long length of chain in seconds the main entrance is swarming with reporters clicking cameras and shouting questions. What were you hoping to prove this action. Did you expect to be arrested before. He's pushed into the back of a sheriff's cruiser. Peter staley addresses the reporters burroughs wellcome is profiting off of our lives. That's why we did what we did today. And if they don't certain listening to us to the aids community then we'll be back a week after act up protests the high price of one. Eight stroke michael callen lobbies fda approval of another on may first nine hundred nine. He appears before an fda committee to present the community research initiatives findings on pentameter now instead of anecdotal evidence they have detailed reliable data showing that contaminating has a positive effect on the course of pcp pneumonia since co founding. Cri nearly two years ago. Cowen has looked forward to this moment. You finishes his data. Heavy presentation is more personal perspective. Ladies and gentlemen. Pcp pneumonia is a terrible way to die. I've witnessed firsthand the unnecessary suffering caused by it more times than i can. Count people with aids gasping for breath. Gagging on respirator tubes. Unable to speak.

Peter staley new york burroughs pneumonia north carolina durham fda california Stra jacobs durham county executive michael callen Cowen louis
"burroughs wellcome" Discussed on American Innovations

American Innovations

07:23 min | 11 months ago

"burroughs wellcome" Discussed on American Innovations

"On Sunday morning in August of Nineteen ninety-five at the NCAA is research hospital outside Washington Doctor Samuel Broder checks in on a young patient, his Joseph use. Joseph looking much better today. How are you feeling? Really good doctor. I'd almost forgotten what it feels like to take a full breath of air. Five weeks ago refuse became the first man ever to be treated with. At, the time he was weak and thin breathing through an oxygen mask aides had ravaged his immune system causing him to contract a rare potentially lethal form of pneumonia. But today he looks healthy is lungs of cleared up and his white blood cell count as rebounded. Broder checks, vitals. Then studies a spot on his forearm where two days ago the administered a skin test to check is immune response. Very. Good. You see these little red bumps when we gave you a skin test six weeks ago there were no marks at all your immune system didn't react but now it's functioning normally I know have been watching it but and it word on whether I'll be able to continue taking the stuff. Refuse learn that in phase one trials of new drugs. It's customary to end the trial after six to eight weeks. This helps scientists measure long the drug stays in the patient's system and check for any lingering toxic side effects. But if refuse stops taking act, there's a strong chance, his aides symptoms will return. I don't know yet Joseph. The FDA is reviewing the trial. Now it's up to them whether we can keep you on easy T- indefinitely. But I can't imagine they won't let us all nineteen of my patients are doing. Great. Guy In. The room next door is doing pushups. Incredible. So what happens next doctors can start prescribing it to everyone probably not. For most drugs, the FDA requires a phase two trial that would probably take about a year but after that, yes, Azt should become widely available. Year. But how many more people will die if you wait another year? Reuter. Knows the answer to this question as many as ten thousand. But he also knows the risks of rushing a new drug to market that hasn't been thoroughly tested instead of answering he pats refuse his hand. Believe me. We'll do the phase two trials as fast as we possibly can. In reality, Broder has very little control over how fast easy t can be made available to the public. His team will run the phase two clinical trials. But how long the trials will take that's up to the drug's manufacturer, the pharmaceutical company burroughs wellcome. It's November of nineteen eighty, five five months since the start of the initial azt trials. At pine needles, lodge a lavish country club and the Rolling Green Hills of North Carolina Group of Burroughs wellcome scientists and executives gather around a Mahogany conference table. They're here on a weekend long retreat to discuss their plans for the phase trials of AZT. Leading them as the company's smoking Vice President of Research David Berry. Of course time is of the essence here everyday. This disease claims more lives, but thoroughness is essential to we all know how hard it is to win FDA approval that's why I'm proposing that our study include a placebo. Control Group. Placebo controlled studies are the gold standard in the pharmaceutical industry the surest way to prove or disprove a drug's effectiveness but giving patients with a potentially fatal illness placebo is a controversial choice accompanied biologist raises her hand. Sir. Couldn't we compare our trial data against historical data for AIDS patients who received no treatment? Berry stubs out his cigarette. There isn't enough historical data this diseases to new it's also far too complex and unpredictable. Now, controlled trial with a placebo group is the only way we'll be able to get this through FDA approval? So how do we mitigate the risks for our Placebo Group? Let's hear some ideas. Shorten trial window six months maybe patients with longer life expectancy diagnosed within the past year. No Kaposi's sarcoma comedy. In January, Berry presents trial proposal San Broder at the National Cancer Institute. Burroughs wellcome has enough AZT for a maximum of one, hundred, fifty patients. So there will be no more than three hundred in trial as broder a team of AIDS experts flesh out to trial protocol the search for volunteers among AIDS physicians and their patients word of potential new treatments spreads like wildfire. It's January nineteen eighty-six at his office in Greenwich Village Dr Joe. sonnen examines one of his many AIDS patients is longtime friend, Michael Cowan. Your lymph nodes are a little more swollen than usual. Are you still taking that now? Chuck Zone I prescribed. Fifty milligrams a day and the backdrop. Honestly it's probably just stress I've got too much going on. A year ago calendar founded the PWA coalition the first AIDS advocacy group in. New York. City run by PWA's or people with AIDS. He also sits on the board of another four AIDS organizations sign of and looks at the black circles under collins is you're not getting enough sleep Michael with your immune system. Well. So am I supposed to do if it wasn't for loudmouths like me the government would be spending even less money on AIDS research speaking, which have you heard about these easy trials because she tried to sign up you're not eligible. They're only taking patients who've had one bout of. Pneumonia and thanks to that back from I've got you on your unlikely to contract what that doesn't make any sense. Why are they only testing it on people have had PCP. Big Drug companies want to control everything they're afraid any slight variation among their patients could throw off their data. They won't even let people take other medications while they're participating in the trial, but that could kill couldn't she pettit good especially, the ones who are taking the placebo they're giving people with AIDS a placebo. Yep which is why even for my patients who are eligible I recommend they don't participate why give up your backdrop for sugar pill or Drug that might not even work what makes you think it might not work. They've only tested it on something like twenty patients and the Big Pharma companies love to exaggerate to potential of their new drugs I. Hope does work. But let's wait and see in the meantime just keep taking your back them and for God's sake, get some rest. February eighteenth. Nineteen ninety-six. At the national. Cancer Institute's Research Hospital the first patients begin to arrive for day one of the AZT phase two clinical trials. In a small meeting room Sam Broder and his colleague Robert You're showing read the new arrivals first off I'd like to thank you all for agreeing to participate in this study. You all know the risks and you signed up anyway. So we're very.

AIDS FDA Broder Doctor Samuel Broder Joseph David Berry Research Hospital National Cancer Institute azt Sam Broder Michael Cowan NCAA San Broder Vice President of Research North Carolina Group of Burrou Pneumonia Burroughs Rolling Green Hills
"burroughs wellcome" Discussed on The Long Run

The Long Run

01:45 min | 1 year ago

"burroughs wellcome" Discussed on The Long Run

"Today's guest is Larry. Corey Larry is one of the nation's best known virologists and vaccine developers much of his research over the years has been on HIV herpes simplex viruses and viruses associated with cancer. He's the founding director and principal investigator of the HIV Vaccine Trials Network Collaborative Group to study vaccine candidates at thirty sites around the world. He's based in Seattle at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center. He served as President and director of that institution in the early twenty tens but now is back to running his own virology lab. Larry spent fifty years thinking hard about viruses and how to combat them dating back to a stint at the CDC during the Vietnam War days early in his career at burroughs wellcome working with future Nobel. Laureate Dr Gertrude. Elian he developed Acyclovir as the first effective. Therapy for genital herpes. As director of the AIDS clinical trials group he led the organization that proved combination antiretroviral treatments could control HIV. The team later demonstrated that these drugs could reduce transmission of HIV. From mothers to their infant's this whole set of experiences has shown him what each major player in the scientific enterprise brings to the table academia government and industry. All of this makes him a great person to talk to you now about Vaccine Strategy for cove in nineteen just before we recorded this episode on May twelve he published a perspective piece in science with Tony Fallacy. John Mascola and Francis Collins of the age as co-authors on how to think about strategizing around this unprecedented global vaccine effort a fly to link to that article in the show.

founding director HIV Vaccine Trials Network Col HIV Larry burroughs Fred Hutchinson Cancer Researc Tony Fallacy President and director Dr Gertrude Seattle Elian Francis Collins CDC principal investigator John Mascola AIDS
"burroughs wellcome" Discussed on From Scratch

From Scratch

02:40 min | 2 years ago

"burroughs wellcome" Discussed on From Scratch

"In fact, there's a quotation of heard that says information is the necessary if not sufficient basis for development, you left serious, and you found yourself in another industry, the pharmaceutical industry, and I purposely use the passive because it didn't seem like an active decision to go into the pharmaceutical industry just on the face of it. You have a daughter. Genesis whom you discovered has a disease Opole menagerie, hypertension disease. And she's the one who came up with the idea that you launch this company. Is that correct though, there's correct it's true that my first love and actually most lasting love is space technology. Satellite communications, if I could snap my fingers, and sort of like, you know, reimagined the whole universe. I would be right back running either Sirius X. Sam or probably even like, a Elon Musk SpaceX type of company, but the fact the matter is that I I love my children and my youngest daughter who is just a beautiful simple child gets diagnosed with this life, threatening to seize pulmonary, hypertension. There were no medicines available. So it was it wasn't a matter of thinking about it. I just went to the library and began doing research. Now, you mention you into the library. But it was you and she who would go to the library. That's true seven year old Genesis, we would together she was very, very helpful. And I would say to her. I know there was an article by Dr rich, and she would say, wait a second. And this is Stuart rich a physician in in Illinois. And she looked through the pile of of Xerox copies of articles and say, here's the doctor rich article, you launched United therapeutics with your own capital. That's correct from serious the drug which later got FDA approval was developed by gentleman James. Crow. Correct. There was a gentleman Dr crow at Glaxo Smith Kline who had a solution for pulmonary, hypertension. A new medicine, but Glaxo would not let him develop it because the patient population was too small and GlaxoSmithKline had recently purchased the Burroughs Wellcome company. Burroughs Wellcome was a very old line pharmaceutical company, and they would develop things whether they were profitable or not so SMithKline Glaxo bought them. And when they bought them the first thing, they said is we are not pursuing any more of these. You know, fairytale dreams we have a filter. We will only pursued drugs that promise a billion dollars or more in revenues which are called blockbusters..

Glaxo Smith Kline SMithKline Glaxo Dr crow Burroughs Wellcome company Dr rich Opole Stuart rich SpaceX FDA Xerox Sirius GlaxoSmithKline United therapeutics Illinois James billion dollars seven year
"burroughs wellcome" Discussed on SciShow Tangents

SciShow Tangents

01:37 min | 2 years ago

"burroughs wellcome" Discussed on SciShow Tangents

"Do do? We know why they sniff epinephrine and can sense that. So this came out as declassification so the British five release that they had been looking into this in the seventies. And that it came from Canadian researchers, but the Canadian research was as far as I can tell never declassified. So I was not able to figure out anything about how they identify the gerbils were good Ephron sniffers, and maybe it's out there. And I just couldn't find the Canadians perfected it and. Atings are so nice because they've taken all stressed out Canadians fed them to the German. Or are. They all have a little personal gerbil that sniffs everything everybody around them. So they know who to trust and who not to trust or whenever they're getting stressed out the gerbils like I smelt that you were stressed out. And I just wanted to say like pack, you're doing great. So my goodness. Probably the one. Good. They look out a personal de-stressing germ. All right, Sarah. What do you what do you got for us? I don't know if I can heat with Cheryl. So the second biggest charitable foundation in the world is the Wellcome Trust. It's known for funding science and medical research and things like co founding the human genome project. So it's a pretty big deal before it was a foundation. It was a pharmaceutical company called Burroughs Wellcome and co founded in London in eighteen eighty by a pair of American pharmacists who were as far as I can tell really savvy businessman who advertise their products to their medical community, which makes them sound kind.

Burroughs Wellcome epinephrine Ephron Cheryl Sarah London
"burroughs wellcome" Discussed on Sawbones: A Marital Tour of Misguided Medicine

Sawbones: A Marital Tour of Misguided Medicine

04:02 min | 3 years ago

"burroughs wellcome" Discussed on Sawbones: A Marital Tour of Misguided Medicine

"Nhs. So said to hear you tell it everybody was crazy about herpes. They love the stuff. And then around the seventies started to take time. I didn't everybody was crazy about it. It just wasn't. It was kind of one of those things like a lot of people got cold sores and people a lot of people are probably getting swords on their genitals. And they just weren't. I mean, whatever we weren't talking about making a federal case at it. Right. People weren't seeking a lot of treatment for it is the truth. In the seventies. Though. A few different things happen that changed that. I the first big deal drug to treat herpes was released. The first one that didn't have a lot of horrible side effects and was targeted at herpes at HSA. It was released by Burroughs Wellcome company, which I think is now GlaxoSmithKline a believe Zoe over access or a cycle veer as you probably have heard it now racks, I'm here to carry your heart breaks that's earth pace. I don't think they don't think the commercials like that. But I wish it was. It was a it would have been good Marshall. But it was originally the idea because we had antibiotics right? Like, this is like by this time in history, we already have penicillin and all of the antibody that came there after well, quite a few of them by this point. And we knew we could treat and cure bacterial infections, the next big landmark. Mark was can we treat and cure viral infections the way, we do 'Bacterial viruses are harder, which is why as you know? We don't have a lot of antivirals. Right. I mean think about it when you come in. And we say you got a virus? We don't give you anything for it. Because we don't have anything that'll help with that. And most of the time they're self limited. And it's not a big deal. Anyway. Well, there are as I mentioned life threatening manifestations of the herpes virus in certain patients under certain conditions. And so we did need drugs to treat that. But the idea as they introduced a psych Lear among their marketing team was that that's not enough because those life threatening infections are not very common. And while that certainly is a good use for our drug. We want to sell it to more people. We've put in all this time and effort and research and development to make this drug and we wanna make a ton of money off of it. But most people just don't care enough about herpes to bother to treat it and certainly not to pay for a brand new antiviral medication. Right. And this is supported by the fact that as late as nineteen seventy five. There was a study done psychological morbidity a clinic for sexually transmitted disease. So this is I mentioned earlier that from a purely physical like cellular destruction standpoint, most herpes not that big a deal, but from a psychological standpoint now, we would say, it's a it's a huge deal for a lot of patients. Well, as of nineteen seventy five when they did a study on the more the specific psychological effects of getting an STI they don't even mention herpes. So it's like nobody nobody cared. They didn't it wasn't even included in the study because the idea that people. Would be suffering a psychological man, some some sort of illness from a herpes infection was just unheard of. Nobody would care. Why would we? So they needed a strategy strategy. How do we get people to care about herpes? They launched a disease awareness campaign. Your oh, no this coming. They were emphasizing the importance of treating genital herpes specifically. So they they didn't focus on cold sores because I mean for one you can see that people have them. So it was hard to stigmatize cold sores. Right. Even if a lot of people have genital herpes, you're not seeing that on the street on to make that a secret. Shame. Yes..

herpes Burroughs Wellcome company Nhs. penicillin GlaxoSmithKline Marshall Mark Zoe
"burroughs wellcome" Discussed on From Scratch

From Scratch

04:07 min | 3 years ago

"burroughs wellcome" Discussed on From Scratch

"I just went to the library and began doing research. Now you mention you into the library, but it was you and she who would go to the library and that's true. Seven year old Genesis, we would together. She was very, very helpful. And I would say to her, I know there was an article by Dr rich and she would say, wait a second. And this is Stuart rich, a physician in in Illinois, and she looked through the pile of of Xerox copies of articles and say, here's the doctor rich article. You launched United therapeutics with your own capital. That's correct from serious the drug which later got FDA approval was developed by gentleman, James Crowe. Correct. There was a gentleman Dr crow had GlaxoSmithKline who had a solution for pulmonary hypertension, a new medicine, but Glaxo would not let him develop it because the patient population was too small and GlaxoSmithKline had recently purchased the Burroughs Wellcome company Burroughs Wellcome was a very old line pharmaceutical company and they would develop things whether they were profitable or not. So SMithKline Glaxo bought them and when they bought them, the first thing they said is we are not pursuing any more of these. You know, fairytale dreams. We have a filter. We will only pursued drugs that promise a billion dollars or more in revenues which are called blockbusters. You got hold of a doctor crows telephone number and called him. Yes, cold called him. And what was his posture towards you? Originally a great scepticism. How is somebody who. Is a satellite CEO gonna develop a medicine. How are you going to get it out of pharmaceutical company? I'm very sorry about your daughter, but there's nothing I can do to help you Martine Roth Blat upon hearing that that probably put my more fire under your belly. It did. I was actually, he did me a great favor by doing that because I was pretty much back to the Martine who was galvanized by the dream of United in the world was satellite communications. And I said, now, you know what? I did something like that I can do this. I can do this and coincidentally, at the very same timeframe, people sent me to movies to watch. One was Lorenzo's oil. There's a story of a father trying to save his son by doing things at pharmaceutical companies wouldn't and another was the to me the the art, typical entrepreneur movie called Tucker about this man who invented the seat. Belt, the parabolic headlight lens for cars, the shatterproof glass for windows who after World War Two tried to create a new type of automobile called the Tucker and was beaten down by the big three automakers in Michigan. United therapeutics is public. You became the highest paid female CEO in America upon FDA approval. The stock price went up exponentially. And how do you navigate that? What does that mean? Exactly. So that really means is that my compensation is tied tar stock price. So this was as of two thousand thirteen and you're not somebody who really revels in the public light. What were your reactions when media was coming to you? Because of this fact that happened almost accidentally. So it's it's basically a kind of embarrassment, at least in my own personality. I don't try to be the center of. Attention, but I do realize as public company CEO every element of my compensation is publicly disclosed. And by the way, when when I first read that fact and the fact that you were previously a man, I thought seriously, the highest paid female. CEO of course, has had been a man. I feel that that's unfair, too. I agree with you. I tell you the truth. I had exactly the same feeling and but I do know in other years, the highest paid female CEO had always been a female..

CEO Burroughs Wellcome United therapeutics FDA Martine Roth Blat Dr rich SMithKline Glaxo Stuart rich Dr crow Xerox James Crowe Tucker Lorenzo Illinois America Michigan
"burroughs wellcome" Discussed on Capital Allocators

Capital Allocators

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"burroughs wellcome" Discussed on Capital Allocators

"So this is washington dc and they said the firm is howard hughes medical institute and i had never heard of howard hughes medical institute but like howard hughes it flies below the radar screen and it turned out that it was a wonderful place it was the second largest medical foundation the world besides burroughs wellcome they were running everything internally at the time of about i think at the time was about eleven billion ten or eleven billion dollars and the new cio there was looking for me to come in to help him restructure that pool of capital to diversify it so that we had a combination of internal and external exposures and then build out the hedge fund side of things and so i went there on a three year deal and at the end of the three years the instituted degreed you can either stay on or will help support you find another cio role somewhere sounds like a great call option to me and so that's what happened so what were the key differences when when you're overseeing corporate pension and now you move to a hospital endowments structure so as a medical research organization howard hughes was really run as a pure endowment so you didn't have liabilities in the same manner that target corporation or dayton hudson had so we didn't have to have actuary all assumptions i don't think that we had the same types of liability payouts you know we we were responsible for making sure that we were able to provide grants of about four to five percent a year and for those that know about howard hughes medical institute if you're in medical research to get a grant and become an investigator howard hughes is like hitting the lottery and it's a great organization for what it does and so we were really just responsible for building up the corpus of that capital in order to sustain all these investment research projects throughout the country i think that in addition to that the type of investment committee that we worked with was very different than internal.

washington dc cio dayton hudson investigator howard hughes medical institut howard hughes eleven billion dollars five percent three years three year
"burroughs wellcome" Discussed on This Podcast Will Kill You

This Podcast Will Kill You

02:20 min | 3 years ago

"burroughs wellcome" Discussed on This Podcast Will Kill You

"The actions of act up are the subject of the 2012 documentary how to survive a plague in the 2016 book of the same name if you haven't seen or read it go do that immediately if you have seen or read it go do it again we'll wait you really should by 1987 one drug had been approved to treat aids azt in the us yep developed initially as an anticancer drug i didn't know that so that explains how they were able to get it on the market faster than they would have if it had already been developed yep yeah and so yeah i'd had gone through clinical trials in 1985 once you treat aids and shown some promise although many patients experienced strong negative reactions yet anemia it was gnarled uncontrollable yeah yeah when fda approval went through in march of 1987 the pharmaceutical company that held the single patent on the drug burroughs wellcome announced that it would charge ten thousand dollars a year for the treatment a price well out of reach of many people with aids notches many like literally everyone a high that's absurd ah i hate money i ha i hate people yeah i hate people in money people and money together they give you took the money away from the people than in them would be were too much okay continue this announcement inspired one of the earliest actions of act up a demonstration on wall street to protest this criminally high cost of azt though it would take a couple of years and many more demonstrations acts up would finally get burroughs wellcome to reduce that price two eight thousand dollars so my god yeah but still it was i mean it was that's amazing to me that this advocacy group actually meet like me to change an impact on a pharmaceutical company i know but that's still just like so infuriating that they can just charge whatever the hell they want anna well it's we've got glass halffull glass heaven very go we need by the bank that's why we do together in when one of us is up to the other one at all the way in the whole overture.

pharmaceutical company burroughs advocacy group two eight thousand dollars ten thousand dollars
"burroughs wellcome" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

02:30 min | 4 years ago

"burroughs wellcome" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"As well as figuring out exactly why it works and then applying those findings to other drugs aliens techniques also led to the development of his it assignment were commonly known as easy t which in 1987 became the first drug approved by the fda for the treatment of hiv by the time azt was developed elian have retired and was serving as scientists a meritous and consultant so she had more of a supervisory role that a handson one early in her career at burroughs wellcome elian had wanted to continue her education she enrolled in the phd program at brooklyn polytechnic going to school part time while continuing to work but after two years in the program the deemed told her she needed to choose between her job and her studies she chose the job and she never finished her doctorate thirty rose to these incredible heights with two strikes against her the fact that she was a woman and the fact that she didn't have a phd but in our own words quote years later when i received three honorary doctorate degrees from george washington university brown university in university of michigan i decided that perhaps that decision had been the right one after all in 1988 gertrude bell elian in george h hitchings were awarded the nobel prize in physiology or medicine in the words of the nobel assembly they quote demonstrated differences in nucleic acid metabolism between normal human cells cancer cells protozoa back tirias and virus on the basis of such differences a series of drugs were developed the block nucleic acid synthesis in cancer cells and noxious organisms without damaging the normal human cells elian in that moment became the fifth woman to earn a nobel prize in medicine the ninth woman to earn a nobel prize in any science category in one of a very few people to earn a nobel prize in the sciences without having a doctorate as a side note also receiving the nobel prize and physiology or medicine in 1988 was james w black who developed betablockers which are used to treat high blood pressure and heart disease and eight to antagonise switch are used to treat peptic ulcers elian is also listed on the patents for more than forty drugs she received more than twenty honorary doctoral degrees in 1968 she was awarded the garvin medal from the american chemical society in a 1985 she earned the american chemicals.

fda azt elian brooklyn polytechnic george washington university b george h hitchings nobel prize blood pressure consultant burroughs honorary doctorate university of michigan james w two years
"burroughs wellcome" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

02:01 min | 4 years ago

"burroughs wellcome" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"This new role was really ideal for her hitchings encouraged her to learn as much as she could including branching out from the field of chemistry he progressively gave her more and more responsibility and often when hitchings got promoted she got promoted into his old role by 19 sixty seven she had written risen through the ranks to become boroughs welcomes head of experimental therapy a position that she would hold until the end of her career when ilian started working at burroughs wellcome a lot of pharmaceutical research was carried out basically on a trial and error basis but lem in the rest of their team took a different approach examining and then exploiting biochemical differences between healthy cells and pathogens so that they could develop targeted drugs while at bir as welcome elian and hitchings developed the first successful chemotherapy for the treatment of childhood leukemia they developed the world's first antirejection drug which made kidney plants possible between people who weren't related to one another elian also develops treatments for a number of other diseases including out lupus malaria meningitis and arthritis in the late 1960s after she had become head of the department of experimental therapy elian did pioneering work in antiviral drugs the conventional wisdom at this point was that any drug that could successfully work against viruses would be far too toxic to be tolerated by the human body the department's first breakthrough was acyclovir invented by howard schaefer acyclovir used to treat herpes was the world's first truly successful targeted antiviral medication there were a few other antiviral drugs at this point but most of them had been developed as treatments for non viral diseases they were discovered to actually have some antiviral effect efficacy or they were broad spectrum treatments that were really hard on the patient aliens work with a cycle of your included refining its development.

hitchings leukemia elian herpes ilian howard schaefer
"burroughs wellcome" Discussed on The Story Collider

The Story Collider

02:37 min | 4 years ago

"burroughs wellcome" Discussed on The Story Collider

"The show is produced in partnership with the nc state leadership in public science cluster and the duke initiative for science and society with support from the burroughs wellcome fund the nc science festival nc stay college of sciences and nc stay college humanities in social sciences a theme that night was new frontiers it is nineteen eighty nine and i am a sixteen year old exchange student from the us at i have just walked up to the berlin wall for the first time my hands trace the giant graffiti letters in front of me that say the myth mao mauer get rid of the wall but that wall is so solid it is hard concrete behind me i go up on ah viewing platform so i can to see to the other side on the western side is just a green park that goes right up to the edge of the colorful wall but on the other side there is just this desolate noman'sland and the wall on the other side has not a speck of graffiti it is all gray there are soldiers patrolling with orders to shoot to kill and i am horrified so the reason i'm in berlin is that i have this amazing opportunity to go with my hosts sister's class on a rare trip into east germany so we've had the classes had the history explained to us about how germany was divided after world war two into four occupied zones including berlin which was in the soviets action but then millions of refugees were flooding out of the east bloc so they closed the border and then they build a wall around west berlin creating an island within east germany and one of the only ways through that wall is called checkpoint charlie saw the students we line up there and you're getting ready to go through and you want when your way down to this kind of steel box where it's the doors closed on both side and then the this soldier examines my paperwork and he's looking through my passport and he's just glaring at me and i think he's taking he's just taking so long that i think there is no way he is going to let me through but finally with one last glare he stamps me into the country.

burroughs us mauer world war nc berlin germany sixteen year
"burroughs wellcome" Discussed on Data Made To Matter

Data Made To Matter

02:11 min | 4 years ago

"burroughs wellcome" Discussed on Data Made To Matter

"I don't want my work to influence how individual scientists are evaluated or perceived because we have a way of doing that and that ways actually to read the work and to form an opinion and his wife peer review is so important so that would be a great misuse of what i do i think what might work can the useful for is just thinking about how we should reform the institutions of science going forward now in the united states we are extremely lucky that in the post world war two era we inherited an ecosystem ready for science data as had no equal elsewhere in the world or at any other point in history right in the us system the government tends not to write really big checks too few institutions and then letting those institutions set of sprinkle right are the big c dust on their favored people as happens in my native country france often but instead most of the eight years their grassroots right scientists apply and then the worth of those eight years is being evaluated by other scientists this is how most of the age budget and yannis have budget is actually yellowkid right so that was an american invention and then the other pieces there's there's any go system so people have heard of the gates foundation for example than before the gates foundation no we had the burroughs wellcome foundation and we have the howard hughes medical institute and now the as the chances are koeberg initiative and the list goes on and on and on that aspect of that there are multiple funders is really important as well because that means at gillette he's some diversity of funding approaches your goal is to turn the scientific method back home science but not everyone is on board with this some people in the scientific community worry that gambles with careers are that it could provide excuses to take money away from science what you say to these fears.

united states world war france yannis gates foundation howard hughes medical institut burroughs wellcome foundation eight years
"burroughs wellcome" Discussed on Gastropod

Gastropod

01:58 min | 4 years ago

"burroughs wellcome" Discussed on Gastropod

"And with a new option to add live tv you can get limited commercials on the hulu shows you love as well as fiftyplus live and on dimond channels even record live tv with cloud dvr enjoy all of your tv in one place with the brand new hulu experience starting at just thirty nine nine two nine a month go to hulu dot com to start your free trial today this episode has also brought to you in part by telenti when to lengthy makes jalasco answer beto they tend to get a little overzealous did they need to use so many raspberries in their room and raspberries or better that the machine broke did they have to try twentyfive different varieties of tried to find the perfect spice blend for their vanilla charge auto did they need to invent giant mintz deeper is to make their mediterranean meant super minty does their obsessive nece make twenty two lotto answer better the greatest you be the judge there also the judge plenty the delicious is in the details were also proud to be supported in part by the burroughs wellcome fund to promote science communication and our coverage of biomedical research no keenan so not nuts the early games so they're more related to like soybeans were among means or something like that than they are to tree nuts like almonds are all nuts some really today we're talking about the p being that doesn't sound nearly as exciting what we can keep calling the peanut if that sounds better chore but either way the peanut is an exciting plot the pinata is about the only plant in the world where our above ground added fruit blue ground john clinton wrote the book creamy and crunchy an informal history of peanut butter and all american food and joy lewis she was the first person you heard she's a freelance reporter based in senegal and she's working on a book on peanuts and the slave trade we don't tend to think about peanut flowers but according to jonah jori therapeutic fall don described them as almost like or kits with little orange and red streaks after about a day or two before our die and.

hulu mintz keenan john clinton reporter senegal
"burroughs wellcome" Discussed on Gastropod

Gastropod

01:58 min | 4 years ago

"burroughs wellcome" Discussed on Gastropod

"You can't find premium dry aged beef from these farms anywhere else including high and supermarkets our specialty stores and for our listeners can get ten dollars off your first order when you go to crowd cow dot com slash gas repod that's crowd cow dot com slash cast report and another sponsor joanne fluke new york times bestselling author and queen of culinary mystery has whipped up her latest recipe failed book banana creampie murder series lieutenants winson returns from her honeymoon to find league eden ripe with murder kenji solved the case without going bananas or will the killer give her the slip banana creampie murder by joanne fluke is on sale now everywhere books are sold more info at kensington books dot com this episode of gas repod is made possible in part with funding from science news your source for surprising and important science reporting this week the shocking portion of fishmeal fish that are perfectly good to eat and how many stressed out stink bugs does it take to spoil a batch of red wine discover science for foodies and everyone else at science news dot org slash gastric were also proud to be supported in part by the burroughs wellcome fund to promote signs communication and our coverage of biomedical research so this is kind of a broad question but what is taste hook you up with road that's robin dando he's an assistant professor of food science at cornell university and he specializes in the study of taste taste is one of our five senses you know the ones site sound touch smell and taste taste like smell is a chemical sense are taste buds are detecting chemicals between books search just below the surface of your term of refusal marooned ramoser's role but muslim or concentrated among a tastebud looks kind of like a very tiny little yellow onion it's a spherical clump of cells at has a little bunch of route looking nerves coming up the bottom like at the bottom of an uneven.

york times kenji murder joanne fluke assistant professor food science cornell university ramoser ten dollars