35 Burst results for "burma"

Dr. Colin Walker on Snake Plants Aka Sansevieria

On The Ledge

01:49 min | Last month

Dr. Colin Walker on Snake Plants Aka Sansevieria

"Well hi folks are. I'm calling walker. I'm currently president of the british koch succulent society. But my eight year presidency is just about to come to an end. I have been interesting growing and studying succulents for just over fifty years. I'm now retired. So i can spend more of my time looking after them. Them and writing about them. I have a lodge collection and two greenhouses conservatory on a porch. I currently live in scotland just gloss so the dry conditions are a bit challenging to what i was used to embed fiche. We hate talk about sense of areas and this has been a subject that people have been requesting pretty much since they thought of making this podcast. And we're finally talking about them dating a whole episode to them and these of grown his popularity in the last few years. But i wonder whether you could tell us. Start off by telling us a bit about where and how they grow in the wild and what conditions are like. I'm guessing they have to be tough because they're from a place where the not getting much moisture sons. Fear is a genus of about eighty species distributed in africa Also there's a couple in madagascar then going east daycare innova beer and his fall eastern burma. There's a severe burn money. I've only ever encountered severe is in the wild once we were on a safari in the eastern province of south africa. And there. I encountered what i am believed to be some severe hyacinth. Authorities are about five species native south africa

British Koch Succulent Society Walker Scotland Madagascar Burma Africa South Africa
U.N. Warns Tanzania Not to Reject People Fleeing Mozambique Violence

UN News

01:21 min | 2 months ago

U.N. Warns Tanzania Not to Reject People Fleeing Mozambique Violence

"An alert now for thousands fleeing violent extremists in northern mozambique and a call from the un refugee agency. Unhcr for neighboring tanzania to keep its borders open to those in need of protection the development comes as the un agency cited fresh reports that people displaced from mozambique's kepco delgado province have been forcibly returned from tanzania similar indications that people were being pushed back to mozambique from tanzania emerged last september and in april. Unhcr spokesperson boris. Chesnokov said that several thousand mozambicans have been pushed back from tanzania into northern mozambique since last year including than fifteen hundred this month during an interagency mission in april twenty. Twenty one to the nicobar boarded pointed mozambique. Unhcr in partners learned that most of the mozambican sheltering their hoped to find refuge in tanzania after fleeing deadly attacks by non-state groups in burma in march people told you hdr they track for days to the ruben river. Cross by boat to reach tanzania from where they were turned by the authorities. Many were women and young children. The situation is desperate for single. Mothers who the agency said our staying in negative mono without family support conditions are dire and needs cute for food water sanitation and health services pertaining limited. Humanitarian assistance is reaching the remote area

Mozambique Tanzania Unhcr UN Chesnokov Boris Ruben River Burma
Violence In Myanmar Continues As Military Cracks Down On Opposition

Democracy Now! Audio

00:34 sec | 3 months ago

Violence In Myanmar Continues As Military Cracks Down On Opposition

"In. Burma were than eighty people. Were killed friday when soldiers opened fire on a crowd of protesters demanding a reversal of the military coup that ousted burma's democratically elected government survivors. Said soldiers used grenades and other heavy weapons to fire at anything that moved. The massacre took place in the town of boggle northeast of the capital rangoon l. swear an alliance of fighters from ethic minority groups attacked a police station in eastern burma saturday. At least ten officers were reportedly killed in the attack.

Burma Boggle Rangoon
Buddhist Attitudes towards Worldly Problems With Ajahn Brahmali |

Buddhist Society of Western Australia

02:13 min | 4 months ago

Buddhist Attitudes towards Worldly Problems With Ajahn Brahmali |

"I thought tonight i was gonna talk a little bit about some of the problems in the world and how to deal with these problems from a buddhist point of year and how to think about them in a way that is constructive and what we can do about some of these things. What other buddhist attitudes to some of the problems we see in the world and one of those problems that we are seeing right now. We have seen the problems in myanmar in burma with the military account taking over the government and people protesting in the streets and then people being killed by them by the military. And of course is a very anti buddhist way of behaving. Yeah people killing getting killed and all of this so the question is what can we do and one of the things. That of course is on my mind is what can i do as a monk. What would i do if i was in burma and the military came up and said okay. You know pointing a gun at you or something like that. And i wonder the interesting things that you find in the buddhist sutras buddha's discourses and the buddhist vinegar is precisely this interaction between the monastic sir. And the lay people especially when the times of trouble and this times of trouble of course with the world was no different at the time of the buddha and it is now. Her world is pretty much the same. Maybe we on a little bit less spiritual so maybe we have gone a bit backwards. Since the time of the buddha people like to think we're going forward is right but i think sometimes we go backward in things like spirituality. There's no obvious reason why we're going forward spirituality go backwards noser and certainly at the time of the buddha things were quite different from what they are now but anyway because the problems are largely the same. What happened if the lay people behaving really badly. Let's was saying bad things about the buddha dharma sangha they were really doing bad things towards the monks and nuns. And whatever and what what you do and the buddha lay down a procedure that you can do as a monastic which is called the procedure of turning the ball upside down.

Burma Noser
Stepping up Myanmar coup penalties, US suspends trade deal

AP News Radio

00:39 sec | 4 months ago

Stepping up Myanmar coup penalties, US suspends trade deal

"Stepping off of me I'm all crew penalties the US will put off a trade deal Washington has a suspended the man long deal under the twenty thirteen trade and investment framework agreement until a democratic government is restored in the southeast Asian country off to a February one crew followed by a violent crackdown on protests trade representative Katherine Ty says in a statement the U. S. supports the people of Burma in the efforts to restore the democratically elected government and strongly condemns the security forces brutal violence against civilians I'm Charles king of this month

Katherine Ty Democratic Government Washington United States U. Burma Charles King
Myanmar air strikes send ethnic Karen fleeing to Thailand

AP News Radio

01:00 min | 4 months ago

Myanmar air strikes send ethnic Karen fleeing to Thailand

"Thousands of villages in eastern ma'am all her from the Karen ethnic minority fled across the border into Thailand the exodus was prompted by several S. strikes on a Carrington with a position in the area the bombing of Karen states metro district near the side win referred by minimal forces left many injured in some dads the director of humanitarian group free Burma Rangers David you bank says the attack was unexpected there are multiple airstrikes and what was very different for us is we haven't had air strikes there for over twenty years tension at the frontier comes as pro democracy leaders are seeking to have the Karen and other ethnic groups join them as allies which would add an armed element to that struggle so far the ethnic armed groups have any committed to providing protection to protesters in the areas they control the Karen National Union okay I need the leading political party for the Karen minority is one of more than a dozen ethical Kanai stations that have been fighting for decades to gain more time to me for me MO central governments I'm Karen Thomas

Burma Rangers Thailand Karen Karen National Union David Kanai Karen Thomas
Tornadoes leave 6 dead across the South

Abdul at Large

00:37 sec | 4 months ago

Tornadoes leave 6 dead across the South

"Meanwhile, they're cleaning up in Georgia and Alabama following Thursday's deadly twisters. His neighborhood in Pelham, Alabama, where there's a lot of damage to tend to, including roofs and homes and holes just ripped through the storm system that gave life to over two dozen tornadoes that rode through parts of the South was extremely powerful and places like Oh Hachi, Alabama for exam. Where the National Weather Service says an F two tornado hit six people five in Alabama and at least one in Georgia are confirmed Dead. Fox is Charles Watson in Pelham, Alabama. Anti government protesters in Burma hit hard today by police

Alabama Pelham Georgia National Weather Service Charles Watson Anti Government FOX Burma
Military tightens grip, death toll among anti-coup protesters rises as Myanmar seethes

The World and Everything In It

00:24 sec | 4 months ago

Military tightens grip, death toll among anti-coup protesters rises as Myanmar seethes

"Security forces killed more than fifty protesters in a series of clashes saturday and sunday and reports of more violence followed on monday. The independent broadcaster democratic voice of burma said security forces killed at least eight protesters in four cities or towns. The united nations said at least one hundred and thirty eight peaceful. Protesters have died in myanmar. Since the february first military

Myanmar United Nations
"burma" Discussed on Don't Worry About The Government

Don't Worry About The Government

07:06 min | 5 months ago

"burma" Discussed on Don't Worry About The Government

"Was the hyperpower the powerful entity in the world china was still rising. Russia was following. We were really drive. India was also rising at that point. We were driving the car when we withdraw. You probably argue that now in a world where india and china are run by governments. That are not necessarily great actors especially in the realm of human rights when we withdraw and these other countries go in and fill the void. It does not necessarily translate into better outcomes for people. And so much of what i think policy needs to be senator around and philosophy needs to be centered around is philosophy needs to be in service. A policy outcomes policy outcomes need to be in service of people outcomes. It's about making life better for people. If it's just about liberty for the sake of liberty for the sake of liberty or socialism for the sake of socialism for like it doesn't do anything for people in invariably those philosophical arguments. They end up being a cudgel with which to make lives substantively worst for people. And so i think what we need to do as libs left progressives whatever. I've been told the massage. Damn i don't really care but what we need to do. All of us is burden ourselves with a smarter better version of intervention one. We're actually helping because these human rights that some of us believe or like inherent to people. You're right not to be killed the again. Joe's drummer know your rights. And if you haven't listened to classical class people but like these ideas if you really believe them we have to have a way of defending them and we actually have to fight for them. You don't just fight your right to party people. You gotta fight for your right to any one of these things. The united nations security council going to have to fight against russia and china using the security council in the human rights council as a cudgel to avoid human rights abuses. But like this is where things need to go. With the twenty first century thought human rights struggle was effectively over in the nineteen forties. When the allieds one world war two and unfortunately the human rights struggle goes on and so to me the real question about interventionism versus isolationism to me. Always centers around. What does it mean for rights. We should intervene. If that can meaningfully be shown to improve the human conditions in that area. If there's a real coach in case for that if there isn't then we shouldn't fucking do anything. But we should not withdraw in that. Same breath if us withdrawing from a place lead to worst human conditions. Even if we shouldn't have been there in the first place you gotta balance it out. Obviously the ultimate goals we should be able to withdraw in a way that does not worsen conditions. But let's talk about iraq. We should not. We should withdraw quick. We should withdraw from iraq. A long time ago. I'm talking about this like in this particular moment. We should not withdraw from a given region in iraq like for example eastern iraq if there is a threat that the syrian military is going to come in an annex that portion of iraq like that would not be a justifiable withdrawal position. What we should be seeking to do is we should to break iraq into three separate nation states that are ethnically divided. That's a whole different ball wax. The should have been a superstar in the first place. Should really be three separate states. Kurds either have their own separate state. Yada yada yada yada yada. We should be setting up those things. And then withdrawing and that is the morally responsible thing to do when you are championing and isolationist position one. You probably win me over and a lot of these cases but to you need to win me over in a specific region. Let's say syria for example by explaining what it looks like when the us withdraws with the conceit that this isolation is essentially going to be the united states pulling out of that region and china and china and russia and other malign actors in the region are going to continue their colonials impulses. That's the other part. The withdrawal is burdened with advancing a narrative of the merits of withdrawal is wall acknowledging that there is a very real threat of colonialism being done by our chinese counterparts on the world stage so yeah we probably should withdraw but we should also be mindful as we draw from certain territories that the chinese are going to step in in some cases. And what does that look like. That's gonna do it for this episode of. Don't worry about the government. Hopefully you enjoyed this one. Hopefully this gave you some things to think about on foreign policy. If you've got some other like one oh one type topics like isolationism versus. You know interventionism capitalism vs socialism. I feel like you know where i shake out on that stuff. I mean like impart like look at the way around my business. I believe that there is an ethical way of a business and that at the core of it setting value for your goods and labor is good and rewarding. And hopefully you know. In my case you'll agree because the malls real simple. I do a show. I talk for in this case two hours and do several hours a research before again. The mike and now's the part of the show where i asked rebecca show. Your bucket show is what keeps the lights on here last episode. I said i was gonna talk about advertisements and guess passing up some of that stuff. So i recently got shot down by someone who doesn't wanna come on the show actually lower profile than the person other talk about. Who is michael. Friggin cohen. says who yeah. No that guy Him trump's lawyer. Michael cohen's people actually reached out to don't worry about the government it or not. I swear it is true. And they want to have him on and have him talk about the book and i think they were going to pay me for it and i really went back and forth on this one. I really went back and forth on this one because on one hand cohen like yes. She is a sleaze A lot of ways but he also said very real things about trump after he was caught some striking honesty from him in various settings that i was like i'll give them some credit for being is here like even on like would you become corrupt..

michael two hours human rights council Joe Michael cohen Friggin cohen trump twenty first century world war two eastern iraq first rebecca united nations security counci china nineteen forties Russia syrian military one iraq first place
"burma" Discussed on Don't Worry About The Government

Don't Worry About The Government

07:46 min | 5 months ago

"burma" Discussed on Don't Worry About The Government

"Job. Managing cova nineteen russian health services. Leave a lot to be desired. In a lot of key industries since the fall of the soviet union even going into the late fall of the soviet union there were trending downwards. And i would suspect in a number of areas. There is a lot of legacy infrastructure. Still from the soviet days that is holding up those various industries on those various sectors of the russian state however one place where the russians have been really really good at staying modern on is in the area of computers and we know this because the russians during the last decade were leaders in the realm of hacking. I think it actually took many americans by surprise when fancy bear and cozy bear were so successful in their coordinate of the dnc in the rnc last time around twice sixteen last time around now. And i think that now that we're five years out from that event. An important takeaways served as an advertisement to fascistic regimes regimes. That might be worried about western or us capitalist influence. Whatever you wanna call it In their society these fascist regimes by the way. So it's not like they're the good guy -sarily A good way to get tech that you need to thwart the us europe australia. Any of those places is through. Russia is through china. So with your chinese firewall. And your russian hacking technology that can be super useful the money laundering stuff that the russians have been doing has been super helpful The russians and the chinese are global leaders when it comes to bitcoin mining. Amazing if you are a military junta that is being sanctioned and you need to wander cash. People have asked me what i think about. Bitcoin and i have long contended that the single most obvious use. I can come up with four. Bitcoin that i could see is like useful one. Yeah laundering drug money. Sure okay. yeah it's like it's not a bad thing. It's not a bad strategy. I know people who have done that. Strategy it's not bad strategy however the strategy that. I sort of always seem bitcoin again. I've never touched a bitcoin in my life. Never one but the strategy to me. Would bitcoin very clearly. Because you can trade on blockchain. because you're not a missing the transaction is you're under sanctions. You need to wash this cash so that you're not being sanctioning more. You buy bitcoin. That essentially serves as a laundromat for your dirty cash. It makes sense for the russians. They need to wash a lot of cash. The iranians need to wash a lot of cash. It looks like the burmese military. Who is going to need to wash a lot of cash. I'm using me and marin burma interchangeably. It's really whatever. My mouth is feeling at the moment and from my understanding although i could be wrong on this. Maybe i am going with the wrong impulse. Check me on this My understanding is that they're more or less interchangeable that like mission burma for example does not need to change their name to mission of mea mar or anything like that to be culturally sensitive My understanding is that burma is less formal in the military likes me and mar more but the people like burma more. I don't know maybe. I'm not right on that. Ladder understands military prefers myanmar. So maybe we should prefer burma. I don't know not sure how i really feel about that. But like this situation in burma myanmar about getting a digital firewall controlling the internet. It's also of a broader peace involving the chinese government so going back to the new york times copy here me and mars digital controls become permanent they would have added to the global walls that are increasingly dividing what was supposed to be an open and borderless internet. It was supposed be so cool kits. You don't understand these boomers. I feel bad for the sooners nine. Eleven babies. I feel like that's a little mean but like your really traumatized by eleven. Like things could have been cool and instead it's like you're borne and like this horrible thing that changes. Us foreign policy happens. I was like fourteen. It was shocking to me fifteen shocking to me but like you weren't even born yet and so like you're really getting shocked and then like the internet at age ten. Everyone's your kid like a little bit. You know you're all happy and shit. Impurity happens you jade about the world you've discovered nirvana it's still resonates with you kirkeby. Music was remains really latching onto something he should. That's not the point. Point is you're angry about the world and then the internet becomes more of a piece of shit and then you're sixteen trump gets elected and he's jakov. What's even weirder. Is that like you're sixteen. Uc's jack off and all of these forty something year old adults who have been scolding you in telling you that they've known best and oftentimes. You've looked at them. You thought that they knew better. They apparently don't because they look at this doofus. Weird guy with the bad hair who was the host of some show that was on when you were a kid called the apprentice like some reality. Tv show or something Now that he's president and they all think he's really good at business even though you've definitely heard that he's gone bankrupt multiple times i really feel for the zimmer's here they have really really gotten a host job and this this is all of a piece it was supposed to be an open and borlase internet. It was opposed to make us freer. It was supposed to liberate us. And instead we are surveilling ourselves were building. I talked about on the wrestling program of all places how i feel like huxley. Doesn't get his his fair shake. The world is not in it. So often huxley ask we seduced our selves inconvenienced ourselves into our own little prisons. These nice little convenient prisons was supposed to be an open borderless internet. Oh how cool that would have been. The blocks would also offer fresh evidence that more countries are looking to china's -tarian model detain the internet. Two weeks after the coup cambodia which is under china's economic sway also unveiled. its own sweeping internet controls. So part of this For those viewer interested in this part of the story goes back to the belt and road initiative china for all of its criticism of the. Us and europe's colonialism. They love to point out the hong kong. They love the point out how much colonialism happened in china china with their belt and road initiative is very much entering into economic agreements that are asymmetrical in which china is the power broker. In those dynamics. They seem from the outside looking in coercive. And certainly if i was talking with someone who is critical about the united states and i talked about the us getting involved in latin america for example on with one of these smaller countries. Now that the us would ever do such thing. In one of those countries we talk about a coup worship relationships to be right absolutely think about like that. That's what china is doing with me and more. That's what china's doing with cambodia that is essentially the core of the belton road initiative as the mafia used to put make him an office. So good he can't refuse..

Eleven babies new york fifteen five years forty fourteen china coup cambodia trump eleven latin america last decade europe jakov russian nineteen single marin burma nine age ten
Spring-like temperatures predicted for the end of the week in Washington DC

WTOP 24 Hour News

01:04 min | 5 months ago

Spring-like temperatures predicted for the end of the week in Washington DC

"Forecast. Wait until we get to Thursday. Here's NBC force. Rianna Burma solo. Yeah, you know, the good news is we kind of just gradually warm up every day. We get closer to Thursday. So tomorrow morning, definitely feeling like winter By Thursday afternoon. Spring is here and will feel those signs of spring much earlier than that. Now, this is officially the second toe last week of winter spring this year, the equinox march 20th 2021 s So as we look ahead to what is officially the last week of winter will be seen twenties to start my Day, then turning to low fifties. Very mild and comfortable. Tomorrow afternoon, Tuesday, mid sixties sunny skies Wednesday, upper sixties possibly 70 degrees in the district with plenty of sunshine. Thursday. We've got low seventies the warmest day of the week. Clouds return on Friday. A chicken our current temperatures, Manassas, It is 27 degrees, Occoquan 29 degrees and college Park 30 degrees, Briana. Thank you very much 38 degrees right now outside our studios brought to you by new look home design.

Rianna Burma NBC Manassas College Park Briana
Bonus #7   "An Audience of One"     Larry Wilson - burst 1

Standup Comedy "Your Host and MC"

02:19 min | 5 months ago

Bonus #7 "An Audience of One" Larry Wilson - burst 1

"I don't really tell jokes. So i think it just not sort of what i do when i think when someone says oh jack i always think of our good friend. Kevin pollock who. I used to play poker with a lot in los angeles and kevin will be cracking up the whole table stuff. I remember joke that he told one time that. Let him right cambridge. Oh so. I'll tell. I can't wait. I love oh. My god these kevin story to back you know but I love the joke especially in kevin. Does he does all these accents. And cardinal these ten tastic hughes of the oh. I'm just on behalf of the joke. Here old greenish miller chairman sitting around a men's club and they're ruminating about their history and there's some younger men there and when the older and says oh originals captured younger champs about the time you came face to face with a man eating tiger in burma and originals only head of causing cultural experience or out in the bush search and had no idea while the movie i cooled open some of the grass and there. I was face to face with an eight hundred thousand ryan. I'm ashamed to say. I told myself what are the younger men says. Walk to miller. I wouldn't feel bad at all. Anyone were over to have that reaction with man eating lion into residences. No i meant just now when i went. I love that

Nightclub Stand-Up Comedy Los Angeles Larry Wilson Larry First MC Larry Wilson Wilson Method Kevin Pollock Kevin Greenish Miller Jack Cambridge Cardinal Burma Bush Ryan Miller
Myanmar forces use violence again against protesters

AP News Radio

00:48 sec | 5 months ago

Myanmar forces use violence again against protesters

"Myanmar police have used tear gas and rubber bullets again to disperse protesters opposing lost months military takeover in the citizen produced video an injured man is rushed home down the street the young man points to a puncture wound on his back multiple from seven cities and towns which are still independently confirmed claim police used live ammunition causing at least one death independent television and online news service the democratic voice of Burma says three people have been shot in the last twenty four hour period including one in the head video shows three with injuries after protesters ventured into a main street then turned around to the sound of gunfire I'm Charles last month

Myanmar Charles
An interview with CIEHF President, Amanda Widdowson On Why Design Should Be For Everybody

1202 - The Human Factors Podcast

05:15 min | 5 months ago

An interview with CIEHF President, Amanda Widdowson On Why Design Should Be For Everybody

"Welcome to this episode of twelve to human factors. Podcast this interview. Something that i've been wanting to do for an awful long time to really get into what it means to be. The president of the chartered institute of human factors but calls with covert and with everything being terribly busy The current president has been a bit of person to track down. But i finally got hold of the individual sense. So welcome and thank you very much for joining us. Thank you very very pleased to be here. Yeah so. I'm underwood's don't you. Now the the human capability capability leave tallies But he hasn't always been there. Where did it all start. How did you get into human factors. going back to the very beginning which is quite a long time ago i i was looking for higher education qualification and that was related to the psychology degree that i did because i found that i i wasn't really Successful in getting related career once they graduated ignored. I go good degree I really interested in the bar logical sidon. Psychological side economics was contested marriage. Those two blends And i was lucky enough to get a medical research council. grant that he mse economics at ucla. I'm from then. I've been working in makes absence. So that was really. That was my big turning point. There's just something that i've always been passionate bow. And i've always been interested in my even my summer jobs that i had. I was always thinking. Oh you couldn't we design that back. So is this the right way to do things say i've always had an interesting vices. I'll say this past year has been challenging. Puerto possibly more challenging than most I've had suddenly felt that in the you know the wool working from home thing is certainly respect. It's been brilliant because you've been been home but then in some respects has been rather difficult because you've been at home all the time. Have you found it. How have you found working from home. Yeah it's been a k- i mean in. I think i'm fortunate in that myself. And my pont vice working from home at the moment. I'm we've got separate rooms the enabling today that off. He on this portion. As not. But i think is really helped us maintain the sensor base and ability to to what effectively saying that i did spend some Working out of sight because since the The nature of the weltman that i couldn't work from So i've also experienced that side as well and that's been really challenging. How you work in an office and work together to kind of huddle. But you've got to maintain the social distancing it's very strange nomination though I've been able to do my job. in just as effectively I haven't really had a. She's being a consultant anyway on east working remotely and in different places and did occasionally wet from home before say I've found it a lot easier. I think than than most hasn't been such a change for me so And in some ways they're they're being benefits it's It's nice not to have to do travel or the strangely. I was finding myself missing. Joe biden was named before but lockdown is about an hour's drive now meet and economist that kind of listening to the radio in the car and the open roads and you know indistinct to You know my kind of playlist thing so missed that a little bit but ultimate. I think our benefits as well as disadvantages in the new ways of working that we will have to adapt to think sunny grew with with with a lot of that because the gap between no matter. How my driving to his fifteen twenty minutes And just having that space to most chill out and wind down all when you going to work so to start teaching yourself up if you've got any sort of meetings or whatever what you're gonna do You saw really lose space when you're working from home you're stepping outside of just going into the kitchen. It's not kind of changed from the home made to be business mode. Isn't tim back again. And that definitely changing an unwinding. Its hottest to when you have When you all wake him from home the whole time so it's slightly. Twenty separate space is just work and and try and keep areas the just behind him as well. you know. Wet possible between separate the two activities a bit. Almost say lucky that i've i've got a dog. Says she makes sure that. I get outside on a weather's like like now. I like it's raining now. Say it it's she's making sure he's taking time for yourself. I think sightsee nature. I'm a away on the way in. Burma is really healthy. Can helped me

Chartered Institute Of Human F Underwood Ucla Puerto Joe Biden TIM Burma
Malaysian court temporarily halts deporting Myanmar nationals

Press Play with Madeleine Brand

01:01 min | 5 months ago

Malaysian court temporarily halts deporting Myanmar nationals

"Immigration officials in Malaysia have deported more than 1000 million mar nationals and move human rights groups say could put them at risk. Following the February 1st coup. The military carried out in the country, formally known as Burma, Michael Sullivan is following developments from neighboring Thailand. Malaysian court ordered a halt to the immediate deportation of the Myanmar nationals earlier in the day. Pending the outcome of a hearing on Wednesday to suspend the deportation altogether. Instead, hundreds were loaded up to three Myanmar navy ships to begin the journey to a home they fled. Human rights groups say members of Myanmar's Muslim minority Rohingya and many from Myanmar's other minority communities are included. Malaysian immigration officials denied this protests against the February 1st coup are continuing in Myanmar, despite warnings from the military protesters have embarked on a confrontational path. That could lead to a loss of life. If the demonstrations don't end for NPR news, I'm Michael Sullivan in Chiang Rai.

Myanmar Malaysian Court Michael Sullivan Myanmar Navy Malaysia Thailand Npr News Chiang Rai
Myanmar's Military Coup: How We Got Here

Morning Edition

03:59 min | 5 months ago

Myanmar's Military Coup: How We Got Here

"The country's civilian leader, Ahn Sung Souci, will remain in custody for another two days. The military staged a coup on February. 1st and people have been protesting it, but the big questions right now are why did the coup happened when it did? And what happens next? Here's NPR's Julie McCarthy. By the hundreds of thousands citizens armed only with indignation March daily against the military takeover. the escalating dangers, teachers, engineers and doctors in their scrubs demand that civilian rule be reinstated the country's defacto leader Aung Songs, Hoochie was arrested February 1st thwarting the decisive re election of her National League for Democracy. The U. N Human Rights Office is tracking more than 350 political and state officials, along with activists, journalists, monks and students who have been detained. Young gon based commentator Kinzel Win, says the atmosphere Feels like the upheaval of 1988 when the whole country went out to protest on the streets of Yangon just by comparison, at time, it ended badly. Some people shot and kills and the army taking over again. When says it is a once in a generation event, especially inflaming the young voters who came of age under me and Mars fitful transition to democracy. They don't want to even hear the name of that. C zero Power takeoff power historian thought Manu, author of the Hidden History of Burma, says over the past decade the Army had relinquished day today governing to an elected parliament. Ah hybrid arrangement that left to the generals in charge of security and believing that after surviving years of Western sanctions They were in a position of strength. But chief parliamentarian Long songs who achieved sought to change that governing model and the constitutional change she wanted was to have the army under the control of an elected government. And under the control of her and this has led to tension meant who says Souci was alert to the possibility the army would probe for an opportunity to overthrow her November's election set the stage. Souci refused to discuss any alleged irregularities at the polls, which the army claimed had reduced its share of oats. Generals took the refusal as an affront on do that feeling of disrespect comes after many years where they've also felt not properly consulted where she's had the limelight where she seeking to undermine this kind of set up that they've had over the past 10 years meant juices from the Army's point of view, the hybrid model might have worked with lesser luminaries. The generals didn't count on the 75 year old on songs. Hooches sustained Star power or that this daughter of Burma's independence hero had a taste for power that might sideline them. But she broke the mold and in a way what's happened this past week? Has been the end of that experiment to see if that system could work with her as well, innit? Kinzel Win says it's entirely possible that the Army never intended Maura than one term for young songs hoochie and they had to find every Ruthie can think of You keep her away, and now it has succeeded but meant who says it's not clear whether the generals will only be satisfied if Souci is permanently removed. The situation, he says, is difficult to read. Myanmar's military rulers have seized power during a pandemic, which has made the messiness of governing even Messier. People are hungry and financially hurting, and now they stand on balconies, banging pots and pans furious over losing their democratic experiment. Julie McCarthy. NPR news

Ahn Sung Souci Julie Mccarthy Aung Songs U. N Human Rights Office Kinzel Win Army Souci National League For Democracy Hoochie Myanmar NPR Yangon Long Songs Manu Parliament Kinzel Maura Ruthie Messier
Biden announces sanctions on Myanmar coup leaders

Morning Edition

00:40 sec | 6 months ago

Biden announces sanctions on Myanmar coup leaders

"Joe Biden is using one of the preferred tools of his predecessor to punish military leaders in Myanmar sanctions. The U. S will freeze about $1 billion worth of Myanmar government assets held in the United States. Military leaders took control of the country in a coup earlier this month. Yesterday, Biden called for a return to democracy. They're the military must relinquish power it seized and demonstrate respect for the world of the people of Burma. As expressed in their November 8th election. The party of the deposed civilian leader on Song Souci swept those elections. She was detained in the coup, and for the past six days, protesters have filled streets throughout the country.

Myanmar Joe Biden Biden Song Souci United States
Greg Elfrink - How To Create And Sell Your Own Media Empire

The Hustle & Flowchart Podcast

07:37 min | 6 months ago

Greg Elfrink - How To Create And Sell Your Own Media Empire

"So when you're when you're seeing someone 'biocyte. I'm kind of curious because he's probably pointed to the seller. Sometimes it's a more of an advance or sorry. The buyer felt like an fbi site because they see the opportunity. Someone did all the hard work of creating the website finding the products. Maybe figuring out what's working what's selling what's not like. What are some things that you're seeing sellers do with a website that on empire flippers. Like are there certain things that they're looking for. Is it like that. where they're like. Oh they did all the work for me. I'm gonna pay for that because they can saved me years of work in heartache to figure all this out like can you know prep yourself for that in a way as a seller. Yeah you're asking. What can i do to help. A buyer seed at their web site. Is that shortcut. Yeah that in the motivations of a buyer yes so they can kind of sync up in the right spot and you know get the valuation yet. This is a very good question. Because i i always Both buyers and sellers so if you ask a seller like why are you selling your business like almost one hundred percent. The fans like i want money vic big vol but that's usually not the real answer right there. That's the superficial answer. Then you dig deeper. They're like oh. I want to do other projects and like okay. Let's dig deeper. You peeling back the onion a bit. eventually filed like. Well i want to focus on other projects. Take less than my time. Because i'm moving to this new house and selling this Business allows me to make this down baby in the house for my new family. And now you're getting to the emotional reason right. So whenever a talk to buyers and sellers say dig deep find out who the buyer seller is copywriting. One we all do like everyone listening to this podcast of the market price familiar with copywriting right but for some reason when you go to buy or sell busy like take the copywriting Just like throw it in the trash like. I don't need that anymore. Businesses success but like the buyer seller. Is your customer right like that is your customer. You need to think about their own motivation. So when it comes through selling thinking about a buyer we recommend Or at least i recommend the seller jagger our buyer persona content. So there's about six of them and they all very different motivations for example a newbie norm. If you've you know you're seller dealing with someone who is a newbie norm. Someone's brand new to the space like that doesn't necessarily mean they don't have business document or money they're just new to online business acquisition. They're probably going not have as much confidence. And so you're going to have to hold their hand a little bit more and that's okay For the seller. Payoff like yes. You might have to hold their hand a little bit more but when you give them a quality business you might have. Effectively changed their entire trajectory of their life in a positive way. Because like maybe knows just starting out and that's always going to be the biggest pool buyers talking to because there's always more people coming in right versus say like a investor yvonne who that would be more of your brand aggregate or someone who's raised millions of dollars to acquire businesses. Obviously their motivations going to be a lot different. And if you're a seller like say you're a amazon. Fda entrepreneurs does example works really well with And you have a one product business. So one hundred percent revenue comes from a single ecommerce product on amazon. Most buyers don't like that look at that and they're like darris seems soup. Exactly right like whoa. Because it's a two hundred thousand dollars of single skew like But an investor ivan. Not risky at all to them. They don't care. They'll buy one product businesses all day long because they raise millions of dollars. A your five hundred thousand dollar eight hundred thousand dollar. Even three million dollar one product business one hundred k. to them as long as it meets their other strict criteria cousin to them is not as risky. Because of all acquisitions are doing right. So this is these are important things to know as a seller going into who am i dealing with For things you can do before you ever sell is ask yourself like would i buy this business like just be honest with yourself would i like. Does this seem like a good deal. Why why does it seem like good deal. You start interrogating yourself. And if you're really honest with yourself There will probably be some answers. The actually seems like not a good deal away. Now i know. How do i fix it. Like how do i make this a good deal for myself right so you always like sellers are obsessed with evaluation for obvious reasons. There's a second. Part of selling a business called attractiveness so some sellers they'll be like Like say you're running this huge media site this You know michigan. Thirty thousand dollars a month affiliates. I and you have this bad ass team writers. Va's as all this all these systems and processes set up in the first thing the so as things like andrei increase my valuation by firing. My old team get rid of that expense. That's valuation boost right. But then the buyer cousin sees all the work that has to be done to maintain this business. He sees you working seventy hours a week. He's just going to discount. You're like hey. I'm going to eat iot. I'm going to hire a team. So i need this for a lower price because the net profit is going to be lower right so you almost get like no benefit for doing that. I always tell sellers like yes valuations imporant that think about. How can i make this business attractive as well. Now right now would you. Would you recommend people go and start a site from scratchers now. A good time to go. Try to find like a site that needs a little bit of love by the site. Flip it and make your multiple. Like what sort of path are you kind of recommending people. Go down if they want to get into this world. Yes so if you're just starting out. I probably wouldn't recommend buying I think it's good to get your feet wet with building. That is a long game. So you don't you don't need to build something until it's profitable. You should be building something to where you're comfortable with the system. So that's the important thing i always like. If you wanna go fast always recommend buying something and if you have some skills. I think it's really good to buy something. That doesn't look great on the outside or even on the inside right like you want to buy other people's problems it's very similar to real estate investing right like if you if i buy a house. That only has like cosmetic issues and smells terrible. No one wants to go in it right. I basically get the smell of discount by the south thirty thousand dollars. I painted to cover smell or whatever and now it's worse as sixty eighty thousand dollars. I just built all this equity for very little right so you. When you're buying it online business you want to look at it in the same way especially once you have skills now if your brand new buying online business. I probably wouldn't recommend buying too many problems because he probably don't have solve them if you're brand new to buy dot go like get this amazing deal because there's a site with us google penalty that's been banned from all its affiliate programs. Like you know you don't want to hunt for like the deal. You're almost always going to be better off buying a high quality business for fair value. Like that's always going to be better at least until you get some skills then you can look at doing this like discount. I call it by business. A discount right. You're looking for these problem of businesses problems like But that's what i recommend. So you wanna go fast. Buying is one hundred percent way faster than building because you already have all the data and you can do all this. Low hanging fruit stuff like cro on page optimization new content taking advantage of the high domain rating on the website. Right all of. You can't do your first starting out site ray like if you put The split testing software. Vw show up on your your ten page affiliates. I was one visitor. Burma like you're not going to change. You know you don't have a lot to work with yet. so

Darris Amazon FBI FDA Andrei VA Michigan Google VW Burma
Biden announces sanctions on Myanmar coup leaders

Morning Edition

03:57 min | 6 months ago

Biden announces sanctions on Myanmar coup leaders

"One of the preferred tools of his predecessor to punish military leaders and millet Myanmar sanctions. The U. S will freeze about $1 billion worth of Myanmar government assets held in the United States. Military leaders took control of the country in a coup earlier this month and yesterday, Biden called for a return to democracy there. Military must relinquish power it seized and demonstrate respect for the world of the people of Burma. As expressed in their November 8th election. The party of the deposed civilian leader on Song Souci swept those elections. She was detained in the coup, and for the past six days, protesters have filled streets throughout the country. Reporter Michael Sullivan has been following the events in Myanmar and joins us now from his base in neighboring Thailand. Good morning, Michael Good morning. Who exactly do these new sanctions target? We don't know for sure, the administration says details will come later this week, but I think it's pretty safe to say the coup leader, Senior General Men online is at the top of the list, along with a small circle of subordinates, basically the same bunch probably who are sanctioned by the U. S and 2019. For their role in the brutal crackdown against the Muslim minority Rohingya Amid allegations of genocide. President Biden also said the sanctions might not be limited to just the generals but include family members and business interests, too. It's not clear if that meant the family's business interests or the military's like the two very, very large military, one companies involved in all sorts of businesses that jade trade Helicon banks, etcetera, some of which have foreign investors or partners, who came after Western sanctions started being lifted in 2012 at the beginning of what look, then to be the start of me and March transition to Democratic rule Well, Michael, Me and Mara is closer to China and other Southeast Asian countries than it is to the U. S. So considering that how effective can these U. S sanctions be? Yeah, well, that's a good question. When President Biden says he wants to work with international partners toe urge other nations to join in these efforts, But it's going to be a slog not just with China but with other countries in the region and beyond Singapore. Japan, Thailand all jumped in after the opening in 2012 in some cases earlier and there's lots of money to be made in Myanmar and a lot to lose by turning against the generals. About China. It might not be happy with the coup, either. It got along just fine without some shoot on some sushi and their party, and there are some reports the military thought Souci and China were getting on far too well. Myanmar's generals don't really trust China don't like it, in part because of their own long fight against communist insurgents, and even today. China is said to provide weapons to some of the minority ethnic groups fighting Myanmar's military for more autonomy. China like things the way they were with him, some Souci, the military maybe not so much. Since Biden announced the sanctions on Wednesday have the military leaders in Myanmar said anything about that. Not yet, but they haven't been very concerned by sanctions in the past. I don't see them starting now. And of course, with all these people protesting, there's the concern about what might the Myanmar military do? Will anyone get hurt? How has the military responded so far? With restraint of the beginning, and then in the middle. It sort of got a little worse on Tuesday after it issued its veiled warning to prevent acts that violate what it called state's ability, state stability In the rule of law. Things did turn ugly and several places with water cannon and rubber bullets used by police and several different cities. But things to have calmed down since so they're happened. More rests of political figures. Nighttime curfews are in place in some areas. The protesters are still coming out every day in big numbers, and I don't see that changing unless the military shuts it down, forcibly definitively, And that's the big fear, because they've done it before reporter Michael

Myanmar President Biden Song Souci China Biden Michael Sullivan Thailand Michael United States Mara Souci Singapore Japan
Biden Imposes Sanctions on Generals Who Engineered Myanmar Coup

The Economist: The Intelligence

08:12 min | 6 months ago

Biden Imposes Sanctions on Generals Who Engineered Myanmar Coup

"At russian protests. Plenty of people holding up gold painted toilet. Brushes luxuriant lose can tell you a lot about despotic leaders. So we head into the smallest rooms from history but i for the sixth consecutive day across me on mar. Tens of thousands of protesters have taken to the streets. They've been demonstrating since the military seized power last week. Overthrowing the elected government of aung san suu achieve. The army has claimed without evidence that an election in november one by miss sushi's party was fraudulent cinema. Today you've got. Where do ya on monday. The top military commander now in charge me. An online made his first televised address since the coup. He restated pledge to hold elections after year long state of emergency and he tried to reassure the public and investors that his interim government would be different from the oppressive That ran the country for nearly half a century. But america said yesterday it will impose fresh sanctions in response to the coup. I've approved a new executive order enabling us to sanction the military leaders who directed the coup their business interests as well as close family members and myanmar's biggest protest movement in a generation isn't backing down every night since the army toppled me and mars civilian government on february. First people all over. The country have banged their pots and pans at atm. This is an old ritual to cast out evil spirits which has morphed into a protest. Totally mccann are southeast. Asia correspondent. Many of these demonstrations have the air of carnival yesterday about one hundred young women paraded around downtown gone wearing disney princess outfits because they wanted to make the point that it wasn't just grownups who are angry about the coup. It's also girls. Their age and the streets are flooded with red balloons. Red being the color of aung san suu cheese national league for democracy party then lt in fact if you look at pictures today you won't see that many red balloons anymore. Because they've all sold out and how has the military reacted to all these protests. What's changed since we spoke just over a week ago when the protests hadn't started but there was clearly discontent about the coup. The army is trying to put a stop to these protests on monday. It's ian named true news. Information team issued a statement saying that action would be taken against wrongdoers who disrupt the state stability true to their word in cities across the country. Police are lobbing tear gas into crowds firing water cannon in mandalay me and mars second city. The police tried to disperse a crowd by beating them with truncheons and police are also firing rubber bullets. Three protesters are now being treated for wounds from bullets. And two people in the capital naypyidaw were shot with what seems to have been live ammunition and so as the military response ramps up our people frightened of what might happen if they continue to take the streets. Yeah i mean despite the carnival ask air of some of these protests. There is a deep sense of foreboding. Military rule only ended ten years ago so people remember how the previous junta crush dissent huge rallies took place nine hundred eighty eight and two thousand and seven and the army responded by shooting into crowds of protesters killing hundreds of people so protesters today are right to be worried. And they're alive. The fact that the military regime is up to his old tricks again. Agents from feared intelligence service or knocking on doors driving many activists and journalists into hiding at least two hundred people have arrested and on monday ninety districts including in the largest city and the capital impose curfews and restricted gatherings to no more than five people effectively criminalizing public assembly and last night the draft of new cybersecurity law. The government wants to pass was leaked. This would give regime sweeping powers to control the internet and effectively end free speech online so given all of those risks. Who is it that that's daring to go out into the streets. It is people from all walks of life. Teenagers labor's professionals. Lots of people are on strike teachers. Firefighters and health workers government workers are resigning en masse among them the entirety of the ministry of welfare. We saw extraordinary scenes on tuesday. The handful of officers in the police force actually broke ranks and join the protesters extraordinary because the police under the command of the army. So it's very unusual for them to be doing this and joining them yesterday. Where nearly fifty police officers from kaya state who declared their opposition to the coup. And what does it they all want. Of course they to reverse the coup they want to restore democracy and they want the release of their hero. Aung san suu cheap as well as other members of her nationally for democracy party who also been detained and do you think there's a chance that with all of this unrest who might backfire on the general's not just the response of people i suppose but also international response. It certainly hasn't been the fate of they expected. Mass resignations. i mentioned are roiling. the bureaucracy and form businesses are exiting the country so analysts saying it's going to be very difficult to see how they got some kind of status quo ante and younger generations are not going to back down easily. They're educated than they were a decade ago more organized and much more connected because of the arrival of the internet about a decade ago us leaders demands are hardening. They're talking about ending army rule altogether and scrapping the constitution which the generals wrote some activists. I interviewed said that if non violent protests fail they are bent on taking weapons and fighting when it comes to the international community in america. President joe biden said yesterday that he had approved an executive order that will pave the way for new. us sanctions. We will identify first round of targets this week. And we're also going to impose strong exports controls we're freezing. Us assets that benefit the burmese government while maintaining our support for healthcare civil society groups and other areas that benefit the people of burma directly but will these sanctions do much. Do you think. Joe biden has staked his foreign policy on reinvigorating democracy around the world. And that's why he's so keen throughout these sanctions but they are unlikely to convince the generals to change course just two years ago and nineteen the commander in chief minister lying and three other generals had sanctions placed on them by the us they proceeded with their coup. Anyway they're used to being isolated by the world and i just don't think that america's sanctions are going to convince them to change course. I feel that this conflict from the protest was in the army may be coming to ahead. The commander in chief is a deeply proud man and he will not stand by as the institution to which is dedicated to his career is humiliated by protesters and disney princess outfits at the same time. The protesters are digging in their heels. I think it's become clear that over the last week there's no returning to the quasi democracy at me and mom -joyed of the last decade either. The army cracks down and it's returned to the battle. Days of military rule or a new political system is going to emerge from the rooms of the old one. My fear is that the former scenario seems much will likely the ladder.

Army Government Of Aung San Suu National League For Democracy Naypyidaw Burma Ministry Of Welfare Mccann United States Aung San Suu Mandalay Disney Asia IAN Democracy Party President Joe Biden Kaya Burmese Government Government Joe Biden
"burma" Discussed on Talking Politics

Talking Politics

06:59 min | 6 months ago

"burma" Discussed on Talking Politics

"Maybe we should just start with where we are today so we're recording this uk. Time on tuesday morning. We're about a week out from the code. What's your understanding of. The current situation is on the first of february army took over arrested. The president's in the de facto head of government on succi said that they were acting within the emergency provisions of the constitution. They said that they would hand back. Power after holding elections within a year's time since then protests have been growing every day. They've spread around the country in several different towns and cities over the past forty eight hours. We've seen massive protests in the biggest city former capital. Rangoon may be hundreds of thousands of people on the streets yesterday yesterday evening. The government put out new regulations. And this morning. They also blocked major intersections and bridges as well in the city so the protests i think have become smaller but they have continued at in naypyidaw the capital. We're getting the first reports that someone may have been killed in altercations between protesters and the security forces. So it's a very very fluid time. We don't know what momentum the protests have they seen bay determined people seem incredibly energized in their desire to oppose takeover by the military. But we don't know what's going to happen because this is an army after all that's crushed many uprisings and demonstrations in the past. So we'll come onto what might come next In a bed. But what's your best understanding of why now so the ostensible reason that's been given is unhappiness about the elections but the elections were in november. So why february. So the elections were in early november around the same week as a. Us elections the commander in chief. The head of the army who turned sixty five. This year is meant to retire. I think he had thought that he might have a chance of of becoming the president after the elections. I think he had hoped that the pro army party the union solidarity and development party usdp would do reasonably well as well as many ethnic minority parties. Were contesting the elections as well when they didn't do well when the nfl the party amongst says suci a landslide. Victory the army. I said they would recognize and respect. The results but in december came increasing allegations from the us dp side of massive electoral fraud. And the army commander in chief and others in the army latched onto that and demanded an investigation that call for an investigation was rejected by the union election commission and that led in january two demands by the army that there'd be a special session of parliament to discuss these allegations that was also rejected by the speaker of the lower house of parliament that was followed by ultimatum and parliament the new parliament the newly elected parliament was meant to sit on the first february and the ultimatum was the weekend before the ultimatum past attempts back and forth reaching compromise that failed in the army seized power just on the on the eve of parliament sitting and the promise now is of new elections within the next twelve months so what reason is that i think that the outcome would be any different unless the elections themselves setup in such ways to guarantee a different outcome given what happened in november given the result would elections at any point in the next twelve months produce a different results. It's very difficult to say that they would. I mean the analogy won a landslide. I think with the army takeover. If anything else has g is more popular than ever strength of feeling against other militaries very high. I think the the pro army party would do even worse if elections were held today or unit. In years time. I think a couple of different sort of possibilities. I mean one is that you know. Assess has now been charged with illegal. Possession of walkie talkies communications equipment. That carries i think maximum prison sentence of three years. One thing would be that they would keep her under house arrest for this period through the next elections which is what they did back in. The army did back in twenty ten when elections were held than the other. Possibility is that they would disband the analogy. The other might be that they hold fresh elections and count on the d. says gee boycotting those elections. They're different possibilities. There's also the possibility that they might try to change the electoral system from first past post system to a proportional representation system in which case smaller parties including the ethnic minority parties. Might do better than they might think that they would have a better chance because the army has an automatic hold on twenty five percent of the seats so they actually just need allied parties to to win twenty five percent up to choose the president and a new government one of the things that highlights is the extent to which seen from the outside. There's often a fixation when it comes to a coup like this on its overturning. An election result. When can the next election happened to kind of reset looks often cooled in this context democracy but the scenarios you've just laid out the excluding the leading candidate leading candidate boycotting it the rules. They will show the ways in which fixating on elections is. The test of democracy actually skews. What's possible here. I mean elections do not sound like the solution to burma's problems. Well whatever one thinks about the need for democracy. I mean on one hand. I think there's an overwhelming desire on the part of of many different backgrounds and especially this urban middle classes in the people who are out on the streets they want to see the back of any kind of military rule and and military domination and they call that democracy and they want to see elections. And there's a huge amount of support wrong sushi in particular at the same time. This is a deeply divided. Society divided along lines of race religion. Ethnicity as well. And you know. This is a country that's experienced decades of armed conflict in parts of the country are still in armed conflict. So it's it's also difficult to see exactly how democracy helps to solve some of these broader problems with the countries facing just armed conflict. That i mentioned but under development climate change. That's coming as well. In time given the urgency and the and the pressing nature of many of these problems i mean in a way the country needs to unite to face all these problems and democracy if anything at least in the short term might further. Divide that society so it's very difficult circle to square. I mean the one had people don't want tyranny. Don't want dictatorship one political freedom. They want a system that can assure them of that. An assistant that that will allow them to choose the government that they want at the same time. Elections aspects of those elections are almost bound further. Divide society and take the focus away from some of the urgent tasks at hand not least bring peace to a country. That's that's in the midst of arm calmly when we talked about this before took through the complicated history of sushi's relationship with the army back to her.

today january december three years november this morning uk tuesday morning early november twenty five percent first february sixty yesterday yesterday evening naypyidaw decades twenty ten Rangoon This year union election commission hundreds of thousands of peopl
"burma" Discussed on Sound Opinions

Sound Opinions

02:17 min | 1 year ago

"burma" Discussed on Sound Opinions

"All right. There is. Why is it so not being played everywhere in America right now, every commercial, all rock station should be playing twice right now because Peter Prescott has not delivered the fat wads of Cash Matt Peter Only reason come on. Peter Guys I wanna get back to something that we talked about earlier a little bit by eighty three. You'd put out this amazing album and EP a couple of singles and then mission of Burma basically went away. Roger, what happened at that point? A technically, it happened because. My tonight US was worsening in these pitches. Every couple of months a new pitch would appear would start beeping. Then we'll get solid and it would I knew that it would never go away for the rest of my life. You know it's freaky. So that was the reason why I stopped playing in the band which. You know a I think they tried to none another guitarist but as I guess it didn't work and Itis is a ringing in the ears a constant ringing years it comes from loud. Is. Generally the causes loud sound and you were the the most suck is the second most famous suffer of this. post-punk, poster. was when Pete, but you and Pete are both back making music loud music. Proof, OF INSANITY Isn't it such though that the technologies change that now you can be really loud and powerful onstage, but but not be killing yourself up. Well, it is interesting. You know the world kind of catches up because now. Tons and tons of musicians have tonight is not a novelty anymore, but it's still too loud onstage. Technically, I've really shouldn't be doing this. Somebody who lives music like you do Wow, I can lose my hearing if this doesn't stop. Yeah. But that's not GonNa Happen Okay I can hear you just fine. Carry yourself and we're we're worried about. We want more lousy. Yeah. Right. I would either stop playing entirely noticed like a football player they love playing football. They're not GonNa Stop God I might break my elbow. Not GonNa stop them from playing and they won't be football players anymore. All Right Gentlemen have we have another great mission of Burma Song? Please we'd be happy lives..

Burma football Peter Prescott Peter Guys Pete Matt Peter America Roger
"burma" Discussed on Sound Opinions

Sound Opinions

02:34 min | 1 year ago

"burma" Discussed on Sound Opinions

"Guy that got lost the guy who eventually died, what what exactly was up with Bob. Stinson, why wasn't he able to hang in there through the duration of this band that he founded well I think it was about so much more I mean the Bob Situation was far more complex than than most people realize maybe even people in the band and around the ban he was someone who was as I say suffering some very serious traumas from his childhood that he never really got. Over and that in many ways, he dealt with a through drink and drugs and I think as the replacement success grew as the pressure became more and in a way as the focus of the ban went away from the group and more towards Paul and Paul and Tommy I think he felt sort of isolated and marginalized, and that triggered a lot of the the feelings that he had having gone through a very difficult and traumatic childhood and teenage years, and so I think Bob, problems were bigger than the replacements. They just happen to sort of play out during the life of the replacements particularly at the point where they were at their most. Visible you know eighty, five, eighty, six when he was essentially fired from the band really he never got the help that he needed in terms of his mental health in terms of his you know the by products of his mental health, which were his his drinking and his drug use. But of course, the ultimate tragedy died way too young at the age of thirty five and and it wasn't really from an overdose or or or anything is basically expired of natural causes. You know thirty-five to die of natural causes he had put himself and had been through a lot in. Physically, during those thirty five years. Laura. Sky Ours. A Home. The great mystery of the replacements Bob is You know they get signed to Warner brothers and the entire music world if not the world at large but people in the know writers,.

Bob Stinson Warner brothers Paul Laura Tommy
"burma" Discussed on Sound Opinions

Sound Opinions

01:54 min | 1 year ago

"burma" Discussed on Sound Opinions

"And although the replacements could be meandering in between songs tuning up the first couple years if you listened to him in eighty. One eighty two really into eighty-three. They were really tight Combo and I think it was that tightness that allowed them later on to get as loose as they did. Yeah. Well, I never forget the first time I saw them circuit sorry Monica take out the trash they were finished and then enough and there were a lot of hardcore kids with Mohawks but poll was not. Done the other guys went off went to the bar and Paul sat behind the drums and he pulled some kids with Mohawks out of the audience and they proceeded to play Louis Louis for half an hour badly horribly. But what it said to me is here's this band named the replacements was yet another reminder. You can do this and anybody can do this. You can be us. And I think in a lot of ways you know the replacement lumped into that sort of diy American Indian and I think in some ways, they were very opposite that none of them drove they didn't have driver's license so they couldn't get to the gigs that's about as as you can get. where I think they do kind of fit into the spirit of that time is about the separation of the band, the artist and the audience they would pull people on stage they would switch intruments. There was this kind of free flowing quality to who they were in the music they played and the atmosphere they created in those shows where I, think it made people feel like, yeah, I could do that. But more I think it gave the audience a really deep connection to the banned from from the Gecko and I think that's why partly why they have continue to. Sort of remain in people's hearts and minds for so long is because they were closer I think to their audience than a lot of bands. You know the big part of this band. Bob Why we're even talking about him today I think is because of you know Westerberg songs but also how they were presented by this band, the band was a key component of the creative thing. You really drought the essential tension between what Westberg was trying to write.

Louis Louis Bob Why Westberg Monica Westerberg Paul
"burma" Discussed on Sound Opinions

Sound Opinions

02:06 min | 1 year ago

"burma" Discussed on Sound Opinions

"Much that was playing out. They were really just kind of a neighborhood man abasement ban occasionally would play parties and local house things but hadn't really gotten on a stage. Paul, had sort of been on the stage a little bit. So it really was kind of Paul joining this existing group that really wasn't doing anything. So I think they found a kind of unified ambition certainly Bob and. Paul did in wanting to get out of the basement and get on a real stage well, who were those Stinson brothers Bob and how could they started making music? They were all minnesotans everybody in the band was native to Minnesota Bob though the product ultimately of some abuse and a very difficult childhood at the hands of essentially the person who was his step father and Tommy's father, and so the first decade of his life was really He was victim of that. He got sent into the state juvenile system, juvenile jails, group homes, that kind of thing and. Began to sort of suffer the effects of the abuse. I think that he had experienced as a child which is bisexual physical mental. And in really trying to reconnect with the world, he found the way to do that was through music. He picked up the Qatar and began practicing obsessively learning obsessively as juvenile jails and group homes, and then when he finally got out at the age of seventeen, almost eighteen and was released back to his family. He had an ambition and that was to start a band and his younger brother Tommy was sort of a wayward child at that point getting into trouble had been arrested a few times for shoplifting was very much headed down the same path in. Bob. Kind of scooped him. Grabbed him by the scruff of the neck and sit here you're going to learn how to play Bass and really that's how the Stinson brothers began making music. No exaggeration to say music save their lives I. It is not an exaggeration at all and you know I asked Tommy Stinson a number of times. Do you ever think about what your fate would have been if if not for for Bob, sort of rescuing you and putting the base in your hands and he said, you know who's petty theft, it would have been grand larceny grand theft and then who knows you know murder and certainly would have meant a life in jail his as the book I, section details there. The title is jailed death janitor and that was the answer.

Bob Tommy Stinson Paul theft Qatar Minnesota shoplifting murder
"burma" Discussed on Talking Politics

Talking Politics

07:11 min | 1 year ago

"burma" Discussed on Talking Politics

"Feeling in the country crystallized around that insurgency, being an existential threat to the country, which it wasn't, and she was swept up in those events, and we saw the horrific violence that then led to the exodus of seven hundred thousand people to Bangladesh in Twenty fifteen, and this is when she had just been in office for a couple of years I think there was a mix of factors I mean both our own values, our nationalist sentiments, the populist mood at the time the role of Media which we haven't talked about yet. The army's own thinking about these things but I think she was also a victim of the way, in which these dynamics came together as much as she was the author of a particular set of policies at that time. Unless we think this has nothing to do with us as you say, the counterinsurgency was in many ways modeled on British. Imperial Forms of counter-insurgency to. You. You don't know her essential claims to have you've met her. And you spent time with one of the vignettes really stuck with me from your book is I. Remember exactly when this happens, but she has an opportunity relatively early on to meet with a group of students and talk to them about the problems facing the country, and she wants to talk to them about fiction novels and the imagination, and she comes across as that this may be ridiculous, but a slightly unwieldly. Is a tool true. I don't think I don't think she would think that I think. She thinks that will unwell. People don't think about. I, think she thinks that in two thousand sixteen. When she came into office, she rolled up her sleeves and getting on with the business of of government, but I think the tragedy in a way. Is that because? Not only was she under house arrest for for such a long time, but so many of her colleagues in the nineteen ninety s died in solitary confinement. They were old men, some of the people that she had brought into to government they had nothing like the experience or the policy experience with government experience that was necessary to to kind of take stock of where the situation was in terms of economic policies or the peace process, then or anything else. And then, of course you did have her own kind of interest, which go back to her time at Oxford in in the nineteen sixties, and later when she was so interested in literature, I think she wanted to to read English and not to a degree, in which is what her her mother had wanted her to do what she did in the end, and so she was never a sort of policy wonk, and then I. think she also has I think deep within her. The sense that government is about. About, and this goes back to her father's legacy about setting a certain example, a setting certain moral example, it's not about government as a provider of services, not about government, necessarily as provider of an industrial policy or an economic agenda. It's about the leader providing this kind of moral tone in this and his vision in this leadership and I. Think probably I don't think she said this in in so many words, but I think she thinks what's gone wrong in Burma is at its heart, a kind of. Ethical dysfunction and that she's the person to kind of bring the people again inverted commas as well as her father's army back onto the onto the right path, I think she has his grand vision in her own way on the politics of things, but not on the kind of nitty gritty of policy and government issues. There is a case was hang. The politicians who think that the central problem of politics is failures, of morality. On worldly, but that's a separate discussion. It's also true. You touch. The has all of this is going on with Burma. co-top in not just the full of democratisation coming from the West, but why international forces so this is the age of social media, and we'll touch on that in a second, but the democratization moment. A moment runs across. Decades is also near liberalism to, and there's a question and you talk about it a lot. Whether points in the recent history of Burma, wet choices could have been made in what he thought to be impossible or avoided different parts of development, different economic models after the failure of military rule and the failure of that full socialism, the alternative came to seem to be free markets and democracy and free markets seemed for many people to go together, but that produces a very very distinctive kind of. Society! was there a choice? There was a choice in and there is a choice now, so the normal narrative is as you said it was a history of of military rule in resistance, military rule, and then this sort of half opening to two more democratic government, but the other way to think about it is that you had the colonial political economy, which was a very extractive economy that benefited only a very few at the at. At the top, then you had three decades of domination of politics by by the left where the only opposition was further left with with the Communist Party in insurrection and insurgency at the time, and then you had from really the late nineteen eighties you had both the turn away to the right towards free markets in an opening up with the markets in the opening up the country to to foreign investment and foreign trade. But you also had an opening of the border to China which was then also moving away from isolation, and just beginning its giant industrial revolution, and so because all of that happened at the same time as the democracy movement was beginning to attract the attention of Western leaders in that then led to western sanctions. The history of Burma away these past twenty years has been the history of this the evolution of this very strange economic system, which on the one hand is a is a kind of capitalist system. It's a free market system, but it's been intimately tied to China much more than global markets until very recently is led to extreme inequality. It's led to the migration of millions of people to to neighboring countries and in search of jobs and. With the Democratic opening from two thousand and eleven, there really hasn't been any kind of rethink of of that economic system, because for all the different new engagements West in Western leaders who came to visit and advice from the outside, everyone assumed that this kind of liberal political transition had to be accompanied by liberal economic transition, but what a liberal economic transition could or should mean on top of the system that had developed over these past twenty years of a kind of capitalism has remained undiscussed in I think there are. Are many different issues in terms of Burma's development path going forward where I think the country does have many options. It has huge potential because of its geographic location between India and China and southeast. Asia it has lots of natural resources. It has a young population, but yet it gets kinda drawn back because the assumption is just now we leave it to free markets. We open up the borders to foreign investment even more, and that will solve all the problems until would you say it is still fundamentally an extractive? System, yeah so the Burmese Wade Socialism, which was his target kind of social program, collapsed in one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty eight..

Burma China army Bangladesh Asia Communist Party Oxford India Burma.
"burma" Discussed on Talking Politics

Talking Politics

08:42 min | 1 year ago

"burma" Discussed on Talking Politics

"They saw it from from Europe and from. From from elsewhere, her father was a very young student at the time, who then left Burma and tried to make contact I with the Chinese Communists, and then with the Japanese even let him a new Burmese army that was formed under the Japanese during during World War Two, and at age twenty, eight, twenty nine, he became not just the leader of the army, but became the leader of the nationalist movement so. He wasn't away. Someone who the Japanese had groomed and nurtured and put into position in the war, but in one thousand, nine, hundred, forty, five in March of nineteen, forty five, he, he took the opportunity to turn against the Japanese and then side with the allies, and there could have been different histories at that point it could have been the allies after reconquering Burma had saw him as a quisling and arrested him and put him on trial, but instead what happened was that Mountbatten as the Supreme Allied Commander in Southeast Asia, thought that he was sort of wave of the future, and recognized him as an arbiter of the allies, and he became by Nineteen forty-six, the undisputed nationalist leader. Leader of the country, and he demanded immediate independence from Britain and the out the government in Nineteen forty-six decided to invite him to London. Agree to a very short timetable for for independence at that moment when the Burmese nation perhaps begun to come together because he had reached out also to the leaders of different minority, ethnic communities as well, and it managed to keep both the communists and the Socialists and other political parties under him. He was only thirty two thirty three years at the time he was assassinated, and without assassination of not just him, but most of the of the cabinet the country was plunged into chaos, and then after into civil war, most people in the West. When they look at his tongue, CG, they have tended to think of her in a very contemporary context and through Western is as representing. A democratic movement against military. Rule as someone who offers a vision of future for Burma, which for many people in the west is more comfortably what they expected and this is? Talking about over the last ten fifteen years, and yet as you tell her story. Her own vision of what she has been doing in Burma, and on what she did during the long period where she was a free political agent. Is intimately connected with her father story. It is a continuation of that story, and in many ways it was backward king is that fair I mean it was. It was trying to reconstruct something that had been interrupted. I think that's the kind of mythology around her. That that attracts a lot of people here, too, because I think for a lot of students in or people in the country, the only thing they learn in school is that there were these Burmese kingdoms in the past, and they was evil, British colonial rule and then came general. General on San and World War Two and he managed to both fight off the British and the Japanese and win independence for the country, and then many people think that the decline of the country over the past many decades and the relative impoverishment of the country compared to many other Asian countries, is because of this tragic assassination of generals, nineteen, forty seven in this kind of unfinished legacy. And in nineteen, eighty eight, when there was an uprising against the military government at the time, people turn to her. She was in her early forties to sort of help. Lead the country back towards the right path and so I think even within the country. People saw in her what they wanted to see in her, but I think she was always someone who was very much product of not so much a product of her father's legacy, but I think he was her role model in many ways, and I think that that's a nationalist. Nationalist feeling was always very important her, but that then became coupled with something else because nineteen eighty-eight, we'd had several decades of a failed attempts at socialist economic development we'd had military dominated government for a few generations, and in one, thousand, nine, hundred eight, the mood of the Times around the world and in Asia's well was was a transition to democracy was just before the fall of the Berlin, wall, but it was after the the Anti Marcos Revolution in Philippines and so as part of this sort of new resistance to the military people. Saw Democracy as the banner under which they want to organize this resistance, and so you had to sort of coming together of both the sort of nationalist feeling that I think she represented very much, and then also this more general sense that that had to kind of move in in some kind of democratic direction without having I. Think thought about it very much at the time I guess the for many people in the West. The paradox then is her relationship to the army and the military rulers. Of Burma. To whom she was in opposition, but as you described him her father, his formation is is as A. Me Man and has a military leader. And many people have been puzzled and confused. Particularly recently. By the ways in which Unsung Suci seems to be so either comfortable with or connected with the people that in the democratic narrative, a meant to be a fundamental opponents I mean the the basic democratic narrative is that? That was what she was in opposition to. And I think that was always very wrong because I, think she herself had set from very early on from when she first entered politics in in the late nineteen eighty S, and emerged of leading political figure here that the army was inter enemy that this was her father's army, and I think the the idea of her and many other ex-army officers and army generals who flocked to her in one, thousand, nine, hundred, Eighty, eight, one, thousand, nine, hundred eighty. Eighty nine was at the army, simply had sort of gone off course in the wrong direction under the new wind dictatorship, which was a dictatorship of the of the sixties, seventies and eighties, and simply needed to regain its its rightful place under some kind of elected civilian government, but still as an incredibly important institution in the country, so she had always gone out of her way to say, the army wasn't enemy, and she wanted some kind of reconciliation in. In a way between these two different stories I mean the army story, which was that they were born out of the Second World War they lead the country to independence from from Britain and seized power because they had to in nineteen, sixty two and have tried to do the best they can to hold together this incredibly fractious country and the other narrative, which is the narrative of the National League for Democracy, which she headed was that nineteen sixty two. Two when the army took power, they began to go down the wrong path, and they simply needed to come back to the right path, which is some kind of democratic government and abandonment of many of the policies that they had instituted from the nineteen sixties onwards, so it was two different variants of the same kind of Burmese nationalism rooted again in the same kinds of stories about the distant past as well as as well as the independence movement and. The army had sort of rejected. Her in the nineties is someone they didn't want to deal with, but she had always wanted. I think salt some kind of reconciliation with again the institution that she saw as her father's as Shutian. There are lots of wonderful vignettes in your book. A new described both various moments the journey to thousands when in the West. She was faded in a way that was almost cult like that kind of Bono the. Western belief that she and it's partly to do with a persona what she seemed to represent the people that she embodied some version of democratic. And at the same time you describe scenes immerse moments in political history, which is so odds with that I mean I was particularly struck by the point of which you describe. I think one of her early cabinets when she finally comes to power seventy one point, and it's made up all of men and their own little older than her. And yet for people in the West, she had come, and we'll come onto the story in second, which is was crystallized it, but she'd come to represent something completely. Different is telling US something about the illusions of. Western ideas of democracy, or is it about simply western ignorance of those various parts of the world which these ideas were applied I count. What kind my mind! What the central illusionist! The people in the West I think it's a couple of different things that happen I. Think we go back to the nineteen ninety S. when when she first appeared on the international stage, she won the Nobel Peace Prize in the early nineties and I think that's when some people I heard of her in the UK and elsewhere in the West this. This was at a time when it was both a sort of end of history time still when people assume that democracy would be triumphant everywhere, but where Asia was also rising, and there were voices in Asia,.

army Burma Burmese army Asia Britain Southeast Asia Europe Supreme Allied Commander National League for Democracy Mountbatten London UK Bono Berlin Philippines
"burma" Discussed on The Brookings Cafeteria

The Brookings Cafeteria

03:57 min | 1 year ago

"burma" Discussed on The Brookings Cafeteria

"That simply will not have the wherewithal with all to adapt to these things easily. I think the results could be absolutely catastrophic Well thank you find. This has really been interesting. We've taken echina- wide tour of Burma from history to the political situation. The economic challenges some opportunities and also the challenge of climate change. Wish you the best is to come back soon. Thank you very much. I'm David Wessel. And this is my economic update as the decade comes to a close one of our colleagues EXAC- Several of US and economic studies at Brookings. A simple question with the Mata come of hindsight we have today. What was the most significant economic development end of the two thousand ten here are few the answers? One interest rates. Hello they are at the beginning of the decade. The Congressional Budget Office forecast that the yield on ten year treasury injury bonds would average around five percent during the two thousand ten's today. Those rates are well below two percent and CBO projects. They'll hover around three percent for the next decade okay. D- This reflects a far-reaching change in the US and indeed the global economy there's been a steady sustained decline in what sometimes called the natural rate of interest the one expected to prevail when the economy is healthy and everything is normal. This low rate of interest makes it possible for instance for the US government to shoulder a larger. Federal debt reduces the cost of borrowing for everything from home mortgages to public investments but it also makes the Federal Reserve jobs tougher with interest rates so much closer to zero. It has been case in the past. The Fed has less room to cut rates to fight the next recession to life expectancy after increasing steadily for decades life expectancy at birth last estimated at seventy eight years and seven months began falling in the US in two thousand fourteen fueled by increases in and drug overdoses alcoholism and suicides. Among working age Americans. The surgeon drug overdoses is at least partly attributable to the introduction and widespread adoption Shen of prescription opioids in the late nineteen ninety s but many experts believe these depths of despair. They're called reflect increasing stress and lack of opportunity. Unity for many Americans and the gap in life expectancy between rich folks and poor folks is widening with those at the top gaining many more years of life than those at the bottom three inequality as the US economy slowly recovered from the devastating great recession of two thousand seven two thousand nine the gap between winners and losers in our economy wydent even after taking account of taxes and government benefits incomes of the top twenty percent of the population grew much faster faster than incomes for everyone else and the very best off. Americans are claiming a large and growing share of wealth of assets. The top one percent those with network of more than eleven million dollars head nearly forty percent of all the wealth in the US according to the Federal Reserve that set levels we haven't seen since the nineteen gene twenties for healthcare since the affordable care act became law in two thousand ten. The fracture of Americans without health insurance has fallen by more than forty percent. That decline is almost entirely due to subsidies. The government is giving for people who buy coverage on their own end to the expansion of the State Federal Medicaid program that covers a lot of low. Oh income families. Interestingly at the same time we were expanding coverage there was a slowdown in the pace at which overall health care spending rose between twenty ten and twenty eighteen healthcare spending went from seventeen point three percent of GDP to seventeen point seven percent of GDP the typical eight year period over the preceding half century saw an increased five times.

US Federal Reserve Burma Congressional Budget Office government David Wessel Mata
"burma" Discussed on The Brookings Cafeteria

The Brookings Cafeteria

10:18 min | 1 year ago

"burma" Discussed on The Brookings Cafeteria

"US policy. We've talked a little bit already about the policy of the Obama Administration during this period of moving toward reform holding elections. And so so on. What is your outlook now or your suggestions for US policy today? I think it's very hard to know how the US on its it's own can really solve any of these incredibly urgent and pressing challenges that permits facing I think the number one thing is just to appreciate the depth and the complexity of the challenges. Alleges that Burma is facing. It's not the case that this is a stall. Democracy transition stalled peace process where you've had extreme violence against the injure and then that's it and it's about pressuring the government into adjusting. Its course instead. I think we have to see this. As a country which is almost miraculously being held together her despite the fact that it has these dozens of different armed groups hundreds of militia multibillion dollar illicit industries weak or failing state institutions and. We have to be extremely careful. That what we isn't GonNa tip situation over into something much worse in a country where because of telecom social media everything else you you have people mobilizing around tribal racial ethnic religious identity on an unprecedented scale and you have decades of increasing wealth inequality and I think economic anxiety is not going to take very much necessarily for things to tip over into a much worse situation so I think one is just to understand the scale and the nature of the problem. The second I think is that the focus cannot be as it has been for twenty five years just Burma as a democracy the project or now democracy projects gone awry. I think the issues of political economy the way in which money is made is being made economic issues inequality issues shoes really have to be front and center of any kind of engagement going forward if it's going to have traction on the one hand and it's actually going to open the door to possible solutions on the whole range of issues on the other. How much of the problem is just the continuing prominent role which is constitutionally enshrined of the military in politics? We saw this in Indonesia. Anisia for instance and it took a long time to sort of reform the Indonesian military out of formal participation and political institutions. But what is the constitution. Now give for instance the military in terms of seats in parliament and also I think oversight or ministers in three or four minutes actually not in terms of day to day government in some ways it's relatively limited so for instance. The army has twenty five percent of seats in parliament but because the National League for Democracy the ruling party has has well over fifty percent of the total it can actually push through any legislation and it controls the budget completely. The only thing that the military with twenty five hi percent can block is any change. The constitution what the military also has through the constitution control of three ministries defense border affairs and home affairs which controls the police until earlier this year. Home Affairs also control the General Administration Department which is sort of the local administration department. But that has now been handed over to the civilian the inside of the government so I think the problem is not so much the military through the Constitution itself though I think most people would agree. That amendments to the constitution are needed needed. I think the problem is that there isn't a shared vision or agenda around where the economy should go otherwise and I think a a deep problem in Burma is at like in many other countries. And this is the way in which I think is not unique. A complete separation of politics from economics so on the one hand politics is seen around identity identity issues and democracy as conceived through constitutions constitutional reform on the other hand economics is seen as the realm of technical experts and advisers flying in from outside and bureaucrats yet. These big issues about what kind of country should Burma be in the future. What kind of economy? How I should be believe? What kind of growth does it want? How does want to handle big issues like tourism? What is the balance in terms of wealth inequality that people are one are they okay with a very unequal but but free society or did they want something much stronger government role and one that reduces inequality these issues are debated at all? So I think that is the missing discourse that is preventing these though. I think if you had the right discourse on the right discussion. I'm not sure that the army would actually stand in the way if you frame. It narrowly around. Why don't you changes inches constitution? That took you twenty five years to write and that's made you comfortable with taking a big step away from government. They'll resist it but I think if you engage the army in these some of these broader ratio. I'm not sure that same resistance would be there but we were talking earlier today. And if I heard you right I think you like me. I believe see probably the two big issues in the world today as the rise of China and climate change and I know that both of these issues loom large in your book as well. So let's look at China Today. You talked a little bit about China's role six or seven years ago. Today we hear a lot about the belt and road. Initiative and other sort of ways in which China is exercising especially especially economic influence which in many parts of Southeast Asia especially mainland Southeast Asia is translating into strategic and political influence as well so just give us a sense of the changing role of China in Burma. It's a long standing process so the border between Burma and China was opened at exactly the same time that Burma transition from its old socialist system to a capitalist system in nineteen eighty nine. So it's a thirty year process of increasing economic integration with China you now have hundreds the thousands of Chinese who've migrated to Burma who have businesses thousands a small firms that operate across borders China's by Far Burma's biggest trading partner in one direction from Burma to China go hundreds of trucks every day mainly with primary commodities agricultural commodities but also natural resources from the other direction from China comes the the vast bulk of Burma's consumer goods market so everything from bicycles to car parts to televisions to smartphones to furniture to clothing. And and if you look at the relationship the economic relationship today at the top level you have the proposed China Myanmar Economic Corridor under China's Bri as part of China's VR. I and that would include huge infrastructure projects that were basically link southwestern China through Burma to the Indian Ocean that would include major redevelopment projects all along the way that would include big energy hydropower and other projects and would include port as well in the Bay of Bengal and proposed new city the opposite of the river in Rangoon in the south of the country as well so this is the big plan on the table but even though the plan has been approved in principle none of these projects have actually. You mean approved by the Burmese government. Burmese government have said that they approve of the enemy and our economic quarter. They have in detail approved the projects in terms of financing arrangements. Or anything else. What is happening instead? Is that around. It's not directly B. R.. I but it's in many other ways can activity between China and Burma has increased so for example. We've gone from just a few flights to China over twenty flights from many different Chinese cities have big rise in Chinese tours. The rise in just small scale small to medium MM scale. Chinese investment has increased markedly over the past few years. And I think the way in which Burma's perhaps different from other countries in the region other countries in Southeast Asia is that you have a completely open land border that is not under the control of the government on this side. Meaning on the Burmese side. So almost up and down the thousand three hundred mile long border the border is controlled to a large extent by non-state date armed groups some of which are hostile to the Burmese army. And so it's a kind of a frontier. These groups are to some extent led by leads that are increasingly signified as well. So you have this weird area probably about the size of England altogether where no one is clearly in charge you have non onstage armed groups. You have Chinese influence political as well as economic coming across the border where there's occasional fighting and so you see this kind of rolling out of Chinese influence influence and perhaps projection of Chinese power. That I think is different than any other border that China has on there. Is I think a growing school of thought among analysts of international relations that we kind of have rival systems developing in the world today where the US represents the old liberal order democracy and so on on and China is promoting something else perhaps even at the domestic governance level kind of model of authoritarian state led development. There's also questions especially in South East Asia about whether the Chinese model is influencing domestic politics of different countries in Cambodia or elsewhere either directly perhaps or indirectly in other ways. Do you see that playing out politically in Burma. Not So far could in the future and the distant future because has now just seven or eight years away from the iron fist of pure military dictatorship. I think people are eager to embrace a much freer and more competitive the system of government. I think what's key is or what's really important is to make sure that these new democratic processes are connected to discussions an effort aimed at improving the lives and livelihoods of ordinary people. Otherwise if it's a content free democracy where the economic system which has been incredibly predatory auditory in an exploitative continues as it is and democratic processes are just about constitutional change. Then I think a lot of people will at the very least become disappointed pointed to turn away and then I think you open the door. Perhaps ten fifteen twenty years in the future where people have forgotten about. The bad aspects of authoritarianism opens the door or to a new kind of authoritarian future. Let's see well. Let's close by talking about climate because this is an issue as I mentioned you raise in your book. When I traveled to Southeast Asia? I hear so much about this. Whether it's the city state of Singapore or the Mai Cong Delta in Vietnam. Everybody is very concerned. It's a maritime region..

Burma China South East Asia US army China Myanmar Economic Corrido China Today Burmese government National League for Democracy Obama Administration Burmese army Indonesia Home Affairs Mai Cong Delta Vietnam Rangoon Bay of Bengal Cambodia
"burma" Discussed on The Brookings Cafeteria

The Brookings Cafeteria

10:44 min | 1 year ago

"burma" Discussed on The Brookings Cafeteria

"Jonathan Strumza Delete Kuan Yew Chair in Southeast Asian Studies here at Brookings on Today's program Jonathan shares another in a continuing series of his conversations with leading experts on issues related to South East Asia. Also in today's show senior fellow David Wessel talks about the most significant economic developments of the last decade including interest rates life expectancy inequality and health care. You can follow the Brookings podcast network on twitter. Ah Policy podcasts. Information about in links to all of our shows Jonathan. Welcome back to the Brookings Cafeteria. Thank you for it. I'm very happy to be here again. So you are on the brookings things cafeteria recently to talk about your paper in the Global China Series on China's rising influence in Southeast Asia. Now turn to another topic. Can you talk about. Who Do you got for us today? Yes we're very pleased to have had the opportunity to interview thought men who who's an award-winning writer. Historian conservationist and a former adviser adviser to the president of Myanmar also known as Burma he has served also on three United Nations peacekeeping operations including in Cambodia in the nineteen nineties and then in the Balkans and he has been at the UN secretary to New York where he was head of policy planning in the Department of Political Affairs Font returned to Burma in in two thousand and eight and has been involved in reform related efforts ever since he is currently chairman of the House a leading education and discussion center and and the founder and chairman of the Gun Heritage Trust. He's also author of several books on Burma. The most recent of which is the focus of our podcast discussion tripping. And how do you know Dr Thought. Well I had the pleasure of meeting font when we both served in. UN Peacekeeping operation called attack in Cambodia in the nineteen nineties. And I've also kept up and when I was with the State Department I went back. I think. Shortly after the two thousand fifteen elections in Myanmar and saw him there at that time as well. Okay well thanks. Jonathan for bringing another really interesting and important conversation to our podcast listeners. Wide Ranging Conversation. I think listeners will find it very interesting great and now. Here's Jonathan Strom. South with thought meant you. Well I'm here with Font Manu and welcomes onto brookings. Thank you well. We're happy to see you've got a new book out called the history of Burma race. Capitalism and the crisis of democracy in the twenty first century. It seems to really Poured in your heart and soul into this book. What is the main message? You hope readers. We'll take away. I've been working in Burma over the past ten years in different capacities trying to work on the reform efforts. When I first thought about this book a couple of years ago I thought it was going to be a fairly straightforward political history based in part on my own experience talking about why the transition from dictatorship shit the initial democratic reforms happened seven or eight years ago and trying to tell the real story the inside story based on interviews with many of the generals and ex-generals about why they began began to move if they really did toward a more democratic system of government but with the injury crisis and the peace process being stalled? I felt I had to look much more deeply issues. Issues around race and identity and take a dive into the colonial past and the way in which colonial legacies around race still animate a lot of discussions in the country but then finally in writing the book and especially in talking to a lot of people for the book I realized that and even deeper current in Burma is this kind of almost hidden. Political Legal Academy in which billions of dollars have been made through illicit industries type of capitalist economy. That's evolved over the past twenty five years that's caused an enormous amount of inequality and I wanted in a way to weave together. These three stories of politics identity and political economy and to try to make this accessible to as wide an audience as possible. Tell us a little bit about how Burma got here as a country. How did it emerge from colonialism? Let's put it that way. And how did did that shape the identity politics that we see today think what's important to understand from the start is that Burma has a very unique geography. It's both the Valley of the irrawaddy river which stretches over a thousand miles from north south and then it's the surrounding mountains over the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. The British ruled Burma as a province of India. The borders of Burma our modern borders. They were created under British colonial rule. Even though there had been Burmese kingdoms in these areas before the borders are new in many different people speaking different languages now professing very different religious face as well live within the borders of Burma but it was as I mentioned before governed is a province of India and by the Early Twentieth Century. This idea grew up in colonial circles are very strong. Idea of Burma is being racially. Distinct and separate from the rest of India India and a Burmese nationalist movement form which also believed the same thing and so this kind of identity politics at the very core and at the very start of modern Burmese politics politics after the first World War and the nineteen nineteen twenties this campaign to separate Burma from the rest of India came to fruition in nineteen thirty seven and so in the the same way that India was partitioned and Pakistan created on this idea of religious difference. Burma was actually the result of the first partition of India. That we often forget in one thousand nine thirty thirty seven where this new entity was created on the basis of racial difference and after independence in nineteen forty eight. The Burmese nationalist list delete found that they were in a country which included many other people's as well and for this also this colonial idea of races is that belong to the country that were indigenous to the country versus people who are fundamentally alien to the country because they were of Indian Chinese or European descent also became came very much part of post independent nationalist. Thinking in your book. If I'm characterizing it right you seem to paint a pretty dark picture of the a future you talk about warning. Signs and a combustible mix of race and inequality kind of percolating through immature democratic institutions blind faith in free market rampant illicit industry and up lands awash in weapons. And you sort of look at that and say or at least ask the question and is Burma at risk of being a failed state in the heart of Asia. How should we view it? Is there a way out of this combustible mix and dangerous situation. Burma's had a very difficult past seven years from independence onwards. Wear it suffered under three different colonial legacies. One is what we talked about earlier. The legacy of identity based politics and race based thinking Burma was born in a way. There's a racial hierarchy under the British. The second are very anyway week state institutions so even when the British left in nineteen forty eight state institutions. Were very weak. They barely covered the entire country that they didn't cover the entire country. The periphery free and after decades of internal armed conflict there that much more limited and because of years or decades generations now military dictatorship these bureaucratic institutions are also extremely frail so almost no one in Burma pays taxes. The ability of the government reach out and actually govern the population is very limited and for about forty forty years. Burma was under different types of socialist governments and that failure of the left to actually produce a better society meant that by the nineteen nineties. Burma Erma lurched towards a type of free-market capitalism but under military rule in a way that was intimately tied to China's industrial revolution next door intimately intimately tied to elicit industries within the country as well and this has created a particular political economy that in a way has generated not just huge differences and inequalities within Burmese society but his animating many parts of Burmese politics today and try to argue in the book that we have all of these challenges. I'm not sure we should think about it as a failed state because in a way you have Relatively peaceful country we have the range of violence and exit. Is We have fighting in the north north. But you go to Rangoon and Mandalay. Nothing looks like a failed state. It's actually relatively peaceful. Despite the fact that we have multibillion dollar illicit industries despite the fact that we have dozens arm group so it is interesting because then that sort of begs the question. What's really holding the country together? If it's not students choose what is it and therefore I think in in a way there's an urgent need to think afresh about. How do we think about these kinds of countries? Because I think we're missing something in a way and we don't have the conceptual framework to really understand the dynamics of a place like Burma right now. I see you've given us a sense of how to understand Burma. Is there a reason for optimism away out out. What is your prescription for next steps? You've advised the government before what's your advice. I think if we looked at all of the different issues whether it's the issue of accountability ability and refugee return in kind or the situation Abidi peas or a peace process. That's been stalled the armed conflicts or even political progress towards a more democratic constitution. I think a lot of those doors are shot in. It's very hard to be optimistic. I think the door. That's actually open the door to kind of a robust Austin dynamic but also fair and much more equal economic development in the country and Burma is in a way gifted because it's naturally naturally so rich in resources it sitting between two of the largest and fastest growing world economy's Indian China and on the other side. There's Austin which also includes many many much more prosperous and fast growing economies as well if Burma had a good economic agenda. I think there's no reason why we wouldn't be able to see the kinds ends of economic growth rates that we've seen elsewhere in the region. The key though is to make sure that that economic agenda is also harnessed or tied to an agenda of equality and greater equity as well and I think we had that much more inclusive economic growth that reducing. How many quality I think that will gradually open the door to a positive change in the political sphere as well or the reverse I think is also the case? Where if we don't tackle these political economy and inequality issues? I think many of these political problems problems in identity and interracial interethnic problems can only get worse right. I wanted to ask a related question to the identity politics because there's been a lot of reporting writing about the role of facebook in Burma today. How has this impacted that particular situation? We've had a telecoms revolution in the country. Since two thousand thirteen where the country's gone maybe two three percent mobile phone penetration to now ninety eight percent plus smartphone penetration with some of.

Myanmar Burma Erma Jonathan Brookings Cafeteria India China South East Asia twitter Jonathan Strumza State Department irrawaddy river senior fellow Political Legal Academy Jonathan Strom United Nations Cambodia Kuan Yew Chair David Wessel Department of Political Affair Southeast Asian Studies
"burma" Discussed on WiLD 94.9

WiLD 94.9

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"burma" Discussed on WiLD 94.9

"Burma skeet quebec eddie you don't think about it revenue bye late the new one their fight can get enough d at home it's own house me more pick a short this my life take him chance to get my strike and never put his hands on me i'll shoot you get locked up booby streak straight now why he didn't take time to think before why make mistakes yesterday too hard nobre lists saito going away still that.

Burma saito
"burma" Discussed on RobinLynne

RobinLynne

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"burma" Discussed on RobinLynne

"Burma word two it is six three seven one of them sleep and rues my name is fine then lead why so ooh your little thing and yes one one those in this and we've done i was is on.

Burma
"burma" Discussed on VIBES-LIVE

VIBES-LIVE

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"burma" Discussed on VIBES-LIVE

"Burma word two it is six three seven one of them sleep and rues my name is fine then lead why so ooh your little thing and yes one one those in this and we've done i was is on.

Burma
"burma" Discussed on Bookworm

Bookworm

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"burma" Discussed on Bookworm

"Um seemed to be none of those things in meaning that she was a pacifist she didn't seek out attention she profess to be embarrassed about having been a beauty queen and even an actress she would say things like i don't understand why am i would have been so famous or every i would have been such a beloved national um figure um especially given her minority status especially given the fact that her father was considered an enemy of the state so in a way for me part of writing the book was seeking to find answers to the questions of who is she is when my mother talked about all of this she spoke about it as of almost as if it was fate that had drawn her from from point two point i'm note the most geographically more in diversion in the world but i'm not the way lease but i did have two grown to an atlas and nook and see where is per among so why don't we almost take a step back and tell our listeners whereas were walking well on burma is sort of wedged between thailand and india china and bangladesh if you can imagine that how would you describe the burma okay but you're writing about well it took me a while i should say to piece together that burma myself um michael it's it's not surprising i mean it's it's not surprising at all the people might not know very much about burma's history or ethnic makeup um because really even the people within burma have had their history suppressed in a way for hundreds of years before the british began to annex what is now.

Um burma thailand india bangladesh
"burma" Discussed on Bookworm

Bookworm

02:16 min | 3 years ago

"burma" Discussed on Bookworm

"Unusual and shocking and previously i'd say on examined materials in this book miss burma which on the surface is giving us the romance of a beauty contest i'm michael silver blood and you're listening to book warm were talking a bow miss burma edson novel by charmaine craig did you ever live in burma no my you know the novel is really drawn from the actual stories of my mother in her her parents and my mother had a price on her head because she was considered an enemy of the state in my father was american and i was born in the united states and um i had the opportunity to go the sort of um through the back side to refugee areas to burma twice uh in my life but both times really very much under under the radar one of the subjects of the book drizzly fielded spirituality somjate rabuka's who also trying to piece together the difference between the journey one on the order official there are all sorts of artifact true behaviors that her mastered in the process of becoming a movie stores you first becomes miss burma then she becomes a movie star in burma and then she becomes a warrior her won her husband ties she takes on his army and becomes the leader of a resistance movement and the question the spoke asks is who wished she these are old wrongs but who is she and that was the question that i was really asking myself during the writing the book and that i've asked myself for a lot of my life because my mother like the character really was those things and yet the mother that i knew um.

burma charmaine craig united states rabuka official