18 Burst results for "brad grey"

"brad grey" Discussed on The Long Run

The Long Run

02:27 min | 4 months ago

"brad grey" Discussed on The Long Run

"Brad. When i looked at your website is one of the first things you do when you prepare for an interview. You see things like your tagline is now map the universe of biology that is quite a phrase and and i really want you to dive in and help define that for for me and the listeners as we go on later in the show. It's it's really a bold statement we're looking to do. Both things administering luke and You know biology doesn't just happen With averages of biology across sells it happens in space were made up of tissue which has three dimensions of physical space and countless dimensions of biology. And there's a lot there to map and nanna strings right in the center of it. It is it's the little universe as opposed to the big the big universe in space anyway. Like with many of these interviews brad. I'd like to start out with a little bit on the person. So can you tell me just a little bit about You and where you come from. You're a native of columbia south carolina. Is that right. That's right columbia's the capital of south carolina. I grew up in a little suburb erm. Oh and Middle class neighborhood. Father was an engineer and entrepreneur. Who is kind of the early days of connecting personal computers to industrial control systems. Started a business in our garage and kinda ran it as a one man. show Coding pc's through the night on my mom was a special ed teacher and have younger brother. Younger sister Okay so you got some entrepreneurship in the family. My did you give tasked as a as a young kid working on your dad's business. No but i watched him and if anything. It made me more reluctant entrepreneur. I mean my father's business was ultimately not successful. He's he tried for on and off for a decade to make it on his own stubbornly refusing to take on partners or capital and It was tough. He eventually had to reenter the more traditional workforce which was a challenging thing to do. When you've been your own boss for a decade so if anything I think it made the approach entrepreneurship with a real sense of the risk As well as the reward

Took timmerman brad grey Brad nana string twenty ten seattle Nanna string two thousands string
Brad Gray on Spatial Biology

The Long Run

02:27 min | 4 months ago

Brad Gray on Spatial Biology

"Brad. When i looked at your website is one of the first things you do when you prepare for an interview. You see things like your tagline is now map the universe of biology that is quite a phrase and and i really want you to dive in and help define that for for me and the listeners as we go on later in the show. It's it's really a bold statement we're looking to do. Both things administering luke and You know biology doesn't just happen With averages of biology across sells it happens in space were made up of tissue which has three dimensions of physical space and countless dimensions of biology. And there's a lot there to map and nanna strings right in the center of it. It is it's the little universe as opposed to the big the big universe in space anyway. Like with many of these interviews brad. I'd like to start out with a little bit on the person. So can you tell me just a little bit about You and where you come from. You're a native of columbia south carolina. Is that right. That's right columbia's the capital of south carolina. I grew up in a little suburb erm. Oh and Middle class neighborhood. Father was an engineer and entrepreneur. Who is kind of the early days of connecting personal computers to industrial control systems. Started a business in our garage and kinda ran it as a one man. show Coding pc's through the night on my mom was a special ed teacher and have younger brother. Younger sister Okay so you got some entrepreneurship in the family. My did you give tasked as a as a young kid working on your dad's business. No but i watched him and if anything. It made me more reluctant entrepreneur. I mean my father's business was ultimately not successful. He's he tried for on and off for a decade to make it on his own stubbornly refusing to take on partners or capital and It was tough. He eventually had to reenter the more traditional workforce which was a challenging thing to do. When you've been your own boss for a decade so if anything I think it made the approach entrepreneurship with a real sense of the risk As well as the reward

Brad South Carolina Columbia Luke
"brad grey" Discussed on NWAP

NWAP

05:15 min | 3 years ago

"brad grey" Discussed on NWAP

"Like the meaning behind it, like any joke to be malicious or useless. You know, is it all in fun? So if it's malicious then yeah, of course is the problem. He said, you had, you know, kinda, maybe difficulties are. Didn't super claim didn't maybe wasn't very outward about being African are not African descent, but your parents being your parents were born they, right? Yeah, yes. You being first generation American. At what point do you feel like you really wanted to embrace it more. Probably. Probably grad school. In high school? Not really any college embassy that a little bit. I wasn't like I was like the new go join ASA or anything like that, but it wasn't like I shied away from either. It wasn't until I really guided college that I know. Okay. You know, maybe it'd be cool if I actually learn how to speak Uraba. You just learned while I break my parents. You had those kind of parents that were like focus on English. Not did not folks English, but they didn't reinforce Uraba in house. So like if they only speak to each other because I understand the language, I just can't speak it so they will only speak to each other and siblings. We spoke English and I go to school or church in only English being spoken there. It's kinda hard pick up language. So here's a question actually, that connects to this conversation that wrote down because you are not a. Offspring of an American slave or slaves. How far back can you trace your family tree. Actually my brother's doing that now it lucky because of that, that's that's something that we can't really do. You know, you're so. Maybe nine or ten shouldn't rations. Wow. How far back is that though? Early eighteen hundreds maybe while right. My family was. They were actually on my mom's side. I'll just on my dad's side so they buy moms. Mom's great, great. Great. Grandfather was a slave, a slave where he was taken from. I mean, what is now notice today? 'cause they weren't. I wasn't actually a country back then and shipped to what is now known as Sierra Leone. Then saving there was if we hear like you, you wanna slave for life. So when he gave me gain Sweden, he came back. If my is doing all that now at the family tree. Slow any princes or kings queens Banou actually, yes. Ooh. Rich in name only. Money was it kinda like kingdoms like? And I don't want to listen to think. I'm trying to be funny. I'm really just ignorant on this, but is it kingdoms in that kinda like in Europe, how futile system in lords and stuff, but you just have an area, but you're like a king or was it like super run in the whole whole shit notice? Like if like you like our, I'm a prince of like this this area, but not country tuned. Now you got JJ Twitter name. Now when I change it to your about demon Esau, you change the name part. What did you used to be before taught? Seven. I'm trying to remember because I thought it was something else before. Brazenly. Real. Yeah. And I never said that allow 'cause I didn't know what those words meant would do. They mean. It was a play on my on. My bike is like. And like your ability to, you know, I don't know. Create offspring. We ought to be looking like idiots. Now. So it's like basically, like, let's brazenly me brazenly like you don't like again, Brad grey brash like you're in your face. Okay. Glad you change that. He's in grad school. Where did you pledge omega psi PHI if he pledged? Yes, no, I I at while on the next advisor non hazing on organization. Okay. Thank you for that display. I, but I did pledge at university of Maryland eastern shore. You'll miss. And why did you choose omega psi PHI? That was really what I wanted to get to. But you know, I won't have these stories like..

Uraba Sierra Leone Sweden Esau Brad grey Europe advisor university of Maryland
"brad grey" Discussed on Gilbert Gottfried's Amazing Colossal Podcast

Gilbert Gottfried's Amazing Colossal Podcast

05:07 min | 3 years ago

"brad grey" Discussed on Gilbert Gottfried's Amazing Colossal Podcast

"When we were out of town before New York, they cast Bruno Kirby, and I'm going will Bruno's a great guy. And I, I love him as an actor, but. This is not a neurotic ju. You know, he got great reviews and they were able to raise money on his name. So he brought it to New York. He was. He was you figure have meet Bruno Kirby real gentlemen once they gives you sweetheart. Yeah, like them immediately. He was. He had his morality team is this. He was very honorable and you know, in his whole body of work, you know godfather to embarrass the course of its in movies and all that I working with Billy city slickers and city slickers. Yes, yeah, yeah. It's a, it's a sweet piece of work. Again. People can get that on Amazon too, and I hope I hope there is another version I would. I would love it. I gotta ask you a couple more things about Gary and about. It's Gary Shanley and the doc is great. Isn't it? It's four hours Shanley doc on HBO. Yeah, it's four hours and flies by it when judge for sent it to me. I thought it was a rough cut because it was for I was long new. You know what I mean? But I told him and I believe sincerely I told him that because he asked me what I thought I called him. And I like ended to you remember that HBO had a special about George Harrison called living in the material where a score says he thing. Yeah, and it was similar because the first episode was about the Beatles and stuff that we knew in. But the second one was about him as a single performer and also spirituality in this was not dissimilar in terms of tone. Yeah, and I just thought the judge in amazing job. I really EMMY. He really did. I mean, it's it's, it's it's about so many things, but it's clearly a Valentine from somebody who who deeply law God Judd was, you know, he was a Gary, was a mentor to him, and you know it was like a amend t. I heard a story recently. I think I was talking to Jackie martling and that. Originally, every Shane Ling was saying that he thought his phone was that. And everyone back then thought, well, Gary Shanley's obviously knotty thinks he's his phone is stat when he had big huge falling out with Brad grey, it's all in the movie. Yeah, it's so that was that was an issue. What? Pellicano. Anthony Pellicano. Yeah. So it got real dirty in it got really underhanded about how they would gather information to use against him and everything. So yeah, that was thing. So it wasn't. Yeah, I can understand people thinking it's. Okay, but I believe that was the case, right? One of the, yeah, one of the recurring themes in the movie your motifs is betrayal is how deeply he was affected by that by that Brad grey Scituate see, he was the thing with Gary. I mean, and if you there, there are different degrees of betrayal in the sense that I talk about it in that documentary. I was married with three kids k. so. Gary was didn't have anybody in his life. Okay. So if on Sunday, Robin, I took the kids to Disneyland. And Gary wanted me to be an an editing room with him. That was betrayal. Okay. Gary's definition of betrayal in it's in the movie is stuff you do away from him when he wants you to be with him interest. So there was a, it was pretty severe. It was a, it was illogical now with Brad. Okay, or anybody else that because he also had a financial advisor who screwed him to, okay. I didn't know that this. So there was that kind of a trail. I totally get see. I thought that there was a little bit of irrationality if it Sunday, you know, we have kids, I'm going to, okay, we, we have a hiatus week coming up. We can edit tomorrow, you know, full day off that so that I thought was a little bit over the top. But this story with him and Brad. It was very sad story because..

Gary Shanley God Judd Bruno Kirby Anthony Pellicano Brad New York Brad grey Jackie martling Brad grey Scituate Beatles George Harrison Amazon Billy city Shane Ling advisor Valentine Robin four hours
"brad grey" Discussed on Sports Media with Richard Deitsch

Sports Media with Richard Deitsch

03:05 min | 3 years ago

"brad grey" Discussed on Sports Media with Richard Deitsch

"I know the praise she gets is rightly deserved. She's been tastic. I love watching the show. I'm, you know, it's one of those where you do this long enough and you know you, you're picking apart everyone's broadcast all the time because it's just what you're come accustomed doing or you look at things like that. You know, incorporate that every I'm a fan of her, but she's, you know, she's one of the few people I can still watch them like, wow. I love watching her hostess show her command over the whole situation. She so at ease with everything. Why. There's no reason for criticism. So I understand why there's no criticism because there's zero reason for it. I would also say that another person who's not out blasting Binyamin social media, all the time does not have a Twitter account, no onto something there, but I don't know Rebecca and you know what away from its, I get along really well for Becca. I a lot. She's fun. She smart. She's hilarious. So you know if you are someone who's criticizing her at this point, especially you, you're watching on air and for some reason you don't like her. I probably have zero in common with all right land. McCue is the fifth most well known person from the university of buffalo behind Khalil Mack wolf, Blitzer, Terry gross in Jeremy Jacobs. Maybe Brad grey might be six, actually, Greg, Jarvis. I take that back. Liam accuses seventh most well-known person university. You have to be right there? No, no, no, no, yes. Seven for sure. Liam. He more importantly than that, he serves as a host on many of the NBC sports properties that you watch, including football night in America where he has a new role this year. Check him out on site. The NHL, of course, Notre Dame football, and you will see him and the Olympics next up in twenty twenty Tokyo which would be actually an incredible Olympics, Liam, I appreciate your work and I appreciate you joining me today on the sports media podcast. Continued success heading forward. Thanks me on all right, back in the studio. My thanks to all my guess Robert with tell of black sports online best news day. It's got Hansen the NFL network and leeann McCue of NBC sports, three different conversations, but hopefully found it interesting if you're still listening to my voice here, my guess is you did a police check out previous podcasts at these sports media would Richard h page on apple podcasts, Stitcher, Google play. Previous guests include Adam Schefter Chennai grew McKay. We've done some tables including on Jamal hill, leaving ESPN Rebecca Lowe. Brett mcmurphy, Frank, Sola, and you can check out all Chris Thompson and everybody else has been a guest on this podcast. Since we started up again, Ebro. For loophole. Reno as always, I appreciate his work in putting together with a multi part podcast on this one. Thanks the cadence. Thirteen, and thanks for listening. See again on the sports media pockets.

Liam leeann McCue Becca Jarvis Rebecca Lowe Binyamin Brad grey Adam Schefter NBC Twitter Khalil Mack wolf Reno Jamal hill university of buffalo NHL Olympics Jeremy Jacobs Ebro
"brad grey" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

Monocle 24: The Briefing

04:02 min | 3 years ago

"brad grey" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

"So with seeing lot more Syrians traveling to Russian universities, particularly in eastern Siberia and what was the thing a lot more Syrians in school in Sierra who had now learning Russian. The headline is actually of this story is the language of Putin for Syria, and it's really, really interesting. I think we focus a lot on military ties, but we don't look a lot about how the educational links between Russian and Russia and Syria developing today. Apparently there are more than twelve thousand citizens of Syria who is studying Russian rush. With Russian was introduced into the curriculum in two thousand and fourteen and is now being taught as a second language and a low of schools, which is really interesting development actually, considering that there's been so much destruction in in Syria, there would be so many cultural vacuums. You could call them. It could be fascinating to see in the future. What actually happens with Russia, getting more involved in that in that side of cereal completely. And I found it really interesting that actually the first Russian boarding school in Damascus is set to open in September. So this'll be a Russian curriculum scoop taught through our Beck, and it's the first Russian school being set of in the Middle East and the loss one hundred years. So it's definitely something to keep a keen eye on as as particular as the conflict that develops something to evolve in the future page. Reynolds will have to leave it there. Unfortunately, we're out of time, but thanks for guiding us through today's newspapers. Twenty minutes past twelve, the new action movie heavyweight mission. Impossible fallout is enjoying a rapturous reception in multiplexes around the world, and it's solid. Opening weekend box office will no doubt come as welcome news full of studio behind the film paramount, which has been struggling to keep up with Disney's blockbuster machine, but will it be enough to turn the studios fortunes around in 2017 full. The third time running Disney, finished the year on Haub as Hollywood's most profitable studio. Thanks largely to its marvel superheroes universe, Star Wars, and popular remakes of classic films with the multiplexes at ruled by franchise films. There's not much box office pie, lift full years without a solid a tent pole to lean on. It's a problem that's being particularly troubling at Paramount Pictures, which for some years now as being at the border. Mm-hmm. Of Hollywood's money-making and it's already coast one CEO. He's job for all the successes of movies and television shows the entertainment businesses in many ways facing the best of times in the worst of times. What I mean by that is this amazing pace of technology and innovation is allowing us to make more exciting creative content than ever before to deliver it more ways than anyone has ever experienced. That's Jim Genova LA's speaking at a Greek America foundation event. He took over as chairman and CEO of Paramount Pictures just over a year ago, ending twelve years at the top. He's predecessor, Brad grey, got there. They weren't a place where they didn't have much development. There really wasn't much product, and so we had a pretty much start from scratch. We had to take a look at the business and really understand what was coming really look at where the business would be was was to be an international business. Was it to be business clearly that had moved toward the next. Distribution of front in terms of digital, where were we? And then how do we tell great story. So where did it go wrong? Full Brad grey and paramount, and could a twenty two year old action movie franchise based on a fifty two year old television series really hold the key to recovery. Since the full of 'em Louis be man in the nineteen fifties. Studio heads haven't lost all that long in the face of consecutive box office flops, the arrival of Jim Gino plus at

Syria Russia Paramount Pictures Brad grey Reynolds Jim Genova LA Disney Putin Hollywood Damascus Beck Middle East Jim Gino chairman and CEO Siberia Sierra CEO Greek America Haub one hundred years
"brad grey" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

02:20 min | 3 years ago

"brad grey" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"Two movies now and the new action pick heavyweights mission. Impossible full life for some reason is enjoying a rapturous reception and multiplexes around the world. It's solid. Opening weekend box office will no doubt come as welcome news for the studio behind the film paramount, which has been struggling to keep up with Disney's blockbuster machine, but will it be enough to turn the studios fortunes around will molecules Ben Rheinland tries to explain in 2017 fully third time running Disney, finished the year onto hall as Hollywood's most profitable studio. Thanks largely to its marvel. Superheroes universe, stall wolves and popular remakes of classic films with the multiplexes ruled by franchise films. There's not much box office pie, lift full years without a solid a tent pole to lean on. It's a problem that's being particularly troubling at Paramount Pictures, which full some years now. Has been at the bottom of Hollywood's moneymakers and it's already coast one CEO his job for all the successes of movies and television shows the entertainment business is in many ways facing the best of times in the worst of times. What I mean by that is this amazing pace of technology and innovation is allowing us to make more exciting creative content than ever before to deliver it more ways and anyone has ever experienced. That's Jim. Gene Opelousas speaking at a Greek America foundation event. He took over as chairman and CEO of Paramount Pictures just a year ago, ending twelve years at the full. He's predispo-, Brad grey. Got there. They weren't a place where they didn't have much development. There really wasn't much product, and so we had a pretty much start from scratch. We had to take a look at the business and really understand what was coming really look at where the business would be was it was it to be an international business? Was it to be business clearly that had a move toward the next distribution front in terms of digital? Where were we? And then how do we tell great story? So where did it go wrong? Full Brad grey and paramount, and could a twenty two year old action movie franchise based on a fifty two year old television series really hold the key to recovery..

Paramount Pictures Brad grey Gene Opelousas Hollywood Disney chairman and CEO Ben Rheinland CEO Greek America twenty two year fifty two year twelve years
"brad grey" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

03:16 min | 3 years ago

"brad grey" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

"And Tom is just very persuasive. I, it's on the land on the on rogue nation. I was working how I got the job on rogue nation. I was working with Tom on edge of tomorrow, and we were. We were at the hotel one night working till like three in the morning on the script talking about some second act, turn in the movie, and Tom looked at me and he said, you know, you should direct the next mission impossible and it she'll Rin down my spine because I had seen Brad bird directing mission, impossible, and I did not want the job. It was a very, it's a, it's a, it's a physically demanding job. It's not just mentally taxing. It's a little bit like the iron man. It's a very hard job and I saw the the strain that it put on Brad and didn't want to go through with that. So. I avoided the question and Tom said, well, who would I ask? Who would I talk to? And foolishly, I said, Well, I, I would imagine you would talk to Brad grey had a paramount. Tom nods, and he takes out his phone and he starts dialing his phone and walks out of the room. And I hear him saying, hi, it's Tom Cruise for grad gray, and I hear him in the other room talking for about ten minutes and he's laughing and they're having and he comes back in there. Okay. All right. Okay. Brad, good. I'll talk to you later. He hangs up the phone and says, you're directing mission. Imposs-. I did not ask for the job. I, nor did I formally accept the job. I had the job, so now we're, we're, we're now talking about the next movie and I distinctly remember I was having dinner with Mark Evans, the president of paramount at that point and the movie was finished. The movie was about to come out. The reviews were coming in and we knew the movie was in good shape. And Mark was feeling very Boyd, and I said, Mark, can I? Can I ask you a question that's really more of a statement. He said, yes. I said, if I told you because mission quite famously has no screenplay. It never has a Finnish screenplay. It's you. The screenplay is usually a. Sort of a token of appreciation that we present at the premiere and we're gonna talk about that more in the spoiler section for sure, but please continue because it fascinates me. So I said to Mark, if I had told you six months ago that this big giant movie that opens with a four hundred with Tom Cruise on the side ended with Sean Harrison, a glass box built from from built from spare parts bought at Home Depot. You would never have green lit this movie, and he said, no, you're right. I never would have done that ever. I would not have done it, but because mission evolved the way that it did. So now here I was with Tom and we're talking about the movie and he's just talking about it like I'm directing. And I said, you know, I can't. I can't do this. I can't direct the next movie. He said, why not? And I said, because there's never been a two-time director. That's the brand. That's what the franchise has become. This is the precedent, and Tom said precedents are made to be broken..

Tom Cruise Mark Evans Brad Brad bird Brad grey Sean Harrison director president Home Depot Boyd ten minutes six months
"brad grey" Discussed on Pure Nonfiction: Inside Documentary Film

Pure Nonfiction: Inside Documentary Film

02:17 min | 3 years ago

"brad grey" Discussed on Pure Nonfiction: Inside Documentary Film

"Well i mean there's a point in the film where i was trying to imagine it from both sides and we'll maybe it's more complicated but then it came out that that gary was being followed and being wiretapped by the private detective anthony pellicano which i take it was part of that lawsuit even though there there there's a kind of denial from brad grey in that you attribute in the film but i mean are we right to assume that that was tied up in that lawsuit i think for certain clients anthony pellicano there was some sort of paper trail or some way they were able to connect that they hired anthony pellicano the director john mccain who directed die hard hired him and anthony pellicano of bugged the the phone of a producer he was in conflict with and john mccain went to jail for a year almost a year there wasn't the paperwork or the proof that brad grey and bert fields asked anthony pellicano to tap gary's phone one would assume that that's what happened because seal the conflict gary was in at the time and bert fields use anthony pellicano all the time and this is the kind of work that he did but they certainly have deniability because there is no direct proof that they said anthony we want you to bug garry shandling 's phone out there's no work order and so can we say maybe anthony pellicano did it on his own and no one asked him to i guess that's within the realm of possibility it does not seem likely that that happened and gary said oftentimes when they went to court or when they were dealing with a lawsuit the other side seemed to know what they were going to do before they did it so i think that both of them may have escaped very serious legal problems just because anthony pellicano.

gary anthony pellicano brad grey john mccain producer bert fields director garry shandling
"brad grey" Discussed on Pure Nonfiction: Inside Documentary Film

Pure Nonfiction: Inside Documentary Film

02:14 min | 3 years ago

"brad grey" Discussed on Pure Nonfiction: Inside Documentary Film

"I found that to be very moving so one of the big crucibles in his life that your film goes into is his relationship with his manager longtime manager brad grey some point he felt betrayed by gray felt that gray was taking too much money from the larry sanders show and 'blanche this lawsuit a hundred million dollar lawsuit against brad grey i i wonder what your perception of that was at at the time at the time it was very upsetting because gary was so upset and he felt so betrayed i remember him telling me i asked to see my contracts and he refused to send them to me that really bothered gary they were his contracts and it's his manage to that that says he knew if he doesn't want me to read my own contracts there's a there's a problem here also someone told gary that was inappropriate for brad grey to have encouraged gary to not have his own lawyer and only use his lawyer and at the time it might have been expressed him as a way to save money or there's no reason to do it but it certainly was in the spirit of i'm here for you you don't need to worry about whether or not these contracts are going to be appropriate and that was i think the big breaking of of trust for gary when he asked for the contracts brad dropped him as clients and that was at the beginning of getting ugly so gary at some point decided there was no way to resolve this without filing this lawsuit and you know when you find a lawsuit for hundred billion dollars it says certainly a big deal gary was very surprised at the response would be that his reputation would be attacked he he was very naive he didn't really put together the when you file a lawsuit like that you're attacking someone's reputation and the response will probably be they will attack your reputation.

gray larry sanders brad grey gary hundred billion dollars hundred million dollar
"brad grey" Discussed on Blank Check with Griffin & David

Blank Check with Griffin & David

01:51 min | 3 years ago

"brad grey" Discussed on Blank Check with Griffin & David

"The weird hands like that are a little too big what if that had been the disguise it looked like tom cruise but the arms really hairy and i was like that can't be thing parkin has classes tom cruise's arms are normal smooth form so them night and day another sort of go universal the united artists thing is dead the water goes to fox it was a big deal he's dribbling a couple possibilities of what he could do i think he almost salt yeah salt he was very close to do is i believe it's angela but that was like a big deal at the time where it's like guess who they tom cruise with angelina jolie and they're not even rewrite movie yeah yeah yeah salts okay i i'm sure it is i've never seen never saw no more of a pepper guy myself rachel right here if you wanna drop in audio of just gales like a wild like yeah yeah you're gonna you're gonna sweeten that up just make it sound like all of audio boom is giving me a standing on good just ignore him all right so doesn't really do all his he's still do well overseas the pitch on him now like official word on tom cruise is the stars faded he's now more like he's drifting into stallone territory where he's a big enough name to carry a budget always get press but you gotta cap those budgets he's not a blockbuster then he announces a making mission impossible for right and there was a moment in between these two points mission impossible three and where we are right now the stuff we've gone over where paramount was like maybe we keep doing possible without him and there was this year gap right fairly large gap brad grey's running paramount's lake.

tom cruise parkin angelina jolie brad grey fox rachel official stallone
"brad grey" Discussed on Awards Chatter

Awards Chatter

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"brad grey" Discussed on Awards Chatter

"And i i was able to learn a lot about directing there before freaks geeks i guess overlapping with your larry sanders era you were doing i don't know if you'd call punchups or rewrites or whatever on a lot of different movies with sandler and carry were i i've seen references to happy gilmore liar liar the wedding singer a lot of the movies that my generation grew up on an love what was the story though with the cable guy because it sounds like for you that was almost like a kintu gary learning that he had been screwed by brad grey there was something where you got gypped over in a way and it was pretty scarring while in terms of making the movie it was it was a fun intense experience jim was paid twenty million dollars i was the first time anyone had made that much money so the movie had a little bit of a target on its back is this worth twenty million dollars the studio wants to make it for forty so whenever we would need anything and drift up a little bit they acted like we were sixty million dollars over budget maybe at the end of it we were forty one and a half or forty two but it was like the movie goes two hundred million dollars by the way they dealt with us because they really wanted to be profitable they didn't want to be humiliated that they spent that much money all jim's movies were mega hits that point and jim wanted to make a dark comedy he wanted to show other colours he wanted to show people that he's going to always try to break new ground and so we tried to do kind of a hand that rocks the cradle type mufi and we couldn't have enjoyed it more but it definitely confounded expectations of what it would be and then in the during post i lost my arbitration for writing credit after really changing enough why felt like he was warranted even have to go to arbitration because.

punchups brad grey jim larry sanders sandler gilmore twenty million dollars two hundred million dollars sixty million dollars
"brad grey" Discussed on Reasonable Doubt

Reasonable Doubt

02:42 min | 3 years ago

"brad grey" Discussed on Reasonable Doubt

"Records and then somebody said it's different cohen and then somebody said some of it's different coen but some of the same cohen and then somebody else said why does he have access to break records kind of ironic i and i'm sorry for tackling but years ago when the pellicano scandal started somebody anthony pellicano famine hollywood detective who had just dig up dirt on people he was the the wolf mr wolf he's like fix or whatever but writing i if i'm not mistaken ray donovan i think is moving fashioned on his life at least i haven't watched the series this year i used to watch it religiously but i don't think he's been to prison for a long period of time pellicano had the unfortunate encounter with the department of justice where he originally pled refused to cooperate thirty months that day they went into his prison cell told him to roll it up they indicted him again and he got sentenced and that's where he will spend the end of his natural life would not cooperate he was listening to conversations when with garry shandling and other comedians and i think he was working on behalf of brad grey or some one of one of those guys like he he had some range this pellicano he was on ever range he was he was we go to private investigator for westside lawyers generally in family law cases work it's nasty and where you know money is no object and ended up the client i had interest full disclosure was stephen kaladze who has represented anyone and everyone in family law it turned out that pellicano at that only wiretapped through i think back then it was pac bell which later got speed up eighteen but he had had a affiliation with somebody who worked there and even literally can tap into the phones was listening to lawyer client conversations so that the people on the other side of the thing would understand exactly where they were headed that's advantage to have as illegal as it is isn't it isn't it isn't anthony pellicano a sort of a metaphor for us as human beings in in terms of our condition and terms of who we are at our core most lawyer.

cohen ray donovan brad grey investigator anthony pellicano hollywood department of justice garry shandling stephen kaladze thirty months
"brad grey" Discussed on Double Toasted

Double Toasted

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"brad grey" Discussed on Double Toasted

"Max miramax went bankrupt after use disney disney own yeah disney let's go to but as far as this movie goes this nominal right here yes crazy and it's it's another one and this is actually you say paramount i think this is a i think this is paramount correctness paramount right here i'm not sure yeah i say that because a lot of people thought that this was connected with cloverfield yeah but it turned out to move the stood on his own some people say should have been cloverfield type movie look to it it did it did do you think that the death of brad grey the ceo paramount would affected excuse me no not the movie but affected airmail no they'll phone another executive come in you know they do class pick out another one yeah yeah they always they grow a lamb you know so so yeah this move is doing amazing all right let's go to number one movie what is the number one movie down yeah is the vendor yes are two hundred fifty seven point six ninety eight well let me let me just a shitload of money two hundred fifty seven point seven million dollars after one week on a budget now this debate about what they're saying here between three hundred and four hundred million dollars is even being said that this might have caused like close to billion if you count both films the way take into to your candidate show both they sat both films at the same time so i guess they've combining budgets.

Max miramax disney ceo paramount brad grey executive four hundred million dollars seven million dollars one week
"brad grey" Discussed on Cinephile: The Adnan Virk Movie Podcast

Cinephile: The Adnan Virk Movie Podcast

01:48 min | 3 years ago

"brad grey" Discussed on Cinephile: The Adnan Virk Movie Podcast

"Everyone loved that show you had the brain trust of appetite and i mean bob odenkirk was on the show john stewart was on the show just the last seasons the best season and shelling says to appetite there's no we're going to make the last season the best season because now that brad grey zone out approved people he had nothing to do with this this was me on the go made this thing happened and that last season jon stewart's replacing him as the host of their late night talk show and so the men of talent that was on the show is amazing but it took such a toll on him and here's what's brilliant about shamming within the pantheon's of comedy he took all of his insecurity and is selfloathing and his paranoia and put it into a tv show and peter tolan said one of the writers we used to always call him glaring rather than larry sanders or gary schilling it's glaring because like yeah gary is playing larry that's him on the screen and the humor of it and the greatness of it is that he was able to use those neurosis to entertain the masses the overwhelming sadness of it is while watching that documentary i said i was laughing at somebody who's clearly a lot of pain and who is having to use this too get through whatever he needed to get through and it's an interesting rumination with regards to insecurity and celebrity ego i myself have now found i'm so insecure now that i won't even ask people for feedback like there's different levels of insecurity like when you're really secure you can ask somebody would you think whenever they said you can take what i've worked to the russillo i noticed he's still does this when i'm at work to anymore but like after everything goods is that good and i'm like he's not actually asking for honest answer he just wants to get quick validation everything in those says that was good right they wanted like yeah i was great or good you feeling good mechat i don't even like on a daily basis like i don't even know how the show is that we just showed that they going like i don't even wanna ask just in our boss macau is the show because what if he goes i wasn't that good i'm like i don't even like i'm so scared i don't.

bob odenkirk john stewart jon stewart peter tolan larry sanders gary schilling
"brad grey" Discussed on The Director's Cut

The Director's Cut

01:39 min | 4 years ago

"brad grey" Discussed on The Director's Cut

"And then i will then he start than this chain reaction thinking starts well this would happen in that would happen this would happen so jim went for it and we started writing but we in it took a long time now the second part of your question how long the taking all these years i wanted it to be my followup to sideways but the script took a long time too long time to corral how do you find a story and a protagonist to serve as the proper vehicle for this quite cinematic idea i think and so that took a long time and it was such a big idea that really it's the idea for like a mini series or something but we wanted to make a movie and how do you made corral a lot of greedy scream play ideas into two or two and a half hours and then financing took was basically impossible for years because of the budget i was asking for i was told by two studio heads it's too intelligent of a script to mirror that budget their word not mine abbott finally as it always at as it has a couple times in my career one person in this case brad gray over it paramount said to his staff i know it does it make sense on paper were making it anyway and what was the budget seventy five you know it's it's an extraordinary achievement in terms of production design i mean you know for it we just take it for granted you know the the whole.

jim brad gray
"brad grey" Discussed on Juicy Scoop with Heather McDonald

Juicy Scoop with Heather McDonald

02:01 min | 4 years ago

"brad grey" Discussed on Juicy Scoop with Heather McDonald

"She went to get her now stan and robert shapiro walks in and this is during the oj trial and she's getting our nails done and he goes oh i he recognized her from the show and he knew the story of how they broke up and she got firing of i believe you have a wrongful termination suit on your hands and she has not yet been can you help me nieto's yeah actually conoway office tomorrow have someone that would help you so she comes he picks up the phony causes feel mal attorney name patricia something and he's like i'm gonna send over this girl to meet you you know she's definitely in the wrongful termination case anna gives you some advice if say thank you so he walked through the door and they tries to kiss her and she's like a stigma right what are you doing it roberts peers marion and and he is i'm sorry you're just so we're learning and couldn't resist myself saying okay well she doesn't make a big deal out of it because she wants to meet the attorney so she meets the female attorney recommended by robert shapiro and tells the story and she goes okay i definitely have a case ace here i actually know gary and brad gray let me call them hopefully we can just settle this and she calls her later that day and said i no longer will be representing you 'cause i'm actually going to re be representing gary and brad gray and legally once you've met with the other party can't jump sides which is why people who are getting a divorce a smart thing to do is if you're thinking about divorcing her husband you go and have meetings with every single top attorney in town because then none of them can be hired by your exhusband so that is actually how one of my favorite cases the broderick scott screwed in the body roderick movie is that her husband was an attorney and no other terni would take her case and all of that so anyway so she seems lost this girl and she tries to go to all these other attorneys and all the other trees oic like wall brad gray and gary shelly are not going up against that i'm not going up at your neria she.

stan patricia anna marion attorney robert shapiro broderick scott nieto roberts brad gray gary shelly
"brad grey" Discussed on The Nerdist

The Nerdist

01:30 min | 4 years ago

"brad grey" Discussed on The Nerdist

"I was super frustrated and when harvey left at disney company and started the weinstein company i was going to go worked for him running production and the at an and i was i was like i can't be an independent producer anymore i'm gonna go back to work for rv i can't take it and it fortuitously happened the brad gray was of paramount at the same time just started a paramount at the same time harvey was doing that and brian lord who i who's been kind of a mentor to me said you gotta go sit down with brad gray even though you've never met him and i met brad and brad made this incredible producing deal for me a paramount and i was which i chuck 'cause i got to be my own boss and i got to my own company but i got money so i didn't have to you know driver in in my drive my own scripts around which is what i was doing and down and so i so i went to work at paramount and then i'm about to answer your question than i really focus on trying to make a big movie and the first big move here i made was the to ferry when dwayne the rock johnson right and the experience of making a big movie any big movie just wasn't what i had thought it was just because there's so much money at stake it's very political and it was it was it was not what i hoped it to be and i had the again got super lucky that we bumped into paranormal activity around the same time that the two three came out i'd been so now is in my mid thirties i've been working in the business for about fifteen years i'd spent half though that time an independent cinema half of that time kind of in studio and paranormal activity was like this awesome mix it was the ultimate independent movie.

harvey disney company weinstein company producer dwayne brad gray brian fifteen years