17 Burst results for "border institute"

"border institute" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:07 min | 6 months ago

"border institute" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"How vaccines were Work, but they don't work the same for everyone. Dr. Eric pray there Another's air gathering data on the vaccines durability by collecting blood samples from volunteers before and after their shots get this, researchers say, even stress and a lack of sleep can impact how long your immunity could last. Make it. In Massachusetts, A local company is out with a new device that it says can monitor coronavirus in the air. Thermo Fisher Scientific is hoping its product can help companies reopen their office spaces. It's an aerosol since sampler and it ain't cheap. It costs about $5000 but can help detect the presence of airborne Corona virus and other pathogens meet the press. President Biden blasts Republicans in his first news conference since taking office for trying to make voting harder in America, calling their efforts to restrict voting rights sick And UN American Big topic, however, for an unscripted president questions about the growing migrant crisis at the Mexican border We get more from CBS is Elise Preston. President Biden defended changing former President Trump's hardline immigration tactics growing back to policies of separating Children from their from their mothers. Make no apology for that. Dylan Corbett, the director of Hope Border Institute, says most adults are still being sent back to Mexico. 42 remains in place, and that's a highly consequential policy. Because it's resulting in the majority of asylum secrets being returned back president is also setting a goal for himself running for re election in 2024, certainly a lot to unpack. During yesterday's news conference, the president says it's going to be hard to meet a promise by former President Trump Pull all U. S troops out of Afghanistan by May 1st. But the president says it is hard to imagine America being their next year, and he blasts Republicans again this time of the Senate filibuster. Which he says is being abused in a gigantic way and promises to get aggressive if Senate GOP leaders cannot work out a compromise, Ah, shot across the bow.

Dylan Corbett Elise Preston Massachusetts Hope Border Institute May 1st Mexico Afghanistan CBS Thermo Fisher Scientific Eric America 2024 Republicans yesterday 42 about $5000 Senate next year first news conference President Trump
"border institute" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:02 min | 7 months ago

"border institute" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Gonna system to make calls. Who family that they have in different parts of the country. Those family members will purchase bus tickets or plane tickets, and then they will be on their way. Annunciation House has done this work before, but there's a new complication. Finding ways to create a warm welcome during a pandemic. Can we still get groups of volunteers together to make meals but instead of serving the buffet style, and they serve an individual boxed meal, Marissa Limone Garza directs the Hope Border Institute, part of a coalition of nonprofits and local government that's helping support these asylum seekers. Is there a way? For people to great care packages that people could take when they travel. And including note or sometimes written expression of love and support as Thies. First groups make their way into the US, many more are still waiting in Mexico for their turn. There's a multi step process for the estimated 25,000 asylum seekers who may now qualify to enter the U. S. First they have to register. See the Alamo Giotto's You Gamble With the day the registration site went live a Cuban asylum, secreting chemical was glued to his cell phone. He's been living in a migrant shelter in waters since fleeing political persecution. We're only using his first name because he's still in immigration proceedings. Locate five days L. A team off L. A team a pass, he says he couldn't get all the way through at first sight was overloaded. But he finally managed to register. There are still more steps receiving a call to verify his information than a date to enter the U. S. And he has to test negative for covert 19 in Mexico. And finally, he hopes his turn will come to cross for NPR news. I'm Mallory Falk in El Paso. How do you have a humane immigration policy that does not encourage illegal immigration. President Biden is grappling with just that question. Biden is already facing criticism over decisions to deport migrants and open a temporary shelter at the border. As he seeks to reverse the draconian policies of his predecessor to talk more about the challenges ahead is Doris Meissner. She is a senior fellow and director at the Migration Policy Institute. Hello, Hello, The Washington Post obtained an email from Immigration and Customs enforcement, saying We need to prepare for borders surges now. What do you make of that? I mean, what do you make of reports that there will be a surge of immigrants trying to cross the border Now that there's a president Biden and not a president Trump. I think there's no surprise that The numbers of people coming are increasing because it is very clear that the Biden administration is committed to reversing the policies of the last administration and to making it be possible for migrants who are claiming asylum and looking for protection to actually have their cases be heard. But of course, the issue then becomes a real difficult one for managing those numbers and putting the changes in place without Getting into an emergency situation. Yeah. I mean, does this administration have sort of the tools to deal with the surge? I mean, there's already concerns about opening Temporary shelters, especially for young migrants and range migrant Children. Well, there does have to be an infrastructure at the border for processing people, and so the opening of shelters Should be seen as a positive sign because you don't want to have AH humanitarian crisis on the border where people have no place to go, which is what we did see two years ago when the Trump administration was trying to keep people out. Are you envisioning Biden going back to the very heavily criticized under trump tactic of what was called catch and release that if you had unauthorized entries, you would process the migrants and then allow them into the community with the hopes that they would show up to a court date. I mean, that was virtually stopped under President Trump has a way of Dissuading people from crossing the border. What the Biden administration is envisioning is having people be able to have their case is heard but heard promptly the difficulty with the way in which this has been handled in the past. Is that the backlogs in the immigration courts are so long that people are waiting in the country for years before their cases get hurt, And that, of course, does lead to misuse of the system. And that does invite Future migration. So what the administration needs to put in place is a system where people are able to file their claims are able to get legal representation. Get a prompt decision. Those who are eligible to stay can stay. Those who are not do need to be returned. And I think that this Connects also to the Biden administration's vision of working more aggressively, much more aggressively with the countries in the region because the administration recognizes that some people are eligible for asylum. Some people are not eligible for asylum and for those people who are not eligible for asylum. The question is returning in a humane fashion connecting people with services in their country. Those services need to be built. There needs to be much more assistance and engagement with the governments in the region to reduce corruption to reduce violence. The very circumstances that the people are fleeing, which are always a mixture of economic circumstances, more and more possibly climate problems. That have ravaged these countries and governance. That sounds like a lot of what President Obama did with mixed success, and President Trump actually did work closely with Mexican and Central American governments. He applied. To stick more than the carrot. He forge deals so that they could enforce their own borders and curb migration. Among other measures. There is a sense that what President Trump did actually, if your goal is to reduce migration, unauthorized crossings of the border, it worked. There's no question that what President Trump did work. The issue is at what cost at what price and that's the price that has had to do with our values is a country with our laws is a country and so the difficulty for the Biden administration is to develop a system at the border so that these decisions can be made promptly. It's the years and years of waiting That are the ultimate breakdown in the system that needs to be solved. Doris Meissner is a senior fellow at the Migration Policy Institute, where she directs the institute's.

Doris Meissner Mallory Falk Hope Border Institute El Paso Migration Policy Institute US Mexico Marissa Limone Garza Annunciation House five days trump President first name First two years ago NPR Biden 25,000 asylum seekers Trump American
"border institute" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

07:13 min | 7 months ago

"border institute" Discussed on KCRW

"They have in different parts of the country. Those family members will purchase bus tickets or plane tickets. And then they will be on their way. Annunciation House has done this work before. But there's a new complication, finding ways to create a warm welcome during a pandemic. Can we still get groups of volunteers together? You make meals, but instead of serving them buffet style can they serve an individual boxed meal? Marissa Limone Garza directs the Hope Border Institute, part of a coalition of nonprofits and local government that's helping support these asylum seekers. Is there a way? Are people too great care packages that people could take when they travel. And including note or sometimes written expression of love and support as Thies. First groups make their way into the US, many more are still waiting in Mexico for their turn. There's a multi step process for the estimated 25,000 asylum seekers who may now qualify to enter the U. S. First they have to register. See the level say, Lamacchia told you gamble With the day the registration site went live a Cuban asylum secreting me cow was glued to his cell phone. He's been living in a migrant shelter in waters since fleeing political persecution. We're only using his first name because he's still in immigration proceedings located five days L. A team off L. A team a path he says he couldn't get all the way through at first sight was overloaded. But he finally managed to register. There are still more steps receiving a call to verify his information than a date to enter the U. S. And he has to test negative for covert 19 in Mexico. And finally, he hopes his turn will come to cross for NPR news. I'm Mallory Falk in El Paso. How do you have a humane immigration policy that does not encourage illegal immigration. President Biden is grappling with just that question. Biden is already facing criticism over decisions to deport migrants and open a temporary shelter at the border as he seeks to reverse the draconian policies of his predecessor. To talk more about the challenges ahead is Doris Meissner. She is a senior fellow and director at the Migration Policy Institute. Hello, Hello, The Washington Post obtained an email from immigration and Customs enforcement, saying We need to prepare for border surges. Now what do you make of that? I mean, what do you make of reports that there will be a surge of immigrants trying to cross the border now that there's a president Biden and not a president Trump I think there's no surprise that The numbers of people coming are increasing because it is very clear that the Biden administration is committed to reversing the policies of the last administration and to making it be possible for migrants who are claiming asylum and looking for protection to actually have their cases be heard. But of course, the issue then becomes a real difficult one for managing those numbers and putting the changes in place without Getting into an emergency situation. Yeah. I mean, does this administration have sort of the tools to deal with the surge? I mean, there's already concerns about opening Temporary shelters, especially for young migrants and range migrant Children. Well, there does have to be an infrastructure at the border for processing people, and so the opening of shelters Should be seen as a positive sign because you don't want to have AH humanitarian crisis on the border where people have no place to go, which is what we did see two years ago when the Trump administration was trying to keep people out. Are you envisioning Biden going back to the very heavily criticized under trump tactic of what was called catch and release that if you had unauthorized entries, you would process the migrants and then allow them into the community with the hopes that they would show up to a court date. I mean, that was virtually stopped under President Trump has a way of Dissuading people from crossing the border. What the Biden administration is envisioning is having people be able to have their case is heard but heard promptly the difficulty with the way in which this has been handled in the past. Is that the backlogs in the immigration courts are so long that people are waiting in the country for years before their cases get hurt, And that, of course, does lead to misuse of the system. And that does invite Future migration. So what the administration needs to put in place is a system where people are able to file their claims are able to get legal representation. Get a prompt decision. Those who are eligible to stay can stay. Those who are not do need to be returned. And I think that this connects also to the Biden administration's vision of working more aggressively, much more aggressively with the countries in the region because the administration recognizes that some people are eligible for asylum. Some people are not eligible for asylum. And for those people who are not eligible for asylum, the question is returning in a humane fashion connecting people with services in their country. Those services need to be built. There needs to be much more assistance and engagement with the governments in the region to reduce corruption to reduce violence. The very Circumstances that the people are fleeing, which are always a mixture of economic circumstances, more and more possibly climate problems that have ravaged these countries. And and governance. That sounds like a lot of what President Obama did with mixed success, and President Trump actually did work closely with Mexican and Central American governments. He applied. To stick more than the carrot. He forge deals so that they could enforce their own borders and curb migration. Among other measures. There is a sense that what President Trump did actually, if your goal is to reduce migration, unauthorized crossings of the border, it worked. There's no question that what President Trump did worked The issue is at what cost at what price and that's the price that has had to do with our values is a country with our laws is a country and so the difficulty for the Biden administration is to develop a system at the border so that these decisions can be made promptly. It's the years and years of waiting That are the ultimate breakdown in the system that needs to be solved. Doris Meissner is a senior fellow at the Migration Policy Institute, where she directs the institute's U. S. Immigration policy work. Thank you so much. Thank you. Right now around the country,.

Doris Meissner El Paso Hope Border Institute Mallory Falk Migration Policy Institute Biden Lamacchia Marissa Limone Garza Mexico US trump Annunciation House U. S. Immigration five days U. S. NPR President Trump two years ago Trump President Obama
"border institute" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:19 min | 7 months ago

"border institute" Discussed on KQED Radio

"That they have in different parts of the country. Those family members will purchase bus tickets or plane tickets, and then they will be on their way. Annunciation House has done this work before, but there's a new complication. Finding ways to create a warm welcome during a pandemic. Can we still get groups of volunteers together? You make meals, but instead of serving them buffet style, and they serve an individual boxed meal. Marissa Limone Garza directs the Hope Border Institute, part of a coalition of nonprofits and local government that's helping support these asylum seekers. Is there a way? We're people, too great care packages that people could take when they travel. And including note or sometimes written expression of love and support as Thies. First groups make their way into the US, many more are still waiting in Mexico for their turn. There's a multi step process for the estimated 25,000 asylum seekers who may now qualify to enter the U. S. First they have to register. See the llama Giotto's You Gamble With the day the registration site went live, a Cuban asylum seeker named me Cow was glued to his cell phone. He's been living in a migrant shelter in waters since fleeing political persecution. We're only using his first name because he's still in immigration proceedings. Look a five days L. A team off L. A team a path he says he couldn't get all the way through at first sight was overloaded. He finally managed to register. There are still more steps receiving a call to verify his information than a date to enter the U. S. And he has to test negative for covert 19 in Mexico. And finally, he hopes his turn will come to cross for NPR news. I'm Mallory Falk in El Paso. How do you have a humane immigration policy that does not encourage illegal immigration. President Biden is grappling with just that question. Biden is already facing criticism over decisions to deport migrants and open a temporary shelter at the border as he seeks to reverse the draconian policies of his predecessors. To talk more about the challenges ahead is doors. My snow. She is a senior fellow and director at the Migration Policy Institute. Hello? Hello, The Washington Post obtained an email from immigration and Customs enforcement, saying We need to prepare for borders surges Now what do you make of that? I mean, what do you make of reports that there will be a surge of immigrants trying to cross the border now that there's a president Biden and not a president Trump I think there's no surprise that The numbers of people coming are increasing because it is very clear that the Biden administration is committed to reversing the policies of the last administration and to making it be possible for migrants who are claiming asylum and looking for protection to actually have their cases be heard. But of course, the issue then becomes a real difficult one for managing those numbers and putting the changes in place without getting into an emergency situation. Yeah, I mean, does this administration have sort of the tools to deal with the surge? I mean, there's already concerns about opening Temporary shelters, especially for young migrants and range migrant Children. Well, there does have to be an infrastructure at the border for processing people, and so the opening of shelters Should be seen as a positive sign because you don't want to have AH humanitarian crisis on the border where people have no place to go, which is what we did see two years ago when the Trump administration was trying to keep people out. Are you envisioning Biden going back to the very heavily criticized under trump tactic of what was called catch and release that if you had unauthorized entries, you would process the migrants and then allow them into the community with the hopes that they would show up to a court date. I mean, that was virtually stopped under President Trump has a way of Dissuading people from crossing the border with the Biden administration is envisioning is having people be able to have their case is heard but heard promptly the difficulty with the way in which this has been handled in the past. Is that the backlogs in the immigration courts are so long that people are waiting in the country for years before their cases get hurt, And that, of course, does lead to misuse of the system. And that does invite Future migration. So what the administration needs to put in place is a system where people are able to file their claims are able to get legal representation. Get a prompt decision. Those who are eligible to stay can stay. Those who are not do need to be returned. And I think that this connects also to the Biden administration's vision of working more aggressively, much more aggressively with the countries in the region because the administration recognizes that some people are eligible for asylum. Some people are not eligible for asylum. And for those people who are not eligible for asylum, the question is returning in a humane fashion connecting people with services in their country. Those services need to be built. There needs to be much more assistance and engagement with the governments in the region to reduce corruption to reduce violence. Very Circumstances that the people are fleeing, which are always a mixture of economic circumstances, more and more possibly climate problems that have ravaged these countries. And and governance. That sounds like a lot of what President Obama did with mixed success, and President Trump actually did work closely with Mexican and Central American governments. He applied. To stick more than the carrot. He forge deals so that they could enforce their own borders and curb migration. Among other measures. There is a sense that what President Trump did actually, if your goal is to reduce migration, unauthorized crossings of the border, it worked. There's no question that what President Trump did work. The issue is at what cost at what price and that's the price that has had to do with our values is a country with our laws is of country. And so the difficulty for the Biden administration is to develop a system at the border so that these decisions can be made promptly. It's the years and years of waiting that are the ultimate breakdown in the system. That needs to be solved. Doris Meissner is a senior fellow at the Migration Policy Institute, where she directs the institute's U. S. Immigration policy work. Thank you so much. Thank you. Right now.

Doris Meissner Hope Border Institute El Paso Mallory Falk US Migration Policy Institute Mexico Marissa Limone Garza trump Annunciation House Cow five days First President Trump President two years ago President Obama NPR first name U. S.
"border institute" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

News Radio 690 KTSM

09:03 min | 2 years ago

"border institute" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

"Com. For this recording here by Moore Salim-owned with the hope border institute, we've been talking about the research work, you all been doing it, and some of the studies specifically, including the most recent one here on the, the customer, being published here and the specific areas and, and kind of tracking the recent set of events here and so right before the break, we kind of got to was specifically. The parts leading up to the kind of Christmas, and the, those releases. And since that point, we've still seen that kind of happening, but in stops and starts, which is made basically enough consistency that the local efforts of continued to respond and improve as opposed to like, what happened in two thousand fourteen two thousand sixteen to one it was one kind of flood over sponsor and then tapered off and then became nothing we've seen. I mean here within El Paso. You know, even positions being funded as kind of a joint between local city and county government to try and help coordinate and deal. With these efforts, it's been that, that kind of level of consistency. Right. Exactly. And it's, it's necessary because the numbers of that. We're seeing are increasing and the setup that we have is not necessarily conducive to having folks that are by themselves. We used to be able to house single adult men and now we are seeing families, and children and that's really problematic for us. So that's what's had to chain. Necessitates a whole different kind of situations when you're working on, you know, maybe very simple basic issues for towards life and limb. And now we've seen there have been people that have had a severe medical responses needed, including some deaths. Exactly. We saw the death. Some Chuck Indian got McKean. In and Philippine almost Lonzo in border patrol custody here in the past sector where they came through antelope, wells, New Mexico and through lords Burke. But we're here when locally when they passed, and so the needs the journey itself is, is treacherous and challenging stressful traumatic let alone actually being detained for whatever length of time. And in the conditions that folks are being held them, specifically, both both of those who that died in custody were from from Guatemala. And there has been some also some additional study that you'll have been doing on those sending communities. Right. Exactly we're really interested in looking at the drivers of migration. We believe this is a forced migration, so that there are a variety of catalysts that are being pulled together in any kind of amalgamation as well. So we conducted a visit to what they Ma earlier in twenty. Nineteen and we'll potentially be going back later this year to really get a better understanding as what those drivers of migration. Are we understand that the drug war, and the transport of drugs is definitely one of those drivers additionally, we're looking at them, mega crops, and agricultural changes that are happening within the northern triangle? Accompanied by some really drastic climate change realities in terms of drought that local communities are experiencing, basically, it's not unusual for each family to have a plot of land, where rice and beans are, are harvested, and especially, it'll like a subsistence level. Exactly. So this is how you live is off of the land is provides you what you need to eat and to survive. And so what we're seeing now is different industries, taking hold, particularly when industries African poem. It's an oil that's used in a variety of products, and, and the price curiously of selling your plot of land to these agricultural companies is indirect correlation. We see with the cost, it is to pay a smuggler to get you to the United States or to cross. So is there a direct link there? I mean, we believe it's highly. I'm curious that it's so coincidental. That there is maybe this market understanding of I can pay you six thousand dollars for your land, and guess what? The cost of you paying for your family and or you to get to the southern border of the United States is like a direct collusion or corroboration between organizations, but the just the from a business standpoint dinner standing on issues, but the just the from a business standpoint, the understanding on these, these entities, buying up this land for this purpose that these people aren't going to agree, unless they give them at least this level of money to allow them to, to buy this service, basically. Exactly. Oh boy. Okay. And we're also looking at government corruption is part of the challenge, because when we have drug trade as part of that, then that becomes another added, element, and also instability, within the countries, just in general has led to a lot of these push factors, and for some families, maybe all of those things for others, it might just be one, but we're looking at those causes and trying to have a better understanding of what is causing this migration and to understand why people choose to make this journey why they know when this when the United States is practicing such high levels of deterrence and high levels of discipline and rigor when it comes to seeking asylum, that, that would still be a better option because I mean, it's, it's not exactly a secret that the United States is official policies have not been terrifically, welcoming, either from statements from the president's on Twitter or. Through more efficient channels sue everything to the, you know, the stories were hearing from the border. I mean, there's some speculation is easy think that goat days or that industry has its own marketing wing, which of course it does put through the grapevine. All it's so easy to get you just have to say these things, but it's, it's almost it's, it's impossible not to then find if you're looking at situation that they're yeah. The United States responses vary very much focus on the deterrent. And making sure that you don't think you can make it here. Both from the response at the border in the processing. The fact that here in El Paso, immigration court approval rates of asylum cases, are in the single digit percentages in some cases, things like that. It's it's been a lot of effort to make it clear that it's not an easy process. Exactly. And yet, people still come for many reasons and gang violence and violence in their home countries. It's just a very complicated scenario and we want to study that more. So our findings are research will focus on that area as well as looking out, what is the role that US policy has had historically in these countries? What are we doing now? And so we think that that's an area of study that warrants further review and additional inquiry minutes, problematic in that the, the president does want to stop sending humanitarian aid, and these kinds of things, and that will probably only make matters worse, again instead this hard line is coming from a very rigid standpoint. But we know that these levels of support are actually what may be sustaining these communities at all. I mean. Yeah, we've heard from, like a congressman broadcast Kabar when she's previously in the show that, that they want to investigate foreign aid, and what could be done to make it so that people are no longer thinking that this is even a viable necessary. Whatever an option period for them to, to need to even look at in any case. And so there's conflict then with the, you know, the administration's dictates and will what its its stated goals at this point again from actual official administration sample. It's not just Twitter in this case is talking about the changes in aid. So that report will be forthcoming there on these any mentioned here a little bit of some of the root causes. It's interesting that you mentioned specifically as well. The climate change as one of the kind of driving factors, because there has been recent New Yorker article about some of the impacts of climates on this, and the ability to people to be able to subsist and live off the land, and there's been previous almost speculative reporting that in other situations involving mass migration, notably the Syrian civil war that, that was again. It's not we've had some, some callers who have been very, very adamant about that. No one is leaving their land, because, well, it got hot one day, and that's not how that works either. Because it's the difference between weather and climate at the very least weather is how what the weather was going to be happening with. Rain, snow show sunshine and the temperature within.

United States El Paso Twitter hope border institute president official Moore New Mexico Chuck Indian Guatemala Burke congressman six thousand dollars one day
"border institute" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

News Radio 690 KTSM

12:47 min | 2 years ago

"border institute" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

"To talk El Paso. We're doing this pre-tape show here with mir-salim on deputy executive director for the hope border institute, and we're talking about specifically the research the organization been doing I'm your host, Andrew j poke we focusing on this important issue here because there's a lot there is more than his really able to be kept track of that's been going on since the Trump administration and even before, but particularly things have been happening. Very fast. It's going faster as we get closer to the current day here with more developments more information and more situations occurring here. So I think you'll have a very specific reports that has come out here, and it's broken down in a few ways chronicling things going on since even twenty seventeen but specifically focused on on twenty eighteen here, and you break it down into several different sections starting with zero tolerance policy. And so when that was I. Announce again by by a former attorney general Jeff Sessions. With Ernie dictation of what would be happening now that we were on this kind of half. Now, there's no foresight, and it's hard to an -ticipant. And if we could read the tea leaves and see we definitely would, but we have not had that good fortune. So we play this continuous game of whack-a-mole with whatever the administration wants to dole out and how they choose to respond to the needs impacting our local community, so zero tolerance there was no clear link to what that would mean. There was obviously concern about what that would look like in terms of prosecutions fairly entry. But when it came to daddy doubting, Ben become family separation and other things there is we had no idea that that would be coming down the pike. I mean during the entire administration not even on on this issue. But in in many overall, it's been significantly difficult to try and divine. What actually is policy versus Twitter policy essentially with. With a very vocal, and, you know, open, you know, executive here and within President Trump, very very penetrated on on a variety of subjects, but what actually turns from opinion and statement into actual action has been a difficult process of divine again on any subject exactly it extends far beyond just immigration into all different aspects. So it in that sense. It's it's consistent. So I guess then what are you all look at when you're trying to set up a responsible again gathering the information for a report like this where do you place, the locus of your focus here is it just on what policy is you look at the different departmental statements. Or how do you even work that there's a different different levels that we look at and levers of information since we've done this research going on three years. Now, we have a track record, and we have some kind of benchmarks what is quote, unquote, normal. And we look for variances with that we have a partnership with the university of Texas. Settle Paso and students with Dr Jeremy. Slack in his class. And they help us do the monitoring in the immigration courts. We also partner with different groups who are doing detention center visits the detained migrant solidarity committee where also part of the borderland immigration counsel, which is a group of immigration advocates immigration attorneys, both private sector, and nonprofit and all of these groups are attuned to what's going on from everyone from their own unique standpoint. But it helps us to have a better feel as to what is happening. What changes attorneys maybe seeing what their clients, and what may be happening in terms of people that were seeing as we monitor bridges and ports of entry. So we have to look at kind of a holistic approach and really have our eyes and ears open kind of at the very base level like the on the ground level as opposed to looking at a statements from leadership here. Exactly, I mean statements are helpful. And obviously our elected officials have access to information a little bit more readily than the general public yet. We just always want monitor and see what the boots. On the ground have to say about what's going on. Gotcha. So that's the interesting interesting complication there, and and how that all works out. So so again, we saw zero tolerance being being mentioned there again back even twenty seventeen and then the the changes to asylum. We're kind of the next major both in your report and kind of in the process of events here with again, Jeb one session statements that asylum should not be a cure for all for all of life's problems. And then that's at the point where we kind of were hearing it occasions of not necessarily fully on about the metering as well. And the the the specifically basically CPA agents telling people who were crossing the purpose of claiming asylum that we can't handle right now, we have no processing space, primarily from kind of the southern California area. But it was definitely also a place here. Exactly it was. And with those changes to then rule out, you know, it's legal it is legal to seek asylum. And so to put barriers to that in the face of international law and human rights is problematic, especially when we are making the grounds for asylum, so narrow whether that means that people can no longer claim gang violence. Let's say or domestic violence as causes of credible fear for asylum. It becomes incredibly problematic, and it did lead to in some instances, the metering the turn backs that we saw at the at our own ports of entry aware, which resulted in people alternately camping out and waiting in line. How can I you know, I need to make this claim? If I go somewhere else in what is community that. I may not even be familiar with. I've come from what am I laugh? Exactly, I may speak an indigenous language all I know is I need to get to those people to basically, tell them that I want to seek asylum and yet I'm being pushed back told to wait. And so it's makes made sense for a lot of folks to wait there at the bridge. Look almost almost a defacto stay in Mexico policy at that time. Exactly. And it continued this this interest in deterrence. How can we make this as difficult as possible? So fewer people try to seek asylum. And then that's definitely and a direct line can be drawn from that to the child separation policy which again as far as we can really tell was was pretty much prototype here. It was unfortunately, in-, it is complicated layered and has long standing repercussions. We know that the administration is still trying to reunite families that were separated, but that may take years. Two years typically what past weeks here to finish that process, which has drawn a lot of criticism from like, the ACLU and other groups about that, and what might actually take and we've talked previously in the show about how that the scope of that isn't even really fully known, right? Because a lot of times as you mentioned, you know, these policies whether they're coming from Twitter or whether the coming from the different agencies are done so very quickly that it's hard when we think about bureaucracies to come up with plans and so in order to enact one policy of family separation. I don't think reunification was necessarily on their minds. And so when it became the need, I don't think the agencies were equipped to to undertake that which is horrific we saw the abundant different ways kind of proving that point of not prepared including the lack of information taken about identifying for you know, parents and. Children with any thought really towards reunification at the end. The fact that you know, certain background checks were being waived for employees ease of these facilities light toward Neo and others and other parts along the border. And you know, what we saw as Torna Neo was kind of coming to its shutdown that that facility of other like DNA tests or things being brought into kind of as a stop-gap isn't the right phrase, but to deal with the problem that had been created due to lack of policies previously. Exactly. So not into supporting the fact that okay when we wanna release children sponsors. Well, we need to verify that the sponsor is viable and safe. And that meant not only fingerprinting, you know, the one sponsor in the household, but it extended to everyone in the household, and it raised a lot of concerns about who was actually able to take these children in and the administration had one provider of all of those fingerprint cases. So inevitably there's a backlog, and that's what we. We saw really coming to head with thought MIO. And I mean, all of that it was vehemently denied by the administration. But it was really apparent anyone able to pay attention that these were these were largely candidate measures. These again were focused on a deterrent aspects within other within parts that were not immediately related to enforcements. Exactly. It was a focus on make things as difficult as possible. So that people do not come to this country to seek asylum and during that period there in twenty eighteen we saw again, it wasn't. It wasn't clear until kind of recent more recently that that we were becoming a focus of not just the response. But the the source of the issue of people actually trying to transit within our community here into asylum in other parts, but. It's all very confusing to try and track directly. It's hard to draw straight lines between one thing the other. But we then saw the the detention separately increasing here in our area. Exactly and vessel is home to several detention centers here locally and in New Mexico. And so we are responsive to the needs of people that are in detention for many, especially those that are single adults men and women are often detained until their asylum case is deemed credible, and it continues through the courts and or the process for deportation. But this may take years, and so this is another permutation of the private prison complex industrial complex. It's just that. Now, we're focused on housing asylum seekers and immigrants migrants. And so we've seen in our local detention center some horrific. Missions that led to some folks even within this year being on long term hunger strikes, and those are still being questioned in those refer religious persecution related issues as well as families that are just trying to get access to information. A lot of times we have questioned the practice of providing limited information to asylum-seekers, especially in their language of their home language language of origin and said that makes things incredibly difficult here. And so the focus on that helps us to understand, you know. Yes, there are all of the families that we're seeing here locally released to our shelter network. But there are so many more people basically locked up waiting for their opportunity to hear to see a judge to process a claim to try to advance their asylum claim or you know, go into the proceedings for deportation. Right. And as. We've also previously discussed the facilities in the structure that is a place in the area. Basically, not at all the quip to deal with the realities of the modern migrant situation because it was very much of that nine hundred ninety s mindset, you know, single unaccompanied often males of working age coming here to seek that kind of work. And so, you know, very barebones facilities warned, you know, cold concrete floors. No heating, those kind of things weren't so much of a concern. Or even particularly a focus of anyone's part at that time, and has now become a very important part of this response because that is not what modern migration has proven to be in this era at all, exactly. It's definitely changed. And unfortunately, our systems our infrastructure is not a set to meet that change. So among the many parts, how long this process here that were not really able to be divined before hands when we reach the, you know. End of last year Christmas week specifically when those unannounced releases of asylum seekers auto Passos streets started your reporting who's afford by by Dylan Corbett about.

Twitter El Paso Jeff Sessions deputy executive director Ernie Mexico attorney hope border institute California Andrew ACLU Settle Paso Ben Slack Torna Neo Jeb partner
"border institute" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

02:11 min | 2 years ago

"border institute" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"Com. Get ethos dot com. Petersburg president. Trump reversing a decision by education secretary Betsy DeVos to eliminate funding for the Special Olympics that proposal drawn widespread criticism with detention facilities of the border bulging with detainees. Homeland security secretary planning to ask congress for sweeping changes CB pieces, so many Central American families and unaccompanied minors have flooded in. They have nowhere to detain them. And are simply releasing them into the country. Marie Salim-owned Garza with the hope of border institute in L Paso, says she hopes to thirties are helping migrants connect with nonprofits like there's upon release. We're operating community-wide all the way to Albuquerque which is a four hour drive up to around twenty five shelters on and off through different parts of the week. Homeland security secretary Kirsten Nielsen reportedly has written a letter asking congress to give them a thirty to deport unaccompanied children home more quickly and hold fan. Families in detention together until their asylum cases are determined. Jessica rosenthal. Fox News or Korea diplomacy is cutting South Korea's president moon. Jae in will meet with President Trump at the White House in two weeks to discuss how to revive the stalemated talks with North Korea to end their nuclear weapons program halfway through the Sweet Sixteen round of the NC double A tournament the Thursday winners Gonzaga, Virginia, Texas Tech had Purdue four more games today. Third seat LSU facing second seed, Michigan state that tips off around seven oh nine PM eastern time. Twenty minutes later top seed in the midwest UNC will go up against fifth. Seed Auburn later on top seeing the east Duke will face four seed Virginia Tech the hokies will have Thai outlaw back after passing a drug test following a marijuana possession charge and the Sweet Sixteen wraps up in the mid west with second seed Kentucky battling third see Houston. Matt Napolitano, Fox News was away Thursdays games. Spoiled the perfect bracket guide. Columbus had Jack. Hello. This is Fox News. From the central credit union home loans. Traffic's authorities continue to work the accident eastbound on I four near three. Oh.

secretary Fox News president congress Marie Salim-owned Garza South Korea Betsy DeVos President Trump Matt Napolitano Homeland security North Korea Petersburg Jessica rosenthal LSU border institute Virginia Tech Kirsten Nielsen Albuquerque Texas Tech
"border institute" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

KTLK 1130 AM

01:54 min | 2 years ago

"border institute" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

"Mr opinion. President Trump reversing a decision by education secretary Betsy DeVos to eliminate funding for the Special Olympics that proposal drawn widespread criticism with detention facilities at the border bulging with detainees, the homeland security secretary planning to ask congress for sweeping changes CDP's has so many Central American families and unaccompanied minors have flooded in. They have nowhere to detain them. And are simply releasing them into the country. Marie Salim-owned Garza with the hope of border institute in El Paso, says she hopes the thirties are helping migrants connect with nonprofits like there's upon release. We're operating munity wide all the way to Albuquerque which is a four hour drive up to around twenty five shelters on and off through different parts of the week. Homeland security secretary Kirsten Nielsen reportedly has written a letter asking congress to give them a thorny to deport unaccompanied children home more quickly and hold families in detention together until their asylum case. Are determined. Jessica rosenthal. Fox News Korea diplomacy is coming South Korea's president moon. Jae in will meet with President Trump at the White House in two weeks to discuss how to revive the stalemated talks with North Korea. Win their nuclear weapons program halfway through the Sweet Sixteen round of the NC double A tournament the Thursday winners Gonzaga, Virginia, Texas Tech had Purdue for mortgage today. Third seat LSU facing second seed, Michigan state that tips off around seven oh nine PM eastern time. Twenty minutes later top seed in the midwest UNC will go up against fifth seed Auburn later on top seeing the east Duke will face four seed Virginia Tech the hokies we'll have Thai outlaw back after passing a drug test following a marijuana possession charge and a Sweet Sixteen wraps up in the mid west with second seed Kentucky battling third seed Houston. Matt Napolitano, Fox News was away Thursdays games. Spoiled the perfect bracket guide..

President Trump secretary congress Marie Salim-owned Garza South Korea Matt Napolitano Betsy DeVos Mr opinion Homeland security North Korea Jessica rosenthal president Virginia Tech border institute LSU Fox News Kirsten Nielsen Albuquerque El Paso
"border institute" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

01:54 min | 2 years ago

"border institute" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"Petersburg in President Trump reversing decision by education secretary Betsy DeVos to eliminate funding for the Special Olympics that proposal drawn widespread criticism with detention facilities of the border bulging with detainees, the homeland security secretary planning to ask congress for sweeping changes CDP's says so many Central American families and unaccompanied minors have flooded in. They have nowhere to detain them. And are simply releasing them into the country. Marie Salim-owned Garza with the hope of border institute in El Paso, says she hopes that thirties are helping migrants connect with nonprofits like there's upon release. We're operating community-wide all the way to Albuquerque, which is a four hour drive up to around twenty five shelters on and off through different parts of the week homeland security secretary Kirsten Nielsen. Reportedly has written a letter asking congress to give them a thirty to deport unaccompanied children home more quickly and hold families in detention together until their asylum. Cases are determined Jessica Rosenthal. Fox News or Korean diplomacy is coming South Korea's president moon. Jae in will meet with President Trump at the White House in two weeks to discuss how to revive the still baited talks with North Korea to end their nuclear weapons program through the Sweet Sixteen round of the NC double A tournament the Thursday winners Gonzaga, Virginia, Texas Tech had Purdue for more today. Third seat LSU facing second seed, Michigan state that tips off around seven oh nine PM eastern time. Twenty minutes later top seed in the midwest UNC will go up against fifth seed Auburn later on top seed in the east Duke will face four seed Virginia Tech the hokies we'll have Thai outlaw back after passing a drug test following a marijuana possession charge and the Sweet Sixteen wraps up in the mid west with second seed Kentucky battling third seed Hughes. Sten Matt Napolitano, Fox News away, Thursdays games. Spoiled the perfect bracket guide..

secretary President Trump Fox News congress Marie Salim-owned Garza Sten Matt Napolitano Betsy DeVos Jessica Rosenthal South Korea Petersburg president Virginia Tech Kirsten Nielsen border institute North Korea LSU El Paso Texas Tech Albuquerque marijuana
"border institute" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"border institute" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"Secretary Betsy DeVos to eliminate funding for the Special Olympics that proposal drawn widespread criticism with detention facilities of the border bulging with detainees, the homeland security secretary planning to ask congress for sweeping changes says so many Central American families and unaccompanied minors have flooded in. They have nowhere to detain them. And are simply releasing them into the country. Marie Salim-owned Garza with the hope of border institute in El Paso, says she hopes that authorities are helping migrants connect with nonprofits like there's upon release. We're operating nudity wide all the way to Albuquerque, which is a four hour. Drive up to around twenty five shelters on and off through different parts of the week. Homeland security secretary Kirsten Nielsen reportedly has written a letter asking congress to give them a thirty to deport unaccompanied children home more quickly and hold families in detention together until their asylum cases are determined. Jessica rosenthal. Fox News or Korean diplomacy is counting South Korea's president moon. Jae in will be with President Trump at the White House in two weeks to discuss how to revive the stalemated talks with North Korea. Win nuclear weapons programs halfway through the Sweet Sixteen round of the NC double A tournament the Thursday winters, Gonzaga, Virginia, Texas, Tech had produced four more games today. Third seed LSU facing second seed Michigan state that tips off around seven oh nine PM eastern time. Twenty minutes later top seed in the midwest UNC will go up against fifth seed Auburn later on top seed in the east Duke will face four seed Virginia Tech the hokies will have outlaw back after passing a drug test following a marijuana possession charge and the Sweet Sixteen wraps up in the mid west. With second seat Kentucky battling third see Houston. Matt Napolitano, Fox News, Thursdays games. Spoiled the perfect bracket guide.

Secretary Fox News congress Marie Salim-owned Garza Betsy DeVos Homeland security Matt Napolitano Jessica rosenthal South Korea President Trump North Korea border institute LSU Kirsten Nielsen Kentucky Virginia Tech El Paso Albuquerque president
"border institute" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

02:21 min | 2 years ago

"border institute" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"Yelling. Our role is to take three steps back and discern what really matters, Sean Hannity. The most important thing that we do. We are looking out for the men and women in this country. Laura Ingram, they're going to get a straight shooter no-holds-barred, I'm not going to cut people slack. Fox's the one place for dissent is allowed. We have voices. We won't be silent. Who controls my voice? Nobody wants news. Real news. Real honest opinion. President Trump is reversing a decision by his education secretary to eliminate funding for the Special Olympics. The proposed funding cut had drawn widespread criticism with detention facilities of the border bulging with detainees. The secretary of homeland security planning to ask congress for sweeping changes has so many Central American families and unaccompanied minors have flooded in. They have nowhere to detain them. And are simply releasing them into the country. Marie Salim-owned Garza with the hope border institute in L Paso. Says she hopes thirties are helping migrants connect with nonprofits like there's upon release. We're operating munity wide all the way to Albuquerque which is four hour. Drive up to around twenty five shelters on and off through different parts of the week. Homeland security secretary Kirsten Nielsen reportedly has written a letter asking congress to give them a thirty to deport unaccompanied children home more quickly and hold families in detention together until their asylum. Cases are determined Jessica Rosenthal. Fox News or Korean diplomacy is coming South Korea's president moon Jae in we'll beat with President Trump at the White House in two weeks from now to discuss how to revive the still beta talks with North Korea to end their nuclear weapons program. Chicago's mayor Rahm Emanuel planning to send a Bill to Eker jussie smollet for the cost of the police investigation into what smollet claimed was a hate crime committed against him. The police are assembling the cost do that. And then the corporation counsel. HIV will communicate Justice. Legal team about recouping that cost in that. And given that he doesn't feel any sense of contrition, and remorse might recommendations. When he writes a check in the memo section. He can put the word. I'm accountable for the hoax splits lawyers had returned demanding an apology from Chicago city leaders NCWA basketball tournament third seeded, Purdue ducks off number two Tennessee.

President Trump secretary Chicago Marie Salim-owned Garza Sean Hannity congress Laura Ingram smollet Homeland security Fox News Fox Rahm Emanuel hope border institute Jessica Rosenthal Albuquerque South Korea North Korea president Olympics
"border institute" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

03:55 min | 2 years ago

"border institute" Discussed on KTRH

"Have been detected in recent days. Currently the winds are out of the southeast. We're lucky that's gonna stay that way for the next few days. They kinda helps the response action be consistent, and I have to change based on the winds pushing the oil and the product in a different direction the Lynchburg ferry and several parks with waterfronts near ATC do remain closed. Southwest Airlines has lost one hundred fifty million dollars in revenue in part because of the grounding of its nearly three dozen Boeing seven thirty-seven max eight jets during the first quarter of this year southwest cancelled ninety four hundred flights twenty eight hundred were because of the Boeing grounding another. Twenty eight hundred were the result of an issue with the mechanics union. Now, the airline says they're working hard to manage the disruptions. But the cancellations have reduced the airlines first-quarter estimated growth from three point five percent. To one percent all seven thirty-seven max aircraft were grounded earlier this month. After an Ethiopian Airlines crash that killed one hundred fifty seven people. It's a Lisa Z reporting. It's four minutes past the hour migrant families now being released into the US this after the customs and border protection. Commissioner says there's no room to hold them. CBS's Commissioner said they're at a crisis point this week, and that they must release migrant families claiming asylum. He said they're working with migrant advocates in the El Paso area. Marie Salim-owned Garza with the hope border institute says she sure hopes so they help operate twenty-five shelters Malpensa to Albuquerque we office. Here's the diocese at all Paso, and there is a shelter here. It's been twenty four seven set up as an emergency shelter starting in October. And the Bishop has come to recognize that it. Now needs to be permanent. She says most of the migrants only stay in the shelter system for about twenty four hours before moving on to family and friends mostly in New York or the southeast Jessica Rosenthal. Fox News gas prices are rising again, Daniel Armbruster. With AAA Texas says there's no relief in sight shooting up to two forty eight for gallon of regular unleaded. That's an eighth jumped on the week about three cents higher than where the price was a hero. Tanny says prices will keep going up through the spring is refinery. Switch over to summer blend gas, the department of housing and urban development is now charging Facebook with housing discrimination. How does alleging that Facebook's targeted advertising, violates the fair housing act, and that it causes unlawful discrimination by restricting who can view housing ads HUD secretary Ben Carson saying in a Thursday, safe meant the Facebook is discriminating against people based upon who they are. And where they live the agency claims Facebook collects users personal data and uses characteristics protected. Bye laws such as race color and national origin to determine he few housing ads. The charges coming one week after Facebook. Agreed a settlement was civil rights groups who overhaul it's targeting system for housing advertisements. That's Lisa Carter. Reporting on Wall Street, the Dow rose ninety two points closing at twenty five thousand seven seventeen the NASDAQ gained twenty six the S and P five hundred up ten crude oil up ten cents to fifty nine fifty one a barrel. News on demand at KTAR H dot com. Our next update next hour with breaking information as it happens. I'm Corey Olsen on Houston's news, weather and traffic station. Newsradio seven forty KTAR h. Broadcasting. Underground command post. Two thousand a hidden bunker somewhere under the brick and steel of a nondescript building, we've once again made contact with our leader. Hello, everybody. Mark Levin here. This is our to our number eight seven seven three eight one three eight one one eight seven seven three eight one three eight one one. New York Post white people's diets are killing the environment of study says..

Facebook Southwest Airlines Marie Salim-owned Garza Boeing department of housing Ethiopian Airlines Lynchburg ferry Commissioner New York Post US El Paso Lisa Z Texas Mark Levin Lisa Carter Daniel Armbruster hope border institute New York Albuquerque
"border institute" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

04:02 min | 2 years ago

"border institute" Discussed on KTRH

"No, the chemical tank fire EPA says no significant levels of benzene or other toxic gas has been detected in recent days. Currently the winds are out of the southeast. We're lucky that's going to stay that way for the next few days. It kind of helps to response action be consistent, and I have to change based on the winds pushing the oil and the product in a different direction to Lynchburg ferry and several parks with waterfronts near. I do remain closed. Southwest. Airlines has lost one hundred fifty million dollars in revenue in part because of the grounding of its nearly three dozen Boeing seven thirty-seven max eight jets during the first quarter of this year southwest cancelled ninety four hundred flights twenty eight hundred were because of the Boeing grounding, another twenty eight hundred were the result of an issue with the mechanics union. Now, the airline says they're working hard to manage the disruptions. But the cancellations have reduced the airlines first-quarter estimated growth from three point five percent. To one percent all seven thirty-seven max aircraft were grounded earlier this month. After an Ethiopian Airlines crashed that. Killed one hundred fifty seven people. That's a Lisa Z reporting. It's four minutes past the hour migrant families now being released into the US this after the customs and border protection. Commissioner says there's no room to hold them. CBT's Commissioner said they're at a crisis point this week, and that they must release migrant families claiming asylum. He said they're working with migrant advocates in the El Paso area. Marie Salim-owned Garza with the hope border institute says she sure hopes so they help operate twenty-five shelters from El Paso, Albuquerque office. Here's the diocese about Paso, and there is a shelter here. That's open twenty four seven. They were set up as an emergency shelter starting in October. And the Bishop has come to recognize that it now needs to be permanent. She says most of the migrants only stay in the shelter system for about twenty four hours before moving onto family and friends mostly in New York or the southeast Jessica Rosenthal. Fox News gas prices are rising again Daniel Armbruster with AAA Texas says there's no relief in sight shooting up to two forty eight. For a gallon of regular unleaded. That's an eight jumped on the week. It's about three cents higher than where the price was a year ago. Candy says prices will keep going up through the spring is refinery. Switch over to summer blend gas, the department of housing and urban development is now charging Facebook with housing discrimination. How does alleging Facebook's targeted advertising, violates the fair housing act, and that it causes unlawful discrimination by restricting who can few housing ads HUD secretary Ben Carson saying in a Thursday sapient the Facebook is discriminating against people based upon who they are. And where they live the agency claims. Facebook collects users personal data and uses characteristics protected by laws such as race color and national origin to determine confu housing ads. The charges coming one week after Facebook agreed in a settlement with civil rights groups to overhaul its targeting system for housing advertisements. That's Lisa Carter. Reporting on Wall Street, the Dow rose ninety two points closing at twenty five thousand seven seventeen the NASDAQ gain. Twenty six the S and P five hundred up ten crude oil up ten cents to fifty nine fifty one a barrel. News on demand KTAR H dot com. Our next update next hour with breaking information as it happens. I'm Corey Olsen on Houston's news, weather and traffic station. Newsradio seven forty KTAR h. Broadcasting from the underground command post deep in the bowels of a hidden bunker somewhere under the brick and steel of a nondescript building, we've once again made contact with our leader. Mark Levin here. Our number eight seven seven three eight one three eight one one eight seven seven three eight one three eight one one. I want to salute the Republicans on the house intelligence committee. They really fought today. And they signed a letter. Read into the record by the ranking Republican on the committee..

Facebook Marie Salim-owned Garza El Paso Boeing department of housing Ethiopian Airlines Lynchburg ferry Commissioner house intelligence committee EPA US Lisa Z Mark Levin Lisa Carter hope border institute Ben Carson Daniel Armbruster
"border institute" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

News Radio 690 KTSM

02:11 min | 2 years ago

"border institute" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

"Them did not come through actual, you know, border crossings either, you know, coming across in the unguarded sections presenting themselves at the border fence like we've seen recently or see or doing the asylum process at ports of entry those people who came here on visas like travel visas student visas other things like that. And then when those expired didn't leave, and that's that's a good chunk of what we see in the overall situation here. But I don't think that your numbers are correct. Their specific in front of me here, but we have pre. Obviously spoken with you know, members of, you know, like, the the awesome migra Reichert refugee service, the the hope border institute, and it's not as simple as a process that they can't just show up say, I'm in fear for my life. I need to stay here and be released again that credible fears here he gives a bit more involved in that making sure that it's not just someone again who is just checking a box. But that there are actually reason that's going to detail prevent documentation that they may or if they have any and go through that kind of thing. So I think that there might be a definitely difference in how people that say from from Wallace. Or would that definitely that's definitely probably something that is different in how it's handled. But I think that overall it's something that's it's a bit more complex. I know. That's a gentle thought of that may have been how previously worked, but our situation now is definitely a little bit different and evolving their, but yes, I think that's if your if your guy that you were talking with his interested in here, come to the US, India's those kind of same fears there might be. Programs available or ways he could try to do things. But I think that's I think that it's less simple than you may think based on what we've talked to the people we've heard from previously or involved in dealing with the people who are involved in these situations. Now, how many people actually show up? I think that it's this process is actually a pretty good number because this is their legal process. This is what they're seeking to do. And hoping that they can actually be allowed to stay through that asylum process is opposed to someone coming through and even find a job and avoid any kind of legal involvement. We we'd have to take a quick break here. So thank you very much for the call. And again, the lines are still open. We'll be getting to more of your calls here. We're please consider supporting Joe Gibbs.

Wallace hope border institute Joe Gibbs US India
"border institute" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

News Radio 690 KTSM

12:10 min | 2 years ago

"border institute" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

"Can help at Saint Jude dot org full statement. And that the first part is definitely saying directed to. I'm assuming Todd here that your humanitarian efforts are greatly appreciated a much-needed regarding your comments about the article about a wall, which was built by Obama and Bush two and then the question as we read it about the many miles of unprotected in the Rio Grande belly. So just to give a full proper context. They're definitely thanking you for your efforts but much interesting, and we have a follow up comment actually by Cindy there as well to see they're not address the people who ended the board the country illegally and do not present themselves to border patrol which again was has largely been a facet of previous immigration waves. And it's not that's not to say that there, isn't that isn't what we're seeing this time around. That that that that doesn't exist anymore? There's not that much focus on. It's it's still exists in my commentary is that. The actual current policies that are in place by ice and border patrol actually are geared to that to individuals who enter the country illegally nodded a border and are trying to just move on through and not interact writing for us. And I think the way that is in border patrol are are handling those is one complying with the law to legal and three makes sense. That's I want it very much differentiate the individuals that cross illegally to the individuals that I was servicing in the past few weeks that we're entering into the country illegally. Gotcha. And we do have a caller on the line. We have a John on line three, John. Thanks for joining us. Good morning morning. And this article that the professor wrote is that on is that on hard copy nation or is it on online its online. I don't know if it will be making the next hardcopy. That's something I can talk with the copy editor about, but it's definitely online. Okay. So it's over on the nation right now. And again, we have the link over right now on Facebook dot com slash talk. Right. Is it because I'm not online. I do anything a hard copy. I usually go to the public librarian read, and there's another text a textbook. I'm pretty sure a professor has had also used it may be in a classroom. It's by professor Howard zinn. I know Howard zinn. Yes. Okay. I did read that on my own. And I don't know about some of these facts that he writes about on on his textbook. What what is the reason why some of these liberal thinkers? The blamed a US for the for us causing a problem down there in Central America. Okay. That's a fair question. Well, it's. It's not as easy as most things you will read it eight long complicated history to say, the least, but the general arc of what they're trying to say is that. In the nineteen eighties. When we pushed gangs out of largely California and Texas the two of the gangs that President Trump likes to frequently invoke MS thirteen they went and resettled back into into their home countries, which is Guatemala Honduras, and El Salvador for the most part now, Guatemala, El Salvador and Honduras, have traditionally had weak governments in when you have a weak government, and you put in an organized crime group like MS thirteen they will basically take over the country. Now MS thirteen wouldn't have power. If it wasn't for the consumption of drugs illegal early in the world, the vast majority of which passed through our border into the United States and United States. Of course is a huge huge, huge consumer of illicit substances of all types. Right. So when when individuals say that we helped cause. The issue that is going on in Central America. They're not wrong. But I don't think it's as easy to connect a direct line from point A point B, we've contributed to the problem, certainly, I don't think we caused it. But we certainly haven't shaped any of our international policy up to this point to help fix it. And that's one of the things congresswoman Escobar's talked about is if you really wanna stop this mass immigration from families from what we call the northern triangle region, you have to create a foreign policy that deals with the circumstances that make these individuals think that a two thousand mile journey is better than residing where they are. I mean. Yeah, it's not an easy decision there that anyone would think is just going to happen. And and be a nice pleasant experience in any case, another key on I think you can also some people in some things we've talked about previously on the show going back to you. You know, the the history of influence that there have been official government actions in some of the government's and areas of central and South American countries that are have not necessarily lead to the stability of those countries. I mean, either official or maybe not necessarily governmental. But like you look at the history of the United fruit co and some I mean, the entire phrase banana Republic was coined by the fact of what some American companies again, maybe not official government action. But definitely American influence had in these countries to make them their own kind of fiefdoms, and that doesn't necessarily to the stability of that country in the long run now. And if you think back to really the fifties and sixties the United States systematically was involved in installing authoritarian governments largely throughout Central America. Authoritarian governments are very good when it comes to law and order as long as they exist. But when those authoritarian countries attempt and most all of them had attempt to transition to democracy. Democracy is difficult to maintain when there has been no history of democracy previously. And that's when strong armed groups like MS, thirteen and other Narco trafficking gangs in the area can just systematically takeover. So yeah, I think it's I think it's fair to say that it has not been the policy of the United States government to make weak central and South American countries that are easily that there will crumble and make these situations happen, but I don't think our foreign policy has been focused in any way on making that not happen either. Right. There hasn't been a foreign policy solution that I've seen put forward by either sides that would address the circumstances that are causing this immigration. And in fact, it's something that's still being studied. Like we were talking with Dylan Corbett with the hope border institute, the director for that institute there about they were going to be sending a fact-finding missions down to some of these what they were calling the sending communities to find out. What really are the situations on the ground there? What is going on that is causing people to seek to flee to the United States and do. That was that another comment on the Facebook page over here from Tracy fuller talking about the question. Full comment here being a phone fag. Border fences started being built about two decades ago, including ours coincidence, I think not and it's undeniable that will pass has had a border fence wall large fence, whatever you wanna call it in some form, or fashion sense. Got the bright line moment. I think of is going about to Sylvester today during his time not just as a Representative. But actually as a government official because he was in the federal government agencies because he was a large part of kind of changing those policies and building physical barriers Paso, definitely used to have a non violent crime problem where people where was documented people were coming across doing like robberies thefts, those kind of things and then going back across to evade law enforcement, and that the up things like operation hold the line, which he put into place, we're definitely effective in stopping that part of it. So we've had stuff in El Paso, and it's undeniable we basically have a version of what could be called a wall here. Right. And I want to juxtapose the national radio. Eric of what we're hearing with what all of us who live here in El Paso are living. It's very different, and we should be able to send look from the rhetoric to what we know that are that the border wall. Here is not the border wall that's being proposed. And as I point out in the article, and is that the influx that we saw in the past two weeks will be not affected by a wall or the absence of a wall because these individuals are presenting themselves legally to border patrol agents do attempt to seek asylum. And they're going to try that at the ports of entry as well with without a wall, so dealing with the current situation a wall may or may not be effective in that way. But if there's anything we've seen the patterns have been kind of consistently changing as of late, right? I mean, we can talk about legal immigration with the wall or legal immigration without a wall. But that's that's what I'm advocating for. That's what I'm passionate about these individuals who present themselves seeking asylum. Do so legally build a border wall, don't build a border wall. It's not going to affect these families who have presented themselves. They will still do it. And that doesn't solve that problem for me. That problem for me is the actual humanitarian crisis that is happening on the border. Not whatever else we're talking about illegal immigration, violent crime, etc. And that also brings up the other issues like again, another policy that we saw kind of being tested here. No Paso in the later. Parts of last year was requiring people once it was being talked about about requiring people to present themselves at the port of entry. Then having. You know, the I see in this case actually, running the the ports of entry claiming for people attempting to cross at the ports of entry and claim asylum saying that the facilities were full, and they could not be processed and lines being created at the ports of entry of people waiting to present themselves for asylum, and even people being numbered and sudden Annunciation has another groups were part of a a response to that in on the water side of the ports of entry as well. So even a wall, and forcing people at the ports of entry doesn't necessarily solve the humanitarian issues in particular, the policies, we've seen it shifts at a couple of the comments I want to get to here left on the Facebook page, we a Irene donnas Jackson, ain't border patrol needs a wall and Catherine sky flower at a two thousand miles of steel fence is a wall. I think that there are a lot of the wall is, of course, a bright focus that has been since the start of this administration. And I think that if we talked about one thing closely here today. Is that that wouldn't necessarily solve the issues that we've been seeing in our community here? Right. I. I don't I'm I'm theoretically against the wall from -serily an economic standpoint, but from a policy standpoint, I get the reasoning behind wanting one it makes logical sense to me. But as someone who's advocating for these asylum-seekers, these individuals who are nonviolent. Are escaping violence are being persecuted in their home, countries and are complying legally with the standards that are in place. The border wall isn't going to change that. And unless we have a policy that can simultaneously handle that and also handle violent immigration, violent criminals crossing the border, illegal immigration taking place. Then I won't be I will be happy. If we have a policy that handles both of those. But right now, what we have is a national rhetoric entire centered entirely around one of those things and the other thing is still going on in. It's not being discussed. And that's why I am passionate about this is that there. The issue of illegal illegal immigration, and legal immigration is much more nuanced than what's playing out in the national rhetoric. I mean, yeah, we are currently in the midst of the longest government shutdown in our country's history base on the large demand from President Trump for funding for a border wall steel slats fence barrier of some time, whatever it may be called..

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"border institute" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

News Radio 690 KTSM

14:27 min | 2 years ago

"border institute" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

"Kristen bell, Nicole Kidman and Steve Carell seventy sixth annual Golden Globes or Sunday night at the Beverly Hilton hotel, John Jeffreys NBC News Radio Oregon since we took that brief holiday break. Many of the same issues were still technically in the government shutdown. And of course, here on the streets of El Paso. We have been seeing quite the situation here, we're focusing today on this show on the releases that we've been saying from ice another border agencies of be refugees asylum seekers have you want to refer to being unannounced just released onto the streets of Al Paso. So us discuss and talk about the response to this issue. We have a Dylan Corbett, the director of the hope border institute. One of the kind of microcosm. Some of agencies. We have in the area that have been responding and dealing with this issue. So thank you very much for coming on the show today. Thank you. Good morning. Good morning to you to own your listeners. Get definitely thanks for coming on. So this situation. It's been I know that there in years past there was some coordination with other with the agencies in in dealing with this, but Elvis this seemed to have come to a shock to everyone the amount of people that were suddenly being released and the consistency with which it's now happening. It's not a one release. And then okay. Okay. Okay. We'll wait for a minute. It's just been a are. They still happening. Even now. Suspended that practice that. Everyone's probably familiar with by now over the holidays, they were releasing people directly into the downtown area. So that's no longer happening. The the it has to be said that that was an an extraordinary thing that that is not the normal practice, right? And then Asian house, which takes the lead in hospitality for migrants coming across the border. And is the leader in the network of migrant shelters across the city has long had a very good effective channels of communication with CB p with ice. Precisely to make sure that things like that don't happen. So when it did happen just before Christmas beginning on December twenty third it it came as a shock to the community came as a shock to folks who have been involved in this work for a long time. There really was no reason for it to happen precisely because those channels of communication exist precisely because there are practices. That have long been observed to make sure that migrants were treated with respect and dignity when they are released into the community. And so yeah, there had been previous years. I mean, going back to my experience with this in two thousand fourteen when there was that at the unaccompanied minor crisis that we were on we were more on the periphery then because it was mostly at that point. That's they were showing up and kind of central south, Texas, and then certain groups of people were kind of being shuttled to our area for processing here and release here. Most of the family groups in that circumstance is kind of what we were seeing at that point. And when those releases were happening there was that coordination between ICBM, the what agencies have you with an association house end our group of local nonprofits on okay, here's who's coming. Here's what's going on. It'll be at this time at this place, which. It kinda came as a surprise to me having not delve at issue when I was just hurting as a reporter in town and dealing with that that there was that that level of coordination to kind of surprised me that that was in place. But I came to realize later it wasn't so much a surprise that it that. There was the response in place so much as that's what the policies were allowing a now we've seen the policy's very much shift under this administration. Right. I mean, I'll pass was fantastic community in the sense that we do have that network of migrant shelters do stand up, and this is for the most part. These is a completely volunteer driven. Response. So what what's provided through enunciation house is is food is clothing is the opportunity just for people to get to get. To get some stability. Because most of the people who are coming through our community who are released their asylum-seekers. They've been released into the community there disoriented because they've just gone through the experience of detention in CB holding cells at the border. They've gone through the experience of having traveled through Mexico, many of them coming from Central America. And they're on their way to somewhere else. Most of them are not gonna stay here in our community. So what they need really is just the opportunity. To be able to plan the next stage in their journey because they'll often go in buses, they'll they'll they'll travel to other parts of the country where they'll have a contact or relative. But they need they need an opportunity to catch their breath. They need an opportunity to have a good night's sleep. This just to be treated with respect and dignity and El Paso, have just that's something that we've long done. So even though even when when that practice was suspended. When I started to release people over the Christmas holiday into the community downtown. That was a shock to many. It was a shock. It wasn't right. It was a departure from that normal practice a cooperation that took place between between ice and the community El pass win stepped up. So whether it was through social media, whether the mall in tears who have been involved in this for longtime or whether folks were coming, you know, they were volunteering for the first time you just had a massive response where people were going downtown. They were bringing food they will bring donations. And and thankfully, everyone who was released into the community was able to be. Integrated into that shelter system that we have in place in the community. Nobody was left behind. People were able to be again treated with respect and dignity that El paso's come to be known for. So let's go back and look at the timeline of things here that I think the first time that I started seeing the response and the outcry about the respond to the situation was I think that the day before Christmas was the first time I had really seen things happening. And the response kind of starting one was the actual for of this series that we've kind of seen going on, you know, through its into the early parts of this year. When did it really seem to to start a company yells attention? Yeah. You know, the first time this happened was actually back in October. And it just happened. Once it was right before the elections. So I think it was the last week in October. I remember at the beginning of that week. I had received a call from ice. I said begin calling a lot of the local agencies warning us that something like this could happen warning us, we're going to expedite the processing of folks. And so there there might be an increase they might begin releasing people into the community without without prior consultation without communication with the community and several days past, and I think it was a Friday Friday evening, probably the Friday just before the election if I'm not mistaken that they I did this and El Paso wins responded. There was a pop up shelter that was set up in one of the buildings. That's owned by the diocese about Paso, close by downtown people were transported to that location. People were given remember people were giving medical care folks showed up with food. And and they just, you know, this this shelter was stood up because of the response of the community at that time in this was everybody from community organizations to ordinary residents citizens here Paso to our elected leaders. There was such strong pushback. That that is discontinued that practice, and we didn't see it again until just recently. So that was a that was out of the ordinary and then when it happened again was on December twenty third so the day before Christmas Eve and it happened late at night. I think it happened at ten o'clock or shortly shortly after that you'll remember just before Christmas is when we started to get more cold weather in the area, so timing there. It was late at night. It was downtown right by the greyhound bus station. Folks, we're essentially just dumped into the into the area by the by the train station and left to their own, you know, left to their own devices. So would like a ice or just busses pulling up. Yeah. These were ice. This was the decision of ice to do this. So what happens is, it's a little complicated. It's a little bit like alphabet soup because we have so many immigration agencies definitely handle these issues. So what happens is normally people if they if they crossed the border, they'll be in CB customs and border protection more border patrol custody, and then they'll be handed over to ice. And then after they were handed over to ice. That's when I made the decision to release them into the community downtown so ice with these buses dumped people essentially off downtown. And that's when people against it up in the community responded, and we were able to respond to this crisis. So what was your initial response going on here? I mean, I'm sure this was it came as a bit of a shock at the time because you had had the previous warning that it was coming out. And even know that warning it happened that policies might be shifting. So at least that was yet in the general idea, but when this specific happened, none of those kind of warning calls or any of those kind of. Hey, this might be coming kind of things going on at that time was there. No. There was no warning. And to be Frank. I still haven't seen a satisfactory explanation. I know congressman or work had said that he was he had communicated with ice. And that they had confessed that they had quote, unquote, drop the ball. But even to this day, I still haven't seen a satisfactory answer from ice. You remember now we're also going through the government shutdown. And so a lot of the inquiries that have been made is into the department of homeland security have not been answered because perhaps of the of the shutdown. And so there there's still there's still a lack of knowledge as to why why we know what precipitated this this crisis. It lasted for three days. So it was the twenty third and then it happened again on Christmas Eve I remember being downtown and the buses began coming in in the afternoon. And then it happened again on Christmas, again, the buses started rolling in in the afternoon all told between those three days there are about six hundred people who ice trapped downtown. And who needed really a humanitarian humanitarian response, which I think we provided as a community. I mean. Yeah. Because we're there were some situations. You know, the the photos that McCain again from El Paso times and another national news agencies. The started picking up on this lake near at times Washington Post and others. You know, people being dropped, you know, with a lackluster clothing or very little for the weather appropriate. Sometimes with no shoes things like that. And again, kind of being just released told good luck with your situation. If that, basically, we're just more, but just get off the bus kind of thing. So that was about six hundred that here at how many total have been released through what did it actually stop? Well, so it stopped on the twenty fifth twenty fifth was the last thing that happened. I think folks have been a little confused because since then more folks have been released more migrants have been released into the community. And so over a week there were over a thousand people, but it's important to note that. El Paso has been doing this for a long time. So. This happens on a regular basis. So I think. Since October since the fall there. There has been a notable spike in the increase of arriving families. And specifically in our region as well. That's right. So there's that spike in arriving family. So there have been upwards of two thousand people a week starting in the fall who have been released into the community. And again, there was a seamless sort of transition from ice to the community because of the the infrastructure that's in place becomes the relationships that are in place between enunciation has community groups churches, and I it was really ISIS decision to interrupt that ISIS decision not to communicate with the community when they decided to do this, which again is is the most perplexing thing. Here. It's the most propelling element because it didn't have to happen. Now they've gone back to the regular practice. But I think if one thing that that I think that the this. This event has brought to the attention of the community are the conditions in detention that people are going through before they released you you were talking about the condition of folks when they were getting off those buses, right? This is brought national attention to our region national attention to a passer because I think that most most folks were not aware of the conditions that people are in I've seen people coming in for months coming off with ice buses. And children have been sick children have been hungry. Children have been thirsty. You know, I saw I remember on on Christmas Eve one of the families that came off the bus, and there was a two year old today. Dole infant has released. The mother didn't have any formula. The mother didn't have any extra clothing, you know, she needed to to. She needed a specialist instance, I saw child who came off the bus who thankfully, we head pestle. Paramedics nearby who were able to render first aid. Sent to the hospital in in an ambulance because he he he had a high fever, and he appeared to be hydrated. So folks were really exposed. I think many folks throughout the country in here. No passer were exposed to the realities of the conditions that folks are being held in detention. Right. And even on today's from age of today's I'll pass times a look into someone voices where they've been held during this processing, but with the take a quick break here..

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"border institute" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

04:20 min | 2 years ago

"border institute" Discussed on The Takeaway

"Those arriving even in that short period of time that we're interacting with these. Children. It's it's a critical area that we need to continue to improve Bob one of the things we've heard from the administration has also been that these facilities are not prepared to take in children you cover the border every day. What have officials been telling you about what they need to support? This this increasing group of folks, it's an interesting question because Krisher McLean and clearly outlined the problem in in those comments to congress, which interestingly came three days after Jacqueline died, but Commissioner Macarena did not tell the congressional committee about her death. As a matter of fact, the administration tried to keep it a secret essentially until my colleague Nick marathon, I write for the Washington Post found out about it. So you have some rhetoric coming out of the administration. There's really not any action matching that even from the president. All you hear when when talking about the needs on the border is wall wall wall. Al- CB P has known for four years that the face of migration on our southern border is changing they've made no attempts to make some of the changes that are necessary to provide border patrol agents on right on the border the tools and the training. They need to take care of the situation. We still have an immigration enforcement system that's built largely around trying to stop single Mexican mails from coming into the country seeking work. That's a problem that has not been a significant issue for more than a decade rather. Now, we have these families coming despite all of that we're still shoving families into these tiny holding cells that were meant for single persons to be held for a few hours. Well, and of course, we've heard from the administration we've heard both from President Trump and cure sin. Nielsen Dylan President Trump over the weekend tweeted, and I'm quoting. Hear that any deaths of children or others at the border are strictly the fault of the Democrats, and quote, the two children in question were very sick before they were given over to border patrol. Also want to bring your attention to comments that cures to Nielsen made a couple of weeks ago where she was unable to quantify the number of people who had died or who were in custody. What are your thoughts on that Dylan? I mean, there is a lot of partisanship right now in Washington. But do you think Washington needs to do something despite this to help the situation at the border? My immediate thoughts are those are highly insensitive comments perverse Cummings. But they're reflective of something that transcends this administration. What we've been talking about is that the precisely because we politicize the border because of the border politics that transcends just this administration, and because of the policy choices that we've made for many decades here in the border were not able to respond to the current reality of the border which. Is now we're looking at the presence the large presence of families passing the border in November sixty percent of all border, Heffer hints were families what we have been doing over the last couple of decades. And the Trump administration has intensified is we've been applying a sort of a strategy to militarize the border in what I mean by that is we focused only on enforcement, we focused only on removal, we focused only on things like deterrence. I remember in twenty fourteen when there was a spike of family rivals during the during the Obama administration, the Obama administration explicitly took a quote unquote, posture of a strategy of deterrence to stop this unless we make the investments that are needed unless we change course in respond to the realities on the ground by investing in things like the infrastructure that's needed on the border imports of entry to be able to respond to the crossing families. Unfortunately, we're going to see that the they're going to be deadly results we need to take a step back. We need to stop. Politicizing the border, and we need to make real policy decisions that are going to respond to the the realities of the flows of ration- Dylan Corbett runs the hope border institute and Bob Moore's the freelance reporter who covers the border. Thanks to you both. Thank you..

border institute President Trump Dylan Corbett Obama administration president Bob Moore Washington Nielsen Dylan Washington Post Trump Cummings Nick marathon Krisher McLean Nielsen congress Commissioner Macarena Heffer Jacqueline reporter sixty percent