35 Burst results for "blockchain"

electric Bonneville car)

The Smoking Tire

03:54 min | 4 d ago

electric Bonneville car)

"Okay on this episode of the show a very cool guest. I haven't talked to the student awhile came up kind of last minute, but he's a really interesting guy Michael. Bream is the founder and. CEO, of Ev West. A company that builds and Converts Electric Cars down. In San, Diego area they have done some really cool streetcars. They've done some really cool race cars. They've raised pikes peak and pretty soon, they are going to Bonneville with their newest project. So here to talk about it on the zoom the CEO of e West Michael Bream. On small tar podcast. I've already done it. I've done it in the in the on awkwardness my own home. How are Ya antastic? You'd see. Yeah. What's I mean you know Since we last talked there's been quite a lot of development in the world of Evil Hot Rod. You can buy E v Crate Motors. Now I mean you know what a world right? I mean, it comes in a crate or why don't you tell me if you bought one of these things I mean GM brought that that electric crate And I took some kind of interest in it didn't you? Yeah, we did. We actually have easy west parts in there and cooled I. Think you know the reality is, is they try to make off in sound simple and Bolton but it's it's quite difficult and a lot of these guys are kind of in the space to get attention Yamaha motors recently of did something like that they're putting out a crate motor and we called Yamaha and they're like, no, it's not. It's really. Out there. Actually openly admitted like. Fishing there we just threatened the pond. This is such bullshit because you know often I, hear from people who want me to comment on the fact that. The new cafe standards are impossible to it's like, do you know how easy it is to say that we're going to go full ev by twenty thirty and then roll that Shit back in twenty twenty five when no one even remembers and your long. In Our news. Cycle. Say Anything and the news cycle is so short that by the time you walk it back later once it's clearly impossible just nobody gives a shit. The Craig's is GonNa Have Bluetooth work on blockchain. Put bitcoin right that yeah, it's it's interesting Matt I was just thinking about that the other day like if somebody could do like a best hits real and just go back through like GM announcements and I mean I feel like we've been told like three or four times from every automaker, they're having an electric truck or this out of the other thing and here it is twenty, twenty and Where are they right? Well, A-. Onto, something right isn't it we're really is a reinvite we're gonNA see Arena I mean that's a good point. You cannot buy not buy it and they don't have a fan I love Ribian. Let me tell you I love her the and I think got the best shot of anyone but they don't even have a factory built yet. Do you think they have a better shot of building a truck than than Tesla does? Want to die. Early And then into politics. Ev Crate Motors but it's important. To note the building an electric truck or a heavy duty vehicles, extremely difficult and extremely expensive, and so This isn't a model three or a key Niro or whatever they're trying market. They're trying to bring up a full size truck and compete with you know the Ford F, one, fifty, soul Arado, etc. that is You know no small task of the and again we're talking about essentially start up companies to this date haven't produced anything and I think Riviera's far far far ahead of everyone but you look at companies like Nikola and some of the other companies that are essentially trying to get her capital off of computer enters

Crate Motors Ev Crate Motors CEO GM Ev West Yamaha West Michael Bream Bream Craig Michael Tesla Pikes Peak Founder Niro Nikola Bonneville Bolton SAN Diego
Twitter Will Be Fun Today - The College Kids Who Hacked Into Twitter

Unconfirmed: Insights and Analysis From the Top Minds in Crypto

25:05 min | Last week

Twitter Will Be Fun Today - The College Kids Who Hacked Into Twitter

"Today's guests. His Hip Awan CEO of Afani. Secure and private cell phone service locum his Heeb. Thank you Laura for home. You'll show. You were one of the investigators in touch with the young people who hacked twitter last week and gain control of prominent accounts, including those of Joe. Biden Obama Elon Musk and others as well as those of crypt companies like coin, base and finance, and when they had control those accounts, they were soliciting bitcoin from twitter users. How did you get in touch with the hackers? So Laura be in like. four-time itself, so then after I was so pissed off that angry that I said I need to solve this problem, and so I've entered into a form that relates how they have those accounts holiday getting pretty much all the ring of how they operate so. When you say that they had had your twitter account, nor they have my Sim Sark four times. Okay, and when you say Sim, swaps just described that in case, listeners does up. Does improper pretty much. What happened is like someone will take the form so the underground market like think about Ebay, but like I knew democracy with information. So you said your name, your information social security number your call logs your life, your life, location or anything on you. If I say hey, I need to find out for Laura Shane telephone number, and they'll give me telephone number will give me a call loss to give you. An everything comes through telephone numbers of numbers unique, and then if I say. Say Hey. I need to take the phone number 'cause I need so they will just prophet abuse him that I control, and I need to pay them few hundred dollars now. Your formula not work anymore because I had control of Sim card, so then I use that telephone number to get into a g mail, facebook and twitter, so if you go on twitter, new likely rescinded to email our number. If it's telephone number you've got. Someone's adopted very common technique deployed across US for a long time. So. The twitter hack twitter said that their employees had been socially engineered, and that's how these hackers gained control the systems. Are you saying that? Some twitter employees have their account. Sim swapped like how how does that you or Simspon tried? These people relate to the twitter Hack Greg? You wanted to ask me like how to get in touch with them so I'm trying to understand. You, that of analysis himself, so started going into the industry into this form than trying to see how they operate and to Dodd funny, so which will provide the made acadia that probably that cannot be Simpson's. That's what we did an offer that. VINCI START GETTING customers. Have you would actually getting a lot of attempts to do so? You would getting Dempsey pretty much every week that someone prior to himself or customer, trying to like hack into our system and mend the failed. I got in contact David Mayhew call, they would email method you and they will do all kinds of attacks. You know they'll try to let pen to pen tests. The everything did and obviously in one of the cases restocked immunity stopping messing around it right I know what you're up to. And after I got in touch with him to signal and author that the lake. Not I won't say that become a friend, but I told them why you're doing this. Thank you know you should not do this multiple hackers and they said okay. If you don't have anything to do pretty much, does it okay? Why don't you get a job? He said job, and then they start feeding the all information to proved at. Legit than a lot of information and how I was getting information from a lot of talk of the vote. And when it all this happened that you got in touch with him and had it happened late four five months ago. Okay They were diverging to me not just for this hot, but for other purposes to ride like a kid discount. Lot of databases beach everyday, so they wanted to see that a hey. If I'm interesting in the database, just wanted to work pretty much. is not money. It's also about ego that they wanNA prove something that they would do something so. So Mike Context for not hacking, but they'll be into the songs that they had access to. That follows A. Up I didn't want to. Excessive today were passing me. Hey, today. This is for sale to do sports on tomorrow. This person's so on the deal stood attack. I got a message that will be fun today, and when this message I thought he'd be like a distributor barks. Like scam scams, and but after why? That's all the kind. We got attacked ten. Finance Accounting Noble at depth one time. I taught that it's just a third party API like you know you have like you know where your schedule. The in everything I thought that may be compromised, and that's how they got author. Riley said No. We have everything. A screen chart I tweeted screen shot, and after that is blue. Well and so, who are these people? who were the people involved in the actual twitter hack? The difficult to identity like frankly I don't know I can speculate, but obviously because someone security and privacy I don't want to speculate but I can tell you wanting like college. Kids are maybe like someone between eight, eighty, twenty, one, twenty, two, and they are video gamers. They'd metaphor armed, and they found fascinating for them. Dislike a game like you go into video game on you killing you do stuff for them. It's like that. They, probably living in some way or radio patterns right now in basement. Who does not even know anything? and. They just do it for fun. Obviously, money's there, too, but most of fun for them is just a today. And so originally. The way you got in touch with them was they were targeting these different cell phone accounts, and what does motivation and taking over the different cell phone accounts so for account you can actually to when people take account, they can actually destroy you financially emotionally ended up recently, though by financial I can say they can get into your county bank accounts ticket by Tiptoe through that they can buy a lot of levels of securities financially they can do. obviously going to facebook in an email to, and then they donor all information from your facebook, and then they start blackmailing you that. Hey, likely when a lot you have done this like you know you have this. And you have to pay me this information out there and a lot of people would have to pay them the money because they don't pay the money. They looted operation right so and then third party. They just become Parson Mike is the word processing me. blender used to take my county new. They cannot get anything, but they wanted to talk to me. Just fun for them like people. Some people are sick. Like how did they pick you out of all the different people that they could torture also the league, if not just me like everyday hundreds of people to get them soft, though I'm just one of them on average, every second medical become victim of since up, not himself but cybercrimes so. But I had the impression that this was primarily targeting crypto currency people, but you're saying it's any bundled nor I think eighty percent of people who was himself to an entrepreneur L.! And the new in the cases of those people is it like personal vendettas that they're trying to? You can make more money by a hacking Lord cell than anything else you know. is one thing but Lloyd is like one number one target Loyd and has professionals league doctor medical doctor then. In Lord other number one targets in suffers, and what is the motivation for targeting lawyers Don. Money don't happen. How do they monetize that Yeah, so I tell you doctors, basically busy less tech, savvy and rich. It's that easy to find out any doctor information. You can find out who the best doctor in the city and you consume. Stop Him. And once you get into that account, you can transfer money between accounts who can be that people have been? Going into the count, Simpson calling the bank making via transfer, and then just checking accounts. That's pretty common. For for doctors to clinics have a lot of money. If you'RE GONNA clinic, instead he did even like five hundred hundred million dollar distorted the front because Alaska. Election for them. Okay, so let's go back to the twitter hack. They were some names that were identified of people who are involved these names. In The New York Times article that quoted you as a source one was kirk. There were some other people ll and ever so anxious. Who were these people? And how did they know each other? So they don't. Know the Best Birdie. They just hang out on rooms like chatting channels lake similar people on developed talked with you. The pirates channels. We had people a go if they WANNA have information to the document industry for finding information. If I want someone associated Gordon dissipates on one. Don't get call for these people trade information. And you asked about like a leg. Imagine your lawyer and you are fighting for my open kiss. We begin go to the website by that long since he will. They are who they're talking to the day can. Make some delays on them. That's one thing but other than that. These people are just a game as they would play like you know different video games and kick the die, who was basically a source of the rate industry rock says they'll be extra agents, and they are in room for longtime and David. Obviously you want you want something you don't trust the new guy. The new guy who is basically the main culprit punching the entity because multiple reasons, but the main guidance, the just which had A. Reputation. If you say you want a username of Laura at Laura, Shannon inactive. You may not trust kick, so you can do this. Middle Diane Tell Them Hey, can you hold the money for because you have a good relation? Because like Ebid forums generally have a petition systems. You know so then you ve into this guy like you know every inch it He went to care. Concur depended he the credit employees but I. Don't think he was employees. And, then he gave him the concert start building. So this is just a middleman. He was just broken deals. You tell them what you want. He was just keep his car and transfer the money. The is completed that fall. And so so kirk was was saying that he was a twitter employees, but as you said, you don't think that he was, and he was essentially selling valuable twitter accounts, and if people didn't trust, Kirk, they would use ever so anxious as their middleman to get the different twitter handles that they wanted. Is that what happened? That's correct. Good Gig, only unharmed on in July of. July it was very recently. that. He actually came so obviously not trust someone admit. That soon. July seventh in the New York Times article are. Limited okay, but all right so but ever so anxious. How to longer reputation and. And that was who people are transacting with. And so then. How did BITCOIN come into this? All. On these things happen through Bitcoins, so the way it started was they were selling. This twitter handles four bitcoin and then later. How did the scam change? So I. Personally is what I personally think. That kid was in touch with the employees who was giving these accounts. For a few thousand dollars. And then. Either bribed him. Architects. Social Engineering Him. Legs because like hey can do. This is my. This is purely my speculation that you're working for so long. He warned the trust. Any may have said Hey, can you log in forbid I wanNA see how it looks like something that he made it something so the guy is pasta on. Hey, just do it, but don't do anything crazy. You Know Butt kicked. Decide Okay, man I can just go on or can also go online with I can do it I can. Can also go on like you know. All those accounts crazy. That's what I okay, but you're just speculating. You don't have any proof that or or do you know what? I don't have any proof of that I don't approve. Have critic probably do it? And Kirk? Is probably a guy called coup, which is on a farm for a long time, so he speculated that he someone that was in the industry for wide, but not. Approved that. Kicked it, but from all the action than everything it all points to cook. Irene so in a moment we're gonNA. Talk a little bit more about what happened. Exactly I, in sight, twitter and scam, but First a quick word from the sponsors who make this show possible. How much in fees are you paying? CRYPTO purchases now crypto dot com as waving the three point five percent credit card fee. When you buy crypto apart from crypto purchases, you can also get a great deal on food and grocery shopping with crypto dot. COM Get up to ten percent back when you pay with their. Visa Card no card use the crippled dot com to buy gift cards for up to twenty percent pack download the Crypto Dot com today, and enjoy these offers until the end of September. Looking to connect with thought, leaders, innovators and blockchain enthusiasts welcome to T- forum a weekly virtual series about all things tasers. Equal, feature presentations about the latest advancements that healthy ecosystem grow together. Interested in speaking at t quorom, submit your presentation ideas and the tasers community will vote on who comes to the podium next sign up and learn more about the virtual series at t quorum dot com. Back to my conversation with his Heeb Awan. So, we don't know exactly how. Kirk got into twitter's internal systems. However Once. He or she did then what'd he do or or she do with their power? So. Kirk than they went to buy I think. Start with by notes I'm coin base. And the see your finance and he made it account Egypt first of all. What did it was did with other? Account. Okay, which means when you log in, it asks you to do a second type of security, which is hopefully. If you're in the crypto space, you have used something like Hugo, authenticate or key, and you're not using text message based second factor authentication. Where they sent a code your phone because otherwise if he gets swaps than than having no. Buyer so. Removed that and then keep going good thing. They added wall a secondary second. You know Autodata so now. I'll give example like you have my username seep, so they moved to a FE, and they're also removed. Jane, Email. And then they. Did possible reset. So the new email guard, the chain deposited garden the account. and. tweeted whatever they wanted. Well, and what were they tweeting? So, they were tweeting that you know. About Co. Ed Nineteen I believe like you know because of Covid, we like helping people. I don't remember the wording. Health Has Something and they said Back. And this is video any comments in YouTube. Actually they were so good that frankly sometime I get like you know Oh my God like the able to make it like a secondary thing. That's real you know and like, but this happens pretty commonly, and and it's happening for almost two years now i. It, really is the kind of thing where people think it's real I honestly. Had created a question for you, which is who are the people who are savvy enough to own bitcoin and know how to send it, but not savvy enough to spot. What to me seems like an obvious scam. Actually went on the Internet and are tweeted out this thing same thing I said like who are those people who can have sophisticated enough to buy Bitcoin, but knowledge to. Send. Bitcoin but I think leap Dick's everything. Like I agree people think okay. Let's give it a chance. You know it's like a lottery ticket. You know people may be, but they think what if this is true and other than that. If you like an must happening there, actually flaunted, be efforts on twitter. All the time with people are donating money on twitter, but they don't ask for anything they say hey, can you give me your Alfred Egland who this every day, so he will dollars to off fifty dollars for every person everyday. You'll say. Retreat this. I'll give you this money. So this happens right now and obviously As hit audible, read like you know when viewed come in people, people forget everything that you know. We have so many Ponzi scheme like so many scattered that happened that exist today could if I come to unity Laura investment scheme, which is a pretty good you know. He hit all the MACHIDA. But it only gives you five percent. You may not listen to that. Say Hey, Lord the Child who may tennis money tomorrow. You may skip everything. Cocaine is thousand and ten dollars tomorrow. Okay I'll take the risk from doing that. Hopefully I'm sure my listeners are savvy enough to know if it sounds too good to be true. But people do that I. Think I have estimated that around like maybe I. Just in this journal given us cam like. He put a lot of tens of millions of dollars and well not last week, but no, not over time overtime. Yeah, yeah, we'll be sending money, so there are enough food. I guess yeah over I mean for last week. The hackers did net about a little over thirteen bitcoin, which was about one hundred twenty thousand dollars, although analysts said that about twenty, thousand of it seems to have come from a suspicious address that they actually think controlled by the hackers to kind of make it look like this was legit and people were actually sending money. But then also by the way they could have netted more. However, Cuevas said that it did prevent more than one thousand customers from sending about two hundred and eighty thousand dollars worth of Bitcoin to the twitter hackers so oriented, so let's talk a little bit also about just what happened in twitter which was? Twitter blog posts. Hackers a targeted. Thirty accounts for forty five of those they reset the password and sent tweets from those accounts for eight of them. They actually downloaded that counts data, and then for thirty sixty legitimate direct message inbox, including one elected official from the Netherlands, and it was who. What do you think they could do with such information? I think it's A. Black, man that I've been talking to you about what happened with sin sopping. Let's think about it if you have first all that fool Phoolan that why didn't put? It wasn't like planned. I don't believe it was just like in the move in the heat of happened. BANDAIDS slaves. They clearly guy who just got drunken pretty might do everything but I think if you have access to like anyone, social media, proper social media like I have been I've received. Messages. And I but I don't believe that I think we have forged around. Believe the electoral, so, but if you have someone should media that maybe confidential information that can be misused by Stacey when leg if you do about it on dedic messages, a you know that's not confident that even with the journalist visceral broads. You know so I. Don't know who the information was. What fast, but that's video very very concerning and I believe this may happen on facebook or other social media from his. Because to same. Attack Factor. Yeah I definitely think that this is. One of those cases where it makes you want to just use encrypted social messaging APPS. Such as like signal or something, maybe what's up? So, let's just also talk a little bit about what we said before about how the hackers were able to remove two factor authentication on these accounts. Well, actually what they did I was. They changed the email address. And then the chain Laras Oh, actually bid on a there was A. There was an email. There was a blog post by somebody who had the at six twitter account, and they said they believed that the hackers change the address, but that when that happened, it did not send a notification to the original email address, but not I don't know if this person was surmising, you know six hundred interest in history, those belong to a hacker. Their the community of Hackers Gobi Twenty six hundred. That's like a court for hackers right. Not a quarterback, just like community for hackers and you were the hacker who ended up homeless anywhere. They will do attack into I think he would to. And he went into multiple you as homeless, but he was a hacker. And oxygen community belong to sixty name. Is this secretly off? I believe his name. And, but yes, but I think the first drift was removed and then. moved. To the letter. Control of it now thought it was the reverse, but either way. In Like for any of us who are in the crypto space who have been? Keeping up with our security and using things like Google. or UB and avoiding. Text message based to a or or any kind of to a based on our phone number. What? Can we take away from this like? Is there any advice that you have for Crypto? People on how they can protect themselves if the services that we use have loopholes like this. Let's not that'll be biased in obviously you know. Will. Finding here, but that's what we do, right. We work, but a lot. Actually I am surprised at how many a compromise them security argue out stocking some customer yesterday and they do You know an extra seat is probably the most I can tell you I know. We are making like a faces, but at same part exit. She's most prominent used offer manager for probably ninety ninety nine percent of the word. What would you recommend instead? Use a password manager, anything manager pretty much everything in the top five six. It stood, you know. Don't cheat on family plan. out on like those like a caveman. This company go with a better company. Even if you don't go the final leg, that's fine at least hell better company like Dourthouse I'm plan because no fan mace. You make you very vulnerable to now you're putting your own life on risk, but everyone who is in the time is. You know and the third party. Don't give out your telephone. Number molasses everywhere. You know like. Don't go to like you. Know have different email address if you want to. And you let you. At Google. Authentic get off your. There's something at one time I have statistics, said ninety five percent of people who are like major changes. Do not have to a fait. Sms I'm talking more to a and I think ninety nine percent of those are what you estimates to say. The people who've been additives Everyday I have started I deal with at least two or three people who get up everyday and came and we had some of the to affair, and I can get into that lot of people into the spark that they were not believe enough not to change it. please. Don't please don't be those people, but I can tell you like I've spent people and I said do this. Man How much time did it like five minutes six league. Logistics you Donald and APP, you know. have to familiar face. You know if you are very cautious, taken for a number, but I can tell you that Khomeini would make this mistake. Ordering will end and it you know, and in the end I did lose industry learn. That's was part. There was still use the same SMS to a fait. The dating did not happen to them. Again happened again. Because if it happens to once, you become more, you know your motorcycle getting out again. If they have found something and something, they just do for fun, and and you know what I because obviously I'm. Biased in a way that the. Customer. Time I've been a victim four times a feed Logar they can. What would you do? Please please please setup. SMS elected more music episodes into gear and please get family plan these I. Know You're saving their ten twenty dollars per months, but in the end you know if you call it a, it's like insurance. You can live without insurance to. But like you know. The one day you need insurance when you need it.

Twitter Bitcoins Laura Shane Facebook Kirk David Mayhew Simpson Google. Ebay United States The New York Times Simspon Dempsey Vinci CEO Dodd Afani
Fandom Esports and Esportz Network Eye Future Collaboration

Esportz Network Podcast

04:56 min | 2 weeks ago

Fandom Esports and Esportz Network Eye Future Collaboration

"My guest today is David Veto Curve CEO and president of FANDOM. Ease Sports David. Thanks for joining the show and thanks for that help with pronunciation. No problems thank his. Bane of my life but elegant. Thank you. Phantom ease. Sports is entertainment company that aggregate curates and produces unique fan focus content. The company's primary product is the fan sports APP which focuses on monetize Phantom via the blaze blockchain this week. Fandom in East sports network side a letter of intent, and we're excited about potential collaborations in the future starting with this podcast. So. David you're the new CEO. Last year. We had Henry home. The previous CEO Phantom on the podcast. What are your goals for the organization going forward? Very simple we're looking to. Grow and engage with the sports community the partnership that you just announced with sports is really going to be one of the building blocks of that goal What we want to do is build out community where people can come follow their favorite games. Their favorite teams interact with what may be going on in those sports. Events live in real time. And engage with each other in A. Unique Way that is. User friendly and engaging, so you know there's two pillars to the platform. Both of them are built on data, so we have data coming in from in game data, win-lose draws matches certain spells happening headshots towers, going down on the other side of that we have content coming in from sports network amongst other organizations that we're working with of. For stories around the Games and behind the Games what our community managers than do as sort through that data create predictions that people can. Predict and engage in real time so as you're watching in event on. Your favorite platform, you know as long as we have data to it. You can play along with that and interact with that game as on, so everyone's used to. have two screens home, always watching TV and I seem to be scrolling through something on my phone. So this is a way to really close that loop and increase engagement have. Absolutely we're definitely in the age of two screen viewing twitch capitalized on that very early on with the twitch chat and realize the people wanting to talk about what they're watching while they play it now. We're actually at the age of probably three screen view I know there's plenty of times when I'm playing her stone. My laptop browsing twitter while watch TV show, which is probably not good for my long term, health but I do anyway. You know. I have a little bit of mild. Add myself fourteen tabs open three screens. I'm looking at a laptop now about another. Desktop screened decided in TV running. Right behind it in. You know having a focused conversation with us. This is just I. think rewiring our brains, but the amount of information that you can interact with today's just fantastic. Nobody. Be Thought you could do this and. You know even when I speak to some of our investors. In People Watch. People play video games gets more entertaining than anything. I see on all these three other screens in front of me, so why not? It's A. Fun Safe Place to work right here at home and enjoying. Good content. It's not hurting anyone, so I'm all for it. I'm all for it to. It's content and again it. It highlights that disconnect towards what people enjoy watching you the second degree Buick. People love to watch you play video games because they're not entirely watching the play video games. They're also on their phones. They're also in twitch chat. Unlike a intense netflix's drama, for example where your need to be focused on it, entirely or movie, or even a sporting event where you need to really be focused in people playing video games, you'll play a battle. Royale is very second screen viewing heavy, which just shows how people are consuming content these days. There's. No thank God. I don't have to phones like I said. There's no real end to what you can do, and I think that's what's really unique about what we're trying to do here. Vandam is that. Whether you're watching imbedded stream in the APP, or you're watching. That's stream from another platform because the data comes in, you're really engaging with. On one type of content on two different screens as opposed to watch in two different screens, two types of content on it, so it really. A completes the ecosystem and we can offer benefits to the companies that we partner with. For example from Addis showing on you know a streaming platform can have that admiral in in the hand held device or vice

CEO David Veto David Twitter Addis Buick Henry Netflix Vandam Partner President Trump
Dan Guido of Trail of Bits - The Evolution of Smart Contract Security

Epicenter

03:26 min | Last month

Dan Guido of Trail of Bits - The Evolution of Smart Contract Security

"So I've been doing security stuff for the better part of my life started probably when I was about thirteen fourteen, breaking into my school computers, like when does as when does. Luckily escaped being severely punished for that but I ended up going to college for concentration program and cybersecurity. It was called politicking university when I went there, but now the Nyu School of Engineering and they have one of these NSA center of excellence programs that teach kids a formalized education in Cybersecurity I think the people that are a little bit younger than me have a lot more formalized education and people that are a little bit older than me, don't they learned? Learned from their peers, learned and kind of like a master apprentice kind of set up, so I'm right on the cusp of that, so I have a formal background in computer, science and computer security, and this is the only field that I've ever been interested in working in, so I've worked at the Fed reserve doing incident response, helping prevent people hacking into the currency reserve the United States. I've been a consultant at Isaac Partners now NC group I saw that Isaac. Isaac partners before they were acquired help start their office in the on the East Coast worked with dozens of technology companies across the globe, but I was pretty frustrated that it seemed like an unending treadmill that you kind of go back to clients year after year, and there's always the same bugs, and they don't really internalize the information that you give them. I thought that there was some improvement that we could make, and I wanted to make fundamental improvements to the. The whole field so I found a trail with two friends of mine back in twenty twelve to fundamentally advance the science of computer, science and computer security I think by and large succeeded at doing that very small ways. The company started as a Darpa contractor. We worked on for your long research programs in Automated Program Analysis and Advanced Cryptography, and then from there we've branched out to help provide those advances to commercial firms and now to blockchain firms, so that's. I guess the medium length overview of where I came from and what we're doing now. Tell us about how you got interested in blockchain as a cryptographic field. Because basically found a trade of bits and two thousand twelve, and obviously, then it was pretty new, so what exactly spoke to you about it? A couple of things I think it was really driven by employee interest there about two or three people in the company that were just really enamored with blockchain technology, because it was a Greenfield, not necessarily because it was anything that you could do with blockchain, but because the field was in its infancy, it was a chance to start over it was there were no security tools. There was no security knowledge. People were building their own programming languages building their own compilers. The execution environment looked a little bit different, so there was this huge gap of knowledge that we could rush into fill and create things that were. From the first step back about three to four years ago, we had a couple people dabbling in that area of technology, and what we contributed was a symbolic verifier. That was our very first thing. We didn't raise our hands and say hey. We'll audit your code for you. We're engineers, so we set up a little unit of people that wrote Symbolic Capable A. A theory in virtual machine, a tool that we have called manticore, and then once we were able to do that. We realized that Hey, this is actually kind of valuable and people would love to work with us to improve their own security, so because we'd already mastered the field through that activity that research activity. That's how we started offering services for

Isaac Partners Isaac Nyu School Of Engineering FED United States Darpa Greenfield Consultant East Coast NC
Tales From the Dark Web

Feedback with EarBuds

03:58 min | Last month

Tales From the Dark Web

"This week's theme comes to us from Daniel Ocho and is called tales from the dark web. Here's why Daniel chose this theme. He says the Internet has a dark side hidden. Just below the surface, these podcasts will guide listeners through stories from the Internet's dark side where crime, drugs and murder are the currency of choice. Here are they episodes chosen by Daniel for this week's theme along with short descriptions of each episode. The first episode comes to us from the missing Crypto, Queen and called Dr Rusia. It's twenty three minutes long. Dr Rouge promised financial financial, revolution and then two years ago, she disappeared. Why. The missing crypto clean is an eight part series from BBC sounds. The next episode comes to us from reply all and is called the snapchat thief it sixty nine minutes long. This week, a super tech support after Lizzie snapchat gets hacked. Things Start Getting Really Creepy Alex investigates. The next episode comes to us from case file, and it's called the Silk Road part, one and two. The first episode is eighty four minutes long, and the second is eighty minutes long. The Silk Road was an ancient network of trade routes that started in China in the second century BC via a combination of roads and sea routes goods like silk, paper, and spices transported from the producers in Asia to the markets in Europe. Eventually, it wasn't just goods that were traded. They're also ideas, customs, religions, and even diseases. The next episode comes to us from Lizard people is called Bitcoin was created by a rogue ai with Sam Baltar it sixty minutes long. Bitcoin is one of the great mysteries of the Internet. Age who exactly created it? Where's it going? How did it blow up so fast? What the fudge is a blockchain, and why don't I have won the delightful Sam Baltar of the equally delightful podcast? Weird work joins to talk about cryptocurrency and the possibility that the J. Cryptic coin was created by. Get this artificial intelligence. The next episode comes to us from breach and is called. Caution falling rocks. It's forty seven minutes long. The Yahoo data breach left three billion users private information vulnerable for three years before the public learned about it. How did it happen? And what can we learn from the greatest known data breach in history? Those are the episodes chosen by Daniel. Ocho for this week's theme tales from the Dark Web, follow along with the discussion of this week's podcast episodes by using the Hashtag dark web pods. Now for some podcast industry news from the inside podcasting newsletter. As always, thank you to Sky Pillsbury. Who writes the inside podcasting newsletter for allowing us to share it with our ear? Buddies on this podcast will share the top stories from this week's issue of the newsletter. I story. Sky Interviews James Kim on her podcast the inside podcasting podcast. James is the creator of the fiction podcast moon face a show. Time magazine named one of the best ten twenty nineteen. In Moon face a young Korean American man named Paul wants to tell his mom that he's gay, but they don't speak. The same language Paul Story is loosely based on James Kim's real life experiences. Next story layoffs public radio suffered a heartbreaking number of layoffs this week. Here are the details Minnesota public radio slash American public media has laid off twenty eight employees. APM has also stop production of live from here and the hilarious world of depression. Chicago public media has let go of twelve employees and has ceased production on sound opinions. Next Story. She. PODCASTS founder Jessica. Cup for men and Elsie Escobar have decided to postpone their organizations. Second Annual Conference until October twenty twenty one. It was originally scheduled to take place in Arizona later this year.

Daniel Ocho James Kim Sam Baltar Dr Rusia Paul Story Murder Lizzie Snapchat BBC Chicago Elsie Escobar China Dr Rouge Sky Pillsbury Time Magazine Arizona APM Alex Founder
Why this Ex-Goldman Sachs Trader Started a Bitcoin Exchange w/ BTSE's Brian Wong

CRYPTO 101

03:56 min | Last month

Why this Ex-Goldman Sachs Trader Started a Bitcoin Exchange w/ BTSE's Brian Wong

"Tell us a little bit about about how you got involved in Crypto in wide. You Start Building this exchange. Show so I came from a legacy market background I started off my career washroom. Actually was set Goldman in Essex Increasing Division. And I you know we were doing. Quantitative Trading Block imaging Trach shredders and then liaison got involved in a hedge fund in in China where I launch a monkey missing. To Trade. On shoal financial products like index futures, commodity futures trading like gold silver. Reba all sorts of things and then. I I heard about bitcoin around twenty thirteen. That was one at first bull market. kind of went might lessen under dollars a shot up to over a thousand dollars, and then in two thousand thirteen. Everyone's talking about bitcoin. Shanghai Shanghai outside. People were saying Oh, you know. MOMS and POPs are all getting into bitcoin and that got me interested in this. New Market. I guess I was coming from A. Point of view of flight. Oh, how can treat this? It seems like that is a lot of ginny stage to trade bitcoin, perhaps arbitrage yet so I started looking into it, and then back in the days, the opportunities were pretty crazy for trading. Like you could. Basically. In between the few exchanges static existed back in the days by hand. You don't even need a computer you don't need to connect by. You can literally just by becoming one exchange transferred over the blockchain to another exchange and then south, and they make a pretty hefty profit sometimes I might be this location couple. That's how I I learned about Bitcoin and then absence. Fascinated by the space by technology by the people involved in his face I would say it's I. Say in the Legacy Marcus I continue to. BOOT, trading systems. Trade and Ben in about twenty, seventeen, twenty, eight, my co-founders and I we were witnessing one of the greatest bull markets in history but at the time a lot of the other changes stay. Plate with issues like system move lows. Scale ability issues technology issues, so we decided that we wanna take a lot of the know how that we have how bill perpetrating system Avocados, scalable trading systems stable platforms. Michael Founder boat. Train system that will trade billions of dollars a day experience in technology side of thanks, so I'll go was really set about building an exchange that cope with the scale ability up the com- oppositionist site. We think bitcoins continued scalp. More people are GONNA put money into big time. More hedge funds more traditional pension funds. Pension funds to teachers, Pension Fund might allocate a portion of that you into become so the the space will continue to grow up. We need technology change that can cope with that skin. So that's how we set off to build bitsy change. We build the proper foundation, layer. Ossetia's highly scalable again. Cobra uses is very low latency and high performance. That's really awesome. I mean you. You come from a tremendous background, and this is you're right. That's exactly what we need. Even today we're seeing you know. Spikes in volume and coin basis crashing bit mexes crashing all these platforms that have a lot of the traffic. They can't handle it and you're right. We do need something can

Pension Fund Shanghai Shanghai Essex Increasing Division Goldman New Market Trach Ginny Ossetia Michael Founder BEN China Cobra
Interview With Chris Coney and Tony Dada

The Cryptoverse

07:30 min | 2 months ago

Interview With Chris Coney and Tony Dada

"When did it stop for you? When did you get the The bug as it were twenty fifteen? It was twenty eight. Fifteen five years five years ago. Yeah why don't you think about it like that? But yet I've been in the game is so what happened. I mean because you know was it. Was it like a Eureka moment because for many people they still don't understand what this whole thing was games about. Tell us a little bit in one of the things about Chris. Leads is really good at explaining simply finding so how would you simply explain this whole cryptocurrency space for people so I use Russian? Dole's right big rich Dole. The smaller one inside small on his side. Right so I have this little one two three that I put these together I say. Bitcoin cryptocurrencies and blockchain right. Those are the three big words thrown around. But the reason. I mentioned the Russian dolls and explaining to the SEC. He's like Bitcoin. The low one fits inside big Agricole cryptocurrency which fits inside a bigger calgary cold blockchain technology right so. Bitcoin is a cryptocurrency and cryptocurrencies puzzle because of blockchain technology right so that's the overview of how it all fit together so SA- bitcoin was the first the first example. A something that was digital that could not be copied. That's basically the revolutionary break-through. So if you think you know when all the file sharing networks came along the music labels lost their mind because you know. Cd's were great but then yet these CD copiers in your home pc see could copy albums but it was still you had to buy the disks and no one knew how to do it but when went digital it was an MP three file. You could just emailed you friends. That's the beauty of digital. Is that he just send a song across web. That's why streaming services so popular now is because it's convenient for the listener. Both the labels get to maintain control of the files right because before it was just a free for all wherever was sharing files everywhere. No one was paying for them. And that's because if something's digital you just copy a million times which means the song lost. Its value count. You can't sell it anymore. 'cause won't buys it. She has friends which is why you couldn't have digital money because if you got coin there's a digital file on your computer. You can make a million Kobe. Kobe scored and then it has no value. Because you can make an infinite number of gold right goes out. It's called in the ground therefore retains its value because of that. So that's that's the big takeaway is. Bitcoin was the first ever thing that was digital. That could not be copied. And that's how come it can be named digital money. It can be digital and it holds its value because he can't just copy and paste the Bitcoin so that was where it will began with that and everything exploded from that by well okay so it used to be really cheap like it used to be ridiculously cheap. We've said that every it was great in two thousand nine and add no value. Was you know didn't have a didn't have a price wasn't traded against anything so? Bitcoin is just to Bitcoin with just the bitcoin being passed around amongst in the inventors view like And it was just won't Bitcoin was being sent here there and everywhere until someone was willing to say you give the the Bitcoin. Now give you some. Us dollars at that point is it gets a price which is a an exchange rate and the famous story is the the first of actual transaction. Was someone on a discussion for said someone by me to Pepperoni pizzas and have them delivered to my house. And I'll send you ten thousand bitcoin so that was kind of like the pizza place. Took the dollars so would pay for the UK the twenty dollars for the pizzas delivered to my house when they go to live without. Send you the ten thousand bitcoin. Summer fest of Patches with Bitcoin. Ten Thousand Bitcoins petits and if that person still has those ten thousand bitcoins ads. Are you like less like how much they pay pieces? Cause Bitcoin might nights trading it nine thousand while human bitcoin and nine thousand dollars ten thousand bitcoin ninety I don't to night. How many million ninety million dollars now granted? You had to wait ten years because I was in two thousand nine so if if that pass and if obeyed ten dollars bitcoin sound them till twenty twenty. That twenty dollars would be ninety million and not have to pieces. God now that brings me onto the point because rolling with you. I mean you've you've enabled me to to to learn and what I've come to realize. Is that most people stay broke. We came just going to say it a case that most people stay broke because they just don't have vision in the sense that like you just talked about the pizza guy. I mean I've seen Things that you show me where you know. Bitcoin is concerned and there were forces at work that that trying to shake your hand to make if you're holding bitcoin. That will give you full snow and ideas about what's really happening. Trump took about the vision. Because unless you're very clear about and have an understanding of what this cryptocurrency weld is about. You'll give you you'll sell your. Bitcoin says the price goes down right so without takes. My mind is the rural of fads in the business world. Psycho Tony's Tony's doing Amazon FDA or Tony's doing shopper fire to property always doing internet modeling almost like almost like the passing fads. The they come and you make a bit of money from him and then they go. So or Tony's doing four x four x take instagram so disposable right and that that's fine but some people. I had a lot of people especially when it exploded in two thousand seventeen. We're talking about it like that. The language was on now. Now Tony's doing bitcoin like as if it's just the next thing like the next fad to play with until it comes and goes and that's that's how people have tried it because it was like it was hard because the price was absolute mental. And then when pretend to know melody be Blah. Last that fad passed in the pocket. And maybe for the reason you said which is unless you really understand what is about in a broader context. You will just pick it up like a fat and put it down and if the thing that got your attention was the price going from three thousand to twenty thousand. Well then you missing the whole game

Bitcoin Tony Calgary Chris Dole SEC Kobe United States Instagram CD UK Donald Trump Amazon
Hashing It Out - Ava Labs Kevin and Stephen

The Bitcoin Podcast

08:41 min | 2 months ago

Hashing It Out - Ava Labs Kevin and Stephen

"I'm a first differentiates itself with its consensus protocol. Which I know you've talked about a lot before Previous episodes of this but I'll I'll give a very brief overview of essentially. It's a highly scalable both in throughput and also the latency and the number of participants The can participate in consensus. So the first kind of main idea that that started album was the concert. Now since then we've also branched out into this idea of sub nets relate heterogeneous or a heterogeneous network. So that allows us to Kind of scale not just like on like consensus speed sides but also allows people to develop their own personalized Network so for example. We we are able to port the EDM so easily because we can essentially just have a wrapper around an existing EDM implementation and then use avalanche consensus with that and so we can court in two Gecko in relatively easy manner with how we structured sub nets and so that lets people not just You know have very fast infrastructure but also very flexible one so someone could implement their own. Virtual machine has an arbitrary business logic. That's specific to them and so Say so those are those are the two technical side And then I think Kevin can talk a lot more about like the business on how we're kind of it chained to to meet unique in that aspect but I think From the architecture side where we're kind of pushing towards like You know very very flexible infrastructure both on the consensus and the engine side for Kevin. Kevin I WANNA I wanNA trend reiterate something that's I think is incredibly important about The what office doing That is it's a it's a market distinction between consensus and the underlying data or mach- machine. Stay right most open networks right now those things are intrinsically married like like the consensus for lives state and the changes nate whereas Aga An it's different. Nation is consistent his own thing and then you can have other like a bunch of different machines rely on. That's exactly yeah that's basically exactly right. It's program ability not just at the application layer which is what other smart contract platforms delighted to already It's also program ability At layers below that the network stack wind data stacks which is an important property allows some interesting things that are very difficult from for for others One of the most important things that we want to make sure is that we build a smart contract platform that capitalizes on the value of the applications built on top This is something that for example doesn't do I can if I issue a let me let me call a low velocity a high longevity type of assets. Something like You know Real Estate Orlando something like that That on a theorem Looks no different than forgive nommik laser here but the any regular should coin It accumulates the same fees. It does not. It is not guaranteed to be different from any other Coined the does may be has no value whatsoever to it and we're trying to capitalize on this problem in a way that provides a that gives the issue of assets in creators smart contracts on our platform the ability to effectively divide the the the guarantees a little bit more at a higher. Gherardi or Logan. Larry Rather It's it's about you know giving somebody that is issuing these applications that or the asked us that have very high longevity needs and high security needs It gives them the ability to pay much much. Larger fees to be stored for very long period of time and be very secure. Burst something that. Maybe he's just not very high value and needs may be much higher speed and much lower fees so this is something that we allow. That theory doesn't quite allow and and is actually goes down to the to the token design as well so in fury on the the problem is it does not You know if I issue a new token Or if I build a ruler. Successful application of the theory Yeah fees are paid in East which is great but down to the minors and nobody else benefits from the fact that there is usage off of these Of this of this token on the system It's actually It's actually quite a big problem for theory. I mean you have so much value being built on a theory that bitcoin could never could ever dream off right now and none of it is really being capitalized at the value that it should be capitalized by the by the underlying token Our design has been more of the not the designer. We've taken is more of the the one that says. This is a cap supply token like bitcoin. And whenever you do operations that require things like creating new blockchain's and paying for transaction fees and so on they burn off the tokens and the burning Obama tokens alternately creates scarcity novel and so that capitalizes on the underlying On the underlying token of the of system. So that's an in a different designed from How a theory has done this But I mean this more foam I would say peripheral property The first goal that we want achieve is really in the ability to effectively labrum ability at the at the network data layer which is very very important because it allows a lot of flexibility on how you can design your your economics for your smart contract. It's like effectively. You know smart contract level charting almost if you want to think of it that way. Maybe that's not quite super correct. But it's the best knowledge that I can possibly come up with in one sentence and And that's just not the case for any other platform the whoops there okay So Steven you mentioned these subjects that have has right. How do those are? Would you compare those those akin to para chains or something like Sharpton East to a so with the St Louis? Model that you mentioned. How does that compare to something like East? Who which has the goal of being more stateless. Yes so I think the biggest difference the tweet our model and something more similar to their model is that offer us are. Our sub nets are heterogeneous which means that they aren't necessarily running these same The same the Amer the same the same Guess scheme if you're preparing database land So east to at least you know. Correct I'm wrong but Each to is planning on the chief being scale ability on the same kind of network with the same security guarantees in the same network guarantees across all of its shards. So what that means is that essentially. They're trying to paralyse computation and increase their throughput by adding nodes not need to validate the entire the entire state And so that's that's very useful in some cases however what's typically pretty difficult. When there's a lot of cross shark communication which on blockchain it then becomes very important of how you're you're splitting things into shards and so from from our point of view you know you're GonNa have something like you know the die chain or the Guy I G- CHARD. Where ever wants to be on the Diet Chart because everyone of us die and so all of a sudden anyone that isn't on the die charred is going to have to be communicating with the DIA- Chard Which is relatively expensive in most Charlotte Systems However with us Our viewpoint sub nets is that some nets are heterogeneous and so they may contain their own environment so for example B. Edm would live in its own sub met and would have surprise like Is a is Senate that were planning on doing which is a soon of Eutherian state. So so that's That's like the big difference really so we have something that's based off of the functionality. Rather than you know just splitting the entire state. So that's like the main

Kevin East Barack Obama Senate AGA B. Edm Gherardi Larry Eutherian Steven Sharpton St Louis
The European Commissions approach to blockchain

Insureblocks

08:24 min | 2 months ago

The European Commissions approach to blockchain

"Hello and welcome to inch blocks urine. Decadent podcast to blockchain ans- mark contracts. I'm will eat. Scuff your host for this week's podcast. We be discussing the European Commission approach to blockchain. And I'm very pleased to have Peters Zilkha this head of unit digitalization Blockchain Digital Single Market Directorate at the European Commission Peteris. You've got a lot of titles. Many thank you many. Thanks for joining us today. Could you please give us a brief introduction on yourself? I'm glad to I mean I'm a lawyer by background. I have the JD degree from University of Southern California before they had a political science degree. And though I've never really practiced their California state bar for almost thirty years now and since Two Thousand and five Florence. My Country Latvia joined the European Union. I've been ahead of unit in the European Commission and digital innovation. Blockchain is what I've been working on and you could say to US sometimes perhaps over used term but It's a little bit my passion. I've been interested in walk chain and tech since about two thousand and twelve so perhaps not at the very beginning but at least relatively early for the public service this is also why I'm The original co chair of the Fintech Task Force. I have my second Co-chair coming from the financial services side. And then I'm from digital single market and I mean in both these areas I'm working in legislation and policy in funding infrastructure and research and managing it as well as working with with stakeholders and international cooperation. So it's an interesting bunch of things to work on. I'm glad to be doing it well. As you sitting the key term as passion because you're effectively getting the job of three other men so very impressive So Peter is As it is customary here at Inter blocks. Could you please explain our listeners? What is blockchain? And how does it work? Well glad to try. This is one of these things. It's a little bit of a communications challenge and exercise. But I mean I would say that. It's simply a growing list of records of blocks In a ledger that are linked utilizing cryptography and generally managed by peer to peer network adhering to a protocol for communication between the nodes and then validation of the new blocks that perhaps gets already a little little technical some listeners. But I would say. It's a way of validating transactions and data in an immutable in permanent way. So that you can be sure that they haven't been tampered with and that you don't have double spending of a value and that you can transfer data along with that value. That's the way that we see it and I think it's also important because some people are I think most of all sometimes negative that they say Blockchain is something that's bad because let's say uses a lot of energy if they take the original crew for work and everything that doesn't do that is is not blockchain. I mean we take a very wide view. I mean distributed Ledger Technologies Hash graphs tangle on these types of blockchain inspire technologies is is blockchain for us. I mean we're not trying to freeze history in two thousand and nine. When the BITCOIN paper was Was published or at some other point. It's developing technology and I would say what is really important is the element of decentralization which is not black and white. It is a gradient going from something which may not exist of completely centralized to something which also may not exist of being completely decentralized but actually allowing a degree of decentralization That a single database or even some federated databases. Don't don't allow so. This is where I think it gets exciting and where it makes it possible for a diverse group of actors to work together while preserving their autonomy. Excellent really loved that. I'm element of your definition of. It's a gradient of decentralisation incidents that's a spot on now could you introduce to us all the different bodies within the European Commission you have the digital innovation in Boston you need. And other bodies within your commission that are here to research enable and further development of blockchain in the EEG perhaps give us an overview where we'll do some deep dive in in some of the sure. I mean starting with with my unit. We're kind of the policy leaders on blockchain as a technology. But we're not. We're not the programmers as I said. I'm a I'm a lawyer and a political. Scientists have other colleagues are engineers but were more economists lawyers people looking at digital policy and in my unit we have the e U Blockchain Observatory in Forum which is a think tank working for us that has a whole set of reports and videos and regular workshops which used to be physical in at least right. Now they're virtually cited We also have the European blockchain partnership that my unit runs. This is twenty nine. Different countries twenty-seven all twenty seven e. You member states and Norway and Liechtenstein. Who are building a European blockchain services infrastructure together. I mean actually building an infrastructure. This piloting this is not testing. We're putting public services on the blockchain justified. We had quite a filtering to see which cases were justified to utilize the blockchain. And this is also something you could call a regulatory sandbox because while the countries and us are working together we obviously have to look at European Union legislation. We have to look at national legislation. Most likely you don't find anything. We're blockchain is prohibited. But you certainly don't find many cases where it specifically allowed though. You're getting some legislation in France in multi in other countries. It's specifically see a root for blockchain Roxanne legally And then we also collaborate with the International Association of Trusted blockchain applications as stakeholders organization I myself I'm in the OECD Policy Expert Advisory Board on Blockchain so we collaborate with OCD with the United Nations and others and In Not Buzz. International position of trusted blockchain applications a global governmental advisory board but also in the OECD activities. In the other activities. We probably would participate in the spring meetings of the World Bank and International Monetary Fund. This year I spoke myself in the IMF Fintech roundtable last year. Also you have the collaboration in the Fintech Task Force as I said from our side digital single market I gave a basic description on the other side. You have the financial markets colleagues the call as coming from research in Salon with the financial markets colleagues. Were collaborating on the digital assets possible legislation we just closed the public consultation on digital assets. Hearing what the stakeholders with the community has to say and in another context of the Digital Services Act which is a updating of ECOMMERCE along with addressing the platforms. We are seeing how perhaps smart contract so we have to do something to ensure that there is not any fragmentation of different requirements smart contracts across the digital single market and the twenty-seven member states. Something that we want to want to avoid

Blockchain European Commission Blockchain Digital Single Mark Fintech Task Force European Union European Commission Peteris U Blockchain Observatory International Association Of T International Monetary Fund Peters Zilkha University Of Southern Califor Inter Blocks California Latvia Oecd United States
Hashing It Out - Panvala Niran Babalola

The Bitcoin Podcast

05:12 min | 2 months ago

Hashing It Out - Panvala Niran Babalola

"GonNa dive a lot into that but I'm kind of interested in like what's your take on okay. So bitcoin substitute model as you just recently put it the inflation rate. Which is the new bitcoin that gets minted with every block is for the most part. What people are after what the miners are? Actually after when they're mining because the amount in fees is substantially lower sixty X as. You've just personally put it right so with the with the. I guess this is a reasonable timing to have this conversation. Like the block. Reward has was just haft yesterday. Dabney's this'll go Thursday so a few days few days ago How does that work? How does that affect the subsidizing of the network and I can have? You had much to be thought about this. This concept of the inflation rate and its effects on the current token holders and people continuing to care and maintain the same level of care over time as inflation rate changes. Yes I think we're going to see in the bitcoin. Our is that that multipliers GONNA go down from sixty six. I don't think it'LL BE CUT IN HALF TO THIRTY X. I think the price will change at some point and maybe get somewhere in between but over time that That subsidies to gradually decrease until it goes to zero and then people expect fee market will be established to operate the network. An Pella ideas that it kind of works the same way. We have a multiplier that we expected decrease over time so In the early days we expect communities to be really excited about. Hey We have this subsidy to operate our community to do our philanthropy into do whatever we WANNA do together. That's really exciting. That gets people involved. But that doesn't last forever so in that intervening decade or however long these attract multipliers lest we have to do the work to make sure that we're building communities. That are worth sustaining over time. Even when there's no Left to be had it's just GONNA be communities operating on their own Sunday. This is just a way to bootstrap those communities and get them off the ground so I think people will still be excited about in when. There's no more subsidy but we have to do the work to make sure that happens. You're seeing kind of like the time of the subsidy is being the I guess the nation of the signaling market. Because what I what I imagined has been pinball is is the ability to signal where you think money should go And we can maybe talk about dynamics later but like it takes a while to get to the point where you have the cohorts that are have proven useful and signaling and once you get to that point you can then change how that bottle works based on having some. I guess reputable source of of signaling. And we'll get whatever signaling means in a little bit 'cause like a like the people who are mining who would be signaling about like validity or security of the bitcoin network. I'm just trying to keep us going or doing real work. We're doing real computation. And some people some people will give that the bottom price of Bitcoin is the amount of energy that goes into the network to secure it now. There's arguments that you've made there. That doesn't necessarily translate to to help him. Vala works like what was the question this like. Where does the value come from in Pensacola so the value comes from two things? Louis we are very heavily modelled on Bitcoin. The value in bitcoin comes from a community that's loyal to Bitcoin I think there'll be a community. That's loyal to pinball because instead of just seen blockchain network being operated by the system they're gonNA see their communities thrive as a result of the system. I think is a result though. Want to help keep the system going and be good. Stewards of the But the other thing is like a if you think about all the bitcoin mining operations that sprung up since two thousand nine Like there's all these people that were trying to find all the nooks and crannies somewhere on earth with the cheapest electricity and the best mining ships that were available Like if you see articles about with all the pitchers like it's incredible that just somebody launch to a piece of software lead to that kind of economic activity if you take that same mentality and apply instead of subsidizing security to subsidizing communities. I think you're gonNA see something equally as incredible but instead of trying to optimize your electricity bills you're going to be trying to provide the public goods the themes that communities want that. They wanted to before but didn't have a way to coordinate to fund them. There's going to be people trying to find all those things and filling those gaps in people's lives and I think that's something that people are going to sustain. The VALUE COMES FROM PEOPLE. One team what the network produces. I think people want thriving communities

Bitcoin Pensacola Dabney Louis
End to end solutions against COVID-19  insights from Blok BioScience

Insureblocks

05:16 min | 3 months ago

End to end solutions against COVID-19 insights from Blok BioScience

"For this week's podcast rigby discussing end to end solutions against couve in nineteen with special insights from block bioscience. And I'm very pleased to have returning to intra blogs aerial Walla no CTO of block bioscience and managing director of experts aerial. Thank you for joining us today for those listeners. Who Haven't heard you in our first podcast. Could you please give them a quick introduction on yourself and on block bioscience they'd thanks and It's great to be back. My Name's Arielle. I've been working in the blockchain space for a while. Is it six years now. It's a longtime Komo experts. Blockchain Because we are all still figuring out a lot as we go but I've had the good fortune to work on a number of really interesting solutions from trade finance to insurance And now working Working in the biotech industry on something. That's really needed excellent. Excellent so as you'll recall our first question is could you please explain to our listeners. What is blockchain? And how does it work but here? I'm I'm curious to see if your definition has changed since the last time you are on the show due to the work you're doing it blocked bioscience so if if memory serves the definition. I gave you a hasn't changed much. Which is that blockchain technology that allows multiple companies where people to share a single version of the truth Without having to spend any time effort or money on reconciliation messaging Synchronization Or other such that the benefit from from gained from That sharing often allows completely new business. Models or new ways of solving problems. Ought to be possible in terms of how it's changed. I think the the main thing that's changed is a very welcome maturation of thought blockchain. I think it's fair to say no longer. A thing on. It is a tool kit For solving problems And for accomplishing what previously would take large numbers of people or expensive software solutions off. That can now be taken for granted when two people are talking and one is sharing a. I found this amazing new APP on my phone. What what we what I wouldn't say to you is. I found this amazing new APP in my phone and it runs the IP stack. That's given so if we're now talking about a solution and that solution includes our two companies Having a common record of a piece of data the presumed solution is that you would use blockchain so that you would share that single solution than do after create a business function hired people or build software to keep our version of that that data and yours in sync great great and I have very fond memories of our podcast where you took us all the way back to the Sumerians to talk about the Boola but I'll let our listeners to check it out for those. Who Haven't had the chance to actually on your on your on your webpage that Keith. Bear actually Commented on similar context of the indeed Princeton this world so in our last podcast I introduced you as managing director offensive experts. Now you've added to that the role of CTO block bioscience. What is blocked by? What is your mission blockbuster? Science is Is A team of thought. Leaders thought leaders in the medical industry thought LEADERS IN TECHNOLOGY THOUGHT LEADERS AND SUPPLY CHAIN. Who grouped together because we think that is needed fast that it needs to reflect how quickly things are changing And that it needs to represent Delivering the best possible medical diagnostic and supply chain capability to the fight The unprecedented impact that covert nineteen is having on the world. Ob conserve experts has entered into a business partnership with block and we are providing The technology delivery capability. But that's only one piece of block block is also about the medical expertise on supply chain in the network of relationships To get things where they need to go on and together we are creating The solution that we're talking about today. Excellent so just to confirm this blog bioscience was created because of the president pandemic or was it created prior to that block solutions. Which is which is this. Group of thought leaders will was already created what we did is mobilized specifically to solve this problem. We've been working on it Pretty much since since Cova I started You know emerging from China in in late January.

Cto Block Bioscience Managing Director CTO Rigby Komo Cova President Trump Keith China Princeton Bear
A Conversation with IOTA founder, David Sonstebo

CRYPTO 101

08:10 min | 3 months ago

A Conversation with IOTA founder, David Sonstebo

"Personally I from a I would say futuristic view like when I was a sixteen years old of his very much into the futurist movement on the Internet. At the time this was like two thousand five six seven when Bitcoin didn't even exist yet and we had something called the extra populists where you discuss everything from quantum physics foundations of physics to the danger of artificial intelligence. So if you've heard of nick booster which has become quite a household name analysts. Yeah I WANNA say. Last seven years I think is like the simulation Disease that he created cetera gained a lot of momentum particular due to alone must he was posting on these forums. And ask His collaborators as was the creator of quantum computation. His name's David Deutsch. He was the father of quantum computation. Also one of the strongest proponents of Theon many worlds interpretation of quantum mechanics which has also become quite popular in the last few years. So this was kind of the environment that my formative years were spent in online and in one of these forums which was gold. Ls wrong by Allies Gulf skit will also is very focused on their life extension artificial general intelligence these kind of research topics Heuristic stuff on those forums. Of course this is were held. Fini Way die in all of these kind of book chains. Cypher legends hung around so I was exposed at quite alone. I think the white paper I owed is. Bitcoin story came up around two dozen ten eleven in the beginning. I wasn't particularly interested because it was like Internet money. And it had this very strong towards a particular political leaning and I didn't like Join Movement based on a political ideology. I don't care for that like I prefer rational and critical thinking so I didn't necessarily like it into beginning. Look because of the technology but just because of the overall movement around but then as I like as the years or a couple years past Of course used Bitcoin a couple. Times was interesting. And then the dove into the White Paper in depth and I realized that Holy Shit. This technology is really transformative. At least it could potentially be a paradigm shifts in the digital around. So from there on I would say early two thousand twelve. It was full time. Twenty four seven just distributed. Ledger Technology. How can we use it for payments? Have degree used for data Degradate boating all of these other kind of extremists So I got into that and then I met my am co-founders Sergei bunch low dominic in there and Sergei Popo. All of them were also early adopters of drip though and we got together in this project called exceed in two thousand thirteen. This was the first proof of stake. Implementation was kind of the first of I I would say INEX- T for those historians out there listening and Exte- was the first project that truly brought the blockchain to other applications older than just transactional back and forth payments because we had a completely decentralized assets exchange which you can now of course compared to Theorems Your C. Twenty token kind of ICO. Hyper happen and we all sat boating. That all of these interesting stuff. Identity Cetera on the distributed ledger. Jen so all of us met there. Erin coalesced around this idea but then personally. I was much more interested in the futuristic aspects. Has That was my background? So I tried to contemplate what role can distribute electric play in the future and for me. There was two very definite role that it can play number. One is the data integrity or data insurance or whatever term. You want to use it. Depends on what the paper rate rise is that like paper or like proving that data hasn't been tampered with and that you know people who okay interesting exactly so the way I think about like the future whether hundreds of billions of sensors and a lot of this edge computational devices which at the time was even called edge computational because it didn't exist at the time but for us it was very obvious that you will have computation have sensors sending day to these gates at the edge. Should they will computer that? They will send it back in. You will have real time actionable Kind of items. That you can Not just measuring analyzed but you can also act on them but in that case like in that futuristic scenario where the entire world is just completely autonomous. You are one hundred percent dependent on the date of being accurate and that's where this debate electric. It's immutable and censorship resistant. So that's kind of the angle that isolated from from point one and point to was what is the incentive. Because you can think of it today. You have Just from a human's centric experience point of view. You fit bit than you have with things rabble these different e health companies. Just a very simple example. How do they interact in? What is the incentive for them to interact? There has to be a mechanism for them to actually data an open up their data silos so it kind of becomes disfluent data lake which kind of been promised for the best twenty years and from my perspective the distributed ledger provides a payment mechanism. This value transferred guaranteed value transfer. So those are the two things that are really Really prompted me to initiate the IOTA Project and since then just just wrap it up very quickly. This introduction became quite long so since two thousand fourteen. We started the project and we went forward with it. Developed the initial prototype Blah Blah Blah Blah Blah and then in two thousand and sixteen restarted the incorporation of thieves Which was the first non partitioning Europe at the time that was confronted with cryptocurrency and it was in Germany so as you can imagine it wasn't the easiest process like Germany isn't known for its Super Liberal policies. We have to go through a lot of the doors to get that accepted the witted and that also paints kind of the backdrop of what I oughta is versus a of these other projects in the sense that we chose to take the hardest route possible from the beginning. Because we knew if this is going to become something if this if this is going to become the next TCP IP protocol we have to get the legislation on our side we have to get the regulators on our side. So let's just go through it in the beginning. So that's what we did. Got It setup. Now we hundred twenty people in thirty different countries around the growth as the foundation. Of course have a huge community as well. So that's yeah that's why introduction

Bitcoin David Deutsch Germany Nick Theon Europe Sergei Bunch JEN Erin Exte Sergei Popo Cryptocurrency Dominic
Why enterprise blockchains fail? No economic incentives

Insureblocks

09:45 min | 3 months ago

Why enterprise blockchains fail? No economic incentives

"For this week's podcast we will be discussing. Why Enterprise blockchain's fail and I'm very pleased to have Stephanie Herder Founding Economists and partner at Prison Group Stephanie. Thank you for joining us today. Could you please give our listeners? A quick introduction on yourself and on Prison Group. Hi. It's great to be here. I'm a founding economist of prison group. We'RE GROUP OF ECONOMISTS WHO advised watching projects on their economics and governance design as we work with everyone from native blockchain startups. That are VC. Funded all the way through to giant enterprise projects excellent excellent so as it is costing me here at Intra blocks. Could you please explain to our listeners? What is blockchain? And how does it work? That's a great question. Sell start at the beginning and work my way up so botching. Blockchain is a type of what we would call a distributed ledger as I think. We All know what a ledger is. We is like a database. We deal with them. On a daily basis Most of the ledgers we interact with are maintained by a single person or organization. So for example. your bank probably uses alleger to keep track of how much money is in your account and the bank is responsible for maintaining updating that ledger a distributed. Ledger is a shared ledger. Where multiple different stakeholders it could be. Different BANKS COULD BE DIFFERENT INSURANCE. Companies collectively control an update. The ledger to they have a process. Called the consensus process where in order to make a change in update to this shared database other needs to be a certain level of agreement among the different stakeholders so the fundamental level. It's way of having a a single share database where no single organization or entity controls it. A blockchain is a particular type of that because the transactions or updates are processed in blocks. And then when we talk about blockchain There's usually Implication of additional layers of technology that are on top of it so for example not every blockchain not every distributed ledger or blockchain protocol has mark contracts of many of them do and so when we talk about blockchain and how it works features like that or sometimes implicitly included great great so on the second of March Twenty Twenty. You published an article on Coin Desk entitled quote why Enterprise Blockchain's fail no economic incentives. Close quote in the article. You start off with quote enterprise. Blockchain is in the doldrums close. Could you explain to us why you feel that is the case? What is it in your opinion that has gone wrong? I think as a active participant working with a lot of different projects on their server. Familiar pattern that we see with enterprise blockchain. Typically these are consortium right so as we'll talk about one of the great benefits of having this distributed controls than enables data sharing consortium to form amid what we keep seeing. Are these pilots that you never hear from again right? So you'll have a consortium announced that they have a proof of concept or that they're going to do a pilot for specific use case and then a year. Later you come back and say oh. I wonder what happened to that pilot and never heard from again. Just see this pattern over and over again. A major thought leaders who were very big on The potential of enterprise BLOCKCHAIN MAY BE YEAR EIGHTEEN. Months AGO are starting to question. Why are these pilots working? Why don't we see more projects really taking off? So that's why I categorized. Enterprise blockchain is being in the doldrums interesting. Because I I totally agree with you. I mean we saw that especially knowing two thousand seventeen thousand nineteen a huge number of appears us there were launch and sometimes it feels that they were launched more for grabbing the press or because the the C. Suite rubbing being pressured by their investors by the practice to answer the question. What is your answer to blockchain? What are you doing blockchain? Fill as though they were just jumping into it to answer those questions without having an understanding of what Business Problem Day here to answer. Is that a fair assessment. In your opinion I think the the fundamental challenge is that blockchain has the ability to deliver a lot of economic value to consortium groups using it to solve problems. But you need to be really clear about what is driving the value creation of. Who's getting that value on before you can survive? Have a project successfully launching GRUB and I think a lot of a lot of projects. They weren't clear about what exactly blockchain was intended to do right. What exactly is it about. Botching compared to existing technologies that's needed for particular use case and then when it's implemented who is getting the benefit from this network How is the value being distributed? I think without a really clear understanding that it becomes very difficult to set up the necessary infrastructure for a successful project. Yeah not totally agree upon that point in in your article you you also mentioned that you know blockchain platforms our economic systems. What do you mean by that? So if you're going to the trouble of creating a blockchain based consortium you're doing it because you think it's GonNa create what we would call economic value right. It's GONNA save companies money. It's GonNa Save Time. You may be putting multiple different data sources into the same database. They're going to allow for synergies in new products and value creation. So there's a there's an economic rationale for almost every blockchain project and so you have to whenever you look at a consortium or permission list project you have to think about who are the different stakeholders what are their incentives to join and contribute to the system and to not be a chaos monster and how is the value that's created gonna be divided up and I think many projects you talk about this in the article on have taken a very technology. I approach so they focused really on. How do we implement the technical details of what we're doing without thinking about the economics of the system until it's almost too late in it's already been significant? Decisions have already been made exactly so incensed. You know something came quite clearly in in your article and you stating now is that you know. Perhaps one of the first step any consortium has to do is in identifying that value. So how can consortium create value straight from the get-go what what? What would you say is the process for doing that? So when we think of value creation in a blockchain based consortium or network we think of it in terms of three layers so the first layer is what is the value that the distributed ledger. The blockchain is is bringing itself We have a framework at prison group that we call the three CS and these are the three different levers of value creation that we see over and over again across different projects so the three CS are coordination commitment in control and the different features of a distributed ledger. Or blockchain create. He's levers of value more or less depending on the different use cases so for example. If you have a use case that's using smart contracts you know. One of the big economic frictions that we see in settings. All over is how difficult it can be to monitor enforce contracts right so just because you have a contract with another party that doesn't guarantee you know in the non blockchain world that doesn't necessarily guarantee that that other person or other entity is going to follow through on what they said they were going to do. So one of the promises of enabling smart contracts is that you know that whenever the conditions for the contractor met the contract automatically executes into this value beyond what we call a commitment right. You can increase the credibility if I promise to you that I'm going to send you ten tokens. Having a smart contract in place is more credible commitment than if I decide. I promise. I'll send them to next week. So we think about use cases knew what to what extent are coordination commitment control creating value. So that's sort of at the at the transaction level and then because these networks contain so many different entities there are two other layers on top of the DNC or the blockchain we think about on the next layer is is network offense so you're bringing together all of these different participants and they're gonNA have val increasing value from you. Know who else is participating. So they're different dynamics that that we're going to talk about and then finally on if you have networks running different types of applications also on the same chain with the same participants a you can have synergies. You have the same source of contribution of data being used in many different places. And so these are we think about any application we think about these different layers and how they build on each other and how they interact to deliver value to the construction.

Enterprise Blockchain Blockchain Prison Group Ledger Stephanie Herder March Twenty Twenty Partner C. Suite DNC Coin Desk
Bitfinex CTO Paolo Ardoino on Tethers Dominance

Messari's Unqualified Opinions

07:14 min | 3 months ago

Bitfinex CTO Paolo Ardoino on Tethers Dominance

"You explain how your role has evolved between tether and embiid Phoenix and kind of wary? You currently sits. Because there's some confusion over the organizational structures. We didn't have to get into the banking and and kind of creation and asset component of it but But where do you spend most of your time on the infrastructure is on the other side or is this just a but the discrepancy? That doesn't really exist. In fact it's more just a organizational chart issue so you know I my exp- by have a really good expertise also in insecurity. So that is one of the reasons why in two thousand sixteen I was asked to stepping us with your Phoenix so I steal mine. Main role is to act An amazing team of developers in Phoenix any better debtor has less developers because most of the operations are on chain of course us well known blockchain. So the key part of my rolling Patter Is ensuring that blockchain's That we are going to has older climates that the we won't in terms of issuance redemption authorisation processes. So that is what they do in patter and also decide. The processes in which these insurance is redemption. Needs to happen so I that is I really I'm I'M BREATHE. Thorough and read annoying when it comes to security So Basically I spent quite some time design a designing All all these processes in between instead. I said I would say most of my time because I read called a lot there Old The basically I I mainly involved in mentioned engine and all the processes so I would say that I still Dimension engineered steel ninety percent me and the old that also the core service is still eighty percent me. I would say to. Let's let's talk about Tether I because it's just seen absolute explosion in volume and in new creation particularly or last quarter. So there's there's two things that I think we've talked about. One is the transition that started people. Forget only about a year ago Between Omni tether and then the RC and crx tether which are in been the case now trae USD this now traded and and And held on the theory of blockchain is Over five billion now which is larger than us DT on Omni ever was I think even units peak which round. Yeah three billion this transition. That really only happened last year. Can you talk a little bit about what ultimately led to the migration to a theorem? Might sound like an obvious question answer but but not only what led to that but also the decision making process for when to flip the switch because on the one hand. It's obvious there's a ton of develop activity. There's a ton of interest in those certainly. The capabilities are C- Tokens to salted a type of transferring creation. Like this but on the other theorem itself as a platform is certainly not ironclad from from a security standpoint and the last thing you want to have happen is any issues with the fungibility of a dollar denominated token during a chain split or a B migration do chain which is basically. What thirty two point. Oh yes so First of all the the moment when we decided to create Tighter on On the theory was really an fewer. No that was really end up two dozen seventeen. If you recall ended as seventeen was we were almost peak of bull run and the price of a bitcoin transaction enhance transactions. At some point reaches out. be five hundred dollars so of course there was. I was making money so You know people where we're kind of happy Steal the where really complain. Hard about pattern so we wear We we got a lot of complaints and other exchanges complaint that that support attacker that is issued a majority from any doubts about the costs of Of running an owning owed because ultimately you have you need to have a bitcoin a unit to bitcoin orders and an amish transaction so in endo tas seventeen we should we worked on the ethereal Michael For for her and we we deployed it. We really didn't use it and we didn't You know as a beginning to eighteen The market started accounting upbeat. And by the time we were we We wear eighty Announce Terry Theorem. It's an alternative the fees if he goes went down. Whitehall so first of all. I won't say that we never intended to migrate so we we wanted to create the diversity. We wanted to offer a way that a solution in case one blockchain guests load and knocks usable. Not So we wanted to give another opportunity to use a different blockchain. So you should. We suggest with changes to support at least to Had Our lunches so at any point in time traders can steal the funds between Between one change to another so I'd also panther was was born to to Make it easier to make faster the cross exchange arbitrage. So if you have really high fees or you have a blockchain that exploded and the commission times are ours than you lose completed the purpose of a stable corn so that is why the that is the key reason why we are blockchain blockchain so we are on Tron IUS legally than the allographs so biscuit we start to buy them and we we not weed. Dan Understood that Traders would prefer anyway Ethereal just for transactions speed and the and call general so start more predictable and Usually lower on on

Phoenix Omni Blockchain Terry Theorem USD DAN Whitehall The Market
ErisX CEO Thomas Chippas on Creating Regulated Crypto Markets

Messari's Unqualified Opinions

05:43 min | 3 months ago

ErisX CEO Thomas Chippas on Creating Regulated Crypto Markets

"Your absolutely anything to say. Initially the blockchain pat as you recall I started chatting. Unabashedly was in me. Talk about the block. Chain crypto thing beyond whatever it was twenty fourteen twenty fifteen whatever it may have been in for me looking at a blockchain side of things at the time I was falling back upon my experience in Capital Markets. Where trying to have multi party processing of financial transactions that had different life cycle events that were causing inefficiencies inefficiencies on capitalisation inefficiencies on risk management inefficiencies trade settlement and. I really saw potential in the technology But those early days were so crowded with wild claims and over amplified desires to change everything overnight in a capital system. That by design changes slowly right the appetite to change risk management settlement processing and things like that from a regulatory perspective. The slow if it's working even inefficiently that's better than an unknown thing that maybe more efficient lets you prune it. Let's ball Annette. Sort of view trickles to the folks in the Capital Market Space. The process banks clearing-houses changes. What happy but I was intrigued. Started down the path and certainly really proud of the time is spent working with the team at Exxon who I think is a great job pushing or the DOT story injury specifically. We've done a lot of things. There have started a crew valve those early day assumptions about potential this technology to improve things like CVs process in equities processing and other uses for me certainly being aware as you point out there were two businesses a trade block which is really market data into sees ems within the space and then separately the dot company. That was very focused on the inside but always sort of I over my shoulder looking at what's going on with trae blocking the trader in me just was constantly intrigued at the market structure of the way the markets were operating in a physical level. The lack of inter connectivity. The volatility all sorts of things that were very different than equities options futures rates. What have you? I was more familiar back my mind and I'd say you know on my own time a my own homework. I kept looking at the markets Personally and then just as the rest of the maturation process started to move from that period to two now in explosive growth in non US exchanges US exchanges various of understanding of the economic impact of something like non-sovereign store evaluate. Could have you for me. Just keeping a constant. I reached an apogee when the opportunity for Aris ex game. Just was the only thing I can see myself doing. Because it is truly the intersection of market structure not to build something different in. Do in the crypto space so now passively watching guilty more focused obviously on the criticized. Things unabashedly started Ornette let's talk about the the institutional landscape. Because there's there's I think three core things but you know fill in the gaps here for a more nuanced understanding three core things that have prevented institutional purchasing and the first step in the on ramp. Historically one has been data integrity which not only impacts compliance teams in terms of other things about marketing market. But much more importantly makes it difficult to prove. That trade was executed. Best bitter offer so sedated integrity and Is probably number one which trickles upstream to the changes are actually providing that data the second is institutional custody and just how a money manager can get their legal teams comfortable with actually making purchases in just evaporate the add some some type of hack and the third is On the regulatory side so you know in the US and most of western Connie's most parts That's been you know y you could argue largely solve at least for Bitcoin but other assets are gonNA be a slow and steady process to get institutions comfortable in reality. It doesn't really matter because the first step is almost always bitcoin. If you're talking about institutional allocations beyond that there's a whole slew of tools it needs to be built in in reality actually smooth that user experience for a large asset manager or a large bank or or per hedge funds and. We're just starting to see products like air sacs liquid back to building like civility coming market. That are are are satisfying adequately satisfying this niche and and I say niche Maybe like an air quotes because we all know that it should be. The biggest driver of long-term value in gross and ultimately the electrical contacts on the rest of the industry has given the enormous amount of money that has been sitting on the sidelines. Historically

United States Exxon Trae Annette Ornette Connie
You've Got to Remember that God is an Idiot with Vinay Gupta

Buddhist Geeks

09:57 min | 3 months ago

You've Got to Remember that God is an Idiot with Vinay Gupta

"Okay we'll welcome vinegar to have you on the Buddhist geeks show. I've been following you on twitter for. I don't know it's been a long time so great to finally connect and talk to this you. Do you do interesting work? Thank you I I. I'd I'd say that you interesting work but I'd say that'd be an understatement I wanted to mention a few of the things you're into at the moment and then of course we'll jump in and just. Kinda have a conversation about a number of these things so at the moment your current Major Gig that I see you doing a lot of stuff around is you're the CEO of material. Which is a new project. That's recently launched as I understand it so we've been in development for about two years and Ten Days Google So we've actually long congrats. We're open for services congrats and you launch the product while it just gets into a little bit of the detail So I mentioned that I'm you also ran the launch of the Athenian Project which was One of the most important crypto projects to launch This decade next to Bitcoin and And I also was kind of familiar with you a little bit before that and really appreciated the way that you were translating. All of these sort of crypto. You know Programming kind of Esoterica into language and concepts that there were pretty understandable for for the you know fairly well educated layperson So so I think pretty critical in getting a theory out there in no small part because of the way you're translating for the for the Super Geeks to the kind of regular people thank you. Yeah I mean I certainly tried to make this stuff accessible to people Because I mean it's very It is very very technical stuff right. Yes blockchain's our house complicated as we know how to make technology and it's very very hard for people to relate to like what it needs to them personally. It's easy enough to think about it in the abstract but when we get to the all important questions like so. How does this affect my life? It's pretty hard to see like over horizon even in the from ably up until maybe the launch of the iphone in two thousand. Ten people didn't really understand that the Internet was going to become pervasive forcing their lives. So here we were with our kind of like. Hey we got the single the internet and we were trying to talk about. What is it going to look like in ten years when it's fully mature when it's fully accessible when all the difficult user interface work is done and all the rest and for the to work you have to get the communication down from the obstruct ruin to the particular? The personal man. I'm glad you think that was useful successful because it was it was no easy to do and it was included that we were getting it right at the time Yeah I. In retrospect it seems like a pretty good damn job on the launch. I'll thank you. Yeah yeah absolutely and you know before that you also designed interesting. Project called the heck seared which is kind of low cost housing solution that I heard about it from burning man but of course. That's not what you designed it for us. I understand this is really more a response to this sort of growing refugee crisis that that we see a lot of different countries And it's a low cost housing solution which is pretty pretty interesting. Yeah so invented the Heckscher. Two thousand two and you know conceive that it was gonNA take thirty years to get from having invented it to large well. You know widespread global deployed capacity for handling knowing what I expected at the time to be three hundred billion climate refugees. You know I've worked pretty hard on climate from a variety of angles but the main thrust is humanitarian mitigation. So kind of everything that I'm doing in my life is driving toward an underlying goal. All you know. Get THE AD deployable capacity to build temporary cities permanent cities to absorb the hundreds of millions of people that we expect to be displaced by climate. Change really none of the humanitarian agencies. Rethinking of that CAN SCALE UNCERTAINLY. None of them have the capability to make thirty or plums. So I've really been you know kind of Alo- knocks or in that space with the clear vision of from two thousand to everything in my life has pointed getting shelter for three hundred million people in thirty years and we're now eighteen years into the. I think that we are five years behind schedule but only five years behind schedule. So that's a project that you continue to to work on. So the hosing is not enough right. You need housing. You need critical infrastructure for water and sanitation. I put a good number years. Work into 'em you need digital identity because otherwise how are we gonNA pass for those people? So I've done a bunch working digital identity at you. Need access alarmed? And I'm brew beginning at dug into access to launch us by current area focus at an annual physical asset tracking because these are going to be very very austere environments so. We need extremely efficient disposition. Physical offer an. That's a long a large chunk. Hope to get done with material. Okay so material fits into this larger vision. It sounds like in a way like you've been driven by vision and I don't know if you'll appreciate or hate this comparison but it reminds me a little of Elon. Musk those kind of having this sort of clear vision of why he's getting into you know to business soon and that being sort of the driving force behind you know the different projects he engages. I hear something similar in what you're doing. Is that an accurate way to put it. I mean the differences Elon. Musk truly successful right. Like he's actually super getting this stuff done. I made a bunch of bad. Decisions vary are wheeling in those processes of helped me buckle on. It's only having seen anyone musk's worked example. That's a load of course correct like I would not be. Ceo of the company. If I hadn't seen Elon Musk make that work. So it was kind of like I spent time trying to avoid capitalism and work in the open source world to solve these problems and a long time to give up on an approach interesting to see the cure for capitalism economy more capitalism and at this point nothing else works toll because everything else is basically eroded so at that point. The only thing that you're left with his Eddie possibility of jury capitalism's more. Capitalism has run a company but a lot of thought was a very conscious course corrections. Like look you know everything I wanted to this. The results are really not nearly as good as I hoped. Hence the five year delay. Okay we've taken over burning non but you know. The charities are still totally resistant to the actor So there was definitely sense having stop and think and set back but okay. I'm doing this wrong. He got it right wrong. I'm GonNa do this his way now. Here we are. You know. There's something you you shared on twitter recently under an I'll just mention your at leashless folks that want to check you out night. I I really enjoy your tweets You're you're talking about for you. You came around. This issue came to the realization that it was really the industrial revolution. That's that's sort of the underlying problem not capitalism per se of curious if you could save a little bit about that because that had me released start to think differently about about the whole kind of broader Kind of economic issues at play here and I've been sort of in a I don't know if you'd call it an anti-capitalist or just you know becoming disillusioned with capitalism and wondering are there viable alternatives. So that was an interesting thing to hear you say so. Lots of people trying to alternatives to capitalism for organizing industrialization. You know we've seen communism we've seen socialism. We've seen various varieties of capitalism. We've seen several phases of capitalism. But y'all still fundamentally houses problem which is at its extractive at one ended polluting on the other. Yes and the extractive. Polluting nature is industrialization and it seems to be. It does matter how you organize. Industrialization with currently available technologies. All Forms of industrialization are extracted at one end. Putin on the up so you just you know it's like if you just don't have enough food. It doesn't matter very much how you'll portion food that are worse ways of doing it but even if you apportion the food perfectly will still have people hungry so I feel like kind of industrial. Capitalism is like it might be a sub optimal way of organizing industrialization but there is even if all industrialization with technologies optimally organized. It's still gonNa suck so got you thought point you either have to question industrialization in Oscar the we could go back to the laund- on the short answer is no on. Why would you want to or we have to push forward and we have to fix the extractive aspect of capitalism but closing manufacturing running clean thoughts still going to leave you with a bunch of social problems caused by capitalism but social problems could be fixed with social change an engineering problems Ecology unmerciful tool of capitalism is engineering. Limits don't social limits. We get very confused about this.

Twitter CEO Elon Musk Google Musk Elon Blockchain Putin ALO Eddie
R/x for Healthcare: Better UX Through Measurement and Deeper Engagement with Jay Erickson, Chief Innovation Officer at Modus

Outcomes Rocket

06:44 min | 3 months ago

R/x for Healthcare: Better UX Through Measurement and Deeper Engagement with Jay Erickson, Chief Innovation Officer at Modus

"Just got back from Argentina year over there Yeah that's right. We have an office down there and I was doing some work down there and Yet we just moved back last week. Interesting time to move back of course to be traveling around but love Argentina. Wow well welcome back to the States. And you are also very focused on the digital aspects within healthcare so tell us what inspires your work in the healthcare vertical In the core of my inspiration is a very personal so seven years ago. I was diagnosed with advanced metastatic to sicker cancer. I spent about a year and treatment at Sloan. Kettering forty five days in patient. Three months of Chemo for big surgery. So I was sort of a professional patient for a year and I learned law things. I'm six years. No evidence of disease now so I feel very much. Thank you thank you and as you can imagine I learned a lot of things and a lot of different levels but one thing I I learned in observed in that role was just in my opinion. How poorly a digital was being deployed in space for patients and for clinicians and this is not a knock on Sloan. They're amazing they saved my life. But it's something that's across the industry. As as soon as I came back and so before that I was the chief operating officer is really just focusing on running the business and when I came back I said this is something I really want to dive back into. Working more directly with clients focusing on as a problem to be solved doing what I can to put my shoulder to the wheel of making better more effective experiences for patients and for clinician. So that's my My touchstone of the passion that I bring to it. Well I think it's A powerful story Jay and I appreciate sharing that and congratulate you for for beating cancer and so great that you have taken this upon yourself. Having been there done that as a patient better and more efficient are two things that we could definitely get from from digital technologies. Tell us a little bit more about how you guys are. Adding value to the ecosystem through digital so our focus is really on creating experiences that are engaging in effective and this mostly for patients but also for clinicians and sometimes caregivers and bringing best practices to the industry that hasn't really been woven into the to the way that the digital products have been built outside. The industry and healthcare has has been data centric and rightfully so right. The legislation was passed. You know twenty plus years ago saying you need to get everything into the data and and that's been journey and now that we have all the data in we're starting to figure out ways to unlock the data and share the data and do more with the data. We need to stop being so data centric and start being more human centric and understanding that people are complex and their situations are often very unique and we need to build experiences that meet them where they are and make things easy for them and drives towards the outcomes that we want for them. So that's a long answer and I can be unpacked. Non Thought of different ways but how we sort of more tactically are coming into his kind of doing really running more design thinking processes That haven't been lacking so picking up on sort of clinical insight or a market research research site in farm industry for instance and building on that doing ethnographic research actually talking to patients in really understanding their sort of holistic view. Their Longitudinal journey that might touch a bunch of different things. A bunch of different providers a bunch of different mediums a bunch of different co morbidity or products understanding those longitudinal journeys doing rapid prototyping and. Co Design and collaboration ways. And then putting those back for early prototype validation before anything gets actually develop so that process of design thinking is something that has been lacking in the industry and has led to a lot of digital experiences that are either painful or hard to navigate or create unnecessary cognitive. Load especially in the case of clinicians. It's interesting you know. And I'm glad you mentioned clinicians as well because bad experience exists on on the patient side and on the clinician side. As well and to your point there's a lot that's going on that's great but there's an opportunity to do so much better and saw I'd love to hear from. Uja On on what your team has done. That's made either outcomes better or business models better within healthcare. Yeah so I think it's. It's applying that process that I described by lake. You know it's all in. The end is about outcomes right so you really are trying to make better Clinton experiences. They can spend more time to medicine less time on data entry or so. They're less burnt out. Say let's make less mistakes and in the patient case you're trying to keep them engaged. You're trying to get data to flow and to have the outcome of their experience in their disease journey or or or health journey. Have a better outcome. So it's not just about great experiences to create great experiences. I WanNa make that clear to but specifically applying those cases. I mean. We've done everything from working with. Pharmaceutical companies to develop a digital prototypes around using stress managed using behavioral change techniques around social support for stress management or behavioral scientists at pharmaceutical companies or working with healthcare providers to provide better pathways for patients to navigate their journeys. So it's a lot of simple stuff and it can be starting with schedule. An appointment and navigating to the in helping with with with transport access to the site of care. Just that doesn't require blockchain or a I or anything fancy but doing that in a way that is easy in as easy as Uber or another experience that we're used to in our normal life bringing that level of ease and utility to those experience that's table stakes right and then it's going from. They're moving more into actual medicine side of things and we do a lot of stuff around adherence and getting people know we know that that forty percent of outcomes is driven by behavior. And there's really nothing better at a scalable in evaluating level to help with behavior change them and digital devices mean there's a there's a shadow side to that too also right. Mike. We're all addicted to these things. But that same power can be used to drive behavior change whether it's adherence to medication or physical therapy or just a care plan so creating experiences for patients that help them with that. So that's we start to get into the closer to the medical side of things so that's some of the ways that we are bringing our skills that we've owned also in other industries like you've working in hospitality and retail and e commerce and all these other industries that have more are more mature digitally especially from human centric perspective bringing all those practices and tools to the space

Sloan Argentina Chemo Chief Operating Officer Kettering JAY Co Design Mike Clinton
Interview with Oki Mek, Special Advisor, HHS

AI Today Podcast: Artificial Intelligence Insights, Experts, and Opinion

08:10 min | 3 months ago

Interview with Oki Mek, Special Advisor, HHS

"Hello and welcome to the AI. Today podcast I'm your host Kathleen Walsh and I'm your host Schmeltzer. Our guest today is okay. Mack who is the senior advisor to the chief information officer at the US Department of Health and Human Services? Hhs So okay thank you so much for joining us on Ai Today. Thank you for having caffeine wrong. Yeah thank you so much for joining us. You'd like to start by having you introduce yourself to our listeners. And tell them a little bit about your background and your current role at HHS. I am a. I am the senior adviser to Sasebo. And I'm also the technical integration. Lead but edgy reimagined but my background is really cybersecurity but my principal around cybersecurity. That just knowing cyber alone is not enough. You really need to know and understand the business I've been with. Hr FINANCE BUDGET GRANTS ACQUISITIONS. I was leaving sponsored to help onboard new employees for personnel security and badges and laptops. So I find that to be very critical and crucial in terms of modern nine station in the government just knowing to three sixty just understanding what you know what budget stream is coming through. What is the budget calendar Audi acquisition services and products and even just getting people on board with badges an laptop? Just getting that three sixty view and been very critical in terms of you know modernizing trying to innovate in trying to change the landscape Embracing Emerging Tech and dealing with big data paradigm shifts excellent. Yeah it's definitely the government's been very interesting. Adopter not just technology in general but especially with artificial intelligence. Because you know is is a transformative technology. Just like You know many of the other big transformative waves in the Internet and mobile and big data and the cloud and now five G. and then blockchain so all of these technology transformative right. They had changed a whole lot of things or multi. System the multidisciplinary and so obviously there are many ways that we see being applied to government agencies organizations. And we've been very impressed. One of the things that been talking about here a lot today is sort of the many ways in which is being adopted. Not only an industry as a whole but especially in government very impressive actually some of these ways that hopefully it's making the government more responsive more efficient more effective more. Give it more visibility into things. So can you tell us some of the ways that? Hhs is currently adopting AI and various solutions. And maybe how those ways are unique to. Hhs or perhaps similar to what other of different governmental agencies are doing in this space so we start of area to the CIO. And I started a program like celery leveraging ai machine learning and blockchain. It was the first watching network that had been authorized to operate in the federal government but in terms of a I think we are using similar to agency mainly we use it to clean and format the data and as you know you deal with a lot of data set the day. I need data. The biggest thing is cleaning the data. Ninety five I believe ninety percent of it is cleaning the data. People WanNa do they WANNA do machine learning they WANNA do. But they don't focus on they're gonna up a root of baking because Clinton. The data is the biggest component of that process. So we use a machine learning to basically normalize the data from different data sets using supervised and unsupervised learning to normalize the data. And then we also get into linear regression as well in terms of predictive analysis. One of the main thing that we'd do accelerate is looking at prices paid and just as so large we do about twenty five billion in spending on products and services just minding data and cleaning the data at it was a big call just to look at. Why are we buying things that different prices and a good example is? I'm just throwing the example while we buy that. Dobie pro at cms for aided aqua- eighty dollars per license and buying that CDC thirty dapper night or licensed an opportunity to mind data to come to the table to be able to negotiate a different price. You can't come to table to negotiate without having that insight so data claiming and looking at data mining and looking at predictive analysis the three main usage for a for us. That's great you know Melinda. We produced a report last year. And then we did a follow up report this year Dataprep prep and data labeling and I think that a lot of people underestimate how long it's going to take to actually get their data into a usable state so it's great that you pointed that out because I think that people underestimate the time and the difficulty that sometimes it can be actually get data in a usable state. Data's the heart of AI. So you need that. For these systems to learn as a government agency adoption of new technologies such as artificial intelligence can bring its own unique set of challenges that sometimes the private sector doesn't always run into. These can be issues around privacy data usage. What can and can't be used where it can be stored so can you tell us some of the challenges you've seen with Ai. Adoption in your agency and how you're overcoming them by the biggest mistake that people do is looking at the technology before they look at the business and the mission of agency. I always say that does no such thing at it. Project and the business project with it components. You have to start with the business. And what are you trying to saw? Most of these challenges that the EPA my experience I've been in a government close to twenty years half awaiting contractor in private industry and also have in federal government. The challenge is not the technology challenges to culture is leaning chain change management and. I don't think we do not a strategic planning. Just because we have one hundred idea doesn't mean we pursued ideas. We need to look at you know strategic planning comes into play. You may have one hundred ideas but you should only pursue one idea through strategic. Planning you know. The first thing is really feasibility studies. I didn't even feasible to at any regression issue. Anani downstream impact. Accountability is big. I think in terms of trying to modernize. Can you prove a concept just because you have this idea? People might think is a crazy idea but if you do it at a tangible way that you could prove that idea is feasible and it's scalable because you wanNA start small and scale that big as well. Sustainability is huge as well just because the project is a success. Doesn't mean that sustainable as your culture your agency your privacy mature enough to take on this new shining toy you know this new technology but the important part is marketability I we. I can't overemphasize that did not marketability is people. Don't think that the government market but you have to market you ideas. You have to win. The hearts and minds of the workforce the people that They coders you have to be able to market in different ways to senior leadership to middle managers workforce. I think culture is the biggest obstacle. But I think doing a thorough strategic planning analysis and putting emphasis on marketability analysis is key and the biggest part of marketability is human design is really engaging the workforce I'll model in terms of accelerated that. We're not building the solution. We are allowing the workforce to go to solution getting them engaged yet here at thoughts and pain point incorporating agile depth. Bob You know building something. Every two weeks and bring him back to them is a Saab issue and we cycled out every two or three weeks and that really is the key of getting people to lean in and to win the heart and mind of people.

AI HHS Caffeine Bob You Kathleen Walsh Audi Senior Adviser Mack Schmeltzer Saab Senior Advisor Principal Sasebo Chief Information Officer Clinton
"blockchain" Discussed on The Internet of Things (IoT) Show with Bruce Sinclai

The Internet of Things (IoT) Show with Bruce Sinclai

02:59 min | 5 months ago

"blockchain" Discussed on The Internet of Things (IoT) Show with Bruce Sinclai

"But if you're prepared to provide this to other organizations and be rewarded for that or even if as an individual you want to contribute data from a weather station in your garden or something like that so you might be asking well apart from the cryptocurrency that's used. The reward is the blockchain use case here. And it's simply as trust because The whole point of not is that it's based on this data which is machines communication with machines and San perspectively using that data to React to the surroundings or whatever but you have to be able to trust that data and because own blockchain's unique data structure as a a centralized into the Is distributed over many places in which is a pens only and cryptographic linked right back to the beginning of time. It means that It has this Consensus mechanism that makes the data somehow more reliable than data that is just provided by central. So take for example A bit of talented from constables. Within stay to working in the same way I often use the example of the intelligent oil pipeline So people talk about the convergence of blockchain. It is something which in future is going to be able to my screen line and lower costs in a range of industries. But at the moment for me you have analysts. Working in the commodities sector crunchy who using obviously powerful algorithms to crunch through and make judgments on the type of political situations weather patterns again to influence demand for oil somewhere in the world and then oil is distributed to different places accordingly like for example if North. America is forecast to have a very cold winter. More I'll get center so this concept of the M smart oil pipeline. You could be an individual with a with your own weather station. Providing data tha this oil pipeline as part of a huge network off Tens of thousands of people of the world who are being rewarded in tiny increments of currency to provide this data which can then be aggregated and the oil pipeline can then itself autonomous. Route the supply of oil to different areas depending on different conditions. Same transport you could have A freeway The.

blockchain America San perspectively
"blockchain" Discussed on Inquiring Minds

Inquiring Minds

11:41 min | 8 months ago

"blockchain" Discussed on Inquiring Minds

"But being talks change with others elsewhere so that you and I could do a deal based on liquidity opinion from somebody else and it's still have this atomic arrangement to be protected against each other. Oldest office heavy cryptography. But it's it's really really important because you start have to see how when we need all these things together we can start to imagine a world which as we token is assets which is something that is common conversation is thrown around. A real estate can be taken is or riots to receivables could be taken is all sorts of things whether they tangible tangible token is there they're now in digital form sincere additional form they can have software attempts which can allow them to speak to each other in lock into these kind of wrenches with neither nobody can control him a whole new ways moving value around the world that doesn't require the constant invention of compliance offices in the oldest intermediaries that we just me but really pose impose massive friction. Potentially so I want to remind our listeners. That Michael Casey and Pelvic book the Truth Machine of Blockchain and the future of everything is now available on paperback. I WanNa talk a little bit about the way in which blockchain chain technology might actually be able to help the least privileged in our world. which is something that you talk about in your chapter blockchain for good and as ah I recently got my real California which I think is probably comes with some kind of chip that probably contains all kinds of data that I don't want people to have and then you hear about Estonia where like everything is digitized? And tell us a little bit about the ways in which this kind of technology might help people who are in developing nations and you know or some of the risks of having so much information digital information available now in these these kinds of ID's right. Well it sounds like you took your favorite specifically to the problem of identity which is a really interesting one. It's a really complex as well because what goes into into identity or some would say like attribute management because identity implies very accomplished definition of WHO I am. We use it as a proxy for getting for proving access to things in the world. That identity is critical if you're gonNA get online or get a utility contractor when I've been a bank account whatever and now this is conversation around hanging second. We don't WanNa let data out there. What about what if we just shit passer out our attributes rather than how full fire hose of information about new crises so that that's pissed terminology Management business identity. There's all these really complex impedance though have blockchain plays that is one. Tom went potential. Piece of the puzzle is not everyone can do it but the idea is like I who I am at least in terms of what matters from a transactional perspective. Right giving me axons is really a function function of a compendium of data about me things I in so much my travels around the Internet expenditures. My credit spills always those things My transaction relationships with other people reputable that all goes into account proves that I'm a lot in in fact this algorithm measures have been shown to be minute spects final accurate than these very antiquated protest credit schools So the idea is that accumulate stuff. That's one big piece of the digital. That's my digital footprint But Anita Control. But I don't want to have them out there and had viable. So uh how would I keep them under my own control in some sort of Paul that nobody could touch but then that's a very useful because because I need to actually share that data I WANNA go to access to things but if I do that exciting I just opened them into my data rooms here. John Fish around and find out about WHO Avenue Kevin end up defeated the purpose. Giving you access to everything right so what we're talking about. Doing what people are doing is finding ways to prove you. Do you have access to information is information. It might be forbidding certain way this Prince which is very interesting. That I have that I have that access to it. And that's where the buckhorn comes in at least under the some of the designs coming up this notion that I proved that I am. I own control that private key. The one thing that is is proven by is blockchain structure It's not that you put put data on the blockchain blockchain attracted completely transparent system. So I don't want eight or up there. What I want is the record of transactions of me using key either improve controller because that he is the thing that I've been able to tap that data pool to share with you so I can say hey you can I improve this? This is this is I. AM The person control this data basically and therefore as a possible to piecemeal way you can and have proved that I have control difference. Make this holiday many of the factors that go. Who's going to test? The data has without revenue structure. Also things it's not on his Ethan but there's a lot of releasing work being done on it in some respects the holy ground. We can get that in. Yes people in the developing world to bring it back to that question who do not have access to state ideas reliable worth trusted enough to the main stand be able to use their mobile fine. I'm actively recruited way that unless proved that they're reliable enough person to Him until we resolve these problems in in that way it can also directions people talking about putting by metrics on there so that becomes Hall is it's complicated. Another doesn't the dancer but certainly I think has one element of the solution to a very complex. Problem is a whole lot of other areas. I think that's watching can be valuable for Necessarily involve this type of identity. Question like acid registries for example. I'm very interested in how we might. In fact we have the project running out of. MIT that Is trying to reduce the cost of raising capital for building migrants. It applies. That wouldn't otherwise have away for me to prove the reliability of that asset unveiled sees it as an investor for added a Now the the youth waste use blockchain and token is transfers of value in access to electricity as a way to automatically control also benedetto significantly the Tet investors. Who would otherwise have protection and Drive down significantly the cost of access to finance itself itself so it's creating alternative collateral systems and all the things that we take for granted in how we rise in raise money in the traditional credit. Will maybe we could find. You know remote ways to do that with this technology and putting the entire title insurance and business out of business absolutely talk. That's a great example right because as a permanent regular women audible trial that exists exists. Right there instantaneously on the train. So if you have your property title that is just their insurance talks. SORTA order so in just a couple minutes we have left. What do you think is kind of the most profound way that blocked blockchain arts technology or as subsidiaries two years as you've described them is going to change sort of how we behave as humans? I think it's GonNa Breakdown Chew Sion's the I think the I I think organizational structures are going to change right now we have very hierarchical models company. Looks at with a visit. What government? It looks like without money. WHO CHOSE MONEY? All of that could get flatter. Could get more horizontal. This not necessarily it within. But it's just the way things could go because You know it's not that I will rely on as does solutions. Solutions Get basically disintermediated by decentralize transmit about-turn is that. I don't need that trust in that system and so food ultimately I think I always phrase it this way. I don't I don't WanNa come across. It's just a it's Gonna fix everything time guy that I think the framework of thinking about decentralized systems that blockchain allows us to imagine is really where we have to go with a relaxed taught because we have an incredibly decentralized already system out global capital moves around the world in seconds seconds. And we don't know who's moving we have. The Internet is a At the architecture level at the data exchange level is is decentralized at the Value Exchange Very centralized and we're now learning that the combination of those shoes by Rick Reed. It's capitalism. It's The scariest book you'll arranges. We should read it with stiff drinking hand. But we need to fix this problem right because surveillance. Capitalism is about control of human beings and losing free will because the intermediaries that have position themselves as the Keep is about data exchanges are essentially. I will determine that back upon. What's through as this behavior? Modification is is really got the way the system works so we need to build something else that allows us to maintain the will that we've created whether we like it or not this That will exchange information with each other but not have to rely on these guys so that in the end drives US woods flatter structure. I think new pal vices emerged in the middle of it that we think about differently the way we organize society that that's that's really the most powerful as well on that note. Thank you very much for being on enquiring minds. Michael Casey So I hope you found that enlightening and that. You're a little bit more informed about where to put your money whether it's Bitcoin or otherwise that's it for another episode. Thanks for listening and if you WANNA hear more. Don't forget to subscribe if you'd like to get an ad. Free version of the show. Consider supporting us at Patriot dot com slash inquiring minds. We don't take bitcoin yet. But maybe in the near future I want to especially thank David. Noel Harring Chang Shawn Johnson Jordan Miller. Kyle Hala Michael Eric Clark. Yushi Lynn Clark Lindgren. Joel Stephan Meyer a wild and Charles Boyle enquiring minds is produced by Adam Isaac. I'm your host Indre Biscottis. See you soon yeah..

Michael Casey blockchain blockchain Blockchain California Kyle Hala Michael Eric Clark blockchain Estonia Anita Control Lynn Clark Lindgren Noel Harring Chang Shawn Johns Indre Biscottis Tom Patriot dot John Fish Paul Ethan
"blockchain" Discussed on Let's Talk Bitcoin!

Let's Talk Bitcoin!

02:57 min | 9 months ago

"blockchain" Discussed on Let's Talk Bitcoin!

"Of those with power will never let people even. I'm doing the right thing. have two things. And that's privacy which we all kind of understand but the attack that bitcoin gives and that blockchain's provide that sort of passive live sub assumption that because we're dated to the Internet we just presuppose but don't even realize how radical it is. There isn't even a mechanism at the system level. Distinguishing distinguishing where transaction is occurring geographically from one location to the other and I think nothing freaks out power more than the inability to not even control. What's happening where it's happening but even recognize where it's occurring and so it's not just the privacy aspects of public public blockchain's that are what means they'll never approve something like a Libro but more specifically libro was allowing international payments and it was sort of the two pronged longed approach of trying to pretend to be like the coin that I think freak them out? There's never an actor in power that will let you do what you want without them knowing about it and then let you go somewhere else and do something in Bitcoin. Attack both of those things at the same time and it's an inherent attribute of even the proof of stake systems and all these other things that we consider public blockchain's and it's an affront to power and it's why if you have those characteristics you'd never get approval from. Yeah that's a great point Johnson. This goes back to feudalism. Maybe even further back from that but those in power always WanNa have like some geographical area. Where they they say okay? This is my dominion. I control everything that goes on this land and and if you're inside my borders it's like your parents like if you're under my roof you're gonNA live by my rules on a bigger scale that's feudalism and then it's nation states and and other types of governments that extend their power even further than that and then if you don't like it you can leave but as soon as bitcoin allows you to move your money out of the country are like wait. That's illegal yet no. You can't leave to do that. Because border defined jurisdictions jurisdictions define the extent of nation states power and and if you create a system that is born lists it is transnational which means it's transcends the jurisdiction and control and power of nation states and the essence of the Internet in the essence of the Internet of money in the essence of Bitcoin and open public blockchain's is that ability to be borderless. It doesn't mean being that it's simply crosses borders may means that it doesn't even see quarters as you said Jonathan and that is terrifying to a state that defines everything based on geographical graphical jurisdiction and every time as a nomad I travel or try to interact with the state. I'm struck by the fact that everything is anchored on geography and and it's very difficult to answer her simple questions. Like where do you live. What is your address? Yes but which state is your company in which state data's.

blockchain Johnson Jonathan
"blockchain" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

03:38 min | 1 year ago

"blockchain" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Everything yourself, and that takes a very long time to make a success. You'll well-supported blockchain with all the stuff that goes around it block explorers and telemetry services. And you is it really does take a very long time Olov f it took it to the old stable insecure. And so what would doing is saying, well, let's try and find a middle ground with substrate. Let's say well, you can build your own chain. If you won't give you this little standard components, all PC's databases, all that sort of thing. And you just have to fill out the blacks, the at the state transition function the bit that sort of processes the transactions decides what to do, but will also provide you with a bunch of modules. So that you can build it from a bunch of basically sort of components that you can put together, and this is the development platform. But I won't when I'm building polkadot. Right. Well, I I'm going to build a develop thoughtful that I won't and then I'm gonna build polkadot top of it. So I figured well may as well, you know, make it free and give out everyone else goes you parents. He's pretty show about open-source in across all your projects, polkadot and substrate. And the of client you use web. Simply how web Shipley useful to blockchain development one of the questions. I go asked back in two thousand fourteen when I was first sort of doing a theory meets thing. It was actually the first proper theory meets by spoke out. It was it was in Silicon Valley guy asked me at the end of the media. What happens what what about when you will talk? Right. The blockchain at the time. I thought well people will just upgrade the software and eventually it will fall. And he said, well, it's not going to be pretty hard to organize. What some people don't want to rate. What if some people don't know forget and kind of dismissed it at the time. But it turns out that it's actually a pretty important point Blockchain's on upgradeable in these days pretty much any consumer product that can possibly upgrade does upgrade. I mean, I've got a pair of headphones on they upgraded the day. I got like an addition of active noise. Is like, wow. These went active noise cancellation headphones. But now, they upgrading is is a fact of modern technological life. It's the idea that you release an MVP I and you add features to it as its product life cycle goes on this pretty important in. It's it's what you need to do to be competitive and blockchain couldn't really do that until we figured out how to get a platform neutral language that encoded the bits of the blockchain that we thought were most important to upgrade. And that's what wipe assembly does. So episode Lee is basically our language by which we define how a blockchain should what we define how it should process transactions. How should process blocks on which consensus algorithm? It should use on using. What this we can? Then just roll out a new rub assembly blog, which is completely platform neutral. It's it's nicely designed. So it's actually tonight Sibal consider compile trends compile it onto native instruction set for relatively. Some decent performance on allows us basically to roll out upgrades on the China. The nice thing is because the upgrades determined by unchain mechanisms we can use all sorts of interesting on cryptographic algorithms in order to the tournament when an upgrade should happen. And so we can do things like implement also interesting governance and potentially fruit Akhi algorithms full that and it also has it has memory constraints to rather you can you can control the memory on it. Unlike for example, Java script right yet..

Blockchain Shipley China MVP Sibal Lee
"blockchain" Discussed on The Tech Blog Writer Podcast - Inspired Tech Startup Stories

The Tech Blog Writer Podcast - Inspired Tech Startup Stories

04:34 min | 1 year ago

"blockchain" Discussed on The Tech Blog Writer Podcast - Inspired Tech Startup Stories

"It's a potentially near infinite numbers will as many nodes as want to hold the information can and as opposed to it being immutable simply because it's written down in to several places. It's immutable because its cryptographic we secured and again mirrored on all these different nodes. And all that does is take the trust that was injected by the very first receipt in the western world. And again, just massively amplifies that it's kinda like the transition from the first spark of gunpowder to our modern bombs. You know, it's the same basic idea combustion in that case, but it's simply been magnified over the decades in really centuries massively. And so in its modern manifestation becomes almost revolutionary even though it's basic functionality something that's been around for hundreds of years. So how'd you get involved with Q? Oh, how did you end up? So like, many people, you know, I had heard of blockchain and crypto currency before you know, the big hand of twenty sixteen twenty seventeen explosion. But it had not always been in positive terms. I remember one of the first things I heard about cryptocurrency was around the silk road FBI court case, and you know, talking about how is involved cryptocurrency that has was involved, you know, the the distribution of illegal drugs and all these negative things. But then in two thousand fifteen later in the year, you know, a friend of mine started really talking to me a lot about it in twenty sixteen. I ended up going through a bit of a career change myself and had some free time on my hands and start educating myself, and then in early twenty seventeen is when I kinda like Baden, quite literally and started, you know, trying to figure it out in the more hands on way. And then. In later, twenty seventeen. I ended up applying my old skill sets of marketing business strategy that kind of thing to this new technology that I was really interested in Acura L, I was a community member they in their slack because I was sort of the summer of slack in twenty seventeen and the belt report with some of the developers and founders they ended up having a vacancy or they needed. Somebody initially just to handle marketing and then to handle a bit more than that as time went on. And I saw through my hat in the ring and the rest is history. I asked me to a roof key road for bitcoin in the will to cryptocurrencies sweep rather than talk about that. I wonder if you could share with listeners your opinion on quantum computing, and that threat he's going to bring to bitcoin blockchain technology and also how blockchain pilot coons he's also comes to security threat from hackers and the agents alva-. Yeah. So the the idea of a double sided coin or, you know. Double sided sword, or whatever something that gives and takes is very useful concept and blockchain because it had pies in many different ways. One of the main ways in this, particular instance, is the decentralized nature of this technology. So we all love the decentralized nature of blockchain technology because it enables the end user the person who's actually holding their of their private key. Massively gives a massive independence, the massive amounts of control. Unfortunately, it also leaves them kind of on an island security-wise, you know, as much as big banks charge high fees and how exert a lot of control and can manipulate people's accounts without they're you know, knowledge or consent. They also act as a as a mediator and that gives and takes in its own way. But in blockchain if somebody accesses, your private key takes your funds, there's very little recourse because there's no way to reverse that transaction was also one of the best things about blockchain. But from a network wide secure. Standpoint upgrading security infrastructure in blockchain is incredibly complicated compared to upgrading security infrastructure in a centralized system. You know, if Google wants to upgrade, their g mail security infrastructure, I as g mail user am not required in that process. They don't need by knowledge. They don't need my participation. They do not need my consent. If bitcoin just use the most the most well known example, though, this also plies to like pretty much any other crypto currency wanted to change its signature scheme. It would need the private keys of every single wallet. On the network will nobody knows the private keys of every single walled on the network. And that's one of the things we love about bitcoin..

blockchain FBI Acura Baden Google bitcoin alva
"blockchain" Discussed on The Cryptoverse

The Cryptoverse

04:30 min | 2 years ago

"blockchain" Discussed on The Cryptoverse

"An attempt to use the brand name to gain invest a trust when the project has nothing to do with them. I have all these ova very complicated. So his the court document which you can access if you want to read it. This is blockchain dot ISO, which is the pay medium project in his the right CO going on right now. And we all know blockchain dot com. As the Wally provide a that's been around forever. So this domain name, blockchain to Ohio was registered back in two thousand twelve according to this coin desk article. Now I'm a big fan of blockchain dot com. The wallet and the company. I think they've done a love for the bitcoin in the crypto ecosystem. However, I've never really agreed with them trading under the brand name, but look chain. I just don't think that's helpful asshole, especially now to new us is because then people like me have to explain the difference between blockchain technology and then this thing, blockchain, the website and the wallet. I just don't think that's helpful at all. So the people the new uses will help this web blockchain, this blockchain that that they're in blockchain blockchain steam book during, yes, plug Jane. And then they find this thing called blockchain, which is a wallet. I just don't think that's a good idea. It's not helpful in that particular things not helpful to anybody. So that to me was a strategic decision that they chose to make. They knew I believe they knew it would cause confusion, but they went ahead anyway because they knew the confusion would be to their benefit right now. There's nothing technically illegal about that is just that if you're trying to help the ecosystem, don't do stuff like that. Right. So they were so banking on. Their brand being conceived with blockchain, the technology so that that would gain trust from Tam and all the hype around blockchain, the Kiewit, right? So slightly unethical to begin with. So now having traded under such a generic Tam, it means ultimately the now having to face the other side of that coin, when someone else jumps on their back and attempts the ride the blockchain wed. So if this company gets done, it Lhamo likely be to do with the visual branding and how it looks similar to the branding of blockchain dot com rather than the use of the Westbrook Birlik chain, which is so generic, no one could possibly take ownership of it, right? We can actually look at the two logos. I don't think they looked at similar a coin desk of done a good job of displaying them side by side in a similar size. But I honestly do not think they look similar. At overly, they have different logo type which is the symbol. They have a completely different fund blockchain dot com. His all up a case, the blockchain. The one is all low case. The blockchain to one has I o in the name. Blockchain does not just has the book capital letters I just think is sufficiently different that they, they can't be confused to be the same thing right? But however this is another goal case. So doesn't matter what I think is for the courts to decide on what they think based on the rule of law. Another interesting point is this inference apparently that blockchain to I o name was also of trademarked legally like back in two thousand seventeen. So legally they're allowed to use that in France and it wasn't contested apparently. So let me know what you think. How would you rule if you were the judge in this case? Do you think this is okay. The blockchain ISO owned. The domain name foot since two thousand twelve and now using it to host their. I see a website is that okay. What do you think to blockchain dot com? Using the name book Jane to bring to that company even though that's kind of a generic ten that confuses people. Let me not think too all that down in the comments Bill. But that's all I got for you today. So if you like this episode, go ahead and hit that like button. If you disliked it, you can hit the dislike. Please leave me a comment below based on things that are stoked about, and if you know already get subscribed, if you're already subscribed hit the bell. So you get notifications when released new videos. And if you want to follow me on the social networks, check out my website, cryptovest city dot com. Click on podcast and all social networks elicit death for other than that..

blockchain Blockchain blockchain blockchain Jane Wally Westbrook Birlik Tam France Ohio
"blockchain" Discussed on Innovation Rising, Presented by Healthbox

Innovation Rising, Presented by Healthbox

01:41 min | 2 years ago

"blockchain" Discussed on Innovation Rising, Presented by Healthbox

"Goes over the blockchain over just traditional ways ascended for action so the reason is of interest is really several the value drivers that are building that technology so one is immutable what ability means is i can't change data so once it's created on the blockchain as a block and as part of a chain that data would never be able to updated or remove your so for security purposes auditing purposes there are various use cases from a patient perspective especially if we look at something like a legal trying to help wrecker that might be of interest another thing we see a lot when walk chain that will working on is using a blockchain actually point two data so we're not proponents of using a blockchain to replicate something like an electronic health record for example or to actually build a population health auditory we don't think they're smarter use scaping all we do is we use cases where you can say yeah blockchain would be great the patie registry or a patient having potential control over access to their data by using a blockchain that is pointing to various data sources and the patient in the concept of a blockchain has control over that through a wallet mechanism that basically says i have a credential i'll give you access to the data on my own provide that consent to do that and the only way you're gonna get to that data nowhere to buy give you my key to do that so we've seen good use cases in that regard where patients have interest as well as collaborate clever type projects in blockchain.

blockchain
"blockchain" Discussed on Innovation Rising, Presented by Healthbox

Innovation Rising, Presented by Healthbox

01:36 min | 2 years ago

"blockchain" Discussed on Innovation Rising, Presented by Healthbox

"They're trying to solve these these very large graphic rental card of boxes rates they call them that they set up to do that that's a function of the currency market right health care we talk about blockchain's and what they're trying to do you're looking more at data being that currency and then when it comes to who touches that it's then the very nodes in the network working together and really being able to change a lot of how traditional healthcare bottles work where things can be more automated but the touching part of actually working the blockchain network is still going to be done by services system notes that may already be placed or maybe applications that you're designing to us as part of that blockchain network only about the blockchain itself and data flows an example that i've worked on as been with healthcare wearables and with iot devices yeah actually being interconnected directly into the boxing and they're just feeding data into that from various devices that might be in a hospital or from patients that are wearing a different devices no different than what you might see some other database technologies dirty out there the is in terms of understanding how a blockchain works and what the architecture framework is you just understand the api's and how to use that framework of able to build the network and then support that running on of civic blockchain design that you have so following up on that if if i'm a patient right and i have like an apple watch and i wanna send somewhere data back to my provider why's it important at that.

blockchain apple
"blockchain" Discussed on Unchained

Unchained

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"blockchain" Discussed on Unchained

"Ice without compromising its private keys the bottom line you'll sleep easier knowing that you're digital wealth is safe insecure visit keep key dot com to order yours today and use the code unchained ten for a limited time ten percent discount blockchain warehouse is an international blockchain accelerator offering a wide range of token sale advisory services to promising blockchain base ventures with access to heavyweight technology leaders the accelerator is heavily involved in crafting the blockchain technology token sale and regulatory landscape on may twenty fifth blockchain warehouse launch the first ever crypto shark tank a new series exhibiting blockchain warehouses review of candidate projects chaired by adrian guttridge ceo blockchain warehouse dot com this week's episode features mesmeh a decentralized media ecosystem offering digital collectibles to consumers for watching the content they already consuming enjoy find out more at www dot messmer dot tv that's emmy s m r dot tv or find all episodes at www dot crypto shark tank dot com hello everyone welcome to our panel blockchain versus the surveillance state my name's laura shin crypto journalist covering fructose as just that in blockchain technology and during the press conference proceeding this panel we had an impassioned discussion around whether there's a moral equivalency between imperfect democracies and dictatorships and as an american whose ancestors come from north korea i would definitely say that there is not a moral quincy however you will hear in this discussion that we do talk about the dangers in potentials within this technology to combat overreaches of both governments and corporations and i also wanted to echo gelinas sentiments earlier that i'm so honored to be speaking and exploring the ramifications of this technology.

north korea blockchain adrian guttridge ceo twenty fifth ten percent
"blockchain" Discussed on The Interchange

The Interchange

01:49 min | 2 years ago

"blockchain" Discussed on The Interchange

"In into be frank if we got through a conversation with my senior executive never mentioned blockchain and that's a win right we care about peer to peer we care about the customer blockchain as a means to that but in a deregulated service territory and a competitive retail space blockchain can potentially provide the opportunity for us to unlock access to our customers who are willing participants in a market for third party interaction in third party a gauge ment as think a lot of startup companies struggle with is access to data access to customers the utility wants to provide the ability for customers to easily give access to to their own information and i think blockchain provides the ledger that that has the the security of mutability in privacy measures that that would satisfy customer privacy needs how did come at first start talking about blockchain to begin with and and how did you get involved so the conversations around blockchain predated me i came in to comment and was directed towards our peer to peer work at our trains active energy work and what spin interesting around the peer to peer conversations is that most of the companies right now looking to the peer to peer insurance active side are blockchain companies so even internally when we talk about this it's sort of hard to differentiate peer to peer from blockchain because they're so intertwined so it was almost by happenstance starting with peer to peer starting with the customer and then being led to this technology that candidate bullet an and you didn't have a background and blockchain and they were like will you have your doctorate you're you're an intelligent person like go figure out blockchain.

senior executive blockchain frank
"blockchain" Discussed on The Interchange

The Interchange

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"blockchain" Discussed on The Interchange

"No i think the real question with that is how these players are all going to work together in the future because i think it's unlikely that we're going to see one blockchain to rule them all what you're going to see is this interoperability happen as blockchain's developed communication networks across each other and so you don't just have to inter operate with the legacy utility infrastructure that might exist like your d dr master durham's distributed energy resource management systems but also with the other blockchain that's on the system and that is something that is being worked on not within the energy space in particular but it's definitely happening that brings us to this big regulatory question and i guess it would be foolish to think that there would be one blockchain to rule them all but i can't help feel like the the interoperability problem could present some challenges because you're ultimately creating a patchwork system of all these platforms the kind of looks like the grid today with that said we do have you know operability standards for power electronics and inverted for example that are servicing the grid so do you see rules eventually coming together that create standards for these platforms i mean it's still it's still like not so far off in the future that no one's really grappled with it but i'm hearing more chatter about that potential interoperability issue yeah so i think standards will form i think if you think of how the internet came about when the internet first started we had a lot of intra nets people really didn't trust how the internet share data they're very skeptical of it and.

blockchain durham
"blockchain" Discussed on The Interchange

The Interchange

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"blockchain" Discussed on The Interchange

"How do you feel about peer to peer trading after this conversation as frustrated as usual because i think it actually signals where things are going but i also i i have a little bit of a problem that peer to peer as an application needs to think about its value to the grid because i think if peer to peer is a feature of new local or retail energy providers their cost of operation should be determined by the utility who is determining that cost by you know the the stresses or you know the value that that those operators put on the grid so if it's just baked in to these new energy providers cost of operation they're gonna try and make that as low as possible meaning they'll create incentives for these dr's to be as beneficial to the network as possible it's a feature of a new kind of utility that can be utilized when you're the in a in a world where dr's can provide a lot of value to the grid well i know we didn't come to folk conclusion here but i feel like we've gotten a little bit closer to peer to peer trading enabled by blockchain might look like thanks for the sober discussion scott thanks always a pleasure you know can i just say that i i've heard people talk about taking a sober approach to block chain of bunch of times but at the same time i've found that the best conversations that i've had about blockchain have not been sober so could i just suggest that gtm is looking at blockchain in a rational but perhaps not always sober context well i guess this one's on me i'll i'll buy you a beer with a bitcoin or something that's an expensive ass beer my friend.

blockchain
"blockchain" Discussed on Epicenter Bitcoin

Epicenter Bitcoin

02:06 min | 2 years ago

"blockchain" Discussed on Epicenter Bitcoin

"That might on the face of itself very important problems but just can't seem to move with the change well don come in here's my comment on change managed general people will do what they get incented too often the problem with change management is that you're introducing a new workflow your traducing new technology that fundamentally conflicts with the existing incentive structure and i've seen time and time again and why i think blockchain is somewhat unique changed management does present a fundamental issue when we talk about some of the disruptive applications of blockchain i can't sell to an enterprise technology that's going to fundamentally disrupt their core revenue generation engine it just makes no sense to them on the flip side though blockchain is really compelling because block chains are somewhat unique systems for generating incentive or behaviors among all sides of transactional set so that's true crypto currencies it's true of the most successful block chain use cases that we've studied in the sense that there's got to be a win win win and blockchain's i think are uniquely situated to do that unlike some other technical architectures which more extracting value from players yeah core is mentioning here is part of the challenge any healthcare is full of great use cases for blockchain you know where there's trust and transparency and incentive alignment issues that we can solve but you know you have to consider not only the technology but also the business model and the governance structure and the the change management process in order to find the right use case it's gonna move quickly and be embraced by the by the industry and so i think that this is part this is one of the key challenges.

blockchain
"blockchain" Discussed on B&H Photography Podcast

B&H Photography Podcast

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"blockchain" Discussed on B&H Photography Podcast

"All the users on the systems sorted chronologically added in groups or tranches or using original wording blocks of transactions now in the original declined blockchain there is a highly complex process of adding new blocks of transactions that required computers to use a resource intensive process to verify that the new transactions obeyed all prior transactions so in a sense it chains together new blocks of transactions by referring to prior blocks of transactions thus it's a chain of blocks or what we now know as blockchain now the bitcoin blockchain specifically include system that makes it difficult to add new transactions that systems called proof of work it's very technical but the basic idea is that it should be expensive from time in a resource perspective to add new transactions so that it becomes more difficult to retroactively falsify them or change them in future this resulted in arms race to find faster and stronger computers to do this work and creates some of the concerns about power consumption that you might have heard about in the media getting back to the point here blockchain's at their core allowed her to be multiple writers to the database with those writers don't have to be trusted many they don't have to be preemptively credentialed and it allows the system to store multiple copies of that history that blockchain in multiple places and the proof of work is what's called a consensus mechanism or the ability for the system to verify new transactions now others have tried to find other consensus mechanisms that aren't as resource intensive but most of those other methods are pretty much fair mental at this point finally you've got this umbrella term called digital ledger technology and that is kind of the broadest base term for the technologies derived from the original bitcoin blockchain.

blockchain
"blockchain" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

01:50 min | 2 years ago

"blockchain" Discussed on TechStuff

"Es you may have heard me do several episodes about cas over the years this is the place where the press events happen before the show floor opens at the las vegas convention center that mandalay bay you would have all the different of brooms booked up for the various press conferences that companies would use to unveil their latest and greatest products they're coming out over the next year or two while at ibm think that's what is being used as the meeting space and the keynote space presentation space for all sorts of different it computer topics and activities it's kind of overwhelming to be honest in fact i am now kind of unwinding in my hotel room before i have to go back out and jump right back into it i'm going to go to a session where they're going to talk about five big topics in science and technology so i'm really looking forward to it there's some very interesting people who are here presenting and i can't wait to learn more some of the areas that we're gonna talk about this week will include blockchain now if you've been listening to tech stuff over the past few months you've probably heard a recent episode i did about blockchain blockchain is the technology that underlies cryptocurrencies like bitcoin and in fact i would argue bitcoin is probably the most famous use of blockchain technology but blockchain is not only good for bitcoins and currencies that's one use for it but not the only one in fact a lot of people argue that blockchain is going to be the next.

las vegas convention center blockchain mandalay bay ibm blockchain blockchain
"blockchain" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

02:00 min | 2 years ago

"blockchain" Discussed on Science Friday

"No or at the same time great carey you're at south by southwest this week so blockchain isn't just about cryptocurrencies rate like what are the other ways that people are using it the cryptocurrency part is definitely really loud and really understandable use case of it but i spoke with a lot of people there who see it being four greater just like the internet isn't just for reading about news stories i think one that's been most fascinating is the benefit for food supply so for instance a restaurant being able to really understand whether or not the food that they get from a farm it's actually directly from the farm being able to track what where your food is being sourced and where it's coming from and then because it's publicly available it's not just the supplier in the distributor but also people like you and me being able to verify that it's true cool so now you read an article about blockchain bros did you coined the term the people i interviewed coined the term but i did yes so walk me through the type specimen of blockchain bro types so i've been in i'm basis evans cisco and i've been covering the blockchain boom that we've seen over the last year and sort of culture of it and one aspect of the culture of it is there are major gender problems it is a predominantly male space and a lot of women a lot of women were involved early on and have felt like they are being pushed out now as the price of cryptocurrencies has gone up and there's been a frenzy and the quote unquote blockchain broza come into the space the blockchain bro being someone who maybe doesn't have extreme technical knowledge but maybe bought bitcoin or ether early on was on read it was on four chan was sort of active involved in this community but but is sort of like in it for cash.

blockchain bros cryptocurrencies chan blockchain
"blockchain" Discussed on This is Product Management

This is Product Management

01:58 min | 2 years ago

"blockchain" Discussed on This is Product Management

"So the most profound innovation is that blockchain's are operated without central authority this world is run by central authorities who we trust with their data for example facebook maintains your social data banks and governments maintain your financial data is such red centra we trust these services to always act in our interests to provide great service could never get hacked never lose or review or change our data to never charged exorbitant fee if you don't like what the central authorities are doing you're out of luck it's hard to build a competitors facebook or a bank or a government the problem is that these authorities don't always act in our interests facebook may should to me ats or provide a user experience that you don't like governments especially kruk ons may manipulate the value of currency or prohibit you from spending or moving money in the way that you want so blockchain's make it so that many important things noble longer require central authorities no longer need facebook to store your social data that can be securely stored than obliging once your social data is in a block chain it's much easier for someone to build hell turned it has to facebook wang wise no longer need up bank or government to maintain the ownership ledger of money that ledger can be stored in obliging many of the services that were previously provided by a bank or government cannot be built on top of that money ledger in the watching so blockchain's make us less reliant on central authorities what happens when you remove the reliance on central authorities well businesses that were currently locked into like social networks online marketplaces or banks will face more competition sula face pressure to church lower fees or provide better user experiences that is a win for consumers now if the senseless libertarian fantasy rather vented obvious good for society i understand that i had the same initial reaction dig into the specific problems that can be solved with launch ends and i think you'll.

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