35 Burst results for "blindness"

Ep3: Pain Is The Agent Of Change Director Tristien Marcellous Winfree - burst 2

Scranton Talks

11:10 min | 2 d ago

Ep3: Pain Is The Agent Of Change Director Tristien Marcellous Winfree - burst 2

"One of your interviewee is mentions that everyone's going through something. And I think people need to understand if you're meeting people on the street. We're talking with some of they've gone through stuff. Like I've gone through things. I'm sure lose Tristan you mentioned you've got through your own grief as well. And with American society, I think American society in general, I think there is there needs to be more conversation about going to therapy, talking about things that are not very comfortable and what are things that society should be saying. What should we be talking about and should be made more aware? Society. Yeah. You know, you know, we live in a culture where everything is so fast paced and we're so, you know, what are you feeling? You know what I mean? You got to get money. You know what I mean? Next thing, you know what I mean? It's so it's so bad because when we see some of our favorites, you know what I mean fall down and we say, wow, they were so kids saying signs of this early on, but we chose not to see that. You know what I mean? I see that person. And I always say, like you said earlier, we meet people. Everyone's gonna be dealing with something. And I think that in this world, everybody, you need to be kind. Point blank period. You have to leave the kindness and all that. So you know, I know it's a hard thing to do to do in the world, but you need to kind of, you know, you'll be on the right path and all that. And as far as the world of itself, then what conversations that we have the better. What I'm wearing this in front of the audience. Everybody stood up at the end. It just started hunting on one another. Why? Because it's that common thing that we go through as people. You know what I mean? You still be able to really talk about okay, yes, I want to do that challenge a theme. I'm like, how did I overcome that by doing XYZ? You know what I mean? And I didn't think I was like, you know, as a self that's crazy or, you know, like, you know, you're crazy if you ask for help. Everybody needs to help. Yeah, and it's definitely a very important, especially disorder. We're all going through something. So now, but as far as the artist's part, right? You are, we're dealing with our own issues. And then we put on top of that, our creativity. How do you do that? Specifically, this documentary, you said, okay, so I was asking other questions and then he led to something else. That has creativity sparking, right? And you're saying, okay, maybe I have something bigger than I thought. How do you deal with that in the sense because it is at the very difficult theme to talk about with people and you're not sure if they're going to be open to share. So how do you deal with that in your creative approach? Well, it's so interesting that you say that because while I was interviewing them, you know, my grief was still fresh in my own. Correct. So while I was interviewing them, I'm like, geez, I'm still unpacking myself and here I am receiving things from other people. And I'm like, I have to take a couple I have to take about a week or so apart from each interview because I'm like, you know, all I talk about some heavy stuff and then now I gotta edit it while I'm editing my short film and it was like, it was filled with stuff made emotional roller coaster for me, but it was that theme to what I knew single handedly that it was in divine order that I was doing the right thing with this project. You know what I mean? And I think for me, the biggest thing was just like sitting back and knowing that Michael okay. This is bigger than me. You know what I mean? My project is bigger than me. It's documentary is bigger than me. And to be able to teach with it in people to see it and feel something, that's what it is. That's what it's about. Right. And it's not something that you're doing. Do you have to sort of detach yourself from your own feelings or maybe you got more into that in order to be able to finish this documentary? I'm curious, I'm a curious person. So I definitely leaned into myself a little bit more about why does the person feel that way or can we go back, you know, the technology and see what happened to our specific time and all that. Yeah, it's just intuitive and me to just like, you know, lead with my body and the heart. Definitely. And I think that's what we have, right? I left at the end. So creativity is our voices just making stuff that it's important to us and that we want to share. So as far as that, we got to bring back something a little lighter. So you said you were doing your film and the documentary at the same time. A lot of filmmakers out there are season filmmakers but there are others that are starting out like I mentioned. So in that sense, tell us more about the process with that. You're doing two projects at the same time, but one of them came out before. And now you have something that you're working. What is the process as far as the production part of it? About at least what you encounter. Yeah, you know, so I'm very grateful for my short film team because when I sat down with each and every one of them, you know, they, you know, what my vision was, single handedly, you know what I mean? So grateful for that. Now, when I was in the editing room by myself for my documentary, it was just me, I didn't have anyone to turn to our go to look too. So it was kind of like it was kind of like a home therapy session in itself. And, you know, you walk through this project and I know that I've mentioned that, you know, we did with the 5 stages of three, you know, bargaining and like acceptance and the value that depression and all those other ones. And the people were talking, but I didn't set up the questions. Like, okay, let's talk about arguing, you know what I mean? Those things just like naturally just like the conversation. And as I was piecing together, this documentary, I was like, huh. Here we are. Talking about the acceptance of something, or the denial of something. And so, you know, my process was very, you know, blindness on and, you know, just getting very articulate about what it is that we want to share when we talk about green. And as far as your festival run so that you completed those two films, as far as being on the festival and screening your stuff, what was your process? The what you do in anything prior to the pandemic as far as that screening your film places and now how has that differ from what you're doing now with the documentary because it might be a little different, right? Yeah, no, it's definitely different nowadays. So the film now the documentary is precious news. So it's definitely been a submitted to customers right now. So it hasn't had its own chance to shine this yet. But the part is the short film pain that's done like an extraordinary job being out since 2019 and being part of your festival in Chicago filmmakers and stony island arts bank and, you know, I get to teach with it and my students get to see it and watch it and we talk about process making and, you know, real health business it's like each, you know, the mediums that I teach on is just I'm thankful for it. You were talking to us about your also a T-shirt. And you also, you work with these you say middle school or elementary school kids? So I work with court theater and we teach our students on the south side of Chicago and also work with tape, which is, you know, Chicago partners, education team, and we work on a west side of Chicago. Well, with middle school students. And I know this right now we're talking about how it is to juggle work and life. And then still try to do creative stuff. I think this would say something about filmmakers that they really get. It gets to them that they have to work more than doing creative stuff. And unfortunately, how do you juggle that? Because I know, you know, like you said, we have to make a living, you know? Yeah. But we also need to be creative in order to help our minds in order to help that creativity. So in your experience, how have you dealt with that within the years? Well, you know, tied before this whole pandemic thing happened. You know, it needs to be a key holder at a store called the tag bar, you know, have to wear like, you know, suits and jackets, people love and all that. And when, you know, this thing happening, you know, I couldn't be in front of people anymore. I had to hop into my teaching bag. Really, and it really just brought out the best in me because my life is, you know, built around passionate purpose, you know what I mean? And when those two things are ignited in me, it's like, okay, I can get paid for actually teaching what I know. You know what I mean? And also teaching to children that, you know, who are curious about, you know, about filmmaking and health stories get told and all that. So to have all the insight and knowledge, you know, lose, listen, I'm not gonna go too crazy. You know, all these gifts. Right, but you have to put it out there, especially for the younger generation, right? Yeah, you definitely got to put it out there because, you know, what we do as artists is. Generosity, you know what I mean? It's a public service, what we do. Sometimes we don't see the millions of jewels and sometimes we do. You know what I mean? But you get the stories out there and sell it. And the most audacity right, right? I mean, I think it is great because just to be able to get back, like you said, we have to be nice, you know? That is really what we should all follow all the time kindness. Regardless of anything, that's the first thing that comes in. And to be able to give that back like you said you're working short films, you're working on documentaries

Scranton Tristan Chicago Pennsylvania Filmmaking Independent Film American Society Michael Okay Stony Island Depression
Is Your 401k Working for You?

Money Rehab with Nicole Lapin

01:58 min | 2 months ago

Is Your 401k Working for You?

"401k as a retirement account established by employers for employees. That's tied to the stock market if you're out of company that offers a 401k. You can make contributions before the money hits your paycheck and then your contribution is invested in an account with your name on it. They will get super excited about 401k's because sometimes the employer can make a matching contribution to your account which is like getting free money and any money. You contribute goes in before taxes. However don't think this money is tax free because you do have to pay tax when you take the money out if you take it out before your fifty nine and a half yes. That's really the number of the. Irs up with you have to pay penalty fees. 401k's do tend to be the most popular retirement plan. But that doesn't necessarily mean it's the best one for you. Remember trusting your employer with your money is trusting your employer with your money. Why not trust yourself instead. Most people don't even realize that 401k's aren't actually meant to be retirement accounts for your entire retirement. They're technically profit sharing accounts because they allow you to have one hundred percent of your money in your company's stock which you should never do hello worldcom tyco and ron lehman brothers folks. Maybe it's just me but the basic idea of having your retirement and your job. So closely linked seems wrong after all familiarity might breed contempt in family but it breeds blindness in business. If you put all your money in your company's stock and the company goes out of business your livelihood is doubly screwed now with losing your job and later with losing your retirement savings. Let me repeat 401k's aren't and were never intended to replace your entire income when you retire. It's just how we started using them once traditional pensions which are meant to replace your income when you retire started becoming less

Worldcom Tyco Ron Lehman
Summer Chocolate Brownie Recipe

The Maria Liberati Show

03:09 min | 3 months ago

Summer Chocolate Brownie Recipe

"Chocolate is so popular for this summer. One of my favorite recipes to bring along for summer picnics. And you know. The fourth of july's coming up in just mentioned father's day is around the corner One of my favorite things to make is the chocolate coffee brownies squares. It's it's a recipe. That's in my book. The basic art of coffee. That was actually one of the giveaway books last month. So whether you're celebrating fourth of july or father stay home or away. These chocolate coffee. Brownies squares are easy to make. And take with you in. Besides who doesn't love you work effect of chocolate and coffee together and besides everybody said that you know in the survey that they're gonna be camping and or taking trips and bringing chocolate with them. So maybe you'll blake to take these chocolate coffee brownie squares with you. They are easy to transport. Here's the recipe a half a cup of flour a half a cup of butter third cup of sugar. One quarter cup of dried shredded. Coconut plus one tablespoon of dry shredded coconut unsweetened the one tablespoon extra is for the topping to eggs five tablespoons of mill two tablespoons of espresso coffee two tablespoons of dried instant coffee one teaspoon of pure vanilla a teaspoon of baking powder one tablespoon of powdered sugar two tablespoons of unsweetened cocoa powder plus two tablespoons for topping blend butter and sugar with an electric mixer till blended in the butter. Soft and creamy in. Sugar is well blended in ad in the eggs and five tablespoons of milk place in the sifted flour cocoa vanilla baking powder mix so well blended then put in coconut powdered instant coffee stir to well blended. Preheat the oven to three hundred. Seventy five degrees line square pan with parchment. Paper spread the mixture in the pan. Bake in a preheated oven for forty minutes in a bull mixed two tablespoons of powdered cocoa powdered sugar and hot espresso coffee and blindness together when the brownies are done turn off the oven. Take brownies out of the oven than place. The topping on and then place the brownies back in to see the warm oven for just five minutes. Take out and let them cool for five to ten minutes in another dish mixed two tablespoons of shredded coconut with two teaspoons of instant coffee powder when the brownies or cool cut into squares and sprinkle with shredded coconut topping before serving scoop of chocolate gelato. Ice cream refers in yogurt served on the side. Intensifies the well factor of this desert. If you're serving this at a picnic or you know a get together or sit down and get together you know. That's a a great way to serve it with some ice cream or gelato refers in yogurt on the side.

Blake
What Human Medicine Can Learn From Fish Eyes

The Academic Minute

01:40 min | 3 months ago

What Human Medicine Can Learn From Fish Eyes

"My research focuses. On the zebra fish i specifically on how the retina develops and how it generates. The retina is the nervous system. Tissue at the back of your eye the detects light and transmits information to your brain to form an image. I look at retinal regeneration. By exposing fish to bright light that kills the neurons in there is that detect light. The cells are called photo receptors. This is the equivalent of staring at the sun which you should never do. Many people have heard of neurons but there are other critical cells in your nervous system called graphic which protected neurons the wheel cells in the fish. I respond to the damage from the light. Behave like stem cells and are able to regenerate the destroyed photoreceptors to restore vision for the fish. Humans have the same deal cells in our nervous system but in response to damage. They do not act like stem cells in usually make scar which i can lead to blindness. That's why you shouldn't stare at the sun. You can't regenerate photoreceptors if they're destroyed like fish ken. I'm particularly interested in the role of conserved molecular pathways and regulating the proliferation of cells during regeneration. One of many ways cells talk to each other officials. I during regeneration is called. Tgif beta signaling. Tgif beta is message sent by one cell that can be received by a neighboring cell in the nervous system. If there's too much of this tgif beta conversation happening you get less regeneration. My team is looking further into whether the pathway regulates the wheel self or the daughter cells it makes response to the late injury to the fish. I the hope is that. As we study how tgif beta signaling and other molecular pathways regulate retina regeneration and fish that this information can be used to inform. Medical discovery aimed at promoting regeneration in the human eye and nervous system.

KEN
Accessible Games, a New Approach to Game Accessibility

Kinda Funny Games Daily

02:02 min | 4 months ago

Accessible Games, a New Approach to Game Accessibility

"And so talk to us about it. Global accessibility awareness day. What does it mean to you. What is it like what what can we all do to be a part of it. Yeah this is actually the tenth anniversary of global accessibility awareness day. And of course my focus obviously in the gaming side but essentially it's a day across a world where we get to celebrate Amazing like innovations and inclusion of for people with disabilities because Fifteen percent of the entire global population does consider themselves disabled. And when even on the gaming side or there's roughly over about two hundred and fifty million disabled gamers globally and. That's a huge. That's a huge number of people that want to be able to to play games but either camp because either a physical or mental disability and so essentially today is There's some really cool stuff that a lot of companies are doing but essentially it's it's a really cool way to be able to what we've done over the past year in regards to accessibility and being able to see what the future is for For accessability moving forward now if somebody has somehow miss you because you've got on all sorts of kind of funny content with us for a long time now but you know most recently. I love you right. You popped in there to talk about return inaccessibility there if they've missed. You don't understand that. What is accessibility. And why does it matter beyond people who are disabled so accessibility is essentially a way for disabled players to be able to play video games Whether you have a motor disability or blindness like i have condition is called the status which means it is back and forth. And it's hard for me to be able to to focus it to build to see anything clearly. There's also deaf and hard of hearing and also cognitive disabilities and essentially we all wanna be able to play video games. But we can't just either because our disabilities and what we're trying to build to sort of encourage studios to be able to do is to add in disability accessibility settings or a build a game based on accessibility. So that more people can be able to play

The Mystery of the Devonshire Colic

Ridiculous History

01:33 min | 4 months ago

The Mystery of the Devonshire Colic

"Something that we notice if you look back in history. The truth of the matter is before the age of modern medicine people had tons of afflictions or conditions real or perceived that they couldn't quite concretely explain and with the benefit of modern science. In retrospect we can say that in many cases of folks were experiencing something that continues today as dangerous effects. it's mild lead poisoning. The most famous outbreak of this accidental lead poisoning was this thing called the devon colic indus english county in the seventeen hundreds. This condition was affecting thousands of people in here comes our laundry lists the victims primarily dudes and they were experiencing stuff like paralysis madness blindness. Death was first reported in seventeen o three and it just continued year over year to increase. I think it was seventeen. Twenty four when there was a pretty big upsurge in the number of cases and this was also a year. Here's our mystery starts. This was also a year that was noted for a bumper apple crop. Love a good bumper apple crop ben and it was the opinion of one john hudson who investigated this mysterious malady and published his findings and seventeen thirty nine. That one of the primary causes cider apple cider.

Paralysis Madness Blindness Apple John Hudson
The Songs Of Ghanaian Women Accused Of Witchcraft

BBC World Service

01:50 min | 6 months ago

The Songs Of Ghanaian Women Accused Of Witchcraft

"Hidden. Many are elderly in their seventies there in these camps because they're accused of being witches, But their voices can now be heard on a new album called I Forgot. Now, who I used to Be sad about that. I love Dublin Bay when my whole but one of the women have never played music or written songs before they were recorded by award winning record producer Ian Brennan and his wife, Maria Elena, Omaha's a deli. But Elena herself has a personal connection to witch hunting, which will get into in a moment. But first Marlena joins us from her home in Italy. Welcome. Oh, thank you so much. Thank you for having me. Marlena. How did these women and they are primarily women Get to these camps? Well, these women are a poor there as early they have been kicked out off their land by younger relatives who are very attracted to buy their land. And that land is all. They own a S. O. This women are very vulnerable. You know, they suffer from physical mental in the Caesar, such as Alzheimer's agility. Misshapen limbs, blindness and they are completely exploited that they're stripped off their dignity, their turned into a monster there literally stripped off their own land. So these women are accused of being which is what is being a witch mean in West Africa. Being a witch is a being a person that can cause harm to your cropper that can cause a stability, which is our accused off doing harm to families. And you know, Westerners often

Ian Brennan Marlena Joins Dublin Bay Maria Elena Elena Marlena Alzheimer's Agility Omaha Italy West Africa
'The Little Things' Is A Star-Studded, Old-School Serial Killer Thriller

Colleen and Bradley

01:10 min | 8 months ago

'The Little Things' Is A Star-Studded, Old-School Serial Killer Thriller

"Um okay, So let's move over to, um, the thing that we were just talking about just a while ago. Why are we all talking about Jared Leto right now? Yeah. So he's in this movie called the little things that the on each feel, Max and and feeders. You got that? Don't you calling? I do I have that. Yeah. So start. You know Denzel Washington places better than cop he had back to his old stomping ground in L. A in order to help chase down the serial killer. Before the seventh victim was claim. Robin Malik is the new detective. That's kind of leading the case. So they've got a bad and you've got this new concept by those two. And then Jared Leto is someone they kind of have their eyes on. He's super creepy, super greasy looking. And you had allegedly that he is a killer. And throughout this movie, you're like you see, actually the killer or is this kind of a Mr AC on? Maybe just a token off kind of police blindness, If you well, I don't wanna get too much because it really kind of scratches that age if you like. That kind of grisly crime, psychological thriller serial killers. I do love me a good show color movies eat, right. It just kind of leaves you on edge the entire time.

Jared Leto Robin Malik Denzel Washington
How to be Brilliantly Resilient After Life's Sucker Punches with Mary Fran Bontempo and Kristin Smedley

Entrepreneur on FIRE

08:21 min | 8 months ago

How to be Brilliantly Resilient After Life's Sucker Punches with Mary Fran Bontempo and Kristin Smedley

"We're talking about how to be brilliantly resilient after life's sucker punches and we've all gotten psycho punches over the years fire nation and. Let's start with kristen. Where specifically did brilliantly resilient first of all your brilliantly resilient. It's it's when like you said john you get hit with a sucker punch and brilliant. Resilient people will be stunned maybe even knocked down ouch with. They're not knocked out. And mary. Fran and i have been sucker punched over and over again in life and then we came together by well you might say by accident but we know that the universe kind of aligns things for us right and when we started talking we realize that both of us had gotten knockdown not knocked out and we each had things that we did that were similar or exactly the same to reset our mindset in our lives rise with some really special parts of the formula and then the key we found that our skills and talents our brilliance. If you will just charted us on this whole new trajectory that we did incredible things because of those sucker punches it was pretty extraordinary and fire nation. And what that. I've really been diving into a lot recently. Stoicism and know the whole philosophy behind. That is doing what you can where you are with what you have. Because listen if we're going to dwell in the past and we're gonna look at our past sucker punches in just like let that dictator future than what kind of future do we have. Yes is a great to learn from our past mistakes past cycle punches absolutely to maybe adjust pivots going forward in the future but at the same time. It's like let's be here and the now and let's be brilliantly resilient after the sucker punches any positive way going forward and i love what you to have done together is. You've taken brilliantly. Resilient in you've broken out into three very specific parts which are reset rise in reveal your brilliance and i really wanna go through these three parts right now in a very chronological way. So mary fran. Why don't you start us off by talking about reset so the reset is this part. Where you kind of find yourself. Suddenly laying on the ground looking up at the sky going. What the heck just happened. The reset is what happens. When you get this sucker punch whatever it may be. It can be personal. It can be professional. You know we don't we. Don't judge over here. It can just be kind of being pecked to death by the little things of life you know so whatever you are sucker punch or train wreck would be. That's the part where you get to reset. And that is the part where you're inherent in this key. Inherent resilience comes in. You know we hear so much about resilience these days and everybody thinks it's this kind of nebulous thing that's out there that they don't have it's in you. You were born with it so when we talk about the reset it is resetting with resilience that you already have you know when you were you. Were a kid you you you learn to walk by continually failing but you didn't name it that at the time so you know it's there it's something that we can immediately rely on and with the reset. We have a couple of things that we talk about. We talk about a value system which is hugely important. We talk about your perspective and we talk about controlling the controllables but the values pieces the one that i think we wanna focus on right now right k. Yeah yeah. I'll actually if i can give a quick story with my own Sucker punch i was. I headed fully planned my life out of listeners out there that are chuck in those boxes every day and you get a real thrill from that and i got hit with my first. Two babies were born blind. That was nowhere in my preparation. But what i learned is it was the my perception blindness was the block in our life not blindness itself. If you can imagine it was how i was looking at it in terms of devastation of settlement fear and when i changed my perception then my boys and i and my cited daughter started on a trajectory of allowing them to achieve greatness. They were destined for but what happened to me personally in my own work and business and launching a nonprofit in the meeting with mary fran and doing brilliantly. Resilient is there. Were some core values in in how i live my life that once i aligned my parenting my business my nonprofit to those core values then the exponential success started any new core. Values are actually so important for you to establish which. I never would have thought this before. I really sat and studied it but it is so important that there was actually an episode of e o fire in december that was dedicated to core values. That they are that important. And i think mary has a few more things to add on on values. Yeah i mean one of the things. That i think is so profound. Is that these giant sucker punches. They knock you for such a loop that it takes so much away from you. It takes away your plans. It takes away your goals. It takes away your purpose but it takes away your identity. You know you define yourself in a certain way and then something happens. I found out on mother's day of twenty ten that my son was a heroin addict. I mean up to that point. I had an idea of who i was and where i fit in the world and where i was going to go in that moment all of that disappears but when you dig deep in those moments and when you're flat on your back that's when you get to do it you dig deep and figure out what your core values are. That's the beginning of your foundation for every rise. That comes after that. So there's a lot of powerful things. These leisure shared fire nation. I mean one thing that i really honed in on for any number of reasons is the phrase that mary fran used which is controlling the controllables and to me. That's actually very comforting phrase. Because listen things are outside of our control. I mean what are we really going to be stressing out about. I mean let's be honest. Chris and didn't have within her control. What happens when her children were born blind. But what does she then shift to after that. Initial you know struggle and shock while she shifted to controlling the controllables now. She has a nonprofit now. She's moving forward with us now. She has such a better understanding because she just said you know what. I'm going to sit here and this moment. I'm going to control what i can control these controllable variables. So there's a lot to be thought about under this reset section and fire nation. We may be kind of dipping back into these as we proceed forward but the next part is rise so mary fran what do we have with this section in the rise you wanna look at and again as you said j. l. d. all the stuff kind of works together in the rise. You wanna look at what you can actually do. And this is not living in the land of magical thinking here this. Is you know what we want. And and what we can do are often very different things but the things that help you figure out what you can do. The rise is all about the action step but the things that go into that are what are your resources. What is your skillset. And the big one for us is who is in your tribe and you know very often when we think of our tribe we think of what christian calls the ride or die folks. You know the ones who are with you your first level contacts. Who are your biggest cheerleaders and while those are the people that you definitely need in your tribe. They are not always the ones who are going to help you rise. Because they're often the ones who want a stroke your head and say poor baby when sometimes what you really need is a kick in the butt or somebody who's got a better or a resource that is not within your immediate tribe so we really encourage people to expand that tribe so you can figure out what your action step is gonna because it's all about the action.

Mary Fran Fran Mary Kristen John Chuck Chris
EU: Thousands of liters of dangerous hand sanitizer seized

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:33 sec | 9 months ago

EU: Thousands of liters of dangerous hand sanitizer seized

"Healthcare workers They're handling a lot on the front lines. There's a lot of stress for nearly all of us even trying to stay safe. Can be hazardous of times we learned today about 37,000 gallons of hand sanitizer has been seized across Europe since the start of the pandemic. That's because the European Union's anti fraud office says that sanitizer came from Turkey. And that it was contaminated with dangerous levels of methanol. Too much methanol can lead to headaches, blurred vision, and sometimes it can cause blindness.

European Union Europe Turkey Headaches
EU: Thousands of liters of dangerous hand sanitizer seized

AP News Radio

00:51 sec | 9 months ago

EU: Thousands of liters of dangerous hand sanitizer seized

"The E. U.'s anti fraud body says almost thirty seven thousand gallons of dangerous hand sanitizer have been seized across the region since the start of the corona virus pandemic the European anti fraud office left says the product originated from Turkey who was contaminated with dangerous levels of methanol a substance likely to create headaches blurred vision and can sometimes lead to blindness when used in hand sanitizers a large Congo of the product have been detained in Dublin with analysis confirming the presence of unacceptably high levels of methanol a white a probe then established to several companies based in the E. U. had ordered hand sanitizers from the same Turkish manufacturer operating under various names I'm Charles Taylor this month

E. U. European Anti Fraud Office Turkey Headaches Congo Dublin Charles Taylor
Eye Treatment Stretches Mouse Sight Beyond Visible Spectrum

60-Second Science

03:38 min | 10 months ago

Eye Treatment Stretches Mouse Sight Beyond Visible Spectrum

"Of having to reach for your night vision goggles. Attract someone's heat signature after dark. Well biotech may someday come to the rescue. For all of you aspiring spies because researchers have developed an injectable nano scale antenna which they've used to allow mice to see beyond their normal visual spectrum. And into the infrared. The work appears in the journal. Cell like all mammals we humans are only able to see light in the visible spectrum which includes all of the colors of the rainbow then limitation is due to the photo receptors in our is being only able to detect radiation with a wavelength of around four hundred to seven hundred nanometers which means we can't see infrared and near infrared light which has wavelengths a little bit longer and that got scientists thinking so we always curious whether we end mansard of technique to allow us to be able to see you for a light tonsure of the university of science and technology of china. He reached out to his colleague. Gone hong at the university of massachusetts medical school who engineered a teeny tiny device which he calls an up conversion nanoparticle. We actually develop nanoparticles Upcoming worship nanoparticles actually can effectively the active by this near infrared light then. They started testing their system in mice. The nanoparticles themselves to photo receptors in the animal's retina there. They absorb infra red radiation and converted to visible green light. Green light is absurd by reconciles which the brain then interprets as regular visible light. This enhanced supervision allows the animals to not only see infrared but to discriminate between different infrared patterns so for example they could be taught to navigate toward horizontal stripes versus ones patterns that the researchers themselves couldn't see found that a bit disconcerting. When we do the experiment the sometime it feel the creepy. Because you know if you do not. We're waiting goggles and do the testing we showed the pack into the animal fact to our own eyes. We cannot kill any a kneeing. Fred patents by the inject anymore. Could they can use to cut their behaviors very accurately and efficiently. Hong says that the advanced infrared detection did not appear to interfere with or supersede. The animals standard-issue visual abilities trainer. Mice were able to perceive his life partners in the daylight conditions. Clearly suggesting that none of working in parallel with coincidental waste but we should as well. The technology in addition to its applications in military or law enforcement might even provide a possible fix for color blindness and best of all share notes. It wouldn't batteries these new particles technique is a stealthy and do not need external power the directly the activities of by the game for light itself. The nanoparticles remained active for as long as two months a similar infrared boost. Could some day allow us. Humans to breakthrough are natural visual limitations. See things in a whole new light. Thanks for listening. For scientific americans sixty seconds science. I'm karen hopkin.

University Of Massachusetts Me University Of Science And Tech China Fred Hong Karen Hopkin
When you feel like life is against you

Building Psychological Strength

04:58 min | 10 months ago

When you feel like life is against you

"Today. I want to open this episode by telling you a story that. I don't think i've ever tall on the podcast before. That's actually pretty amazing. Since i share quite a bit about myself on this podcast. But i don't think i've gone into detail about this particular story and i wanted to do so today because i think it is an interesting introduction into the topic that i want to cover For the majority of this episode so bear with me and listen to this quick little story from by past many of you know that i have multiple sclerosis. I was diagnosed when i was about thirteen years old. Which is extremely young. And i've lived with it for over twenty five years of my life. I've had a number of experiences as a result of having a mess. But one of them. That i wanna share with you. Today is the first time that i went blind. I've actually gone blind twice each time. Thankfully it was in. Only one i But the first time i went blind was in really interesting situation that i want to dive into a little bit today because as i mentioned it sets up. Today's topic really nicely. So for those of you who may not be familiar. Multiple sclerosis is an autoimmune condition. So my immune system is a little bit hyper vigilant and it attacks my body more specifically it attacks the mylan aided narves in my central nervous system he can think of mile unaided nerves as The wiring that's in your house. There is a wire with some Some insulation around it my similar to that we have nerves in our central nervous system with mylan around them. Mylan is the insulation that allows electricity or nerve responses to flow cleanly along a nerve instead of sort of Jumping over to other nerves or haphazardly firing around in our brain it allows those impulses to move more cleanly so when the violated gets scarred so multiple sclerosis actually means many scars when our mylan get scarred in our central nervous system it can cause issues and deficits and one of the things that i experienced was blindness. So this to give you some context. I was about fourteen years old. Or so and i woke up one day and i noticed that i was starting to see double vision when i would look way. To the periphery of my left eye. So if i looked way to the left my vision would go double the further to the left. My eyes would go and i thought this was really strange. But you know at this point in time. My ms was not regulated. I wasn't. I hadn't been on medication for very long and i was really used to things very strange symptoms happening and so i didn't think much of it now. Over the course of the weeks that followed it took about a month for me to lose my vision entirely in my left eye I increasingly had very strange visual effects. So the double vision worsened. I didn't have to move. My is very much anymore for that. Double vision symptom to happen. I also had incredible pain behind my i later learned. This was my optic nerve swelling up. Who knew that's thing. Apparently optic near itis is that it's called anyway. I had some pain behind my eye and the edges. If you think about the thing that i remember most is looking at leaves on a tree or there's a lot of detail right. Each leaf is very. It's a little tiny detail on the tree and they have very sharp and the edges of branches are very like sharp lines. those would almost. This is the best way that i can describe it. Sparkle kind of they were blurry and they were sparkly and it made it really hard for me to see detail. Those symptoms progressed and progressed and progressed to the point where i couldn't see anything out of my left eye. We're talking if i closed my right eye and completely shielded from any light. If i went into a room i didn't know if the light was on or off i actually went into the doctor side. Note this is just a funny story. i went into the doctor and they did What's called an eeg where they take this big electrode cap and they glue all these electrodes to your head. And then they have you do a task and they measure

Multiple Sclerosis Mylan Blindness Scars
What happens if online advertising is just a big, fat bubble?

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

06:26 min | 11 months ago

What happens if online advertising is just a big, fat bubble?

"So. Big Tech monopolies are in the news this week the Department of Justice sued Google over how it maintains its search dominance and it search dominance is the key to its business model, which is that it makes eighty percent of its revenue from digital advertising facebook by the makes ninety, nine percent of its revenue from advertising and the profitability of targeted ads is also a big reason why tech companies are constantly collecting so much data about us and there's a multibillion dollar ad tech industry that exists because all of this makes so much money. But what these ads didn't actually work all that. Well, Tim Wong is a former public policy executive Google where he worked on artificial intelligence and machine learning and he's of the new book subprime attention crisis I. Think this is an interesting important distinction right? which is it's not necessarily to make the argument that advertising never works categorically right? We have examples of it working. The question is whether or not the market as a whole really lives up to the promises that it's made and the promises made is that data driven. Automated form of what's known as programmatic advertising is a kind of advertising that's way better than billboards or magazines or the kind of madman style of advertising and I think ultimately, it may be that we are exactly where we were decades ago. Right? which is we actually don't know which half of the money spent advertising works in which one is wasted. We just very difficult to tell. Is, there an awareness of this? I mean I know that you know after for example, Cambridge Politica, there was a lot of conversation about how there are lots of promises related to micro targeting and that it just might not be. Realistic. Like do advertisers are they starting to understand this? Well, I, think there's a lot of willful blindness in the Advertising Space you know so this book that I just wrote, it opens on a really strange experience that I had going to a marketing conference where a professor laid out all of the evidence right? You know sixty percent of people never see ads ad blocking up all around the world it was just dead space the. Advertisers kind of refuse to engage with it, and you know it's one of the things I've been thinking a lot about because it's similar to patterns that we see and other market bubbles right where there's these deep structural problems with the industry. But a lot of the people involved either don't want to hear it or they don't believe it I mean listen I'm very familiar with the idea of the belief that technology must be working even. All. Evidence to the contrary. But I do want to ask you about targeting specifically because it seems like there's a lot of technical reasons it doesn't work. But what about this idea that there's a massive amount of data collection that ads can be so specific and personalized that you literally cannot resist them are you saying that's also not true Yeah I. Mean You brought up Cambridge Analytical earlier? I mean there's a fascinating report that just came out from the UK privacy regulator that was basically their research to say look there's all of this kind of. Metric advertising does it make a difference and the conclusion? There was no there actually was not any significant difference and there's two reasons for that. One of them is a lot of researchers find that a lot of the data being used as faulty and messy and doesn't work and I think the other one is whether or not. This data actually helps you to target a message better is really unclear. There's a great researcher by the name of Allesandro. Who's been doing some work on if you have targeted ads versus non targeted ads, does it actually make a difference and conclusion is it does but really only by a small margin, much less than you think. Could it also expose the fact that a lot of these companies no longer want the data for advertising like they want it for machine learning. Yeah I. think that's ultimately you know I think one of the great questions and responses I've had to the book is people say so why have we built this enormous surveillance infrastructure? This thing just doesn't work I. Think people have traditionally thought. Oh, well, it's because Mark Zuckerberg wants to build a mind control ray that's his advertising system. You know the reality is that it has been collected for other reasons and for sure I think things like the promise of machine learning is is one of the reasons that people collect this data. What Can. Be Done. Do you think I mean? This is a big complicated technology question. You've got companies spending a ton of money and companies that rely on this for their whole business model. Like what could solutions even look like? One of my worries about this is that again, if you study the history of market bubbles, a lot of what we see is very reminiscent right to the say the subprime mortgage crisis of two, thousand, seven, two, thousand, eight, and there is a momentum here in the problem with bubbles is that. While, it may look great in two, thousand, seven, I think we were saying how great economy is doing. At some point they pop and I think the human costs will be great. It's really not just a matter of whether or not you know Mark Zuckerberg has less. Fewer billion dollars right I think you gotta think about all the media that's relying on this ecosystem that journalism that relies on it and many other places that advertising touches online, and so I I tend to believe in the idea that we have to find ways of deflating this bubble and so I'm really interested in kind of the ability to both spread the public word about some of the problems in this marketplace. But also I think there's room for regulation I. think There's room to enforce transparency in the marketplace to try to make sure that you know expectations about this match up with reality. There's been just as a regulatory matter there been a lot of questions about banning targeted advertising. Should that happen? Yeah I I do think. So and I think in some ways you know in may be the thing that pops the bubble right because for the longest time, advertisers have been basically holding to the position that we need all this data order to do our business to target our ads and what we're seeing as things. GDP are the European privacy law and CPA to California privacy law rollout is in many cases the market just keep chugging along even though our advertisers have a lot less access to data and I do think that that kind of realization that all this data might actually not have been very. Meaningful might actually 'cause you know sort of expectations or perceptions about how great this stuff is to kind of crash to Earth, and so you think these privacy laws have these two effects. One of them is to protect privacy, which of course is important but I think the other side of it is actually in May of like you know strip the veil off this market that I think has been kinda shrouded for so long Tim. Wong is the author of the new book subprime attention crisis. How big a bubble are we talking here? Digital advertisers will spend over one hundred and forty billion dollars in the US in twenty twenty.

Tim Wong Mark Zuckerberg Google Department Of Justice Facebook Cambridge Politica California United States Cambridge Analytical Executive Professor Allesandro UK Researcher RAY
#1 Marketing Skill That Will Get You Hired in 2021 (Hint: Not SEO or PPC)

Marketing School

04:05 min | 11 months ago

#1 Marketing Skill That Will Get You Hired in 2021 (Hint: Not SEO or PPC)

"Welcome to another episode of Marketing School I'm Eric Su. And I'm Neil Patel and today we're going to be talking about the number one marking skill that will get you hired in twenty twenty one and it's not SEO PPC. So what is it Neil? The number one skill that will get you hired in twenty twenty one is going to be creativity and you're probably wondering how the heck is this a marketing skill while as Andrew, chanoine one said our marketing channels eventually, Goto Shit in other words. The. Channels out there they're going to cause people to compete get crowded with you and when you end up doing things like that, they just get expensive and their heart approves Roi from but it doesn't mean that you can't do well as a marketer. You just need to be creative. You know an Eric and I have talked about this. When people are digging UNITA Zach you need to get creative and do some of the opposite of stuff or tests new unique stuff. For example, when Russell Brunson wanted to grow his podcast he was giving away free MP three players installing his podcasts on there to really help boost his numbers. That's example. Of, getting super creative and the list goes on on like one thing that I'm trying to do right now is working on our commercial strip. So we're going to start running television ads throughout the united. States and we're GONNA skill it up and just really go hard and hit really hard and branding people are going to be like meal. Why would you run television as your digital marketing agency everyone in your space talks about how digital is better than television sure. But Television does a better chance at branding than digital does so like just doing new creative things when competition is not willing to that's how you win in the long run. And, one thing we looked at in the past is if you open up the facebook Ad Library you can see that Russell Brunson who neil just mentioned he runs a ton of new creatives he's creating new stuff all the time it's new ad creative and it's new offers under concert rotating because there's banner blindness and there's also offer blindness while People WanNa keep saying the same thing over and over. So the thing is too if you look at response rates in terms of your engagement rates and conversion rates and all that you know it all starts to decline. Once, you have something working. So you have to immediately start them work on the next one, and so I remember for our consulting school program where we show agencies, how to get more clients. Basically, the one thing we struggled with was creative everything was subpar to click the rates were all under one percent for the longest time once we started look thinking about, okay. How do we make better creative? The team got together and our click the rates over two percent, right. So one of the things we look at at the top of funnel metric is what is Our Click through rate first and then not cutting finals down to everything else your conversion are your CPA numbers and things like that. So creative is by far the number one thing and it's hard to find people that are creative right now it's for whatever reason if you work in tech usually if you're gonNA demand generation, they're hiring you to just run paid ads right and then you might have someone that does some email stuff but there aren't people that are really well rounded understand copywriting psychology which all ties in with creativity as well. Right so at the. End of the day, you have to practice the stuff we've talked about a lot of books recommend around copywriting around Seo, things like that but you gotta become more well rounded and when you becoming well rounded and creative keep in mind that just knowing ideas to tasks in knowing solutions isn't enough you gotta be able to execute on them because if you can't execute an implement them without very little help, you're not going to do well, and like the people who are creative and can move fast are the ones who tend to do extremely well in the marketing world. Yet the final ad that's been critical for us around that program that I was talking about is we do a daily stand up every single day and we talk about creatives. We talked about iterating very quickly because you can't just wait if you start waiting a week every time you do you're you're spending in a good chunk of money while at the end of the day, you're not going to be able. To iterating quickly enough, and that's going to cause your performance to to fall apart. So that's just a side thing that you might want to consider if you are looking to scale a campaign. So that is it. For today

Russell Brunson Eric Su Neil Patel Unita Andrew Facebook
Having the Last Word

Your Brain on Facts

04:59 min | 1 year ago

Having the Last Word

"I am about to or I am going to die either expression is correct. These were the last words of seventeenth century, French, Jesuit, priest grammarian, and man after my own Heart Dominique Boehner. Narrowly, edged out by eighteenth century French Aristocrat who declared I see you have made three spelling mistakes. As. He read over his own death warrant. We assign a lot of significance to last words hoping that we'll leave some deep philosophical epitaph or something funny like what's this button do? But you may end up with last words like American author, Henry David Thoreau who simply said Moose. Indian. My Name's Moxy and this is your brain on facts. Many people think Irish playwright and poet Oscar Wilde's last words were either this wallpaper goes or I do. That would be typical wild but there are two small factual inaccuracies in this retelling. The actual quote is this wallpaper and I are a duel to the death either it goes or I do. And he said that a few weeks before he died. Oscar Wilde's actual last words were a mumbled prayer. He did also say toward the end of his life as he lay in bed sipping champagne I am dying beyond my means. With about a third of the world being Christian it's not surprising that God gets mentioned a fair amount. As the clock was winding down for one of the baddest. Of Golden Age Hollywood Cancer Stricken Joan Crawford her housekeeper began to pray aloud at her bedside. Crawford summoned her remaining strength and said, don't you dare ask God to help me. A priest was at the bedside of Francois Marie Oh, Rhett the philosopher firebrand known as will tear. The priest implored him to renounce the devil voltaire considered his advice but decided this is no time to be making new enemies. German romantic behind took a different view as he lay dying of tertiary syphilis. God will forgive me. He said that's his job. A quick tangent while the dead have been in our collective fears and folklore since the caveman days, our modern interpretation of Sambas is strongly influenced by the ravages syphilis. Its Body count his paltry when compared with things like the black death. But the five million people at killed in the Fifteenth Century alone definitely qualify for epidemic status. Syphilis comes in distinct stages. Primary Syphilis is characterized by painless sores on the genitals or mouth, which typically heal on their own. The second stage usually presents with a rash and fever. These resolve and the disease enters the latent stage which can last for years. You're not infectious in the latent stage, but the bacteria may still be damaging your heart bones, nerves, and brain. People would think they were no longer sick which was just as well since there was no cure anyway. Tertiary Syphilis the third stage. The skin may be covered by growths that break down into lesions that spread unchecked. The disease can away bone and caused tremendous pain. Sufferers could also experience numbness and difficulty with motor functions, vision problems leading to blindness and dementia. which combined left people shambling down cobblestone streets with their faces routing off. If you bumped into such a person under a ready gas lamp on a cold Monday night, you'd probably be willing to believe they were a corpse who had gotten elusive. It's grave. Will Save, the debate for the spread of syphilis whether it started in North America or Europe for another day. We have these last words because someone was there here in record them. Sadly, that wasn't the case with Albert. Einstein one of the greatest scientific minds in history. He was not alone in the room when he passed away but he understandably spoke his final words in his mother tongue and the nurse that was attending him didn't speak German. Perhaps his final wish was something along the lines of don't let anyone steal my brain and keep it in their desk for years. As, you can probably guess that is what happened but that is also a topic will cover on another show. Many people can feel the end is near and leave prophetic pronouncements behind. Reputed Future Sier and tabloid staple. nostradamus correctly forecast tomorrow when the sunrises, I shall no longer be here. Similarly. The Godfather of Soul James Brown said, I'm going away tonight. Less

Syphilis Oscar Wilde Dominique Boehner Joan Crawford Henry David Thoreau Einstein Francois Marie Oh Sambas James Brown Sufferers Albert Rhett North America Dementia. Europe
Biden's Agenda for the Latino Community with Congresswoman Sylvia Garcia

The Electorette Podcast

05:13 min | 1 year ago

Biden's Agenda for the Latino Community with Congresswoman Sylvia Garcia

"I'm Jim Taylor skinner, and this is the electorate. On this episode I have a conversation with representatives, Sylvia Garcia of Texas twenty ninth congressional. District. Discussed Biden's agenda for the Latino community and what we can expect from Bein Harris Administration including their plans to address income and healthcare disparities and the disproportionate impact of Kobe purpose. Of course, also addresses those criticisms of the campaign around whether their outreach to the Latino community is enough. So here is my conversation with representative Sylvia Garcia. Purpose Garcia. Welcome to the PODCAST. Well. Thank you for having me. If I I want to talk about the Biden Campaign I. Guess these are criticisms not doing enough to connect with the Latino community, and if you think that that assessment is fair or do you think that there's more work to do there? Were you know I think people are just so excited about the Joe Vying Kamala Harris. Ticket that everybody wants some light right there now in their neighborhood at knocking at their door, I mean, they're that excited about this ticket that I think there's some folks who who just feel like until they go come to their neighborhood, it's just not happening but but I know I serve on the National Latino. Council. For by now early supporter I know that from day one joe by his been reaching out to Latinos but I know that we can always do better. Anything that we could do to make sure that we reach more. Latino voters. Not Just in Florida not just in Texas not just in California. New York Arizona. New Mexico but everywhere across the country because if you look at any state these days we have Latinos everywhere we have them in Hawaii. We have him in Alaska. So I think what matters is knowing that that he has started his spanish-language press he started making sure that we we air as much as possible. Eh, he's gotten. The Latino Leadership Councils now in several states, I know I'm working on building up in in Texas because he wants to make sure that he touches the Latino community in especially also is Dr. Biden I think Dr Binding early on recognized Latino vote was and more importantly how important Bill Latino vote was that I know that she had a virtual event with with the would we call the commoditised synagogue Nestle. Which is Debbie Powell from Florida. Veronica, grammar from from Texas and myself were all three Judiciary Committee and people here called on ESCO mothers did judiciary it stock and Jill heard about it and wanted to do an event with us and we did, and now we're going to launch a commodity to commodity campaign to make sure that we impress all our voters that we got to vote until one mother to another. To remind work in our own mother network to make sure that we come out and vote to make sure that we make the change that's needed at the White House. So I'm excited. So one of the things I've found really impressive about Biden's response to that specific criticism is that he wasn't defensive and I think you know right before he visited Florida reporter asked him about. Whether there wasn't enough outreach to the Latino community and buying said something like you know I'm going to work like the devil to make sure that I listen and their vote. So he was open to the idea that there was room for improvement and I think both by an Harris are both consistent in responding without being defensive you know and they bring people to the table. There's a lot of work to do and I think we can always do better and I can tell you Scott along with surrogate were willing to do that. He's he's got a lot of people on the ground. Excited to do that. I mean I can tell you a story Saturday I. Don't do too many in person events, but they wanted me to go to a phone bank and I was assured that were social distance everybody's a math. And I went and the minute I walked in it was about Sylvia Joe Sylvia Joe. Any they know the job blindness running. They're excited because. It hurts them to see a White House that is about hurting people for us in. Texas. It's about what we've seen him doing at the border, but it's also seeing that they're not getting more help and more relief on for everybody on unemployment. It's also about what he's doing to Medicare and social security because that hurts our relief does on our lead us. So people know and they know the to make the change that we need they're going to have to get there in those phones. And? Of, course, the member of Congress I've First Ladies First. So that became their chance. Soviet Joe and I told him I said well, it's not just a joe as it Soviet Joe more contests. So I left him with at Madeira. Very excited. You're making calls and Were Spanish language of phone calls to low propensity Latino voters in Harris County

Sylvia Joe Sylvia Joe Dr. Biden Sylvia Garcia Texas Scott National Latino Latino Leadership Councils Florida Bein Harris Administration White House Harris County Jim Taylor Skinner Kamala Harris Harris Alaska Congress Representative Veronica Debbie Powell Arizona
International Panel Warns Us to Tap the Brakes on Gene Editing, but That Wont Stop Us

The BreakPoint Podcast

04:33 min | 1 year ago

International Panel Warns Us to Tap the Brakes on Gene Editing, but That Wont Stop Us

"Disasters are mostly by definition unavoidable, but we can often take basic steps to mitigate the damage such as not building in flood zones are on top of major faultlines mitigating manmade disasters. Hand is almost entirely avoidable, but quite often we don't because we're victims of our own ideologies and collective pride. For example, last week a panel of genetics experts issued a direct and stark warning against editing genes of human embryos that are destined for implantation. The panel, which consists of experts from ten different countries was jointly convened by the US National Academy of Medicine the US National Academy of Sciences and the UK Royal Society. The present state of gene editing said, the panel's report is simply too risky for both individual embryos and the human race as a whole while technologies such as Christopher are fairly precise and targeting and editing certain genes. They wrote recent ventures have demonstrated that fairly precise isn't. Good enough for instance, when researchers at the Francis Crick Institute in London US crisper recently to edit eighteen human embryos in order to study the role of a particular gene in the early stages of human development about a half of those embryos contain what they called quote major unintended at it. Now, that phrase is a euphemism for harmful mutations and genetic damage, the kind that could lead. To birth defects and even life threatening medical problems like cancer and not to mention could permanently enter the gene pool to other studies were also cited in the same report and one researchers attempted to correct gene mutation that causes blindness in the other the attempt was to prevent certain heart defects. However, researchers found that in both experiments, a significant percentage of the treated embryos suffered chromosomal damage one. Genetics expert described these failures this way if human embryo editing for reproductive purposes, germline editing were spaceflight. This new data would be the equivalent of having the rocket exploded at the launch pad before takeoff. Still once again, this new report focus only on the technical failures of gene editing. Once again, any discussion or even any acknowledgement of the many ethical questions inherent to this very idea of. Gene editing were completely avoided. So now and what's become far too typical of the scientific culture of our age in which philosophy ethics are completely divorced from technology and science research proceeds with an ethical framework of utilitarianism built on a philosophy of scientism or to put it more. Simply gene editing will continue because you know scientists are only real hope to solve problems and if we can do. Something we should, and so even though this panel admits that it could be years before the technical difficulties of gene editing are ironed out experiments will continue and should continue though quote initially limited to serious genetic disorders that are caused by DNA variants and a single gene and should be used quote on when the alternatives for having a biologically related child that is unaffected by the genetic. Disorder are poor. Look Scientific. hubris is indeed a very tough train to stop certainly an international panel of experts admitting that gene editing dangerous and unnecessary but we should proceed anyway as long as it's with caution that's not going to stop any eager scientists around the world, much less the governments and corporations who are funding them. Now, the sincere desire to eradicate dangerous diseases including genetic diseases understandable. It's even noble. The longing to heal is just a reflection of God's image in US ethically sound and medically safe treatment should always be pursued but we should never proceed without a full awareness of the human temptation to become like God is genesis three puts it determining good and evil after all couples are already genetically screening donor sperm to create designer babies and governments like China have. Already. Demonstrated their willingness to experiment on entire ethnic groups we are a world and too often h church that proceeds with the most invasive and inhumane technologies without adequate or in some cases any serious ethical reflection now, there is still time to prevent the potential manmade catastrophe of gene editing time itself however won't be enough unless we have the will to say,

United States Us National Academy Of Medicin Us National Academy Of Science Francis Crick Institute Hand Cancer Christopher London China Uk Royal Society
"blindness" Discussed on Life After Blindness

Life After Blindness

02:30 min | 1 year ago

"blindness" Discussed on Life After Blindness

"I'm <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> <Silence> <Speech_Telephony_Male> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Male> <hes> telling <Speech_Female> you they <Speech_Female> taught me <Speech_Female> these friends. These <Speech_Female> groups <Speech_Female> taught me more <Speech_Female> at at coffee <Speech_Female> talk lunchtime <Speech_Female> and after <Speech_Female> class <Speech_Female> because i did <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> i needed help <Speech_Female> i needed to know <Speech_Female> how i was going to <Speech_Female> navigate. <Speech_Female> You know <Speech_Female> This world <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Female> And <Speech_Female> accept the best. <Speech_Female> Infant lot of the best <Speech_Female> information i got was from <Speech_Female> folks who are blind since <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> birth. The <Speech_Female> you know you. <Speech_Female> You darcy in <Speech_Female> an holly. You <Speech_Female> taught somebody <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> You'd probably <Speech_Female> teach people all the time <Speech_Female> who just <Speech_Female> kind of get into this <Speech_Female> world and <Speech_Female> there's happens every <Speech_Female> day as we know <Speech_Female> this happens every day <Speech_Female> How <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> it can be done <Speech_Female> the at a success technology. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> You know putting close together <Speech_Female> as we've talked about <Speech_Female> picking out iphones <Speech_Female> you know <Speech_Female> things that sort. <Speech_Female> You know what's really <Speech_Female> important <SpeakerChange> in life in what's <Speech_Male> really not that important. <Speech_Male> So what you're saying <Speech_Male> is don't lose <Speech_Male> sight of that <Speech_Male> perspective exactly. <Speech_Male> I totally <Speech_Male> agree <Speech_Male> So anyway <Speech_Male> i think is a good place <Speech_Male> to wrap it up on. <Speech_Male> This has been a really good <Speech_Male> conversation. I'm <Speech_Male> so glad that a <Speech_Male> holly <Speech_Male> darcy. You guys are both able <Speech_Male> to join us <Speech_Male> and have this conversation. <Speech_Male> Because like mary and i said <Speech_Male> our last discussion <Speech_Male> about coping with sight <Speech_Male> loss <Speech_Male> did trigger a lot <Speech_Male> of questions. <Speech_Male> About <Speech_Male> what are the differences <Speech_Male> if any for <Speech_Male> people that were <Speech_Male> blind since birth. <Speech_Male> And i like <Speech_Male> that we did <Speech_Male> find. There are some <Speech_Male> things different that <Speech_Male> ultimately when it when <Speech_Male> it's all said and done as <Silence> we said a moment ago <Speech_Male> in <Speech_Male> the end we are <Speech_Male> very similar. <Speech_Male> Were in a very similar <Speech_Male> space and <Speech_Male> fighting advocating <Speech_Male> for the same thing <Speech_Male> and so. I'm glad <Speech_Male> that we've been able to have this <Speech_Male> conversation and <Speech_Male> really highlight <Speech_Male> that point. So <Speech_Male> i wanna thank <Speech_Male> you so much for coming <Speech_Male> on holly <Speech_Male> anderson. Dr <Speech_Male> bernard thank you guys <Speech_Male> for coming <Speech_Male> Please tell the <Speech_Male> listeners. What they need to <Speech_Male> know about what <Speech_Male> you guys are involved in <Speech_Male> with max. <Speech_Male> Disability roundtable <SpeakerChange> podcast. <Speech_Male> It's <Speech_Male> a podcast we <Speech_Male> do every two <Speech_Male> weeks. And it's just <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> sort of a <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> a group discussion <Speech_Male> on what's happening <Speech_Male> in. The world <Speech_Male> of apple <Speech_Male> entered of apple <Speech_Male> related technology. <Speech_Male> Sometimes it veers off. <Speech_Male> We've been talking a lot about <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Audio description and stuff <Speech_Male> lately. But <Speech_Male> that's <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> that's kind of what it is. We've <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> been doing it since <Silence> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> Actually doing for quite a <Speech_Male> while since <Speech_Male> early. Two thousand nine <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> and <SpeakerChange> so we've <Silence> <Advertisement> we've been <Silence> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> Doing for quite <Speech_Male> like bef- before the iphone <Speech_Male> is accessible. Actually <Speech_Male> when it was just a mac that <Speech_Male> was accessible. So <Speech_Male> yeah we do <Speech_Male> that and you can. <Speech_Male> You can find us <Speech_Male> at max's ability <Speech_Male> dot <Speech_Telephony_Male> or wherever <Speech_Male> you get <SpeakerChange> your your <Speech_Female> podcasts. <Speech_Female> And we strive <Speech_Female> to on thursdays <Speech_Music_Female>

"blindness" Discussed on Life After Blindness

Life After Blindness

02:02 min | 1 year ago

"blindness" Discussed on Life After Blindness

"Now. Let's advocate together and be in this big group or more and we can we can learn from each other and i think you might be easy to get upset when you are someone who's been blind since birth and then you see someone else getting upset that they're now having to deal with something you've dealt with your whole life but i mean i think the fact is okay. Yeah we are both were both groups of us are dealing with it now and we have to. We can learn from each other. And i think that's the the biggest thing is that you can always learn from other people you can always learn from from people who have Low vision or who are you know who recently lost all their sites and and if you are someone who has little vision You know when you're reading large print and if you're going to have different needs as far as what's going to work for you versus what isn't but i think we all have stuff we can learn from each other and we all can you know help each other and and all the i totally agree some of the best things that i learned after i started going to One of the organizations here in san diego called the braille institute was the best times was sitting before classes started in having coffee sitting around the table and speaking with other folks who are blind many of them blind since birth and learning just just life from them and almost to the point of me sitting. There thinking. I can do this. I can do this. They've been doing it their whole life. There they were. You know these these friends that i still have were a wealth of information for me for someone like me who had just lost the the lost vision and you know i give them all the credit for getting me into you know into para transit into writing. Ride shares all Talking prescription bottles the things that you know no one else is gonna tell ya but i was getting it from the source whether they'd been blind for twenty years or plans birth..

twenty years san diego braille institute both both groups One Ride
"blindness" Discussed on Life After Blindness

Life After Blindness

05:46 min | 1 year ago

"blindness" Discussed on Life After Blindness

"That that i just yes. Yeah and and so yeah there are. There are times that it's frustrating when you when you just don't have the concepts and no it's not like it's it's not like a huge like it's not like something i get like depressed about or anything. It's just like you know. I would like to know what that is and it doesn't it's not like i lose sleep over it or like we'll be nice to be able to do that. Nobody understand what that means. Or on sept of that you know right and that's how you guys have lived your life essentially born born and if something like that came into play for me now i was in dc and we were doing a tour where we're going to do a tour of the white house in any way didn't end up doing it but went to the white house museum. Well they had a you know a model of the white house down. You know scaled way down but it was for people to touch and feel like. Oh my god this is. This is it. This is yeah. This is awesome and never paid attention to it seven years ago. Just oh. isn't that nice But now i was like i was like eating it up and i'm like yes. Yes yes and this. And there are those pillars. Always seen pictures of it never been. It was always the postcard so but one now i was. I was missing out on was actually getting going and getting that visual of what that white house really looked like so as we said you know kind of in the beginning was we may have not had vision. If you will or any vision but up to this point now we all have that are in that experience of what does it look like. And how can we find out how it looks when it looks like and and the be it you know. Did i lose out on seeing what the white house well. Yeah but there's different ways. And i felt the model you know. They're and she kind of described.

seven years ago white house museum dc one white house
"blindness" Discussed on Life After Blindness

Life After Blindness

04:19 min | 1 year ago

"blindness" Discussed on Life After Blindness

"I don't know that it's it's like a loss or anything. It's just you know it's obviously the way i have to do things It does get frustrating You know and and different people are going to have that to different degrees. I don't have like different. People have different skills and different abilities. Some of my Skills or maybe not up to what they probably should be. I don't i think things. I can't do my own or things that you know. I might have to help with that. There's frustration there. Sometimes i mean. I don't i don't know honestly though because it's it's it's always been something that that you know that i had so. I don't know that i feel a loss. I feel you know there are famous and you're missing out on things. Yeah missing out on a sunset missing out on getting your driver's license right missing out on those your answers. Yeah right right. Get in the car and drive somewhere or like. We talked about earlier colors and that sort of missing out on being Books with or things that i would want to like like like looking on looking at the online world of online. You know when things all of a sudden like you know twitter's great you know facebook. I don't really facebook. But i mean it's pretty useful but now things like instagram are popping up and i know you can put comments on them but that that's a world that were never like things like the internet games and stuff like that things are never going to get like. Those are things that are ever going to the brain of laser instance Yeah and it's it's just frustrating visas. Ah the things like that and it's it's it it it is you. I hate it sometimes. When when we're missing out on things like things that we talked a lot about this before the show but things that like When things aren't described like you know different types of entertainment or not described Yeah audio described..

twitter facebook instagram
"blindness" Discussed on Life After Blindness

Life After Blindness

05:56 min | 1 year ago

"blindness" Discussed on Life After Blindness

"In my dreams. I rarely have my cane. So i know. I'll be walking outside and i'll be like feeling the There was one time. I was locked in where i was sitting on the ground. Like feeling my way to where it was going. Because i've driven in my dreams before and and even what am i. This is ridiculous. what am i thinking. I'm going to get. But i'm still going on like okay. Well i know approximately how long this road is starting. Need to turn and just like insane. But i have had that happen where that's funny. You've never even know yet. You dream that you've driven how interesting. Yeah it's just like and it's even at the time like this is ridiculous. But like i like. I'm like i'm already doing it so now to get where i'm going but this is completely. This is not good. This is a ridiculous thing that i'm doing but i'm i'm doing it so well i can talk to oddness of that. I think because sometimes in my dreams. I most of the time see in my dreams. Because i'm just reverting to what i could see in putting that in my dreams i guess but it's funny because i'll have conversations people my dreams and i'll see them or see what i think they should be looking like or see our surroundings and not walking by kane like i said but then it'll come up that i'm blind and the big. Oh he can't see or say will. Yeah that's great. But i can't see that so i acknowledge my blindness in my dream but i can still see in my dream walking around without a cane seeing everything looking at everything but then acknowledging talking about the fact that i can't see it was like an wake up and go watch. I don't i don't use my cane either. I have no problem getting ready to go. It's like in the dream..

one time
"blindness" Discussed on Life After Blindness

Life After Blindness

04:01 min | 1 year ago

"blindness" Discussed on Life After Blindness

"At the end of the day. 'cause it's like but it's still just words and i can memorize okay. Oranges is sort of red and red is like you know bright and dark but it's it gets sort of it. Gets you sometimes like doing it. I have. I have trouble with that too because people always try to explain colors and they always read is hot. Blue is cold. But that's not. Okay that's all well and good if you're talking about actual like actual hot and cold things but not all you know not all read. Things are hot so it's it's kind of it's very like i don't think it's something we ever really could get like someone who's never word not going to get sick. I wanna know like what you know what has like but it's it's it's weird it's and i don't always think about it but sometimes i do and i actually don't wear a lot of makeup because well i did wear it in high school in and stuff but i just don't want actually you don't need it you.

"blindness" Discussed on Life After Blindness

Life After Blindness

04:29 min | 1 year ago

"blindness" Discussed on Life After Blindness

"And and i don't really have as much of a problem with it now as i did then but it was just plus on are always like things with alliteration. That's where screen the switches. because i. i liked that one of the names ever when i first came across that podcast. Many many many moons ago on like this is awesome So that's like again it doesn't it doesn't bother me as much as it never really bothered me but it just it wasn't necessarily We talked with this before the show when pike casting. I started going There was a little bit of an attempt to start using the term casting. And i'm so glad that did not take off gadget. i just like We dodged a bullet there but And i think. I don t to me just never sounded like a term i wanted to use. I wrote i actually wrote a blog. Called is blind a bad word because nobody would use the word around me after. I lost my vision. And don't say don't it's the b word like don't say it and i got kind of calm. I just kind of grabbed it. Although i was still dealing with the whole fact that i had become legally blind in a short time in no time to prepare. And what was i going to do. I i never really I never really kept the word at arm's distance. Because i'm like well i am legally blind. That's just the way it is. And i also didn't know all the terms that were out there in the out there not until i really got into the communities and things like that and you know will you know. Obviously i'm okay with the word. Because i came out with my blog three months after i was deemed. Legally blind girl gone blind. And i've had people say like you're not blind. I'm like You know much to the near ophthalmologists. Yeah pretty much an and it's but it in on another point is that i think it's up to all of us to determine what we wanna use to identify our our site or lack thereof and you know people like vision disability which i think sounds kind of weird but vision disability vision loss as weird You know site loss blindness those things. I really feel that it's we shouldn't have to justify what we want to use As long as it's legit obviously but the b word as people in. I know people to this day. He will not use the word blind and again stemming from what my comments before was friends and family. They kinda stutter. Yeah you know she's she she can't really well you know she doesn't see real perfectly or they either blurted out like she's you know blind or they're like stay whisper it like she's normal and like it's a bad word like kansas can't sir..

first one three months after many moons ago pike
"blindness" Discussed on Life After Blindness

Life After Blindness

04:35 min | 1 year ago

"blindness" Discussed on Life After Blindness

"It just sounds rather terminology is a big thing especially when this is all you guys have known. Being blind from birth terminology could be awkward. And i can understand where some people say. Hey you know what. I don't watch it. I don't see it. And i get that but i'm with you from the standpoint of it just sounds more natural and for me and for you. I'm sure as well area. We had a time in her life where we were watching it and it and so. That's what we're familiar with and that was going to be one of my questions for you. Guys is terminology and if that bothers you offend you shoot. You've kind of answered that so. What about other types of terminology vision. Loss sight loss blindness Have a different product. Line that i wonder an and This would be an interesting thing to to know. I wonder if it if it is people who've who've lost their site later Aren't aren't how because because blind blind can carry a lot of baggage with it. I mean it's it's your it's a term people don't necessarily like and i think we've we've tried to move away from that and the current and it's changed many times because like you know i. It was blind than there was visually impaired. But the thing of one point people didn't necessarily visually impaired because it might mean like unattractive so they thought maybe vision impaired and and then the current terminology seems to be site loss and vision loss. And and that's fine if if we're talking about people Like the two of you who who have lost your sight but for me it. It doesn't sound accurate because You don't lose something you never had so i i'm perfectly comfortable with the term blind but then i grew up with it. You know it's it's something that that it's it's always been a characteristic to describe me you know one of one of the i mean everybody has a whole bunch of characteristics that described them and blind was one of them and so that might not be a characteristic..

two one one point one of my questions you one of them of
"blindness" Discussed on Life After Blindness

Life After Blindness

05:31 min | 1 year ago

"blindness" Discussed on Life After Blindness

"Obviously you would make friends in as you did that you just they would help you out and usually with friends. You didn't really have to a lot of educating it was more like they would just know what to do lose. That was my experience. It seem like a maybe because a lot of people. I was friends with especially younger rope with me. So maybe they just knew but yeah i didn't. I don't think ahead to do a lot of educating in that way i can think of anyway. Yeah i mean. I think it's just the kind of thing where you're i think you're constantly educating when you're when you're out just and you talk to people in people ask questions and you know people wonder how you're doing the things you're doing and and whatnot I was just out and about with a friend that i haven't really been in contact with and so we were out. Take care some some errands and running around doing some business and we were going up and down a lot of stairs and you know got the trustee kane out the whole thing but it's always helpful when you know someone says okay last two flat. You know you get to the platform. Many hit the next set of steps. But you know he didn't know that's what i need it so it was just again it was. It's been over six years for me now and it. Just you know different situation. Different friends that i said okay. You know it would be really helpful. If when i get to that flat part that you say flat. So i don't look like a prancing horse trying to you know see i have another step or not And he took it to heart and eat now he says you know last one to flat you know. Just i kind pr. I prefer to get a little bit of that detail when i'm doing steps. Not so much on the up but on the down because that that could get ruler. Really quit really. You know that last one can be a doozy. I can't and owen once that's where was brick and so for me with low vision. I still try to use a little bit of that bull be blurry and grainy and contrast works really well for me and So if there's no contrast it's just kind of nothing there's no depth perception for me so brick which is just all one color I mean there's no definition there's no nothing so for me. I think i can do it. But there's times i'm like yano i. Yeah you're going to have to kind of walk. Talk me through this one so yet. Another difference right. There is that i will having a little bit of vision and.

over six years two flat one color
"blindness" Discussed on Life After Blindness

Life After Blindness

04:43 min | 1 year ago

"blindness" Discussed on Life After Blindness

"Smile and then like her lips and then bucker lips and i can see the movement of the corners of her mouth. But that's it's like this dark line that i dec- movement yameen so so basically at this point that i'm very similar in that respect where there's nothing functional said. That happened to me later on. It started with me. As i mentioned the last episode in my early teen years and then got worse in my twenty s and by the time. I was in my early thirties. Basically i had no functional vision. And so that's why we wanted. Come together today to talk about this. Because review myself and derek talked about losing vision later in life but holly and rpm sheriff had similar but different experiences. And so guys. I'm really interested in this. Because i'm sure we'll get to all the burning questions that cited people always ask us like. Can you see when you dream or is your sense of smell and hearing like superman because you were blind since birth. You know we can talk about those things. But i think that starting kind of the beginning with what's what was your childhood like. Was it different with school. Different or things that you experienced or didn't experience because you were blind since birth. That might have been kind of a different upbringing for you. Holly once you take it. I i don't i mean i'll be. School is different because when braille and read braille and that kind of thing As far as i had a special class that will go to. But i was in a mainstream school. Mostly things were pretty much A normal childhood plant side. I was i was actually a cheerleader. I was on the t. ball teams i did. Mostly you know those things that you do when your kid. So i had a pretty normal childhood really other than learning braille and all that now as we know sometimes kids because they just don't know any better kids can say things because they don't understand or they're just not familiar with something for either of you darcy or holly. Was there ever any of that kind of interaction with other kids or anybody. That just didn't understand emotive.

today twenty s derek darcy Holly early thirties holly rpm
"blindness" Discussed on Life After Blindness

Life After Blindness

03:59 min | 1 year ago

"blindness" Discussed on Life After Blindness

"The round table from the max. Ability roundtable podcast. We have holly anderson. Holly thanks for having me. Thank you for being here. And we have. Darcy bernard darcy. Hello don't get to be here. Thanks for having me so guys of you. Of course as i said were blind at birth so if you could just take a few moments and tell us a little bit about that. What is your What is your blindness. Does it related to Tell us a little bit about that story. All right well for guess. It's that's the classic thing in podcasting. Right where like yes. Let's start with you. Darcy inevitably what happens is to people. Wait everybody's to talk and then everyone talks painlessly exactly exactly. Yeah dilemma. it's as i meant to say darcy. Let me do all right well. my Blindness is an eye condition. Called levers congenital morose. Which i don't really know a lot of the details of it other than it. Oddly there i think there are different variants of it but in my case the Retina and didn't develop properly in my eyes. It is a it's a combination of my parents. Jeans end strangely enough. There's no one else in my family That is blind and they when they first diagnosed my condition they thought that was kind of remarkable because often people who have this condition there are Like siblings would also have it. But i'm the only one of three. I mean i'm i'm have two siblings and a million who's who's blind so i have no No site at all not even light perception. I never have as far as i know. Some people have the the condition have have some degrees of that. But i don't have any any Like sensory input from is at all. God that's really geeky. Didn't it Slow yeah but yeah. That's that's that's where i am and.

holly anderson Darcy bernard Holly one Darcy first two siblings three a million darcy
"blindness" Discussed on Life After Blindness

Life After Blindness

02:58 min | 1 year ago

"blindness" Discussed on Life After Blindness

"Welcome to a blind point of view a round table conversation where we deep dive in the topics that affect the blind and visually impaired. My name is tim schwartz and joining me around the table this week. Four hour blind point of view is first of all my trustee lovely fantastic co host from girl gone blind dot com maria johnson maria. Welcome back. hi tim. It's great to be here and i'm really thrilled to be back at the table again while i'm glad to have you here and an notice i'm always trying to butter you up. I don't know what's up with that was trying to keep the gusts co hosts happy. You're doing a great job. Great job. I'll take it. I'll take it. I do what. I can do wanna mentioned before. I introduce our guest joining us this week. some people who heard our last round table podcasts. No derek daniel from life after site loss dot com had joined us and we were planning on that kind of being the the way we would do things where we would have the three of us either talking amongst ourselves or having a guest or two on to talk about a topic with us and unfortunately for us but fortunately for derek. He has had an amazing opportunity. Come up where he has been able to get a position somewhere and and do something. He's passionate about something that he loves. If you go to life after sightless dot com..

tim schwartz three tim two this week maria johnson derek daniel first derek Four hour blind loss dot com com maria guest
"blindness" Discussed on Life After Blindness

Life After Blindness

03:09 min | 1 year ago

"blindness" Discussed on Life After Blindness

"It's why will yet. So all of that being said. Then max you were talking about. You know things that you've learned that you're able to then share with other people to help them with their confidence building and help them get over those Those speed bumps of things that they're trying to deal with because you you've got that confidence and you've committed a few mistakes here and there in your life that you've been able to learn from As you know and the listeners know there's a segment that we do on life after blindness. Where i talk to people about things that have happened in their life because of their blindness the segment is because of my blindness and i like to ask people to talk about something that they've learned or an experience. They've had someone they've met. Whatever it might be something that because of your blindness may not otherwise happened or may not have otherwise. Been an experience that you would have had something you've learned from that you think is important to make sure other people hear about something that you can share with me and the listeners of something because of your blindness you know me. I'm a storyteller have more stories than i need Actually this question was just one is going to be hard. But i'm gonna. I'm to start with a little one and In two thousand and sixteen. I won the prestigious amtrak rising residents ward and i went off to new york city by myself for two weeks Wa- there because my blindness. Also because i'm a very friendly positive person. I i like to get my way with a with a handshake or a hug. And a smile as opposed to throwing a fit. Just the way i am during. The course of two weeks was in new york. I had a cab driver. Tried to give me as umbrella. I had another one refused to charge me. I had another fellow. Pick up my breakfast tab and this is all happening in manhattan new york city. Usa to brits from the uk had accent so thick. even i had trouble understanding him. When i got stuck at rockefeller center and couldn't get out because you can take a cab there but you can't take a cab away from rockefeller center. Two guys from england that walked up and throw money down to a to cuddle cabdriver and he takes me to go to go to my My schedule ago to go checkout wicked on broadway that night so those are the happen You know just in the space of a couple weeks. I do think that going back to this confidence thing. When it comes to pitching other people i think my blindness is definitely adviser. Because i don't get embarrassed as i think i mean When i was in new york the i was was shepherded by to skate yards at rockefeller center ice skating rink because it was crowded. And they didn't want me hurting myself hurting. The other patrons are one of the other patrons hurting me or so. They said one of those had to be true but the thing is is. I fell down two or three times last time after i got up. I told skate guards man. You should've taken my picture. You said what do you mean you. Nobody wants to see a picture of somebody laying on the ice. I said i said yeah. My followers walk because they know that the next picture will be back up again..

two uk england Usa new york brits Two guys two weeks amtrak three times manhattan new york city new york city two thousand one those rockefeller couple weeks rockefeller center sixteen
"blindness" Discussed on Life After Blindness

Life After Blindness

05:05 min | 1 year ago

"blindness" Discussed on Life After Blindness

"Join me as i interview someone about their journey with a life after blindness this week on life after going to spotlight i am joined by a man of many talents. You could say. He's an entrepreneur. He is an author blogger. Podcast her and former carney. Yes i did say former carney and we will get into that. I'm sure so this week. I'm joined by the blind blogger himself. Max ivy max. Welcome to life for blindness. Thanks town mom. Happy to be here and it's good to spend some time with you again absolutely. We had a preliminary discussion prior to this and found that we have a lot of different things in common not just our blindness but so many other interests in things so yeah. I'm sure we're gonna have a lot of fun Over time talking about different things wrestling and so many other different things that we have in common. Yeah yeah and i did. I did quit and one of the things we talked about. Was that in order to bring back the passion to my podcast. I needed to create an ideal guest list. Which i did. And while he's number. Twelve on their cody rhodes is on there. So that i can talk to him about his story of his entrepreneurial journey from you know turning his back on a big corporation family as starting out on his own which you know as you agreed with me is like the idea guests for excuse show exactly and we'll definitely talk about that because you are the host of what's your excuse the podcast and of course you have the blind blogger dot net where you get into a whole lot of things about yourself personally and different things that are happening in your life as i mentioned your son entrepreneur. You're an author so many different things that we can talk about. But as i always do i want to go back and kind of set the stage a little bit and talk with talk with you about where you've come from. I know that you do have retinitis. Pigmentosa and as many people might know that is hereditary. but it doesn't always pop up At birth necessarily so talk at the bow your childhood and your upbringing and so when our p. came into your life i was about four or five years old and i grew up in a family that was in the car. Business owes big family just like families in farming and ranching children mean free labor so My mom had five brothers and sisters..

Twelve five brothers this week five years old one Max ivy retinitis cody about four Pigmentosa net
"blindness" Discussed on Life After Blindness

Life After Blindness

07:50 min | 2 years ago

"blindness" Discussed on Life After Blindness

"Well first of all. I want to thank everybody who sent in their messages to me for blindness month and the because my blindness i had so many great submission so many things that people wanted to say. It was kind of a hot button topic maria when i went online and said okay i want some some recordings to share on the podcast. People were so eager to say. Oh i want to tell you about this. And i want to make sure that cited people aware of that or i would make sure that people who are losing their vision are aware of this and and we've heard that through these different submissions that i played throughout the month. So i'm really grateful to everyone for participating in the because of my blindness. This month now did say before that. That i was going to give you an opportunity to answer this so i know in the past. You've written some blog posts actually about this on girl gone blind dot com talking about things that you would want others to know. So so what. Would you say because of your blindness and your experiences. What would be something. You'd want to say for blindness awareness month. I i want to say that some of the things that those folks said are things that maybe i haven't even thought about myself so they're always good to hear from other people as well so i'm really glad that people do speak up when they do and they volunteer their thoughts Feelings on that topic as well. yeah so. I did write a blog. Gosh i don't even know what the date of this blog was but it was titled five things blind people shouldn't have to justify to anyone and it was one of my more popular logs. It still is pretty popular. But it's so back in the archives. That i'm not sure if people get back that far because my i've been doing my blog now for almost six years so it's it's way back there but i thought it would just touch on the five points. I'm not gonna take the whole podcast with this. But i'll just touch on a couple of the points. Sure the is. We're just things that. I came across personally for myself that i just found myself constantly explaining Justifying the people. And i just i just i just came to the point where i thought. Why am i always having to justify this stuff. You know why when. I shouldn't have to you know i really shouldn't have to so i just listed them and then i gave my reasons and all that stuff one of them are. I was I shouldn't have to justify if i want to use my cane or not now. Let me preface that by saying. I have low vision. I can see some what Not super clearly My vision is like looking through. Frost frosted glass and i have no central vision. So i've had people say to me like Aren't you gonna take it your cane. Aren't you gonna use your cane. Get your cane out. We'll send us. They don't want to use my cane. Maybe i'm familiar with the area. Right made them in. You know maybe. I just wanna use a sighted guide. You know. it's my choice to use a cane. It's it's if i'm comfortable using the cane So i shouldn't have to justify why i want to or don't want to use a cane. Another thing was how. I want to identify my vision loss. If i want to say. I have vision loss. I can say. I have vision loss if i want to say i'm legally blind. I can say. I have legally blind if i want to say. I have a vision disability. That's i can say. I have a vision to somebody. I can identify my vision loss. Anyway i want to. I have been accused of people saying you're not blind and i'm like well last time i was at my doctor's is still was differ with you. Yeah yeah pretty much deemed legally blind november two thousand thirteen so But you know there's people that would battle with me on this. And i mean if i want to say yeah i just i don't see well. Well that's my choice so you know don't don't make me justify what terminology Use to describe my blindness. So there you go just don't make me do it The other thing is don't make me justify why i'm asking for help kind of like that. One oh i am asking for help because i need help now if i could do whatever it is i would do it. I'm asking for help. Because i can't do it all right. So that's why. I'm asking for your help now when i asked for help i can tell when you're putting on that fake friendliness and say okay. Fine i'll help you. I'll just be a me in it and then we can tell your voice. The tonio voice speaks so much louder than your words. We can tell when you don't want to help us just by the sound of your voice so if you think you're being so you know Sneaky and making it sound like you're okay with helping us. Yeah you're not okay. We can tell so again. Just keep in mind. We're only asking because we need the help. Not because we're wanting to bother you okay. That's that's just how it is all right so don't blame us all right. We don't really want your help but we we just need much prefer to do it on our own. We would our independence however yeah a good thing always remember is. You've got to be able to ask for help asking for the help sometimes half battle for us so once we've gotten to that point where we we've gotten over that hump and we are now comfortable enough to ask for the help we've shut down the pride swallow their pride and we ask. That was such a big step. So yeah exactly. Don't make it harder for us rate. Don't ravel tell me or can't if it's a matter of you don't want to or you can't whatever okay you know. Be nice about it but tell me you're not able to or you'll try later and and that's okay. I'm okay with that. If you're not able to or not comfortable just tell me that you know. Yeah that simple. Simple i mean in but what is the worst is when. It's you know when you when you're just faking it and because you feel you have to oblige to our request but you don't want to You know we can't tell if you're busy or not. We can't tell what you're doing and if we're asking at the wrong time we we sometimes can't tell so. Give us a break. You know always doing something right now. Were you busy are you. I know it's almost like. Oh i don't wanna bother you but so you know it's like i said it's you know we it's hard enough. It's hard enough so give a break but and then yes just say. Hey i can't right now but can give me five minutes and a hope. He'll so yeah. I've i've I spoke at a conference and that was one of the big topics i spoke about. Which was you know asking for help So the other thing. And tim this goes for you and i.

five points five minutes maria one This month november two thousand thirteen almost six years first dot com one of them tonio five things One
"blindness" Discussed on Life After Blindness

Life After Blindness

02:50 min | 2 years ago

"blindness" Discussed on Life After Blindness

"Schwab blind people are not fragile and helpless. And we're not mindless we are just sightless that's it. Oh hi tim. So the first thing i would say is learned to ask for help. You'll save yourself a lot of australian and there's no shame in asking for help. There's no shame in being blind or so. Shame certain things you may not be able to do So shaming the first thing. The second thing is i see this with certain by folks. I almost think that poor self esteem low self esteem is more than disability than the blindness. Because if you don't have that confidence self esteem than pobably may not go to Post secondary education. You may not apply for a particular job. Like i think confidence self esteem is a big problem in the black community. And i'm not sure why that is but if you get rid of the shame learn to ask for help and i would say when you're talking to cited folks don't make it always above blindness. I i know people who it's always joke about. The about blind are always. It's it's it's too one dimensional then Were more than just wouldn't we're more than that we're blind. We're we're a person and we have all the other features just like everybody else does I would say not to make it all about blindness fact a lot of my clients a lot of my friends. They always forget. They always forget that i'm blind. You and then they'll say something. Oh sorry i forgot. I forgot your blind. You might ask me whatever it might be. What kind of car do you drive. Or whatever and say oh. That's good that's that's a compliment really in a way because because i don't make it always about me and my blindness i don't go there by. I won't talk about it if But it's just one part of who i am it's not all who i am Yeah so when you're out in a boat sure people are going to be looking at you going to see with the guy dog and see what the white cane however they're not pitying you they're not Making fun they're not what they are doing is third miring for being out there because they would you know they're thinking i could never do that and.

second thing first tim first thing one part australian third
"blindness" Discussed on Life After Blindness

Life After Blindness

08:11 min | 2 years ago

"blindness" Discussed on Life After Blindness

"I'm glad you had a great time. Yes one of those things where you can do as little or as much as you want you want to do. Absolutely nothing just lay in a chair with a drink or whatever and just soak up the sun and do nothing. You can do that but if you wanna do all of for active like you said or just whatever you have the choice in. They definitely have many many things for you to do. I talked about this a little bit earlier this year. Because i had done an interview with their senior cruise director john healed and he told me about all the wonderful things that carnival cruise line does for people that are blind visually impaired and a really enjoy going on cruises especially carnival because of all the things that they do to make things so accessible so if anybody missed that interview aleve linked to it in the show notes but Yeah is a lot of fun. There's so many great things you can do. Like i said and i. It's funny marie. I was telling you about this before we got started. They sent me the first day. Their daily basically their daily rundown of everything. That's going on the ship and they sent it to me in large print onto pages of poster board. That's probably almost as tall as i am. And i'm six foot four. I i love it. It's great if i had vision had been fantastic for me. I prefer to use their app. Which is mostly accessible. I'd say it's probably probably about ninety percent accessible. So i can see all that same information through their app using voice over my phone but it was really kind of cool that they set me. This big to page large prints daily paper and in addition to that on our television screen. They're welcome channel or whatever. It is where they talk about all the things going on board and all that they had that audio described for the blind. It was so neat to get right on board go to my cabin and have all accessibility right from the beginning. Wow they have a lot of options there. I mean anywhere you turn. You probably would be able to find something that you could look at or listen to to find out what's going on and to have large print on poster board size pieces of apor awesome. I mean that's awesome now. I have low vision and so something like that would work for me. Although i would probably prefer the voice over version probably get more detail. It has honestly the large print would probably be daunting you know for me to read but nevertheless that's a pretty cool option. I'd have to say well absolutely. And i'm just appreciative. Like i said they do those things. There computers that they have in their library have screen readers on them. They have areas for guide dogs to go to relieve themselves. They also will assign a person to you. So say for instance if you are in your cabin and you need assistance getting somewhere. Nobody's around to help guide you. You can call the number and they will send somebody to come. Get you in and help navigate you to wherever it is. You need to go to on ship. So there's so many different things that they do to make it accessible to make the enjoyment be for everybody. They actually have a lot of initiatives for for different disabilities. I was looking at something recently where they are doing different things for people that are deaf. Blind actually Being able to sign for the death as well as described with like drawing pictures on their back When they were watching a performance in one of the theaters they had somebody signing into their hands in in front of them and then a different person. You know basically drawing Things on their back which sounded really kind of cool. So that they do all that. I think is fantastic. But anyway i digress. I could talk about my vacation all day long. And and so if i don't move along we we will be stuck in the caribbean for tower. Which isn't a bad thing to do. As a matter of fact that's not a bad thing. But now i want to go on a cruise so absolutely absolutely. We've already got her next one planned for next winter We're gonna do another family cruise and really like you said before. Went one quick point before we move on when you start adding up the costs if you were to travel or going to vacation anywhere else after you've done the hotel and your food and your entertainment and all that kind of stuff really. It's competitive pricewise. Go on a cruise and you can get so many things you're talking about food twenty four seven and drinks and entertainment in so many different things that you can do. So so yeah i. I encourage anybody that that is looking at a vacation. If you're already going to be spending money on a vacation look into a cruise. Because there's so much to do and they are so accessible nowadays but anyway moving on maria. We have so much to talk about this week. Maria because later on in the news we have some things coming from google. Or they've updated their google maps app to help the blind visually impaired a little bit as well as an update to the google chrome browser. There's plug ins and extensions that you can use for. Google chrome and google has added something for us there as well. So little teaser. There for you also in the news we talking about a study that was done recently over the last eight years or so. I believe out of taiwan where they're talking about sleep apnea being a problem especially for people that are diabetic and leading to other forms of blindness. So we'll get to that later on in the show but first up maria as you might know i try to start every episode off with a segment that i call because of my blindness away way back when i did my spotlight interview with you We actually did a bit on this as well where you talked about some things because if you're blindness so you were gracious enough the to answer that question for me in the past because of it being blindness awareness month. I thought it would be interesting this month. To have people say things that either they want other people that are blind to know about or they want people maybe that are in the beginning of the journey losing their vision to know or maybe a message that they wanted cited people to hear so i. Maria is to listen to a few more of these missions that ever see from people online and then on the back end will have you add to this as well so here are some more stories because my blindness for blindness awareness month the mon- then a garden to this. This disticts sta statistics. I like that one of only four percent all registered blame people who are totally blind and my point is for those who are still able to see whether it's shot is whether it's whatever he should always explain to friends exactly what you're coming and if they don't take on board let's look after that the fair game for your comments of ability to help you when you are a visually offend that one of the embarrassment because under adult big on Winded too much whereas if adult people are say problem did smooth. The we saw del cited possible sighted or visually. Embiid people to tell people about your this on what you don't what he the point late with the day to the stage where the boarding and buddha video deathly division with all black diggle do that being blatant people though. The blind are still very capable people. I looking at goodsell out the market to get on your program. After the dog.

Maria six foot john healed google taiwan next winter google maps app this week twenty four first one first day marie last eight years four percent maria earlier this year this month about ninety percent caribbean