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Fresh update on "black community" discussed on Chuck Dizzle

Chuck Dizzle

00:47 min | 26 min ago

Fresh update on "black community" discussed on Chuck Dizzle

"It's Hollywood. A lot from Jason Lee Yeses deejay damage with us today. Civil rights leader Reverend Al Sharpton. Alright now, Reverend Al, I have to ask you. What do you think about when Barack Obama was in office and a lot of people used to say he didn't do enough for black people in the black community? Barack Obama. Oh, With president He was not King. He had to fight like hell to get anything done and got the affordable care got a lot of the things done that no other president did. Put the can alone 23 million people get out insurance that never had disproportionately black fighting to keep voting rights was where they would tell you. Some of these states in the vote at the zoo. He did that for us on and on and on. He would meet with us and tell us. Look, that's what we're trying to do. You go out there and force this The thing that you do as president, you don't set the agenda of the community you lead the community, said the agenda and you try to get it done. We wanted Obama march on himself. You don't leave the marches against the president. He was the president and I think that a lot of us got the role mixed up that he's supposed to have done everything. He can only do what you can do and then get the Senate and the Congress go along. I think he didn't tremendous job, NASA Some point, and I feel like right now We're just in the middle of this Cancel cultures. It feels like an epidemic. I want to know how you feel like we can re program this self hate that's coming up next Hollywood or not. Look, I live the life I deserve less of a castle. Better that we're I mean, whatever is worth I give whatever works for my new go to hell. And back for me. I'm gonna give him heaven under for a hell of a checkout, whichever.

Barack Obama Reverend Al Sharpton Reverend Al President Trump Hollywood Jason Lee Yeses Nasa Senate Congress
"black community" Discussed on The Odd Couple with Chris Broussard & Rob Parker

The Odd Couple with Chris Broussard & Rob Parker

02:29 min | 4 d ago

"black community" Discussed on The Odd Couple with Chris Broussard & Rob Parker

"Well, you know not play. I was man I was making a hundred fifty thousand dollars, my foot, the rams, two hundred, and they were saying I was overpaid. And elway and Marino was making a million five and the me, and that's what I wanted. I wanted a million dollars, and they thought I was crazy, because I just wanted I just wanted to be fair. I, said because at that point, the running back was. Running you know because we will feature guys. I mean. I was doing with a quarterback was. So I just feel like for then that era. We deserved when we never I finally got him when I got the Indianapolis. You know but it's just. It's different era. I mean like you said it best right now. That's the disappointing. They WanNA throw everything they wanNA. Talk about it these two backs. You know you want to show you how smart they are! Look at that Iran. This say USC. You haven't seen the play like this before, but you know you still need to run the football. I mean in in Tennessee dairy candidate Dallas. Cowboys running football teams. You can run in Carolina with McCaffrey. Just up, so many things yeah when you can run the football and you're not one dimensional, no doubt about it, but it'll be interesting to see plays out, but I don't blame. Running backs who are going to fight to get paid? You know what I mean, Eric. Because once you get used up to tell you. Hey, we can't. We can't pay you. You know you've got all the carriage you've had so. You have to, and you might not even be beat up, but they start looking at you know what to me. Start listening to these these so-called. Experts say back when he has this. Many cares you know he's. Just over the hill I mean that meant I had three hundred eighty cares the thing. My first year, four hundred and four carries the next year, so I busted that all out, and then the next year I think ahead another full four hundred cares in my field out of here so. It just depends on the guy. It depends on the player. I was a player that I. Mean I could take the punishment. I wouldn't have got their got beat up easily. Eric and we got about a minute left Cam. Newton you see going to New England. How do you think that's GonNa? Work out for him and the team. If Cam can could stay healthy I, think I think it'd be great. I. Mean I cam has a lot of football left any I. Mean I just feel like this. It's really insulting that they pay him a million dollars minimum wage for guy, the first round draft pick up. The MVP or the Super Bowl.

Eric football rams Cam elway USC Indianapolis Newton Iran MVP Carolina Tennessee Marino Cowboys Dallas New England
Fresh update on "black community" discussed on Radio Surgery

Radio Surgery

00:37 min | 54 min ago

Fresh update on "black community" discussed on Radio Surgery

"Three times a night to urinate. He was offered medications to urinate better. Why should he get biopsy? Well, number one. Is a black van in the black community. One of six placement get prostate cancer. One in 23 will die of prostate cancer is from Jamaica in the Caribbean. There's lots of cancer. Cancer Center. I've met with government there. We treat men and women and shoulder of every race and religion and create and colored origin and belief. We're talking about the black community because there's so much prostate cancer, and if you give a heads up, we hope that men and women and Children will get earlier diagnosis when the treatment is much more successful. So for this man, we explained, there's a 30% chance if there's three men like him with a PSA about 6.5 is a chance of getting that cancer is about one and 31 of those three men will have cancer. That's a reason to come here. Many men come here and many women come here for cancer checkups been comfort crossed another things Women come for. Breasts and other things were here. That's something that we do every day at 13 80 for Broadway is cancer screenings. So you're welcome to make a date just cause that two and two choices. Two and 2246 40 to 37 to 12 to 46 40 to 37.

Prostate Cancer Cancer Center Jamaica Caribbean Broadway
"black community" Discussed on The Odd Couple with Chris Broussard & Rob Parker

The Odd Couple with Chris Broussard & Rob Parker

03:55 min | 4 d ago

"black community" Discussed on The Odd Couple with Chris Broussard & Rob Parker

"Yeah, but I think the bigger issue is is the I'm just saying out of the stuff that he said to me bigger was, but I think that. I don't think a kid goes. Oh, I I'm not play baseball because they will be mad if I flip the bat, I, just don't believe. Saying. That, there's no. Kidding say and also I. Don't see any black managers I. don't see any black front office. I'm not playing day. Stop the NFL, Chris. Pulling. That's nobody's because of that I think. What percent black and they got three. GM's baseball has one and seven percent. I mean if you were to take a look at it, honestly the NFL's. Far Worse. Where where league where set three quarters of the players are black, and there are no. Backlash, my point is. A factor in why kids aren't playing. Actually do think what he said is there? That's one of the factors I don't think it's the main one or even one of the top two or three, but I do think it's a factor okay. I'm just saying when we talk about it, but what he's talking about what the travel teams and the showcases and thousand dollars a weekend the plane these big game discovered. Go Chris I one hundred percent this. This has eliminated a lot of people. We saw the baseball coach at Michigan who talked about it openly. That's not where he was going to get his players Chris. He won just GonNa look there that there were a lot of other good players. We watched them Michigan in the College World Series Tournament. Chris and they had three or four guys black players who were starters on that team and it was very noticeable and when they talk to the. T bought boarded up himself. Who is not a black coach he's. so that is an issue and Desmond has a point there. Yeah and I think. Like I said I do think. That, it's becoming a a sport for the a fluent or like a lot of the kids. Even even the black kids that play a lot of them were from. Families that have a lot of money we eat from Salaam enjoys rice to come and talk about how their kids are playing baseball, but there there are those guys are rich. They played. They played pro football. They played both pro football, and so in the in the inner cities. I do think as I brought up, I think. The fatherless-ness in that's really plagued. The inner cities now has become an issue with it. I think is one of the many where you know a lot of times. You Fathers Are the ones teaching you coaching. You throw in the ball with you hitting the ball, so you can feel grounders and things like that, and it's just not a lot of them. They're in certain segments, inner city populations, and so I think that's a factor, too. What would you do rob like? 'cause you. You brought it up, they stay. RBI program reviving baseball in inner cities in nineteen, eighty nine. And I got a friend who play college. D One College baseball season to get owner holder with the Yankees very much into baseball. He coached at an inner city school. Here Newark High School and the kids are just so far behind. You know by that point like they haven't played a ton day. They're not getting the coaching and the training that the kids in east travel teams and stuff for getting, and even though they may be athletic it. Is Tough. I've seen it both sides because I have. Godson who play baseball? J. C. is my Godson. Chris he is Jr. Gamble who use on the show right forbe's Rawal from the shadow league. And he's all into based bossie nothing, but he they travel..

baseball Chris College baseball NFL Michigan football Godson GM forbe Desmond Salaam shadow league Newark High School Yankees J. C.
Fresh update on "black community" discussed on PodcastDetroit.com

PodcastDetroit.com

00:40 min | 1 hr ago

Fresh update on "black community" discussed on PodcastDetroit.com

"Our energy should not be in the black community. It should be in the white community and we have to. We that was the whole point of the show is to really open up the issues of racism in the white culture and to address the white culture. And the greatest support from the show came from the black community. And thank you by the way all of you wonderful wonderful people, all of you for for supporting us in the way that you did and all your likes and and listening in. On deeply deeply. Appreciate it and what I want to say to. The white community is open up your ears for sakes come on, it's like with all issues. We have to talk about it, and we have to look at it and we have to see a problem. We have to own it and we if we can get more comfortable in dealing with it and talking about it instead of being afraid. Then we've got a chance for change. Then, that's what it comes down. All leads to that. We have to make change yes. Yes, we do the bottom line and we have to know there's a problem we have to own their we. We've talked about the history in the United States. We've tapped on some of the stories that have led to this problem. And if we don't look at that, and we don't look at those cycles, we have no chance to change it and as in the white community, we owe that to the black community. We owe them that. If not they shouldn't trust us. Plan simple if you aren't gonNA. You know it's like when we're doing couples therapy. You got one partner. That's in there working their ass off. The other one keeps saying it's just your fault. And there's a certain point where you know what that loved that was. There is resentment and is going to destroy that relationship. If you don't own and participate. It's not going to change. And? That's up. I'm using eft up instead of the real world we're. In Barbara you know what I'm saying. You and I've had these conversations over and over again so when I look at whoever is in that feed doing these comments. When I first read you again had. In deleting you, because obviously didn't listen to the FRICKEN show, okay? Can we talk about ignorance for a minute and how dangerous it is? kimmy break. And I want to say to the white community where the hell area. Where the hell are you if you listen to the show? No one is attacking. You were trying to get to resolution. People don't be afraid to listen. It's very very important. This is not GonNa Change unless you listen. Mother. And even get ya I. Mean even now. I think you've just wasted enough. Breath on them. Yeah, I really do. Yeah, it's all. Mother I. See I was back in New York this last week. My mouth is real. It's real data and I had to go back to New York to help my father unfortunately, because he got sick and I was telling David have a stepmother. That's very interesting person. But I kept slipping up on the land. You know they're always. You know like language whole God, no Oh. These are old school Italians. Oh. You don't think they would like that. Language and my daughter and I wrote stairs I kept dropping the bomb. Know my daughter's going to be twenty people hang on their. Don't judge And so my mouth, and now that I'm back, it'll be a good now. My daughter's going to sit in the other room and say she's not taxing from swearing. She swears all the time. and. It's true. I. Don't think she's listening. She had no react. Over talks from cursing. Is. It a swear jar a certain. That's what a lot of money value detox dude. When the kids were little, we had a swear jar and we took it to church. We the kids okay now. Mom and dad are going to put money in the swear jar. And then when we go to church, which was not often. We're GONNA. Give it to the priest for the pastor. And so I stuck not swear jar saying this money's donated to you because my mom and dad swear. And every time they swore they put a quarter. And it was like twenty dollars. Wow, over two weeks like it was ridiculous. Yeah we did that? Did the the preschool with the kids and say hey, make them swear more well. I was more money. Hoping that even laugh and it was funny, but yeah, so anyway, my. Obviously started us off my experience. You know. Jesus, my F- The first thing that comes is some of these responses that I got. And my frustration with people. Crow have these damn opinions that don't educate themselves and. When I talk about educate yourself. You know this one particular White Supremacists Neo Nazi. person was obvious because. His data his facts. Were not. They were not they were very. Very degrees your cracking. Without a script, I think. Okay. Here's the thing. I've been doing this work for years Seattle. And I can I see that you got shook out y'all and rightfully so. You cannot ever get used to the to the. Assaults troll comments. I mean it's ugly. At of interview, sensitive person which you are. It. It really can stay with you, but I have learned over the years. Because I've been called all sorts of things believe you me. All kinds of names from African tall, just recently I was told by a guy that you know what you should be lucky if slavery were to come back. Even your skin tone. You'd have to be one of the house sneakers. Yeah well. So I. Want to tell you this. She tell you that. In this line of work. You GotTa realize that we are working against a group of people who have already made up their minds. Yup that this is how they see.

Black Community New York United States Partner Barbara Seattle Crow David
"black community" Discussed on The Odd Couple with Chris Broussard & Rob Parker

The Odd Couple with Chris Broussard & Rob Parker

03:33 min | 4 d ago

"black community" Discussed on The Odd Couple with Chris Broussard & Rob Parker

"Minorities. You got to be careful because of the the the huge numbers for. Hispanic players that have only gone up so I think that that you know what I 'cause basically African American exile. We look just. Right I mean let's face right. Let's twenty seven percent Latin like that's a huge nominees number. But I will say this Chris. His part about the money and being accessible to everyone. I, think that's his strongest argument and his biggest argument. 'cause I brought up the other thing about the the flair whatever that they don't like or whatever we talked about with the NFL. And what went on a few years ago, the NFL's reversed its track, but it did at one point penalize you, remember Te'o Chris with the popcorn pop pompoms, and and all the stuff that used to go on, but now they've relaxed was letting. US know. My point is I don't think that that argument about the white rules is as strong when when I, but is there any credence to a little bit, but I don't think that that's I think that I think that pitchers have always been that way Chris even, and this is my point, even when Bob Gibson was a pitcher, black pitcher wanted the greatest black pitchers who ever played in the Game Chris, if you at home off Bob Gibson, and you show boated. You know what happened. When you got back up the next time. He throw at you. I would also argue at that time. Blacks were blacks were just conform to what they had to do. Now I'm just saying I mean that was I got the part of the point. In time, it was like. I'M NOT GONNA. Come in here and mess it up for the rest of our I'm there's no unity. Robinson bid his tongue 'cause you know in the Negro Leagues. It was a lot more colorful. No Pun intended some of the things they would do like I just think like the bat flip. What's wrong with a backflip? I. Actually, yes, you, when I don't think you need to black players, Chris, I think Hispanic players bat flip more than black players. That? Would you with that rob? Gee what drew? Out or like. Be. Why should that be? You can't do that. Why can't you show a little? You know personality like a Lotta, times. We've talked about it before and I. Don't necessarily agree with it, but it is what it is when we're on. The debate shows television wise. We're on national. Most national radio shows. They aren't talking baseball when they do tend to talk baseball, it is because the guy said something kind of off the wall or did something. I don't want to get into the. Or not to another argument we could have, and that's no I'm not talking about this. I'm just saying storylines is my point. Storylines and personality are what drives sports today other than football. Football's just king, because it's it's just on a whole `nother level, but basketball route. What is made basketball so popular the storylines, the personalities of the players, the social media like people are just into these guys, personalities, and the unique creativity and things they bring baseball kind of squelches that I mean Bryce. Harper's has said it. That we gotta let guys have fun more. That's what the fans want..

Chris Bob Gibson baseball Negro Leagues NFL US basketball Football Harper Robinson rob Bryce
Fresh update on "black community" discussed on All Things Legal

All Things Legal

00:21 min | 3 hrs ago

Fresh update on "black community" discussed on All Things Legal

"WWL TV's do Carter as details on another man shot in central city He was shot near the corner of Marla thinking and a Simon Bolivar just before midnight. We don't know what led up to that shooting, or if officers are looking for any suspects, Of course, if you have any information about that shooting incident, call police just before nine o'clock last night, there was a shooting in the 3100 block of Saint Claude. That left too. Juvenile female suffering from wounds. About 25 minutes Earlier, police were called to Decatur and Bienville in the French quarter. Police say a male victim was shot and taken to the hospital. A man from North Louisiana died in a fireworks related incident. W W. Wells. Matt Doyle tells us that happened in Monroe Memorias Hollins was holding a mortar round that accidentally was set off while I was pointing at his leg. The explosion did significant damage to his left hip area, which resulted in Holland's death later that day. Small group used the Fourth of July to gather intra made a call for reparations for blacks in the United States. About two dozen people called for paying those of African descent for the enslavement of their ancestors and the ongoing impact to the black community. The very least we can do the very least we can do is be out here in support of reparations and figure out what it means to really rebirth A nation.

Simon Bolivar Monroe Memorias Hollins Saint Claude Matt Doyle Marla Carter North Louisiana W. Wells United States Black Community Bienville Decatur Holland
"black community" Discussed on The Odd Couple with Chris Broussard & Rob Parker

The Odd Couple with Chris Broussard & Rob Parker

02:58 min | 4 d ago

"black community" Discussed on The Odd Couple with Chris Broussard & Rob Parker

"New Direction and I'm enjoying and Eric so it's been going great. Thanks thanks rob. We're not your older brother. That's. We're we're? We're we're different? We're different view. We have a very different staff. And we're taking on story that I think that I think matter I think sports. Fans read about nine been great. There'd been great stories, and in fact you were one recently about that. We talked about at the beginning of the show in Desmond, and how here like baseball? Obviously, there's the percentage of African. American players in the League has really dropped his down to seven and a half percent. do you think Ian Sad? That baseball is failing? African Americans that he's less European. Minorities because that's what he saying. Did you say minorities or black okay? Minorities, how is not failing Latino and that's what that's. That was my point. That's why I was asking. Okay. So, what would you think? Well I think that he makes makes a great point, and I'm very curious team like. You, when I was growing up when I was a kid I played little league I play literally got Queen. You know that was common They weren't traveled. My family didn't have to cough up kill forty fifty thousand dollars a year. Baseball and that's where we're at and who can pay can afford that. And who can afford to take these weekends off? So got says to me that a certain demographic of this country is getting an opportunity to succeed in baseball while another demographic is not and I worked demographic. We're talking about here you. Know there's. No way you could dispute the expense of it and we saw the Michigan Baseball coach who also broke that down, Eric, the and the other part I talked about is. The academies which they've set up in Latin America. That's why because Hispanic players their numbers have gone through the roof. Opposite so when you look at Brown, players you talking about what does it Chris Twenty, six percent, twenty seven percent, his twenty, seven and seven makes thirty four now about a brown players. Rice Ball. Of many more than more than ever, players of color knows you got. Thirty, some odd percent about thirty five thirty six percent of the League is of color. I WANNA ask my uncle. We were talking about where out of black players are he said well. They got plenty of black players. They just blacks born in the Caribbean. When I was going well when I was a kid, I used to think that there were more black players actually work because someone had somebody that was stars. Have you didn't have you know you know black players that were you know middle infielder, as or you know. Riding the bench. Your Star players on your team, so it'd be the impression. That there was there were there were so many of them, but they weren't..

baseball Ian Sad Eric Chris Twenty Caribbean Desmond Michigan Latin America Brown
Fresh update on "black community" discussed on ABC Perspective

ABC Perspective

01:12 min | 4 hrs ago

Fresh update on "black community" discussed on ABC Perspective

"Get Blitz or call 800 Newsmax for the free offer. At least 13 people are dead, 68 have been injured and shootings over Chicago's holiday weekend as of this morning, including several Children, according to the Chicago Police Department. The victims include a seven year old girl who was killed around seven yesterday evening while riding her bike at her grandmother's house shot in the forehead after two unknown suspects fired more than 20 rounds. CPD crisis responders Andrew Holmes urging members to come forward community members. If they have any information for somebody on the street. I say somebody on the street no shooters were Somebody on the street Know who took the child's life. One professional athlete takes his message to print A bee sees Yoon Hee Han has more basketball star Carmelo Anthony, showing some new moves as guest editor in chief for Slam magazine. The 10 time eh? NBA All Star included his son in the cover shoot because he wants to reach young people with his message of social justice. He's 13 years old. He's at that age, where He started really understanding a lot of the things that's happening in a lot of the things that transpired already slams. New issue focuses on social justice Through the lens of basketball, 100% of proceeds will go to charity supporting black community issues. You neon baby seniors English pubs, making their comeback in a royal way. Reopening after Corona virus restrictions close 35,000 establishments. Since mid March. Restaurant hairdressers in cinemas in the UK were also allowed to reopen this weekend. This is ABC News..

Yoon Hee Han Chicago Police Department Chicago Carmelo Anthony Slam Magazine Andrew Holmes NBA UK ABC Editor In Chief Corona
"black community" Discussed on The Odd Couple with Chris Broussard & Rob Parker

The Odd Couple with Chris Broussard & Rob Parker

02:44 min | 4 d ago

"black community" Discussed on The Odd Couple with Chris Broussard & Rob Parker

"You're turned away in. Why do college athletes seem new a speak-out moral social issues than even the pros right now are ready. Let's do it. Let's do Gw in Cincinnati. You're on the couple of Fox sports radio what's up. What's going? On Chris. Actually I don't believe that they do Chris. Let this issue. pro athletes don't have to deal with what they had to deal with on some of those Campbell pro athletes don't have to deal with some guy in the locker room or some guy apart organization. Saying what he said against George Floyd I mean what if I'm not mistaken? The James's got together like some of the greatest avenue in America. Voting drive and there are a lot of people that are against that. He's got lots of money, but he decided he wanted to do that so i. know I I mean I. appreciate what what what they're doing. But on college campuses, and what's going on in corporate America by two different world you. Here's what would have ended I and we're not. We're not in any way trying to downplay what the pro athletes are doing including. Lebron, yes, but the college athletes are making a sacrifice. That I've only seen the Colin Kaepernick May. Of Today's current athletes like they. We can't even get the Washington redskins play. Thank you say we're not playing for you as long as the nickname with the team. That's all take Chris. It would be over in five minutes. No question, no question, no loss of pay nothing Chris for our I refuse to wear that helmet now. I'm not wearing that helmet, and unless you change it, none of us a plan. What what what? What would Daniel Snyder do say? Oh, you're all fired and I'M GONNA? Go get riots. We're going to wear the helmet. Is that what do you absolutely right? Come on absolute, and that's what we these college players are putting. Are Sacrificing. Yes, they've made their automate. Even no, no, they don't know Cook Chris. If to coach is going to retaliate against him, or or what's going to happen to them? Or maybe they had aspirations go into the pros or something else. There's a whole big thing is a lot of unknown, and these kids are willing to step up I'm with you Robert in Georgia. You're on the odd couple Fox sports radio WHAT'S UP ROB. Garza doing do. You. Give me a second two points here. One reason why I think probably prayer the speaking out because we know today. Out Do, you think. They'RE GONNA get into backlash at this point in time and. What's going on, so no, no athletic director coaches going back backlash them because they will.

Chris George Floyd America James Cincinnati Washington redskins Colin Kaepernick Garza Daniel Snyder Lebron director Fox Robert Georgia
"black community" Discussed on The Odd Couple with Chris Broussard & Rob Parker

The Odd Couple with Chris Broussard & Rob Parker

04:35 min | 4 d ago

"black community" Discussed on The Odd Couple with Chris Broussard & Rob Parker

"The crew has taken over your Monday night and this season when the global pandemic blows into the Windy City, everything changes for the crew in the blink of an eye. See what happens. Happens with Ryan's no longer at the top of the ink game because nine Max shutdown, or how charmaine handles giving birth to her first child in the middle of a crisis, and what's the deal with Ryan and kitties relationship? Anyway? We'll just returned from London to save second city. Inc I've got so many questions. I know. I'll be tuning in for the premiere. PREMIERE OF BLACK INK crews Chicago on its new night. This Monday there is no telling what will happen when love life in the city of Chicago put on pause, and the ink crew is pushed to the limit. The new season of black crews Chicago premieres on an all new night Mondays starting this. Monday at eight PM. Seven central only on vh one. All right is the Chris arrived wrapping up our first hour. George Rice through. Who Filled in for you rob last week? He is coming in. He wants to comment on this baseball thing and quickly rob you think you take ells on a daily basis I mean George took Mac. When he came back swing, and so I got respect for I don't take. You. There was. Only got a few minutes I know you WanNa get to Lee's I'm glad you called in? May Big, because Chris trip in where where he says he doesn't think. That you know African American black kids that they gave up on baseball when it gets to the high school age eighty from was right, my son did it. My my my my son had potential to make the US team. Playing baseball is whole life. He goes over to Sierra. Canyon they all of a sudden. The boy don't WanNa play baseball, though no more. You know and and a lot of it is like we've seen a lot of African American kids who hit his as Eddie played with. It's just not quite as cool any anymore and a lot of it does have to do with that with the. With the! If it's coup socially attention. It is not just a black thing it's it's just kid George. Let me ask you though and. When you obviously have been in NFL, player. You're in an affluent neighborhood. Your Assay. The lack of DAD's in inner cities and allow these black areas is is hurts, hurts our participation in the game to when your kid was playing was he wanted a few blacks? Not, not not on our team I. Think goes to put him on a team. That was very diverse. It was about equal between black. Latino and white kids. They were all high level kids, but the, but you were right about the factor about baseball pricing people out because not because it's turned into such a technical sport that you have to have specific training, so if you own a club team, your parents are paying him anywhere between one hundred fifty and four hundred bucks a month to be on a club, T. Then, you're getting specialized training. If you're a pitcher, catch your. You know some hitting coach and all of that, but there are. You mentioned the RBI program. There is a program that the MLB has started incompetent where the competent baseball academy. My nephew he ca. He goes there. He comes out from the valley like these..

baseball George Rice Chicago Chris Ryan London charmaine US MLB NFL Sierra rob Lee Eddie
"black community" Discussed on The Odd Couple with Chris Broussard & Rob Parker

The Odd Couple with Chris Broussard & Rob Parker

01:43 min | 4 d ago

"black community" Discussed on The Odd Couple with Chris Broussard & Rob Parker

"You mean who cares. I don't know if you're late. For my trout. Yeah, but but you can't always. Saying That point he's not. He's not that charismatic charismatic. You like you can relate to. Lebron James Right. I feel you ought to marshawn lynch I can relate to Russell Wilson. And, then for for for those communities, date baseball hasn't allowed their players to show as much individual Lizzo mouth think as the wars. And some point. And you want that attention and you're seeking you see these figures right? You see the Jordan you see the Kobe, you see the the quarterbacks in the running back and the receiver. You see Jerry Rice. We're baseball like we have Barry Barnes. Right now I don't think that point is legitimate. I do think that point is why I e from. We'll get you on again. Brother because we need more time. Bruce Send me the proof. Don't know, follows. I will call you out on National Radio Senate. If there's an inkling of a photo on sending proof collared old playing basketball right now. I'm a send you proof from my My star-studded days in highschool. Don't show anybody these private, okay..

baseball Lebron James marshawn lynch Jerry Rice Russell Wilson Senate Lizzo Barry Barnes basketball Bruce
"black community" Discussed on The Odd Couple with Chris Broussard & Rob Parker

The Odd Couple with Chris Broussard & Rob Parker

06:05 min | 4 d ago

"black community" Discussed on The Odd Couple with Chris Broussard & Rob Parker

"Probably where when he made his decision. Right what they say I don't remember. They all said that if if he could play if they could play baseball at that level, they would have picked baseball over football. This is from Dion Sanders whose. Favor play at that level. No, no, but he has A. Little Bit, he played. He looked like if he has focused on it, he might have been able to be a hall of Famer. I don't know about the hall of. Very good I, mean he? He was in the world. See never made me. They never made. The Oakland played a full season I. Just don't know if that's totally Bob Look I had. My point is. There's a lot of other factors that I agree. Maintenance has baseball not. They out like I say mostly is because of the academy's..

Dion Sanders baseball Oakland football A.
"black community" Discussed on The Odd Couple with Chris Broussard & Rob Parker

The Odd Couple with Chris Broussard & Rob Parker

05:58 min | 4 d ago

"black community" Discussed on The Odd Couple with Chris Broussard & Rob Parker

"Off often ends. No surprise here he graces with his presence on the updates is my man. Ralph Ervin, all right. Let's get into this rob because this is a hot Ian Desmond. Is Not going to? He's one of the one of the latest baseball players to say that he will not play in the Bob. There's not going to be a bubble, but he's not going to play this season. He's GonNa sit it out, but he he expressed some disappointment with baseball itself and he feels like baseball is. Failing African Americans that's basically what he said, and so we want to address this topic. and. Yeah I I'll let you let me let me go. Because this is. This is something yeah? The it seven baseball is seven point seven percent African American last year twenty nineteen. That's actually up. From two thousand sixteen was six point. Seven percent I was GONNA say has gone off I was GonNa say it has ticked on. This is something that we talked about over the years. And what's happened in baseball and something that I've studied Chris talked to a lot of people and most of it has to do with. Economics baseball owners basically decided about fifteen twenty years ago that they were going to outsource their jobs what they were GONNA do was set up baseball academies right not in Detroit, not in Tampa not in the Bronx, but in South American countries right. Why Chris? Why would they set up camps? They're. Cheaper. Cheaper great weather, kids can play all year old year round. They're not dealing with agents. Lawyers. You know what I mean. There's no quote. UNQUOTE UPFRONT MONEY. That you have to pay in this country, and that goes not only for black players, but white players to along year. Baseball's had a long history of signing guys. It was a guy. Todd Van. Papa was a big time pitcher Chris. Who was signed giving his big deal and he never panned out in the major leagues. He was a bust. And, there've been other guys who've gotten big contracts and big money, so they decided. You know what we're GONNA do they'll pay. Baseball pays money. When you make it Chris when you get your six or seven.

baseball Chris Ian Desmond Ralph Ervin Papa Todd Van Detroit Bronx Tampa
"black community" Discussed on The Odd Couple with Chris Broussard & Rob Parker

The Odd Couple with Chris Broussard & Rob Parker

04:23 min | 4 d ago

"black community" Discussed on The Odd Couple with Chris Broussard & Rob Parker

"Some stuff today. We got some Major League Baseball some college sports. Some football. We got a hall of fame guest. House waiting for the Ding, but it's going to be great. Great Show. Keep it locked right here for the next three hours. Fox Sports Radio, the iheartradio, APP or Sirius Xm channel eighty three. Let me welcome in my partner Mr Rob Park. What is up man? What's happening? Chris Broussard I'm great. I am doing very well very well. How do we know like I'm I'm hanging out? You know like. We're close to like July fourth in the summer, and it's supposed to be like cool and fun and I am not. Is No you. Not Nobody's there. Expectations you know happiness sadness. Dependent on expectation. So you got I lowered expectations for some reason that he'll be a typical summer. Now I show off your six pack and you already know all the time which little your little drink and a coke. Lou half cut coconut. You know was. And Hundred Jay. We're supposed to wash all these C. Right. What's? Next week that's week was the start of the National Association of Black Journalists Convention. We had a great Tom last year. Right Chris Oh! Yeah, it was fun a lot of fun down in Miami. Yes, you're supposed to be DC and canceled going to have a virtual one which? I didn't even know that. Yeah, a virtual one. and. It's still good for the younger people. Get involved in that right. Dad is not going to be the. You can't have much fun virtually. Yeah, you know what I mean. Yeah, it'll be. It'll be informative and instructive, and all that stuff I said why young people should still be around and sign. J. Dot Org. Because they don't WanNa. Miss out futures. Go on. We're all clogged. We've been there. Okay, no question. But, yeah, Yeah the vacations are I was going to Martha's Vineyard. So. Cancel well, we. We rented a house for a couple of weeks and we canceled that just because you know. Some people are still going up there, but that's like a black haven african-amer. Dog. Spike Lee was up there last year when we were up there and Henry..

Chris Broussard C. Right Sirius Xm National Association of Black Major League Hundred Jay Spike Lee Baseball Chris Oh Mr Rob Park Martha's Vineyard football partner Lou WanNa Tom Miami Henry
Netflix to Invest $100 Million in Black Community's Financial Institutions

KCBS Radio Midday News

03:44 min | 4 d ago

Netflix to Invest $100 Million in Black Community's Financial Institutions

"Joined today by Bloomberg Entertainment reporter Lucas Shaw and Lucas Netflix is pledging $100 million to help black communities in the United States. Where is this money going to go? Do we know It's going to go to financial institutions that in some way lent money to or support black communities. A lot of institutions will be black owned or Or black lead, you know, One of the 1st 1 is Hope Credit union whose CEO Blackman and Bill Bynum, another $25 million is going to the Black Economic Development Initiative, which is a new fund that's gonna invest in black of financial institutions. But the big goal here is to try to take out of some of their cash and give it to institutions that can help facilitate investment in black communities and that the initiative was inspired. In large part by theory of research on the racial wealth gap on how much less capital a lot of black Americans have access to than the average white Americans. For example, besides the benefit of the direct access to money that these communities will now have What does it say that a big companies like Netflix is doing something like this? You know it send the real signal to a lot of the other big companies in the U. S. And around the world. This is the second pretty significant action that that Netflix our CEO Reed Hastings has taken Reid Hastings. Donated $120 million of his own fortune, historically black colleges and universities and I think that was really hoping that this particular commitment will inspire other companies to do the same because Netflix compared to some of the other big tech company has a relatively small amount. Of cash on hand. It's got about $5 million right now. That sounds really big. But then when you think about the fact that companies like Apple have hundreds of billions of dollars in cash, and they're bound sheet if they committed Tio investing some of that money or shifting some of that money Into some of these other financial institutions. That could really be a huge benefit the black communities across the US well, and then that makes me wonder how much weight does Reed Hastings carry in the tech community? I mean, the fact that he's done this Is this likely to inspire others? He carries a lot of weight. I have to say, you know, he is somebody who is very well respected by his peers. He was one of the co founders of Netflix. Prior to that, he found it a couple of other tech companies. He used to sit on the boards of both Facebook and like a softy with the biggest tech companies in the world, and he is really somebody So I think it's seen as one of the leaders in that community that being said he is a little bit of a lone wolf. He kind of he does keep to himself to a certain extent. On doesn't put himself out there in the same way that that may be a mark Tucker Berg does he sit. He has very specific causes that he focuses on me spent a lot of his adult life. Investing money and education, which is why his personal investment in the HBC use without a shock. But you've seen him come out pretty strongly following the death of George Floyd and kind of position Netflix as as a leader trying to invest in black communities, and if if that's going to be a place that he puts his time on energy and money, I think he'll probably push a lot of his peers to do the same. Lucas. Not a lot of time left. But is he doing any work at home if you will, because Netflix doesn't have any black executives. Yeah, it's the 3rd 92 at Netflix really does have to improve its own diversity, especially senior leadership position. None of it really is a black. It has one black board member. But that is something that executives the company acknowledge. Must be worked on in the years ahead. Lucas.

Lucas Netflix Black Economic Development Ini Netflix Lucas CEO United States Lucas Shaw Tucker Berg Reed Hastings Bloomberg Entertainment Hope Credit Union George Floyd Apple Reporter Bill Bynum Blackman Facebook Reid Hastings
Washington DC - Prince William County Votes to Rename Stonewall Schools After Black Community Members

Larry O'Connor

00:38 sec | 4 d ago

Washington DC - Prince William County Votes to Rename Stonewall Schools After Black Community Members

"William Public schools After a unanimous vote last night by the school board, the Prince William's School board had already been considering a name change for both the middle and high school name for Confederate General Stonewall Jackson. I think the George Floyd Death of George Floyd in the black lives matter of discussions have accelerated these movements. Prince William's School board chair, Barber, Latif tells w e mails mornings on them all. It's important to look at intent. What was the original intent? And what is it currently doing now? What is the posture of that symbol now? Is it intimidating folks? The names will be changed to Unity, Braxton Middle School and Unity, read High school, Barbara Brit W E Mail and

Prince William's School Braxton Middle School George Floyd High School Prince William William Public Schools Stonewall Jackson Barbara Brit Latif Barber
Washington - Call Your Mother Apologizes For 'Co-opting Black Culture,' Changes Sandwich Names

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:44 sec | 5 d ago

Washington - Call Your Mother Apologizes For 'Co-opting Black Culture,' Changes Sandwich Names

"Response to the Black lives matter? Movement changes are coming to the menu at a popular DC deli in the Delhi's owner is apologizing to the black community. I call your Mother Delhi. There were bagel sandwich is named after black athletes and entertainers, including the singer Rihanna, but those names are coming off the menu with deli owner Andrew Dana. Ology izing saying by including the names he was co opt in black culture and profiting off it. In April, when Dana opened a second location in D. C in the middle of the Corona virus pandemic, he told w T O p. We just said, like If there's something positive we can do at this time where everybody's anxious, let's go for it. And now, he says, This is the positive thing he's focused on. And he says he's adding new members to his team to ensure that there is more diversity at the company's leadership level.

Andrew Dana Black Community Ology Izing Delhi DC Rihanna D. C
K-State players announce boycott after student's Floyd tweet

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

04:00 min | 5 d ago

K-State players announce boycott after student's Floyd tweet

"Kansas State. Football. The players will not plaque the plaque to. Play or practice or even meet. Until a student at the university. Who tweeted? Something is thrown out of school. Several wildcat players. Including Sophomore wide receiver. Joshua young blood posted an image on or with a statement announcing the boycott. This weekend he said. To our family at Kansas State due to the recent, disparaging and sensitive and unsettling comments made by a fellow student, we as a football team consultation with students from campus organizations, as well as students from the General Student Body. Feel it as best for us to stand with the students. We are demanding that Kansas State University put a awesome place that allows a student to me, dismissed for displaying openly racist, threatening disrespectful action toward a student or groups of students. We have resolved that we cannot play practice or meet until these demands are heard and actions taken. We Love Kansas State, but we must stand together and protect all students moving forward. So. That comes from a tweet posted by a student named Jaden McNeil. And the tweet is no longer available. It has been yanked, and his account has been yanked, but it mocked the death of George Floyd. And you wouldn't think people would mock anybody getting killed in any situation, but obviously to mock something like that in these times is just not even to say out of left field is just insane. And so Kansas State has released a statement about the football boycott. The statement, said quote K. State Athletics along with President Richard Myers and university leadership respect and support our student athletes and standing up in the fight against racism at K. State. We are a family, and we will work together to make our campus community and even better place to call home. and. So multiple case day football players have. Talked about how they. are going to be boycotting and Chris Climbing. Is just starting his second year there. He put out a statement. Our Program on our coaches will continue to be part of the solution when it comes to racial. And Justice. They meant racial injustice. I love our players and they know I have their backs. The Gene Taylor chimed in. Recent tweets from case day student. Downplaying the black lives matter effort and the tragic and senseless death of George Floyd are disgusting and totally inappropriate and not reflective. Of who we are as university or our athletic department. They are not reflective of our administration and goals. We are committed to listening and supporting our black athletes, black students and members of our black community, and taking positive steps in the matter of social justice racism. So then CBS, CBS sports reached out. To the students. And Chris Climate reply to CBS. Racism is all caps not welcome a state now in the future and off the field as family. We make a difference to our. Action, I am excited help every player unite for the solution all caps now so that we can come together stronger than ever. Black lives matter as he put it.

Kansas State Football George Floyd CBS K. State Chris Climbing Joshua President Richard Myers Jaden Mcneil Chris Climate Wildcat Gene Taylor
People come to America for a dream

The Brown Girls Guide to Politics

05:35 min | 6 d ago

People come to America for a dream

"Today we had the honor to talk to Nana Xanthi. She is an attorney and the executive director of the Black Alliance for justice immigration or. She's also the founder of the Community Legal Clinic and Transform Justice Center in legal these workshops as well as the founder of Justice Warriors Black Lives I. Hope you enjoy this conversation. Nana how are you today? I am well well, as can be expected in during these times and hoping you're well as well you know I am well despite everything, but one of the reasons that I'm grateful is because of the great work that women like you do in this country so excited to talk about the Black Alliance for just immigration, which is one of the organizations that the BG and wonder me a network which produces the BG podcast has been encouraging our audiences to support, so thank you. These organizations are critical in times like this. Thank you so very much? We appreciate that support and the support that we've gotten from black folks all over the globe. Appreciate it. Tell us a little bit more about the Black Alliance for just immigration, and what brought you to the organization? So the black lines for just immigration is a national black lead Immigration Rights Human Rights Racial Justice Organization. We are the largest of our kind in the United States. We educate we advocate. We organized on behalf of the. The roughly ten million Black Refugee and immigrant families in this country as well as black folks who are trying to come into the country, whether it be permanently or temporarily, and those who are seeking asylum. We have our headquarters in New York, but we also have offices in DC. Miami Atlanta Los Angeles and Oakland and we have staff in Houston, and in Minneapolis, so we pretty much are all over the place as well as doing work on the. Episode of the border in Mexico, at the northern border with Tijuana, and also we've been doing some work the southern border of Mexico in Chula where you have black asylum seekers coming to the United States through Mexico. In that way and the work that we do is national in many cases in terms of policy, and you know we've been very busy in that regard, especially in with this administration, we also do national work with respect to racial justice our. Former executive director open committee was one of the big three that started black lives matter, and so by has been involved in black lives matter since the beginning and we do that work, and then we also do local work regional work. I'm both on the policy side, but as well as more, and with even more vigor on the organizing side to make sure that we are pushing for racial. Economic and social justice with an right alongside our multigenerational African American siblings. So much work, such powerful work. As. You said you've been very busy with this administration echo, they're just keeping everyone busy with their foolishness, but I definitely do a suit top about Daca so for our listeners, who may not be familiar Dhaka's stands for deferred action for childhood arrivals and the Supreme. Court decision around Dhaka now allows immigrants who ever see Daca status sometimes referred to as dreamers so if you seen the Hashtag is sandwiched dreamers. That's what that means. It allows them. them to stay in the country safely without a threat of deportation, but one the things that we've been really seeing missing from mainstream conversation over Daca was that it also impacts not Hispanic and Latino communities that there are black and brown communities impacted by this as well other black communities that are impacted by this as well. So, what was your reaction when you hurt the decision? And what are our next steps in the Dreamer, movement so? It is really important in think I really WanNa, thank you for lifting up the fact that yes, there are dreamers who are not Brown folks. That are not Latin next folks. That are not black right that we have black Latino next folks as well as black dreamers from the continent of Africa from the Caribbean from Europe right we think about. Twenty, one savage right and how this came up? And he actually falls in the category that is equally as important that we need to advocate for a person who isn't a Dhaka recipient, but who happens to be undocumented, and obviously we're looking for permanent protections, not just for Dr Recipients because everyone. Coming to this country is dreaming. No one's coming to this country to be a nightmare. Faces are looking at the Supreme Court decision. I also happen to be an attorney of twenty six years. Doing movement work is it's a temporary relief. It is not the permanent protection that we want our people to have and that our people need to have in order to thrive,

Black Alliance Attorney Dhaka Nana Xanthi Executive Director United States Daca Transform Justice Center Mexico Supreme Court Community Legal Clinic Tijuana Caribbean New York Africa DC Europe
The Monocle's Luxury Retail And    Fashion News

Monocle 24: The Globalist

04:31 min | 6 d ago

The Monocle's Luxury Retail And Fashion News

"Time to run. This Day's top retail luxury and fashion news with Monaco's fashion editor Jamie waters good morning to you, Jamie. Warning Jordana now of course, wearing black, as long been fashionable, but now the black in fashion council along with some other organizations is moving to make the fashion industry accountable for its race problem. Wearing black has never been more relevant. Tell us what's happening. Hi Yes, but there's a few initiatives and organizations that are being launched at the moment. And blocking fashion. Council is one of the biggest ones, and that's sufficiently launching these wake, but it's founded by Lindsay. Papers Wagner whose the editor in chief of Teen Vogue and Sudden Sandrine Charles is a PR executive basically they wanting to to make the industry accountable. So you know we've seen in recent weeks that were. Browns posting duck towels on instagram and sort of pledging. To the black communities, but now these organizations is saying Kay. We a lot of brands of said this, but they don't actually have representations in terms of their employees on in terms of your mortals and things like that so waking waking to call you to account. So black fashion counts who? Is doing what they're saying is a yearly report cod to hold brands accountable and so every year for the for the next three years, though sort of released this report card that shows. You represent the number of representations of black employees across different levels in the company's on. That was a good qualify paypal's wagner in times of the weekend and she said. We're in a state of cancer coach for right now, but we want to move to accountability Coccia any brown complex, one million dollars to the NASA pay on Instagram, but who will follow up and check that they did. So I think it is the idea of of really putting your mouth is and an If you can make the post on instagram and things like that, but what are you going to do about it? Let's take a felon Tino now. who have who are suing their landlords to try and break the Fifth Avenue wrench contract. Yes, this is an interesting case at the moment west of in this in this position, where over the past couple of months has been kind of. Danz between landlords and retail landlords and tenants in terms of. It's been the kind of case by case basis, but they're in various instances. Landlords have delayed, rent reduced or sometimes. Not Made Brown's pay rented all, but now getting into a situation where things as starting to open up and we're seeing landlords. Say Okay. You need to pay off now and Valentino is suing swing. It's landlord on its Fifth Avenue Flagship in Manhattan. Because it wants to break. It's it's lace contract which I think. He's due to run until two thousand twenty nine I'm basically the brownies saying but. It's such a drastically different retail landscape from when it signed the contract, two thousand and thirteen that. Basically can't make this work in this is just not tenable situation anymore and these these interesting case because. reports saying that the outcome of these. Early lawsuits. we'll really send a signal as to which way the courts are going to go. I think Victoria's sacred is falling different following a similar path. And basically. Whether what irrespective of what happens in the courts? There will be this tussle anyway, because if if brands say that they literally compay. What it's leading landlords in a difficult situation because there's no. in some ways because the the landscape is so decimated, landlords aren't really in a position of power. Because there's no one else is going to fuel they slots. No other people are going to be wanting to retail tenancies at the moment, so it is this kind of interesting tussle. Absolutely I mean it means that the whole character of Fifth Avenue, the kind of beating heart of luxury in the middle of new. York will change completely. Slowly I mean I I think you know obviously things are starting to open up in New York at the moment in terms of shopping, but gear I mean it's the one of the biggest things is that there's just no tourists and I think even if even as the shop so the open an an work how to make these shops attractive to shoppers. You're still not going to have the tourists that make up a huge amount of sales at these flagships in in your in power in the big in the big cities Jamie. Thank you very much. Indeed,

Instagram Browns Jamie Waters Wagner KAY Jordana Teen Vogue Monaco Editor Paypal Nasa Lindsay Tino Brown Sandrine Charles Editor In Chief New York York Valentino
California City Bans Predictive Policing Software

WSJ Tech News Briefing

05:06 min | 6 d ago

California City Bans Predictive Policing Software

"In the wake of black lives matter protests, governments across the country have been weighing how to reform their police, departments and address inequities law enforcement. One tactic that's come under scrutiny has been the use of surveillance technology last week, a city council in Santa Cruz California voted to ban what's called predictive policing software? It could be the first measure of its kind in the US, our reporter David. Bertie has been looking into this and joins us to. To explain hey, Dave. Thanks for joining US Qatari all right, so explain to us what is predictive policing? How does it work predictive policing technology as it's used in Santa Cruz or has been using Santacruz? Essentially a data analysis tool that tracks usually three types of data, crime, type, location, and timing, and essentially allows the police department project where hotspots within the city would be an argument for this type of technology is that would allow police department? To basically make decisions more efficiently in terms of how they allocate resources. So why is it coming under? Scrutiny is coming under scrutiny for a few reasons. One is sort of this national discussion. We're having about race and policing which has filtered down to local areas such as Santa. Cruz in California, but also people in that city had a first hand. Look at how this technology has played out the police department. There was an early adopter of the. The technology and decided that if we base our policing tactics on analysis of data that is inherently biased is going to produce an in some cases replicate biased policing tactics. So why is it inherently biased? Explain that to us. How does watching where crimes are happening now and using that data to predict new crimes? Why why is there bias in their book to Santa? Cruz Mayor Justin Cummings explained it this way. Basically, it's garbage in garbage out. Coming said to me if we collect data from police, stops or crimes that are reported in our current policing system, it's going to reflect a policing system in which underrepresented communities such as black communities or Hispanic communities face disproportionately heavy police presence, so we take data from a policing strategy. The disproportionately put officers in communities of color were going to get data reflects. Reflects that policing strategy so in ways in some cases perpetuates that cycle, so it's not I mean just to be clear. When we say, it's collecting data about crime that's happening. It's using data that the cops are giving them about things like police stops there stopping someone, and that is being recorded as crime whether or not actual crime place. They're not yet the. Gist of it and what Cummings would argue, and what the city council. Santa Cruz also agreed upon is that they will also reflect sort of the disproportionate ways. Cops have been shown to stop people of Color, so you know in some cases they might stop a black driver more often than a white driver for a regular speeding ticket, for example that's sort of a mundane example, but I think you could play the Dow and people in Santa. Cruz have played it out over the course of different types of potential crimes now, Santa Cruz isn't the only place in the country. That's used this sort of predictive policing New York. City has used it as. As well, and they've been under fire for many years for stop and Frisk. Policy which basically feeds into exactly what you're talking about. Roy New York pioneers a statistical modeling called COMSAT in one thousand nine hundred ninety S, which is a little bit more of a primitive version of this essentially uses big data from different types of crime committed around the city in order to project where officers should spend the most time in resources, so predictive policing technology basically takes that to the next level. It injects an artificial intelligence to the process. It basically allows software to learn crime patterns over the course of time in order to better project, police should go. So are other cities following I mean this is obviously happening in the wake of the killing of George Floyd and a lot more attention, being paid to the way that policing is taking place around the country. Are we seeing other cities and states kind of think about this in the same direction Santa Cruz is thought to be the first city in the country to actually ban predictive policing, and it did so in large part because. It has experienced with this technology actually in two thousand eleven time magazine named the Santa Cruz police departments. Use of technology is one of the fifty best inventions of the year, so they're definitely ahead of many other cities in this regard, but spoke to some civil liberties advocates over the last couple of days, and they said this is certainly a new front in this larger discussion we're having about police surveillance, which is really ramped up over the last few weeks. Particularly Municipalities, so you have places like Boston, which recently voted to ban facial recognition technology. Technology for its police. Department California, also recently stopped bill at the state level that would regulate facial recognition technology, and I think at the state and local level across the country you do see a lot of lawmakers and activists really start to push reconsider how police use technology

Santa Cruz Santa Cruz California Cruz Santa United States Justin Cummings New York Bertie Dave Reporter California David George Floyd Comsat
Eric Ward on Racial Justice

People of the Pod

05:44 min | Last week

Eric Ward on Racial Justice

"As. Our nation continues to grapple with the best ways to make progress on critical issues of racial justice. We here at people of the pod felt that we needed to hear from Eric. Award Eric is the Executive Director of the Western states center a civil. Rights Organization based in the Pacific Northwest Mountain states he is also a national voice, racial justice and a leader in the black community speaking up urgently. Urgently for the need to fight antisemitism, which he identifies as a leading driver of other forms of Bigotry Eric thank you so much for joining us I'm so glad to be here with you. All thanks for inviting me now as someone on the front lines of the Civil Rights Movement today, the first thing I want to ask is how are you? How are you doing this really busy, really crazy time. I think like everyone else I'm exhausted. I'm carrying a lot of weight. A lot of responsibility I'm not alone in that we are moving fast soaks at the community level has really mobilized around civil rights, and you know it's a responsibility to support that leadership as much as possible I think I'm both nervous and. We are watching kind of in a way, the end of one age a period of time, and the beginning of another, and we're kind of in this inbetween points, and so it feels a little chaotic can. We don't know what's next I. Don't know about the rest of folks, but that brings anxiety to me, but also joy Reid I watch folks every day across communities across religions, really coming together, trying to find one another struggling with one another and I think that bodes well so mile this chapter. The book is not ending particularly well. I think it tells us the story fact will. Yeah. We're clearly in something of a moment. Right? Historically politically. We're in a moment and I guess the question for someone like you and for anyone who wants to kind of be a part of making this elastic changes. How can we take a moment and turn it into something that really changes our society, so you know at the macro level I like wow, you know we are actually finally poised to acknowledge that everyone in our society are fully actualize human beings. That may not seem like a really kind of radical thing, but it's taken a lot of centuries for us to get to this point and I'm actually really excited to be here, right? Having a strong democracy. Means having strong participation, that participation doesn't happen if we only consider part of our society as fully human so at the macro level. I feel like. Wow you know. We are getting close to getting this right. And after ten thousand years you know or forty thousand years I think we finally earned the right to that right, so I want to own that and I. Hope folks own map for a second, and if it makes you feel good, good I so now here's what we should do. Its APP, we should get serious about some very specific things so. Twentieth Century. Policing has come to an end. It is a system that no longer works for the inclusive democracy that we are, and it is time for a twenty first century version of it that is grounded in community, safety, right, and the prosperity of our community them I think that that is exciting and I think we should be encouraging those conversations. We should be continuing to encourage folks to be dialogue with one another I. An I'll just be playing, right? We can't be a society that seals. It is okay to shoot and kill unarmed. Black people in our society are quite frankly folks were unarmed and running away. It is just not becoming a democracy so i. you know I think policing as. As a policy conversation is a topic of the day it will be the topic of the year will be the topic of next year, and we should not allow the sacrifices of those at the community level been working on these issues over the last three weeks or the last three decades to go to waste right now. So that's one. The second is look. We have to get a hold of the mission oriented hate crimes, and what I mean by mission oriented I. Don't mean the average hate crime. We experienced. You know that the random hate crime those have to be tackled, too, but untuckit about this rise of mission oriented targeting of vulnerable communities and their institutions whether we're talking about Anti Semitism. Racism. Talking about the targeted Latinos in El Paso or the targeting of Jews in Pittsburgh at a targeting a blacks in Charleston seeks in Wisconsin. It is time for our government institutions just step up and protect its citizens and its residents and A. We don't need new laws to do that. We need to actually start using the laws that are on the books. We have to bring transparency to those who seek to try to destroy democracy by terrorizing folks in our community. Those are the two things we could be right on top of right now.

Eric Civil Rights Movement Pacific Northwest Mountain Western States Center Executive Director Reid Wisconsin El Paso Charleston Pittsburgh
Seattle will move to dismantle 'CHOP' zone after shootings, mayor says

WBBM Early Afternoon News

01:11 min | Last week

Seattle will move to dismantle 'CHOP' zone after shootings, mayor says

"Two weeks after Seattle police abandoned their east precinct precinct the the confrontation confrontation with with protesters protesters who who then then created created an an occupy occupy protest protest zone zone Seattle Seattle mayor mayor Jenny Jenny Durkan Durkan has has decided decided to to take take it it back back on on Saturday Saturday there there was was a a shooting shooting in in those those on on the the claimed claimed the life of a young black man that was too much and so the mayor who once described the occupation as a summer of love has announced plans to bring the police back peacefully she was supported by several black community leaders including the founder of mothers against police brutality along with an activist whose brother was actually shot by Seattle police and the pastor who offered displays demonstrators the use of his church sanctuary even the local black lives matter organization organization said said black black people people should should consider consider gathering gathering elsewhere elsewhere in in the the zone zone itself itself a a supporter supporter named named

Jenny Jenny Durkan Durkan Founder Seattle
Officer charged in death of Rayshard Brooks booked for felony murder

Wisconsin's Morning News with Gene Mueller

00:32 sec | Last week

Officer charged in death of Rayshard Brooks booked for felony murder

"Today is the family of Ryszard Brooks is laid to rest the fired Atlanta officer who's charged with his death has a bond hearing the district attorney has now filed charges against both of the arresting officers including a felony murder charge for officer Garrett Ralph the Brooks family in much of the black community are pleased with that decision though they say nothing can bring race card Brooks back meanwhile much of the rank and file in the Atlanta police department is deeply unhappy with these charges they say that this was a justified shooting and they feel the district attorney brought these charges because of politics

Ryszard Brooks Officer Garrett Ralph Atlanta Murder
Former Atlanta officer charged with murder of Rayshard Brooks

Joel Riley

00:33 sec | Last week

Former Atlanta officer charged with murder of Rayshard Brooks

"In Atlanta his family pays its final respects to raise short Brooks in a private funeral the since fired Atlanta cop was charged with killing Brooks has a court appearance the district attorney has now filed charges against both of the arresting officers including a felony murder charge for officer Garrett Ralph the Brooks family in much of the black community are pleased with that decision though they say nothing can bring ray shard Brooks back meanwhile much of the rank and file in the Atlanta police department is deeply unhappy with these charges they say that this was a justified shooting and they feel the district attorney brought these charges because of

Atlanta Brooks Officer Garrett Ralph Murder
Seattle mayor announces plan to dismantle 'CHOP' zone

Afternoon News with Tom Glasgow and Elisa Jaffe

05:07 min | Last week

Seattle mayor announces plan to dismantle 'CHOP' zone

"Here's Jenny Durkan Seattle's mayor here today the chief and I wanted to share some of what we're doing in Seattle to lead the nation in reimagining public safety and in investing in our community after meeting with community leaders and organizations business and residents of Seattle in the last three weeks in hearing many demands for change I wanted to share an update on what actions the city is taking in response to community to address the systemic inequities in Seattle we will be investing in black communities investing in young people rethinking and reimagining police scene including our culture and budgets we will have accountability reform measures including statewide reforms of police unions across the city hundreds of thousands have gathered at different days and different events at least one event had approximately eighty five thousand people who marched silently in solidarity and peacefully and though they were silent their message was strong in loud and clear for nearly two weeks people have been gathering on Capitol Hill many are there to continue their protests to build community and demand change over the days tens of thousands of people have peacefully gathered or visited Capitol Hill during the day there have been no major incidents but we know it is very different at night particularly in recent nights the cumulative impacts of the gatherings and protests and the nighttime atmosphere and violence has led to increasingly difficult circumstances for our businesses and residents most of them supported protesters rights to gather at the outset they stand with them in solidarity but the impacts have increased and the safety has decreased both on Saturday morning and last night there were incidents of gun violence and that escalating violence concerns me chief best residents businesses and the greater community all of Capitol Hill has been impacted no violence is acceptable and we have worked hard to address gun violence in our city particularly youth violence yes Saturday a nineteen year old tragically lost his life to gun violence as a mother of a nineteen year old boy I cannot imagine the pain of his mother and his family we must do better here and in Seattle and across the country just in the last few days we have witnessed that it is a violent time in our nation just this weekend two people were killed and seventeen wounded in Charlotte one was killed in eleven wounded in Minneapolis thirteen dead in a hundred and six wounded in Chicago the previous weekend four killed and fifteen wounded in twelve different shootings in New Orleans the herd continues Seattle demands that I do better the chief do better and that we do better and we agree I will let cheap best address what they're doing in those cases and those investigations we've heard from people on Capitol Hill and across the city but the gun violence unfolding at night is not only wrong it also is undermining and distracting from the message for change that we are hearing in the street and in so many of the peaceful protest it is not I noticed that the victims were black men at a time were called upon in working to dismantle the racist systems that the portion disproportionately affect black Americans particularly black men what we believe individuals organizations and others can continue to gather on Capitol Hill peacefully the continued disorder the violence in the impacts on residents and businesses are not just at odds with the message of justice and equity they cannot continue to occur we are working with community to bring this to an end Capitol Hill belongs to everyone in the city and it is a deep deep importance to the LGBTQ community particularly during June the month of pride businesses need to open many of them have barely survived the covert shut down and they and their employees are ready to get back to work and they should be allowed to do so

Jenny Durkan Seattle
Washington DC-area chefs launch international bake sale to combat racism

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:52 sec | Last week

Washington DC-area chefs launch international bake sale to combat racism

"What happens when local pastry chefs get together to work against racism they have an international bake sale according to all of the letters the pastry chef of kith and kin on the wharf dangers against racism was not only to make a fundraiser but to raise awareness on the issues that impact the black communities unless along with willow Pollini of families as well as rob of oyster oyster say they wanted the bakers participating to focus on the issues impacting black lives in their own communities we made it a point to not choose an organization to donate to we wanted everybody to have the opportunity to really find out how black lives were impacted in their communities and what they lacked the hash tag bakers against racism has tens of thousands of photos from pastry chefs around the world who are asking their followers to place orders and

Willow Pollini
Protesters Fell Confederate Monument In D.C., Provoking Trump's Fury

MSU Today Weekend

00:53 sec | 2 weeks ago

Protesters Fell Confederate Monument In D.C., Provoking Trump's Fury

"Is told to rally president trump went after his likely November opponent Joe Biden for the black community in four years forty seven is that also saw two tied the destruction and removal of Confederate monuments and statues to democratic leaders following the may killing of George Floyd the African American man who died while in Minneapolis police custody and trump name DC's mayor after protesters toppled a statue of Confederate general Albert pike the only rebel monument outdoors in the nation's capital we're not happy that's going to be very expensive for DC they're always looking for money we need we always need more money and then they don't do the proper job she's not going to be good for I'm sorry your browser

Donald Trump Joe Biden George Floyd DC Albert Pike President Trump Minneapolis
Donald Trump calls Covid-19 'kung flu' at Tulsa rally

77WABC Programming

04:11 min | 2 weeks ago

Donald Trump calls Covid-19 'kung flu' at Tulsa rally

"About that trump during that rally before he also he he prays Supreme Court appointees but he said that the court is almost like a minority court I don't know if you want when he was at the Supreme Court ruled in favor of daca and the trump administration was against it so he's like all day I don't you feel like they have something against me but here's some of the issues that I have to disagree with okay I I see it trump is in in he you know he's in a fallible human being and there are some things that I like what he does some of the policies like main thing securing the borders bringing jobs back to America I I like the reforms that he's going for the ball at the African American community the criminal justice reforms there's a couple other things that he's doing but he doesn't get a lot of credit for and attention but then he says things that I'm like all Nolde so I was preparing for the show when I'm listening and so he talked about coronavirus obviously and like I mentioned and he just like it's it's like I wonder sometimes if he has people around him and see if there are the purposely not advising him correctly or is he just not listening I don't know tell me what you think but it just like I couldn't believe what he said so he said something to the fact about that the corona virus has a lot of names two way there's nineteen names with some call it the Chinese virus and then he said some call it the Kong flow hello my god why why why why give them animal why give them ammo Mr president why why give them ammo and you didn't even hear people cheering when he said that so I just I don't know why see trump if you if you're listening to the show your base they will vote for you if you you could shoot somebody in the middle of the street on Madison Avenue in front of every camera in front of every media outlet in the world and they will still vote for you that's it you don't have to worry about them to stop pandering to them with these kind of that that mean Kong flu that's that's racist so don't pander to them don't go down to that died thirty level what he needs to do is get the undecided voter the independent voter the suburban mom he needs to get those of people like the Catholics are notoriously voters that sometimes they vote conservative sometimes able Democrat he needs to focus on those people that are middle of the road the moderates stop pandering and when you say stuff like Kong flu that that's that's going to turn a lot of people off I I don't know do you agree like it I do you agree with that like I want to hear what you guys think because to me it's just like why are you doing that you're already called a racist and do I believe trump is a racist no I really don't so al Sharpton he said recent when he was and he was in Tulsa and he was saying how he thinks trump is B. S. saying that he doesn't he never heard of June thirteenth before this year and how could he not he was born in queens and use from New York City where you know you have so many minorities guess what I'm born and raised in the Bronx and I know I'm I'm I'm I stoop I never heard a Juneteenth before either before this year and trump is not pushing for it to be a federal holiday so how can you say he's being racist when he's pushing for it he has done you know a lot for the African American community they have the unemployment rate that's he's I mean according to a lot of statistics it's the lowest it's ever been among the black community but when he says stuff like Kong flu ages and then the Democrats if you check Twitter out they have gone wild over it and god I just wish she would just wouldn't go so off script while I I love his cancer and I love the way he talks like a regular person and that's why I think people love him because he says it like it is when he says stuff like that it just turns people off it turns the moderates off it turns the people of middle of the road off the independence the ones that are still undecided and those if he wants to win this election those are the people that he has to

Supreme Court
Companies and state governments celebrate Juneteenth, giving workers the day off

Randy Baumann and the DVE Morning Show

01:08 min | 2 weeks ago

Companies and state governments celebrate Juneteenth, giving workers the day off

"Today is June eighteenth a June. Nineteenth commemorates the ending of slavery. In the US the origin of the holiday comes from June nineteen, eighteen, sixty, five, when General Gordon Granger of the Union army, arrived with soldiers in Galveston Texas and told enslaved African Americans their the civil war had ended, and they were free more than two years after President Lincoln had signed the emancipation proclamation. June teeth is now celebrated in black communities across the US, and some have called for it to become a national holiday. Nearly all states recognize June teeth with some limited special status in this year. The NFL Nike and twitter have all recognized. June eighteenth as a company holiday. Governor Tom Wolfe is marking June. Teeth is a special holiday closure for employees under his during. For the first time is office as the more than seventy three thousand workers will get either the day off or a compensatory day to use it another time. If they are often, office remains open. The Governor says today is a moment to honor African, American history, and to reflect on how everyone can promote equality, liberty and justice for all people.

Governor Tom Wolfe United States General Gordon Granger President Lincoln Twitter Union Army NFL Texas
How Did Juneteenth Get Started?

BrainStuff

06:11 min | 2 weeks ago

How Did Juneteenth Get Started?

"Every year on June nineteenth, millions of people across America. Come together to celebrate June eighteenth with parties parades, prayer, breakfast and golf tournaments, cookouts and music. The holiday is now officially recognized in forty seven states plus Washington DC though it hasn't been made a national holiday yet, despite having been around for more than one hundred and fifty years. We spoke with Paula Austin a professor of African American Studies and History at Boston University. She said You'd be surprised. There are many students who get to my class, and they sort of never learned about the history of enslavement. They've never learned about the civil rights movement. I think I've had students who because of where they're from, or their families know about June eighteenth, and of actually participated in the celebrations, but most students come, and they don't know. But let's go back to the beginning on June nineteenth eighteen, sixty, five more than two months after confederate general Robert e Lee surrendered to ulysses s grant at APP Maddix which all, but ended the civil war, a US army officer by the name of Major General Gordon Granger. In Huston Texas with two momentous announcements, the end of the civil war, and with it the end to slavery. Nobody is quite sure why it took so long for news of summation to reach Texas several stories have been told throughout the years though none has ever been confirmed including one of an earlier messenger who was killed on his way to Texas to tell the news of freedom. Others believe that some enslavers truth, but simply continued going about business as usual. The most likely is simply that there were not enough troops to enforce the emancipation proclamation whether enslaved people knew about it or not, so things remained status quo. That is until Major General. Grainger showed up. After granger's announcement, some of the two hundred fifty thousand freed people in Texas, immediately left for the promise of true freedom in the north, while others traveled to rejoin family members one formerly enslaved person, Molly Herrell said in the slave narratives of Texas. We all walked down the road singing shouting to beat the band. Others stayed defined pain work in the fields elsewhere. That day marks what is now often called lack independence day, or the fourth of July. It's the American celebration of freedom from slavery. June teen was first observed in Texas in eighteen, sixty six. It wasn't officially recognized as a holiday in any state until Texas did so in Nineteen, seventy nine. Since then only North Dakota South Dakota and Hawaii have declared a holiday. In recent years both the US House of Representatives and the US Senate have formally recognized June nineteenth as June, tenth Independence Day. Various movements to grant the day status is a national holiday are ongoing. US Senator Cory Booker said in two thousand eighteen. On this day we must confront ugly parts of our history and honor the slaves who suffered and died under a repressive regime. We must also pay tribute to all those who had the strength and conviction to fight to end slavery and keep our Union together. June teeth independence. Day is also an important moment to recognize how far we've come and take note of how far we have yet to go. Certainly during the original June eighteenth, there was still a lot of work to be done. It came just months after the civil war ended and two years after the emancipation proclamation was signed by President Abraham Lincoln the Thirteenth Amendment to the US Constitution, which abolished slavery, had been passed by Congress was well on its way to being ratified by the states, but the fourteenth and fifteenth guaranteeing equal protection and the right to vote to all citizens, regardless of skin color were still a couple years off. And not all enslaved people in Texas were immediately freed some held by defiant plantation owners were not emancipated until much later, some formerly enslaved people who tried to leave historical reports show were tracked down and killed. Many more stepped into a future of poverty, fear and uncertainty. Austin suggests that many Americans ignorance about June eighteenth stems from a disinclination to completely face the country's past slavery, and it's far reaching and continuing aftermath. Still? June eighteenth has persevered. Its observance has waned through the years under the oppression of Jim Crow laws and attitudes, but the festivities that began in Texas eventually spread to more states and the idea of commemorating block independence picked up through the civil rights era of the nineteen sixties, and the parties continued today. Austin, said the kinds of celebrations that I've seen and been a part of have been incredibly wonderful there about black culture there about black history there about the resistance and the resilience of the black community. Several years before grainger made his do nineteenth declaration in Galveston famed American Orator Frederick Douglass himself formerly enslaved, spoke to an abolitionist group in New York about the fourth of July. As being dave independence, and how it didn't fit for all Americans, he said what the American slave is your fourth of July I answer a day that reveals to him more than all other days in the year, the gross injustice and cruelty to which he is the constant victim. Opel Lee a former schoolteacher counselor in Fort Worth. Texas has been instrumental in trying to get June. Tenth recognized as a national, holiday. This year she'll walk from the Fort Worth Convention Center to the will. Rogers Coliseum, leading a caravan, urging people to sign a petition for the cause leave who is ninety three years old has been part of the Fort Worth June eighteenth festivities for more than forty years. Last year, it's as important as the fourth of July. In fact I dream some day. They celebrate from the nineteenth to the fourth like they do Mardi Gras. I haven't dreamed as large as the Rose Bowl or the macy's parade, but I'm getting there. To those who observed June eighteenth despite its shaky beginnings, and it's still unfulfilled pledge the day still holds the promise of freedom, independence, equality, ideas, and ideals always celebrating.

Texas United States Paula Austin Gordon Granger Grainger Huston Texas Washington Us House Of Representatives African American Studies And H America Fort Worth Convention Center Dave Independence Senator Cory Booker Fort Worth Robert E Lee Rogers Coliseum Mardi Gras North Dakota
Power to the People

Lost Notes

05:25 min | 2 weeks ago

Power to the People

"In nineteen seventy-three Michael. Torrance a twenty two year old Black Panther he's dedicated himself to the cause and obeyed every command. He's a true soldier, but five years of complete devotion to the panthers has taken a toll now torrance's. Focus on his personal life just for a while, but to do this. He needs to get permission and it's gotta come from the top. Torn shows up at the lamppost. It's bar in West Oakland. Where Panther. Leader Bobby Seale is having a birthday party. The two men huddle in a corner and talk for a while, but it's all good seal gives Torrance's blessing for some time off. Torrance's relieved, but as is making his way out of the bar. Someone tells him that Huey. Newton wants to see him. And he wants to see him now. Newton is seals, comrade and Co founder of the Panthers for Years Newton has been a strong and charismatic leader. The reasonably his moods have been unstable tonight for whatever reason he's agitated. Torrance's into a back room in their flanked by a couple of serious enforcers is Newton and he says. You WanNa. Leave us. He's well. Do you WANNA leave bad enough to die. Do. You really want really bad enough to on the question. Is. My. Man On. Sale. So, this is what's GonNa Happen. You State. But at up. Would you elizabeth than at Awkward Talking and so? You give me a boot how? To correct it? Okay. So. You say. I'll Palette. So, Michael Torrens has just been persuaded to rethink his request for some time off. An epistle to the head. It's hard to argue with. Route. Then the. TORRENCE's five years in the panthers have been intense. It's been a roller coaster. Live of extremes many times. He's picked up a gun, but he's also picked up a microphone. Now, turns didn't join the panthers to sing, but the movements minister of Culture gave him and three other young soldiers, especial assignment for the 'cause it was a musical Qadri whose mission was to spread the seed of Social Revolution through the Trojan horse of funk and soul. It was an rn be group called. The London's music is explosive. Band is powerful, and so is the message. The lumpen work. For the cause killing it wherever they perform San Francisco La. New York Philly and throughout the Midwest, but it only lasts eleven months. Then things in the black, Panther party begin to implode. which you're about to hear is the story of the rise and fall of an unlikely aren't be grew born out of social upheaval. But why did the Black Panthers even need a musical act? Why did they need a band? WHO's militant agenda? Put them up against the forces of prejudice and law and order with every downbeat. The thing is the lumpen were not out to make hit records. There were out to change American culture. It's a journey unlike that of any other band and Michael. Torrents was at the center of it. Up? In Nineteen, sixty six Huey Newton and Bobby Seale Co the Black Panther Party. Most students at Merit Community College in Oakland within a few years. The party offers educational programs, food, service, free, medical care and Drug Rehab. The black community and the panthers lead the fight against rampant police brutality. By the end of the sixties, changes in the air in the bay area is Ground Zero. San Francisco that I will ruin. The fillmore district was very very hot tension. Police were riding. You know if I've if you are selling your papers would come in. Who asked us at you pay? Arrest at new. But at the same time there was a lot of energy. an s the best thing about it. You could really feel the energy particularly among younger people that we felt we could really make a change. Not only make and we're GONNA make. Their will us this commitment to die if necessary.

Black Panthers Huey Newton Torrance Michael Torrens Bobby Seale Oakland Torrence San Francisco San Francisco La London Michael Co Founder Midwest Elizabeth Drug Rehab Bobby Seale Co Merit Community College New York
"black community" Discussed on Eater's Digest

Eater's Digest

04:57 min | 3 weeks ago

"black community" Discussed on Eater's Digest

"That was just one of many many. Many complaints I think Tammy actually deserves a little bit more credit than just for for the tweet. She's been I. Mean if you follow her on twitter, really on it and I suggest you do. She's Tammy E. T., c.? She's been on this for a while now, and she's really the driving force behind this. After after atom, she moved on to Matt Ducker who was running all of their video programs and the accusation against him was he's responsible for not paying people of Color, the same amount as some of their white youtube celebrities and a number of other. Terrible things they were, they dug up a number of his racist and sexist tweets homophobic tweets. It's pretty it's pretty bad. I've actually talked to some people who've worked there and I. Mean is happy. It's like it seems like a giant route has been removed. Yeah, yeah, I mean I think that the fact that so many people were willing to go on the record and speak out and speak out on twitter and speak out on instagram. I think it just shows. The lack of support for those two individuals I mean maybe they do have supporters and they just there's. It's impossible to support them in this moment publicly, but. It just. Yeah. There seemed to be a groundswell like that people were. I play golf with rap every. Thursday after work we go to Chelsea Piers and smash balls. He's a good guy. Yeah, he always brings like dopes Gosh. It's pretty rare. It's funny. People ask me if knew about any of this because of course as anyone. I love media gossip but I always knew. The magazine was Brohi. And clicky, but I didn't know that this was going on Are you as an example and the business insider piece saying like? People they are call each other by their last names as an example of a masculine environment and I find that so funny, because it's so true, there are. That's a weird thing. In the Bro side of food media. Yeah. I was shocked because I mean in high school kids like. By their last names, and then I didn't really see that again. Until some certain food media, people just been like. It's such a strange. It was a weird thing. I. Don't think I've ever called anyone just by their last name really. Yeah just can't I'm trying to think. Of A world in which that would come up. Just like Janine. Has Anyone ever call it? Yes, men. The only people who called me Klute as lake reference to me have been. Are you optimistic about the future of APP? Like do you think? Do you think they're going to be able to come into work? Monday and I think it's it's probably very stressful. Time for everyone who works there, but optimistic. That change is happening I think. It's better now than it was before when people had these problems, and no one knew about it or the people who knew about it weren't doing anything about it well, I'm excited I'm truly. Excited to see what they roll out the video program..

Tammy E. T. twitter Matt Ducker Chelsea Piers Brohi Janine
"black community" Discussed on Ground Zero Media

Ground Zero Media

03:56 min | 3 weeks ago

"black community" Discussed on Ground Zero Media

"Do we. Eliminate prejudice. We created a goat police. We stopped selling Lego. Police stations. We stopped. Little police dogs from being on the case? Patrol! We cancel a god of the wind is. Hypocrisy it's ludicrous. And I I don't know people understand how liberal piety looks really bad, because it just makes them look just as bad as those who are race. It's another form of racism. It's kind of sick joke that you don't get. You know you can't be condescending and they're very condescending. In my opinion to the black community, there are a lot of been say we need to do something about the black community and none of them as wide as they are, will never will never step foot in the black community, and they won't help out a black community. Their best is to just to sit back and to do their little. Little, I am responsible guilt trip and it doesn't do anybody any good and see that that to me is what is sick and wrong about what is going on with the way I called the Hollywood piety. It seems to be happening at the moment because I I just I. Don't know it just makes me uncomfortable and there's a lot of wrong going on here. That I don't think anybody is. Paying attention to their all caught up in the in the in the hate anger. Out of Scotty in Oregon Hi, Scott. You'RE ON GROUND, zero! I just You know I just wanted to to member thinking with all this. Going on.

black community Oregon Scott
"black community" Discussed on The Current

The Current

06:20 min | 3 weeks ago

"black community" Discussed on The Current

"Thinking about it, you know historically in some of these first laws right in the colonies in Virginia was against black folk gathering for funerals and one of the things that we know about how black folks were using You know funerals as a form of resistance is that slaveholders diaries and writing that have come down to us. They kept writing out right and it was this idea that Oh, you know. The slave holder is accepting. This is no black. Folks are refusing to roll over you know, and they're continuing to memorialize, and I think in our rituals what I've seen in my own research, definitely in the twentieth century. Is this idea fighting? Fighting back against that stereotypical near right, so if white society you know sees you as definitely during the Jim Crow ear, the nineteen twenties nineteen forty as this brute. You know this angry, animalistic black man. You know, mammy. Here's the black woman here you know to serve why folks in that General Right? You are the untethered to your community. I'm a mother I'm a sister, an aunt, and then shown through first of all the number of mourners at come right. There's hundreds of people that want to gather in to pay their last last respect. Then you look at how black folks have used material culture right, so we're having horses that are drawn glass casket. Multiple floral arrangements to say no. We are a three dimensional human. That was part of this community. That's missed about this community. You know we're not just your here. In this moment where people are connected in ways part of this. Pandemic, where we haven't been able to go out, and you can't do the things he could you know rub somebody in the back or give a hug or something and in a moment of grief. How has this moment changed? That context can. Yeah. you know that collective coming together? for black folks is essential and I'm saying you know many white Americans, really leaning into You know digital whether they're leaning into zoom and saying you know I wouldn't have had to find time to this funeral anyway and really embracing it. in different ways I'm saying in the collective black community and I. WanNa be clear about this. You know this collective black community is this consciousness. Is this identity forced or slavery? So there's differences as it relates to. To religion, as it relates to economic region for the most part, they're feeling really incomplete I'm hearing that I'm hearing cheated. in folks are opting to wait you know you can. They've done the fifteen person in funeral home? You know funeral. Wake all in one but a good friend of mine. She's waiting in November. which we think outside of open up again or either you know next year to have full home going. You know you're not fully celebrated. If everyone, the newest person you know is not able to really. Gather up and remember all about celebrating the life that that's a big component of ritual. Now now you grew up in a funeral home. Myself? Cami No, no, but not in the Nile now grew up in a funeral home. In Newark New Jersey, and what did you learn about grief and those rituals academy was talking about. Where you grew up. I think several things one is how we've turned a ritual of death into a celebration of life. you go to any black funeral? Most blacks through knows at least. You're GONNA see joy and sorrow being inseparable. You'RE GONNA see folks, shouting and jumping and dancing and clapping, and you're going to see a eulogist and. Sweating and A frenzy while folks cry, but also a lot folks shout out and last you're gonNA. See A repast after the funeral where folks are telling stories and eating food. So I that the way that black folks have responded to loss and death is remarkable. How we made a celebration of and I think that's also reflected in the protect. The chance the dancing the energy the pageantry that we see funeral sort of reflecting over in the way that we protests. I think the other thing is how we given in death. to are deceased what times they don't receive in life, and that's also historical, so the pageantry the adornment, the ways in which we treat the body we beautify it I. think that's part of the reason why Ferguson exploded because when you leave a black boys body on the pavement bleed. For, four and a half hours I think that local community refused. To accept that in part because of how dear we've treated our debt, so I think a celebration of life and a way in which we've given to I dead in debt. What they haven't had him life just in it. We only have a few seconds left, but do you see as the Pastor said Nile? A moment that has momentum beyond what we'll see in the next couple of days. Absolutely. we see people rising up in the street. We see folks also organizing. We see folks demanding that government officials define law enforcement budgets, so yes, we see grief. Yes, we see rage, and we also see strategizing organizing movements that are going to. Go Pass this particular moment, and so I'm very excited to see the latest iteration of this movement, and I'm very excited to see folks translating and concerning their grief into rage, and into something that will outlast this particular moment. It's really great to speak with you both this morning. Thank you for your time. Thank you. Thank you so much? Now Ford is the son of a black funeral director also minister activists PhD candidate in religious and African American studies at Princeton University Cami. Fletcher is a professor at Albright. College. Who Studies African American deaf practices. For more CBC PODCASTS TO CBC DOT CA slash podcasts..

Cami No Virginia Jim Crow Princeton University Cami Nile Newark New Jersey Ford Fletcher Ferguson Albright professor director
"black community" Discussed on The Current

The Current

07:21 min | 3 weeks ago

"black community" Discussed on The Current

"Doing some things here on the ground, and so now you could feel that there was this collective sense, and then I think after his funeral. You'll probably see people spring to Action. With their various campaigns and such. What would you like to see happen in the days following I mean today and tomorrow will be huge events in in Houston and the community will come together, but what happens in those in those days following. I think that you see people. calling out governments into account And I'll masive into town out churches into account saying hey, bid needs to be a national whether it's day time year of repentance from systemic. Slash corporate racism. What do you make what's happening? In Minneapolis where city council, there's pledging to to dismantle the police department, the Police Department that was responsible for the death of George Floyd. I actually think that that's a good thing. When say dismantle if we mean. Sinking about rethinking how we do, releasing I think that's a good thing. police corps so I sent you. To any. Any thriving. Third World Country But I think that all the structures. Economic legal. political needs to be examined the reexamined in light. Of The fact that racism is at the fault line. Most of Western civilization. What do you expect to happen today? I suspect a city to come out and to celebrate. His favorite of and I think it'll be a great time. I mean you know bittersweet time. But the time of memories in celebration of life that. was cut down in, the prime. I'm sorry for your loss and I appreciate you speaking with us this morning. Pastor, thank you. It was my pleasure. Thank you very much. Pastor Patrick England is a lawyer and the founder of Resurrection Houston close friend as well as George Floyd. He was in Houston. Texas. I'm Dr Hillary Bride. Let me, take. You or microphones rarely go into my therapy office. It's where my clients hurt. He'll and ultimately thrive. You'RE GONNA. Hear private conversations that we rarely ever have with ourselves. Let alone share with others. Welcome, to other people's problems. Maybe along the whale discover that other people's problems are a lot like your own. season. Three's out now. Subscribe on CBC. Listen Or. Wherever you. Get Your podcasts. We've been talking about that idea of grief. And mourning the kind of public outpouring of grief and anger has a long history in black communities and in political movements, the murders of black people in the memorials to them have been crucial in struggles for civil rights desegregation, and the ability of slavery joined now by two people with insight into that history in the pain of collective grief and the power of collective morning Kenny Fletcher. At Albright College in an expert in African American culture in history, so so the president of the collective of radical deaf study now Ford is a minister and activist PhD candidate as well in religious and African American studies at Princeton University and the son of a black funeral director. Good morning to you both. Good Morning Morning Cami. We just heard pastor in willow, talk about exhaustion, and just being tired that sense of a collective. That is hanging around people? Is that how you feel? Yeah you know when he was talking. I thought about Sandy Lillehammer. You know who coined the phrase I'm sick and tired of being sick and tired and nineteen sixty four rights activists. in wins the political route. You know the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party and what's so telling is a few days ago, I just her great niece on TV. She had been shot with rubber. Bullets may lose an is you know in experiencing the same thing and it was just crazy. You know in which she kept saying was. We can't keep going through. You know if any little Hamer sharecropper almost lost her life. There's absolutely you know collective tiredness, but when black folks get tired, we gather strength together collectively, and we get active that that's part of our history now Ford. What have you been thinking about over these last few days as you've seen to point to that that kind of collective exhaustion? Well. In many ways I. think that we're recognizing that something is very unprecedented. But at the same time as all too familiar. I'm black. Folks entire. Centuries in this country, but I think we're reaching the combination of an expression of not just exhaustion, but of rage and I think those things are inseparable part of the reason why folks are so angry. Is that because have been so tired? and I think that it's inspiring to see people with their backs up against the wall who had been quarantined for much at this point? To essentially walk out into the streets and risk their lives in order to save other lives. I think it's truly inspire funeral rituals. We know are important in all cultures. What's the special significance Nile in black communities? What's distinctive about what happens in black communities? So much I, mean historically. It's been central to how we forge African. American life you can go back to slavery and see how slave rebellions plotted at the funeral of enslaved folks Gabriel proser Nat Turner. After that tournus rebellion. The Commonwealth of Virginia passed legislation to actually ban black preaching at Lazio generals because they saw as threatening. We see that all throughout African American culture and history I think the most familiar example is mammy kills decision to keep the casket open, so the world could see what they've done to her baby. And I think it's important to realize. Many historians argue that that the pictures of the images of her son Emmett till actually spark the civil rights movement. We see that all the way through. Even the black lives matter where you have breen newsome, climbing a thirty foot pole, and taking down the confederate flag the day after Obama eulogize Reverend, pick me, and she said in an interview that when she saw his. His casket role by the flag. It's a part of what agitated her to do it and we see the same thing to that. He expressing grief out in the street Chemi pick up on what comes out of these collective moments of of morning, and and how do you see I mean the whole idea of the home going the funeral rituals that have been so important as NAS to to black.

George Floyd Houston Ford Police Department Minneapolis Mississippi Freedom Democratic Sandy Lillehammer Virginia breen newsome Dr Hillary Resurrection Houston Pastor Patrick England Albright College Obama Emmett Texas Hamer Kenny Fletcher
"black community" Discussed on The Brookings Cafeteria

The Brookings Cafeteria

05:41 min | Last month

"black community" Discussed on The Brookings Cafeteria

"Perry is fellow in the Metropolitan Policy Program here at Brookings in his interviewed on the show by Robert Wicks from the Brookings Press. This is Roberts I interview for the Brookings Cafeteria so welcome Robert also on this episode Senior Fellow Sarah Bender through three developments on Capitol Hill in Washington. That deserve a closer. Look you can follow the brookings. Podcast work on twitter at policy podcasts. Get information about and links to all of our shows including dollar incense the Brookings Trade podcast the current events podcast first up Sarah Bender with what's happening in Congress. I'm Sarah Bender a senior fellow in governance studies at the Brookings Institution. These are unusual times on Capitol Hill Cove. Nineteen has upended both the congressional calendar and congressional routines in Washington and even after Nachman of nearly three trillion dollars in emergency relief. The chair of the Federal Reserve Jay Powell has called on Congress to do more but the House and Senate seem to be on different partisan paths raising questions about whether or when Congress might act again free developments on Capitol Hill deserve closer. Look I an opening shot by house. Democrats second divisions emerging among Senate Republicans and third steps towards Virtual Congress. I up house. Democrats Democrats last week planted their parties flag in what could be a couple months battle over another economic relief package on the floor. Vote Pass the Heroes Act. Democrats lost a dozen mostly moderate members and picked up just one Republican from a hard hit New York City District House. Republicans largely deride the bill as an ideological and partisan wishlist. The Democrats bill commits about three trillion dollars for state and local governments individuals essential workers in hospitals as well as unemployed workers in their employer's. The bill also includes billions for the ailing. Us Postal Service and for states to handle the November elections even at three trillion dollars though there are few measures that both moderates and progressives wanted the bill to keep benefits flowing to Americans hard hit by the Economic Christ's but not all the provisions made it in the bill on the one hand. This is certainly a messaging bill. It helps Democrats draw a stark line between how Democrats and Republicans are responding to the crisis on the other hand speaker. Pelosi will use the bill to drive a wedge through Senate Republicans why She wants. Republican senators to pressure their leaders to come to the bargaining table. Less Republicans be blamed if an economic recovery fails to take root this spring or summer. Second what's happening in the Senate well in some ways it's business as usual albeit most but not all senators wearing masks. The Senate has largely been focused on advice and consent confirming nominees for both positions in the trump administration. Amfar vacant federal judgeships. Democrats have decried this business as usual to put pressure on Majority Leader Mitch. Mcconnell to consider emergency relief but Republican leaders have largely played. Wait and see in part because while the White House has vowed to veto the house bill. It hasn't made clear what the president would support. Meanwhile Senate Republicans facing tough elections in November. Such as Colorado's Cory Gardner are getting nervous. Just listen to what Senator Garner tweeted this week quote it's unfathomable that the Senate is set to go on recess without considering any additional cove nineteen assistance for the American people. Colorado are hurting end quote. Those pressures from within the Republican conference will surely continue to grow third steps towards Virtual Congress. The House and Senate are slowly in their own ways beginning to adapt to legislating during a pandemic. The House last week adopted a new set of procedures known as a proxy voting. This means that not every lawmaker. We'll have to come back to Washington to cast their floor. Votes members can now get their proxies to the handful of members who do appear in the chamber to cast votes declared by those absent members so long as the houses in an emergency period. The House also greenlighted the practice of virtual committee proceedings. Once the details are worked out but only Democrats seemed on board for the change. Republicans voted lockstep against the reforms. Put in the burden on Democrats to defend the reform now. A lot of reporters have called this store. Change for the House to allow members to participate without being present. But it's important not to exaggerate. What happened crisis often precipitates change in Congress and proxy floor? Voting is certainly novel. But it doesn't really shake up the balance of power in the house. Party leaders still hold the upper hand especially during the pandemic given the challenges that rank and file members face in congregating coordinating and legislating over in the Senate. Reformers haven't gained much traction with their formal proposals but the Senate is changing at least informally most notably moving to virtual hearings even when the Senate is in session in Capitol Hill virtual hearings and even for high profile witnesses like the secretary of treasure in the chair in the Federal Reserve. In both chambers camels have put their noses under the tent and they may get take a few steps farther in the meantime the parties will wage messaging battle over the need for more economic aid SMART MONEY. I think is probably on Republicans to.

Senate Democrats Senate Republicans Brookings Institution Congress Republicans Sarah Bender Washington Brookings Press senior fellow Brookings Cafeteria Capitol Hill Cove Colorado Robert Wicks twitter New York City District House White House
"black community" Discussed on WBT Charlotte News Talk

WBT Charlotte News Talk

02:17 min | 1 year ago

"black community" Discussed on WBT Charlotte News Talk

"It's back, and then we got George Bush doesn't like black people and Michael Myers. Picks up starts reading the teleprompter. An all time moment. Anyway, now, I don't think George Bush was is a racist. But what I do think that he many establishment Republicans engaged in is the belief that you know, what we can't win there. And if you don't try hard if you don't try to institute policies that make that big of a difference. If you aren't willing to have the politically incorrect conversations, well, guess what? Maybe you're not going to have the success you need, and I'm not talking about politically. Because again, if you want to have political success with somebody, what do you have to do you have to prove to them? Can make a difference. And as we're talking about record low minority unemployment rates, especially with the black community. That's Donald Trump story. So you can sit there, and you can say Donald Trump is racist. Donald Trump is whatever. But you know, what Donald Trump is responsible for an economy that has more black adults at work than ever before. That has hundreds of thousands of families on welfare, providing a path in an American dream for people who didn't think it was possible, and you had to sit here and collect government assistance. That's what Donald Trump is doing. Never forget. I've led many lives. Even though I'm not all that old. I pack a lot into a given day. It's an understatement. Given that I do to morning shows and keep going. I had. Mood. The company had a manager there. One time. And. End up getting a call. Call came from. Government office doing a an employment verification. Check. Verify the employment, and then they wanted to talk to the employees. Like, okay. So a hand the phone over to the employees and conversation takes place. And I could tell after a couple of months that it was going. She's getting upset. She's getting really upset. Was like, okay. Gets.

Donald Trump George Bush Michael Myers black community
"black community" Discussed on Black Agenda Radio

Black Agenda Radio

02:34 min | 3 years ago

"black community" Discussed on Black Agenda Radio

"Russia hysteria russia gate and most politicians have fallen in line and as such the left and progressive elements must not allow themselves to be isolated in pushed into a corner politically they must go to the people and to the masses and they must not rely upon the ideological and political interests in line of forces that represent war and the establishment the establishment of both the democratic and republican party if we want to have a movement of the people we must go to the people we must politically educate the people we bus clarify the issues that are confronting the world's people and move on from there i think at this point we have not yet come to that type of thinking doctor anthony montiero's speaking from philadelphia the up a lot bala i felt blackish back coalition for social gesture if peace in preparation hansen important gate coming up with the philadelphia city council that black is back coalition and its allies are pressing for black community control of the police listeners do soup to fall to the community can kill ponies working group to the black is a coalition we're gonna be reading a whole contingent opposes into the city council meeting sewage those our bill for black community controlled the police which contains the principles or run the right to an independent nongovernment affiliated black community control the police commission that is democratically elected by people all the black neighborhoods and district level and this commission has the tall was a higher volume train and when necessary discipline police forces in our community by discipline particularly we talking about the power to subpoena and actually bring police that violate on our rights porn charges in theaters office the city government the court system and the police department to respect this process as well two passing this do so that's our main objective are going into the city council meeting on september fourteen.

anthony montiero philadelphia city council black community Russia philadelphia hansen