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26 Burst results for "behavioral scientist"

What We're Missing, By Missing Strangers Now

Short Wave

05:17 min | 2 months ago

What We're Missing, By Missing Strangers Now

"So you're way to find out why you were feeling high. After talking to random people you delved into the science of strangers. Yeah I I started looking into it and it turns out. There's this Newish Line of research examining this very question. When is the last time you yourself talk to a stranger? Who Gosh usually that would be so easy to answer this. Is Elizabeth done a psychology professor who studies happiness at the University of British Columbia? So done I started thinking about the importance of strangers when she noticed something odd happening with her boyfriend. Back in Grad School. Benjamin was a lovely person but Benjamin happened to be in a little bit of a bad mood. He would act a bit cranky grumpy around me longtime girlfriend now that that was okay and I would. I would stuff with it. We are crankiest around the ones. We Love True True. But but then they'd run into a stranger on their way to dinner or something and her boyfriend would perk right up like he would suddenly become pleasant and cheerful and he'd often stay that way being a better mood even after the running Like a little stranger boost. Yeah and wanted to know why. So she conducted a study. She got a bunch of couples together in a lab and she asked everyone to predict if they'd feel happier interacting with their own beloved partner or complete stranger from one of the other couples. I'm guessing they chose their own partner. Like that feels like the safest choice. That's definitely what they chose but with done found was that people actually ended up reporting feeling just as good after interacting with a total stranger as they did after interacting with their own partner. Ooh Drama Drama Ya. I know it was also surprising because for a long time. Researchers had mainly focused on the effects of spending time with intimates like our friends and family not complete randoms. You know I think we consider these interactions to be trivial. They happen quickly and spontaneously most of the time. We don't really give them a second thought so don't want it to know like what is up with. These stranger interactions and over the next decade she conducted a few more studies looking at how these interactions affect our wellbeing including the study at a coffee shop in Vancouver where she got people to either have a conversation with a Barista or to just get their coffee and get out. Be Totally Utilitarian about it. Which by the way is how done usually likes to roll. I really like efficiency. This is a woman after my own heart. Yeah me too but what done founded that just. Having brief interactions with the BARISTA would on a scale of one to five make people feel happier like six tenths of a point better in terms of positive affect and a half. A point might not sound like that big a difference but actually compared to a lot of other findings in our field. It's pretty solid given how minimal the intervention that we're using here is do we know why your way well. There's only been a handful of studies so far so researchers don't really know what's happening just yet but Dunne's theory. Is that when you talk to a stranger? You generally try to be friendly and cheerful. Because that's the social norm in a lot of places right and so just by acting more cheerful. That can shape how you feel and I imagine like you know bumping into a stranger kind of jerks you out of the routine of daily life maybe makes you feel like. I don't know I feel like a little more awake after I have a nice interaction with a stranger And I think when these interactions go well it can also affirm your existence There's this study that showed when participants were given I contact by stranger passing them on the street. They reported feeling more socially connected than when a stranger looked through them. As if they weren't there are such fleeting moments in our daily lives and yet be really powerful and just making people feel you know I am seen. I'm connected people around me notice my presence but what about people who? Maybe don't like talking to strangers. Yeah I looked into it. And there's this interesting study. By behavioral scientists Nicholas Julia Schroeder that found that commuters on trains and buses routinely reported a more positive experience when they talk to strangers even when they said they preferred writing alone in solitude. Oh yes I remember this study. There was this like big gap between how they thought interacting with a stranger would make them feel and what actually happened. Which Kinda loved. Yeah I mean I think it's also kind of tragic because it means that there are people who think they don't like talking to strangers and so don Even though it would probably make them happier in the moment and then the cycle just goes on and

Benjamin Partner Elizabeth Nicholas Julia Schroeder Grad School University Of British Columbia Don Even Vancouver Dunne Professor
R/x for Healthcare: Better UX Through Measurement and Deeper Engagement with Jay Erickson, Chief Innovation Officer at Modus

Outcomes Rocket

06:44 min | 2 months ago

R/x for Healthcare: Better UX Through Measurement and Deeper Engagement with Jay Erickson, Chief Innovation Officer at Modus

"Just got back from Argentina year over there Yeah that's right. We have an office down there and I was doing some work down there and Yet we just moved back last week. Interesting time to move back of course to be traveling around but love Argentina. Wow well welcome back to the States. And you are also very focused on the digital aspects within healthcare so tell us what inspires your work in the healthcare vertical In the core of my inspiration is a very personal so seven years ago. I was diagnosed with advanced metastatic to sicker cancer. I spent about a year and treatment at Sloan. Kettering forty five days in patient. Three months of Chemo for big surgery. So I was sort of a professional patient for a year and I learned law things. I'm six years. No evidence of disease now so I feel very much. Thank you thank you and as you can imagine I learned a lot of things and a lot of different levels but one thing I I learned in observed in that role was just in my opinion. How poorly a digital was being deployed in space for patients and for clinicians and this is not a knock on Sloan. They're amazing they saved my life. But it's something that's across the industry. As as soon as I came back and so before that I was the chief operating officer is really just focusing on running the business and when I came back I said this is something I really want to dive back into. Working more directly with clients focusing on as a problem to be solved doing what I can to put my shoulder to the wheel of making better more effective experiences for patients and for clinician. So that's my My touchstone of the passion that I bring to it. Well I think it's A powerful story Jay and I appreciate sharing that and congratulate you for for beating cancer and so great that you have taken this upon yourself. Having been there done that as a patient better and more efficient are two things that we could definitely get from from digital technologies. Tell us a little bit more about how you guys are. Adding value to the ecosystem through digital so our focus is really on creating experiences that are engaging in effective and this mostly for patients but also for clinicians and sometimes caregivers and bringing best practices to the industry that hasn't really been woven into the to the way that the digital products have been built outside. The industry and healthcare has has been data centric and rightfully so right. The legislation was passed. You know twenty plus years ago saying you need to get everything into the data and and that's been journey and now that we have all the data in we're starting to figure out ways to unlock the data and share the data and do more with the data. We need to stop being so data centric and start being more human centric and understanding that people are complex and their situations are often very unique and we need to build experiences that meet them where they are and make things easy for them and drives towards the outcomes that we want for them. So that's a long answer and I can be unpacked. Non Thought of different ways but how we sort of more tactically are coming into his kind of doing really running more design thinking processes That haven't been lacking so picking up on sort of clinical insight or a market research research site in farm industry for instance and building on that doing ethnographic research actually talking to patients in really understanding their sort of holistic view. Their Longitudinal journey that might touch a bunch of different things. A bunch of different providers a bunch of different mediums a bunch of different co morbidity or products understanding those longitudinal journeys doing rapid prototyping and. Co Design and collaboration ways. And then putting those back for early prototype validation before anything gets actually develop so that process of design thinking is something that has been lacking in the industry and has led to a lot of digital experiences that are either painful or hard to navigate or create unnecessary cognitive. Load especially in the case of clinicians. It's interesting you know. And I'm glad you mentioned clinicians as well because bad experience exists on on the patient side and on the clinician side. As well and to your point there's a lot that's going on that's great but there's an opportunity to do so much better and saw I'd love to hear from. Uja On on what your team has done. That's made either outcomes better or business models better within healthcare. Yeah so I think it's. It's applying that process that I described by lake. You know it's all in. The end is about outcomes right so you really are trying to make better Clinton experiences. They can spend more time to medicine less time on data entry or so. They're less burnt out. Say let's make less mistakes and in the patient case you're trying to keep them engaged. You're trying to get data to flow and to have the outcome of their experience in their disease journey or or or health journey. Have a better outcome. So it's not just about great experiences to create great experiences. I WanNa make that clear to but specifically applying those cases. I mean. We've done everything from working with. Pharmaceutical companies to develop a digital prototypes around using stress managed using behavioral change techniques around social support for stress management or behavioral scientists at pharmaceutical companies or working with healthcare providers to provide better pathways for patients to navigate their journeys. So it's a lot of simple stuff and it can be starting with schedule. An appointment and navigating to the in helping with with with transport access to the site of care. Just that doesn't require blockchain or a I or anything fancy but doing that in a way that is easy in as easy as Uber or another experience that we're used to in our normal life bringing that level of ease and utility to those experience that's table stakes right and then it's going from. They're moving more into actual medicine side of things and we do a lot of stuff around adherence and getting people know we know that that forty percent of outcomes is driven by behavior. And there's really nothing better at a scalable in evaluating level to help with behavior change them and digital devices mean there's a there's a shadow side to that too also right. Mike. We're all addicted to these things. But that same power can be used to drive behavior change whether it's adherence to medication or physical therapy or just a care plan so creating experiences for patients that help them with that. So that's we start to get into the closer to the medical side of things so that's some of the ways that we are bringing our skills that we've owned also in other industries like you've working in hospitality and retail and e commerce and all these other industries that have more are more mature digitally especially from human centric perspective bringing all those practices and tools to the space

Sloan Argentina Chemo Chief Operating Officer Kettering JAY Co Design Mike Clinton
"behavioral scientist" Discussed on Love Your Work

Love Your Work

02:59 min | 6 months ago

"behavioral scientist" Discussed on Love Your Work

"Thinking or you'll be on on your way. Let me give an example right now. I'm sitting ten feet away from a rocking chats on alumni which is the patio and it's this outdoor rocking chair that that folds up well before that rocking has had like a chair from Home Depot like a garden chair fight. Sit In that chair in the evening and sit there and read and what have you then one day. I got this vulnerable rocking chair capture and I put on the night I sat on and after about ten seconds. Man I love this guess. What from then on on I never sat in home? Depot chair sat in a rocking chair. So after sitting in the Rodney's are one time that then became the habit. How long does it take a teenage eighteen Trade the habit of carrying himself from almost instantly some people after the first time. They use lifter Uber. They never considered going out in the street. In hailing a cab again. So it's the look at habit as a function of authenticity and what you're really trying to do is how to it for like writing thing are going to the gym or doing push ups is. How do I get myself to do this without deciding? If you're deciding yes no go to the gym. It's not a a very strong habit Now that's not necessarily bad right now in my life has been varied. There's never been a consistent time Monday when I could go workout so every day I am deciding on my working out so it's not a habit but I do it every day. It's a very reliable behavior and that's okay okay so I think we might get tangled up in the word habit a little too much. Maybe somebody writes five hundred words every day and maybe they don't do it automatically what they do it reliably and that's okay. You know. There's sometimes lights work thank you so much. BJ for coming on and talking about habit building so it sounds like for two thousand eighteen people if people want to build habits probably GonNa work better than resolution. They should start very small. Make it something that is attached to some sort of anchor. Some sort of other thing. That's going on in their life and go ahead and use the momentum. Is there anything you would add to that the nutshell that's great great advice And there's a lot more online that you can discover million others But YEAH EGYPT DOT COM or tiny habits dot com and I have a whole set of videos coming out right now in the new year. This coming I have a video series on habits so yeah check those out. Great thank you so much. BJ David greatest talk to a glass. Thanks again it is love your work helping you find your unique creative voice. Does it bring you the inspiration and motivation. You need to become the Creator and human you want to be if so please be part of making a special and nourishing and thoughtful show support the show on patron..

Rodney Home Depot BJ David
"behavioral scientist" Discussed on Love Your Work

Love Your Work

02:43 min | 6 months ago

"behavioral scientist" Discussed on Love Your Work

"Smaller one hour one way. I explained it to deal with my boot camp. BOOT campers which boot camps about training and behavior design resigned. Tiny habits is a very specific method or boot camp is the broader broader training umbrella. It's if you wanted to. You played beautiful music. You wouldn't start with a concerto. You would start with something simple and you will start with something you actually like and you'd work up to the concerto if people die right right in saying I'm going to write two thousand words every morning from now on. That's like somebody who doesn't play the piano saying I'm gonNA play this concerto. It's just GonNa be frustrating and so I'm thinking that you dead the etudes and you did the simple pieces than you work your way up to the point. Where even if it is your job you're able able to do that? I mean it wasn't. You just suddenly did that you. There was a progression scales years years. And I could do that. Yeah so I mean if you could articulate what those steps were so. I'm not work on that particular habit of writing or any kind of creativity but if you could say hey here are the different ways to start. There's more than one way to start just like formalities. Get do this do this and make progress in just trust over time. I'm you're going to have more skill more motivation to do this. Bigger thing I don't want people to think just by listening to you talk that they're going to magically I play the concerto or right two thousand words a morning yeah well. It's funny you mentioned because it actually the book that will be out by the time. This conversation is out. It's called the heart to start so it's all about starting so perfect for her. I WanNa make sure that we cover another listener question before we go. We have had one listener asking. I probably about the thing that you hear over and over again that this. I'm going to say it's a myth aside guessing that it takes twenty one days to build a habit this listeners to know what is what is the science say about how long it takes to build a habit does depend on the person the sort of factors control this uptake time. And it's unlike you had a long answer so I don't know if there's enough time for but that's the question. Yeah I'll try to give short answer to it First of all you have to define what have it is and people have. I've I've come up with their seven different uses of nap word. The Way I think about it is it's An action that you do without thinking so something. You do quite automatic. You're not deciding. You're not deliberating you just do it. and.

"behavioral scientist" Discussed on Love Your Work

Love Your Work

02:30 min | 6 months ago

"behavioral scientist" Discussed on Love Your Work

"Maybe it's delete facebook from my phone. Okay great what else are you. Come up with a whole bunch of different behaviors by thinking. I can and get myself to do anything. What would it be? Have a stack of Ruxton slip through Call my mom were avenue and so generate ten to fifteen of those behaviors dinners and then choose among those. So now the words you're looking at a range of options to the magic wanding method and and you can do more than fifteen people are great coming up with options on Bieler really. Can't slow gotta go back and look at those. Some of them are going to be impossible. Some they actually don't want to do match yourself. Those ones can be effective easy to do and you actually want to put it into practice and then you can take that in design for the tiny habits method. Seems like it's it's actually a specially equipped for breaking things like Social Media Addiction. Because I guess it's a relatively new thing that we have technology in our lives manipulating for a better word. Our motivation and so something like my book reading thing was just kind of making books more like facebook like making it able to giving living in a fighting chance against these little hits that you get throughout the day again. I want to say I want to go to directions with this but what I'll do the short run I in the going to the main direction Good Habits what we call good habits bad habits form in the same way by nature. Human Nature doesn't care whether we consider they spoke is good or bad are push ups Gunnar bad start small they find a place in our lives nights where they fit. Well they can take root so going more with a plant analogy Some of those unlike we'd try it and so you got to like identify with this. This is becoming a consistent thing. I got up Ruta so I've got to put something else in its spot not so. That's kind of a the. The simpler pieces could happen. Some bad habits from the tiny habits. You know it's really it. It's it's not a random set of principles is derived by looking at my own behavior model motivation ability trigger and seeing that. It's really easy to do.

facebook Ruta Ruxton Bieler Gunnar
"behavioral scientist" Discussed on Love Your Work

Love Your Work

03:35 min | 6 months ago

"behavioral scientist" Discussed on Love Your Work

"There there it is Ryan in but you can't go to somebody any directly angle heights. You are a person that gives about nutrition or high you are a a consistent rider your writer. At least I don't think you can do that. But what but I do know is when people see evidence that I'm the kind of person that you healthy snack. It changes how they think about themselves and then that identity the ship than has ongoing facts and wow diabetic. That's it right there. I mean that's what you want now that that being a healthy eater doesn't generalized analyzed. I'm the kind of person who cares about my finances are kind of person who gets a lot of sleep. There are these it seems to be identities are connected with different domains. Yea I've seen this. I guess I think it is sort of like Like the way that a crack grows on a sidewalk or something or the way that ran Canaan has been carved. It happens over time if you just get that first thread started and I have a relevant story to one of the listener questions on twitter. There was one of the listeners I was asking. Is there any tiny habit practiced to break social media addiction. I actually had an experience like that where I was scrolling through facebook doc. Sometimes an hour at a time literally saying out loud. I do not want to be doing this. And the way that I overcame it was I was having a conversation when I first met when I met a friend. Who was saying? Oh you get like a pile of books from the library and just set him out in front of me and I pick one up and I look at it for for second I put in pick it up pick another one up and look at it for a second and I said okay well. That's interesting because when I pick up a book I feel pressure to finish the the book and so it was interesting that he had completely flipped everything so that he had permission to pick up a book. Read just to subheads or pick up a page and start reading it there or read the table just the table of contents and so I started doing that. I got a whole bunch of books. I set them out at any time. I felt the trigger the trigger of wanting to go on facebook like a little tinge of anxiety or something it up a book and I had total permission and to read as little or as much as I wanted but at least the thing was that when you gain momentum in picking up facebook then you're just you just end doc with your brain fried because you through a million different news feeds items but when you when you gain momentum reading a book that now you're reading a book now you're doing uh-huh slower more methodical thinking and design of the artifact that you're interacting with is shaping your behavior I loved that as an example. Let me give a method A method that I teach in my boot camps for deriving adding that other options so up in the little cloud of the aspiration cloud I mean you. Just write it down in that. Say Oh use facebook last stop using facebook or don't use his face for convenience. Whatever the aspirations and then imagine and I call this method magic wanding imagine you have a magic wand and you can get yourself to do any behavior that would lead to using facebook less white? Would you wish for what would you help yourself to a write that down and then you have another wish. Same thing you what else he beat yourself doing well. Maybe it's delete facebook from my phone. Okay great what else are you. Come up with a whole bunch of different behaviors by thinking. I can and get myself to do anything. What would it be? Have.

facebook Ryan writer twitter
"behavioral scientist" Discussed on Love Your Work

Love Your Work

02:53 min | 6 months ago

"behavioral scientist" Discussed on Love Your Work

"Too afraid or not confident enough or even wanted to have the trainer when you start at you in your wants will change over time. That's what you shouldn't I say. Should you start with like I should be working out in on our the warning. That's not where you you don't WanNa start there. Don't start there but trust that as you progress with something small and on something related that that that thing that felt like a should will become a want and it's just like pace change in what you want changes over Time if you're doing related behaviors however small feeling successful and the key. Is this that you naturally start doing a bigger things. Without even designing it specifically just happens those ripple effect I was measuring that eighty percent. Plus people ball reported there within five days. They started doing other behaviors about eighteen percent on average reported during a big behavior. Wow and so there's this ripple effect and then it finally collect the mechanism mechanisms like what causes what was behind it and it was an insight that I had that it didn't come out of actually running an experiment. But what an now. I'm quite sharks. I started measuring this. Here's what happens as you behavior. Let's let's say let's let's let's go to nutrition a lot of people wanna eat better as you start eating better even if it's very very small usually a healthy snack in the afternoon and as you do that and feel good about that behavior however small you will start thinking about yourself in a new way you will start thinking. Oh I'm the the kind of person who eats healthy sex. Oh I'm the kind of person who eats healthy. And it will generalize out and affect other aspects of your nutrition So in other words there's an identity shift that happens when people do a behavior like writing fifty were today. Oh I'm a writer rider or eat healthy snacks. The kind of person eats healthy and then that ripples out to other parts of their life and once I saw that once I confirmed it through you know the measurements I was doing on a weekly basis as like. Oh my gosh. That's amazing even a small mall thing if people feel successful about even changing a small thing. We'll shift that person's identity and then that opens them up to other changes in propels them to continue among us there. It is. There's the trip I don't WanNA call it. Trump knows the key right there. There's the crux. Give me a good way there. David Your Guy I can I can but all marketers sewing but.

Trump writer David
"behavioral scientist" Discussed on Love Your Work

Love Your Work

03:40 min | 6 months ago

"behavioral scientist" Discussed on Love Your Work

"It's you know and that's That's probably the most powerful metaphor or analogy. You can tell me David which it is even though I have a couple of degrees in English number by digging habits like plants is a very powerful and accurate way of The thinking about it right now underdogs for me. There transplanting palm trees and I saw them on the side of the road and so they don his full grown palm trees and they're gonNa go put them in the earth in this big hole and it's a huge production and I think it's going to take a lot of care and feeding to make sure those palm treaty survive whereas these Coconuts floating around or just happened to be in the right spot that grow just on their own without a lot of churn feeding and you can think of being habits in that way you want to start with something big and massive. It's like transplanting a big tree. Which means it's GonNa take a lot of effort and energy in in a lot of chatter feeding and it's you man picked the wrong spot for that habit or you may not know how to keep it nurtured? And so that's what one one of the reasons why I always like no started really really small find where the habit fits and then grow the roots and the roots. The Way I think about it as you feel good about what you've done like good for me for doing one hundred words at five hours towards that like grows the roots that helps it get more firmly planted and then And then you can play around with you know doing more than that and you may find six hundred twenty. Two words is optimal for you. The one hundred hundred is fine. I'm glad you brought up this transplanting. I- -nology I guess it's analogy. I Dunno no no not have any English degrees because I- tiny habits really helped me when I was transplanting myself. I had a nice healthy Workout schedule habit. Going and I had a number of things that would help me keep that in place. One of them was that I would go to group classes and so I would have to go to class because it was on a certain schedule and if I missed it out you totally screwed but then I moved to Columbia and so as always moving I was like well. There's not group classes of the style of fitness. That I WANNA DO ANA moving I have. I'm just struggling to figure out how to feed myself When you get discombobulated like that and so? My habit was after the writing session on Monday Wednesday Friday I would go to the gym for fifteen minutes Add it was just total. Oh acceptance go to the gym for fifteen minutes feel good about. It doesn't matter what you do. Just go and after Oh maybe a couple of months of that. Then I started ramping up to thirty and then I had a trainer design a program for me and and so now I don't have to think about it. There's a lot less mental energy going into maintain maintain that habit. I have not missed a workout in the two years that I've been here. well-done there's patterns to all of us in what you're describing there's is the pattern whereas you feel successful even on small things you know one of the patterns is you've heard this in your listeners. Change leads to change and success leads to success. That's a pattern and even though those Bush as that's how that's how habits working so you you can start anywhere our because as you feel successful You'll do more as you change you. Open yourself to other changes. You now see. He went fifteen minutes of bigger workout to a trainer. You wouldn't you probably are.

Bush David Columbia I
"behavioral scientist" Discussed on Love Your Work

Love Your Work

02:18 min | 6 months ago

"behavioral scientist" Discussed on Love Your Work

"Your own without doing unlike experiments thousands of people of how to create this habit Just you know if you're if you're listening and it's like Here's the thing thing I WANNA do. Yes and I'm falling into this perfectionism trapped in David's time just one time give yourself permission to lower your standards or do do a bad job just once and go good for me. I did it I did. This thing weather is good or bad. Just try it once and the reason I'm saying that is is. It might seem impossible David for people to go okay. I'm going to lower my standards after twenty years of being a high achieving. The person and I'm hitting some roadblocks and I started doing this height achieving perfect person. They may not And say I'm going to lower my standards from now so I'm saying do it once and see what happens and then maybe do it for three days in a row and see what happens just to build your confidence that you can undo. I love it advice because it brings up a point that I think is very important which is dead the active lower. Your standards is a skill That I've found any ways that I I still struggle with it all the time Every day but I have gotten better. I've found that I can sit down and get on a keyboard right stuff. That isn't good and that's an accomplishment compliment that I can do that without feeling paralyzed without feeling the self judgment all the time and it's something that I'm constantly fighting Is is can. I do work below my standards which David I can see it now. Somebody who's GonNa Treat David Talk for an hour about lowering your standards the value of compromising. But I think it's just. There is a skill to quieting the internal critic for some people. I well young and some people will be able to do it better than others i. I think it's kind of a a trust issue of this doesn't mean I'm lowering my standards everywhere. It's just means to kick start to get this because we're really talking about how it's the end of the day in I think we're talking about is to kick to get that habit. Nothing to get routed into your life and.

David
"behavioral scientist" Discussed on Love Your Work

Love Your Work

04:17 min | 6 months ago

"behavioral scientist" Discussed on Love Your Work

"Means you you can do it more intensely or do more of it and so that means you don't have to increase your motivation to actually do more So that's one thing thing to understand. Is that over time. You will naturally do more and if you feel successful in doing the hater by you writing the five hundred words or one hundred words then it will increase your motivation to continue. That's why it's so important to frame whatever you did with the hundred word fifty words of four hundred words to think of it as like good good for me. I got this dawn. Look at the positive side because then that increases your motivation to do it again now if you look at the negative side ended fifty words words. I was four hundred fifty words deficient then that seems to. I'm not a neuroscientist but it seems to make you forget or not want to do it so what I do on this. Is You know fog maximum to its its punishment right is would you fail at a gold. You've basically punish yourself if you feel bad about it then at the the end you're you don't WanNa feel bad and so it's so important to feel successful to continue on these kinds of Maximize it's it's helped people stale successful designing products or services. If you're doing it for yourself it's help yourself successful and I know that's GonNa Strike People's it was just really odd navy delusional By you know the way behavior works. That's really important for a lot of these challenging aspirations it's like productivity and creativity and stress and so on when you match yourself the behavior you need to be successful as you do the behavior. That's what keeps you going. Maybe one element almond was going on was that I was going for a goal of one hundred words but that was I was stopping. My goal was finish one hundred word completed one hundred were post. It wasn't necessarily do one hundred words and it sits there and I'm not sure what I'm GonNa do with it in so baby. There is a completion thing going on on that was again. I'm not I'm not a neuroscientist or a scientist in any regard but I think if it is like oh I gave myself a little dopamine hit and I wanted this reward of looking at social media. So you've made thoughts about the contour is always going on there i. I don't know it's hard for me to like explain saying that from a systematic perspective without asking a bunch more questions about it. But instead I'll give this generalization Often to succeed lead with habits you need to lower your standards and I know for you know people listening to the podcast and the kind of people that look but my work and so on. They don't want to lower their standards. They have high standards. That's why they're spending time but in reality. If you want to have habits if you WanNa be you gotta creating habits bringing new behaviors in your life. One of the best things you can do is just lower your standards. Mike make the eight or smaller. Don't insist on being perfect every day if you miss a day ghetto. Don't don't make a big deal out of it. Don't count streets I am. I'm not at all fantasy excuses. visit some point that streets can break it can have a D- motivating factor So you know lower your standards and really look and see in that hundred words so there was a finished piece or not finished species like I did it I did a hundred words spam. Good for me. You know good for me. My mind trick is permission to suck basically yesterday giving myself permit just idea of permission. I don't know if this works as well for everybody else but just the idea of permission opens up the permission to do all sorts of things but permission to sock being one of them relevant to what we're talking about. It's okay if this isn't any good or this is only one hundred words you know that's very powerful for me is. Is that consistent with other people will i. I think it's consistent with an effective Habit maker like for self think but some people are just going to be a now these high standards and you know. I'm not sure why our culture I mean we're all in our certain segment of our culture. You're part.

Mike scientist dopamine
"behavioral scientist" Discussed on Love Your Work

Love Your Work

05:37 min | 6 months ago

"behavioral scientist" Discussed on Love Your Work

"In my garage. You know so. It's really easy to just walk from my Home Office my garage four minutes. I'm done and I get on the air assault bike you know from the cross the gym. I really love air assault. But I've tricked myself. I kind of like told myself just is to four minutes. But here's what happens about three and a half minutes. There's a change that comes over me. It's almost right on you so that I'm starting to like checked by the time. Four minutes hits almost always. I'm feeling good and I want to continue getting but if I said I gotta go to thirty minutes or an hour I would have never walked into the garage so yeah it is kind of trick and and but that's okay. This is something that I did when I was writing my first book. Actually I was. It was getting started every day and so I would set a timer for ten minutes. Took first thing in the morning time for ten minutes and I write and it'd be okay and inevitably I would. I would get thirsty. I think I need to eat something I I would be allowed to go to the bathroom or something like that. But I've just a note ten minutes you can do for ten minutes. I knew none of that stuff was going on and I was in for two hours or so. See see good for you on. I mean that's that's for whatever reason in our Western culture people say oh. I've got to do this big thing and if I don't do this big thing that I can't feel oh good about it and that's exactly in some ways at least a tiny habits world. I'm trying to help people understand. That's not a good way to go and what you've done. David is exactly the right thing it could for you and it's probably what you're so successful. You've been able to do that now. Let me ask you a question. How do you if you only do one hundred words? Is there kind of self talk or kind of thing that you'd I mean how. How do you reconcile that with being a a high performance high achievement aspiring David? Oh yes that's a very good question because there is an ego components of I've experienced it with the book that I'm writing too is that my last was pretty successful than theirs was pressure of. Well if that's GonNa be just as successful and I actually this is interesting. I've actually learned to take a little bit of pleasure in going the opposite route of. Let's see what this is silly. Little thing works. I'll just write one hundred words a day. Put It on medium men's it. It did surprising it had like a little. I have a a little blog on medium called one hundred words about and came on the post one hundred words about one hundred words and how McConnell and and yeah so and they caught on for a small group of people so yes there is the the ego bid to go around but I I'm always messing around with that because that's a big part of being a creator is getting over perfectionism. Some of the timer is a terrific. I I do that mostly for tasks than I don't WanNa do something with accounting or legal solar. Yeah so I just. I usually pick like seven minutes because I like because it seems a lot shorter than ten. In what you did with the timer is a great for step. The first step is well in some ways it setting the timer but the first segment is that ten minutes. Then that propels you to do subsequent steps. That's an a well designed first step will entice you to take it and it will propel you to take subsequent steps whether it's that morning or whether the next day I want to be specific about this because sometimes people get confused that I'm talking about the Pomodoro technique with this ten minute. It thing as an example the pomodoro technique from what I understand. Is You said timer for twenty five minutes and you have a five minute break and then you do another twenty five minutes whereas has this sort of technique is more about just getting through the start knowing that you will probably keep going. I always like to say if I had to take a break every twenty five minutes I would reconsider my line of work. Yeah what we're talking about is different than Pomodoro. It is the trick yourself into getting started writing thing or exercising or doing some accounting. You have to do. I've wanted to circle back to what you were saying about About not it upping the ante on the habit. Because I experienced an interesting thing which I would love to hear your thoughts on which was that when I went from writing the five hundred word post today too. I was then working on something else. I didn't have as much time to do that. I started writing. One hundred word post today and really funny thing happened. which was was that when I was done with my hundred word post I suddenly wanted to reward myself And the way that was rewarding myself when I was finishing my five posts I would be right for an hour hour and a half finished by five hundred word posted. Then I would go to twitter. I'd go to facebook the go-to g mail and it was fine because I had done something but then after I did the hundred words suddenly I felt like I needed this same reward award and it was difficult to stop myself Jimmy thoughts on what was going on there and well let me address it this way the thing that keeps you going. There's.

assault David twitter facebook McConnell Jimmy
"behavioral scientist" Discussed on Love Your Work

Love Your Work

10:51 min | 6 months ago

"behavioral scientist" Discussed on Love Your Work

"Do think about. Who Do I want to be wrong? How do I change my life and so on the problem long as we both totally agree on is the way people go about it? often doesn't lead to the results on the outcomes of people are hoping hoping for and you were saying that habits need to be specific Like for example I used to. I'm a writer. I use use to decide how I want to write more. I was always very resistant to developing any sort of habit around it. Then you know in two thousand sixteen I actually made a specific specific habits around writing saying okay. I'm going to write at that time. Five hundred posts every morning first thing and my word output soared. My writing started showing up in a more publications and everything so that really works. What kind of mistakes do do people typically make? When they're trying to build a habit is if habits are better for getting the results out of our lives well first congrats Bratsk? I think Writing as a habit is one of the hardest. Meditation is very hard habit to really wire in a few classic. Ones like that. So good for you so you must have done. There's a lot of things Ryan the things that what you WanNa do in David. I don't know if this maps to how you address this but to look at it systematically dramatically so my work is all about A system I call it behavior design and it's a set of models. It's a set of methods the models that I've created like Thong behavior heater model or the choice model and set of methods. Like how do you then models are ways of thinking methods are ways of doing are designing and so one model. This is a very a simple model that I call swarm of bees. Actually one of my students named its form of is. You haven't aspiration and I put that actually in a little cloud our an outcome the aspiration might be you know. I want to be more productive writer now. There are a dozen fifty. Probably a hundred different behaviors. Saviors that can take you to that aspiration Little Dis with arrows. Like the letter B. With arrows that go up to that cloud and what you WanNa do is saying given aspirated of reducing my stress or being more productive rider or losing way or whatever it is what what are behaviors. That will help me get there and there's not just one again. That's part of the point of this model as is you have a bunch of these around. This is cloud. It's like others different behaviors and there's no one perfect behavior so that's a way of thinking it's a very simple model that a powerful one tunder stand that you There's no one magical behavior that everybody has to do. So what you need to do is match yourself with the behavior. That's a good one for. You are a set of behaviors when I say good It has three characteristics but before we go onto that was the swarm of bees in The cloud was that clear without further. There's an aspiration that maps. Oh well to cut the way that I used to think about things things in way that I do now think about things but had different opinions about it. Before but the have an aspiration this nebulous thing. I went to write more. Like there's something about me wanting to write more. There's something important indentity about writing more. And there's behaviors is that will make me meat that aspiration and they're not. It's not just necessarily writing. Yeah exactly and they might be one time behavior something in just once like a purchase a new APP or adopt a tool or something like that. It might be behaviors. You do for a limited time period. Maybe you train on something. For two weeks another behaviors you would would consider habit. So there's different types of those BS. Those behaviors around aspiration. There are different tights. It's and the the end again you. There's no one perfect behavior for you or any other writer you have to match yourself with a a good one now. what's up in the cloud that abstraction of that aspiration or that outcome you can design directly for and this is where I think. Solutions go wrong is you. Can't design directly for that abstract. Like I WANNA get more fed. I want to write more. I want to be creative. You can design for the behavior now. So that's why you have to boil down and then match yourself with a a behavior of set of behaviors and they need to have these characteristics. It's number one. The behavior actually needs to impact. It needs to take you toward that aspirin. It can't be an ineffective behaviors of number one number two. It needs to be a behavior that you can do. So don't pick something that's impossible and the number three picket behavior that you actually want want to do so if you can do all three things that's a good match for. That's the kind of behavior you should say Yup I can do five hundred words I I can do it. I want to do five hundred words every morning. And it's going to be effective in leading me to this aspiration or being more productive. That's a good match Too often people oh match themselves with stuff that might be too hard or that. They actually don't really want to do that much. It's like should I should be doing this. That's that's not a good match. What's it at least part of you needs to want to do vague okay so it has to be effective? You have to to be able to do it and to be something that you want to do. Oh and that sounds perfect too because so five hundred words. I had tried that before I tried a thousand words before and I think there is certainly a thousand words. I couldn't handle it all. I could do it for a couple of days. I would totally lose motivation. Five hundred words. I don't think I could have done on it earlier. But at that point I had practice writing enough. That five hundred words totally doable. These days I I can do with thousand. I do more than a thousand most days but yeah I think it sounds like there has to be like this sort of achievement window that you have to go through where it's gotta be enough that you don't your ego doesn't revolt on you decide like I don't know if it's like a child or the monkey mind or there's something something inside of you this is. This is an unreasonable demand. I'M NOT GONNA deal with this and then starts for when you into not doing a thing. Is that science win. Dangerous seem really hard. It seems like our brain has a way of helping us forget to do them or not doing them right. And so for you to scale back from one thousand five hundred dollars great. You know 'cause what people miss is that consistency matters so much more than the actual size in the behavior so as you know navy changed method called tiny habits and you make a major really really really small. Aw and when it's really really small than it doesn't require a lot of motivation. Knew it so you can be very consistent now. You can do more than the tiny behavior savior so like if you're struggling with five hundred. I'm so glad that you can do that but not everybody listening. We'll be able to do that. Scale it back to fifty because if you can't get yourself stopped fifty than that's a real that's a signal that maybe you actually don't WanNa do that big. Maybe you need to pick a different one but if you are consistent with fifty and most days when you do fifty words you're really going to say I'm going to keep going more but if you stop at fifty in this tiny habits mindset the tiny behaviors. There's always find the only do fifty a new stop. No good for me. I'm done you move on but when you want to do more you can. And here's here's something that I actually don't teach in the public tiny habits. We teach our coaches and we trained coaches in it. I should be teaching in the public program. But as you progress as you find yourself more and more able able let's take you David Five hundred sheriff. Good for you for Donut as you progressively say I can't do a thousand. Don't raise the bar on yourself. Two thousand heap. Keep it five hundred and if you thousand if you do two thousand terrific but if you raise the bar on yourself then you're headed toward the the approach. Prost doesn't work where you're now looking at something hard. You have to have a high level of motivation the day when your motivation sags or when you have competing motivation you don't do it and then they have it starts to break. This is something I will. I wonder about because I don't know I. I do see that building the habit. I like the habit in itself South building. The habit itself is an accomplishment uh-huh so whether that's a hundred words which I I've even afternoon the five hundred words I reverted to doing one hundred words when I'm busy working on their stuff and I just WanNa keep practicing elder do the hundred words but I at a certain point d. Is there a point. When it's okay to start upping the ante on your habit habit no no actually no firm stand on it What you did by giving yourself like I'm only going to do one hundred words in the okay with that? That was exactly the way I talk about it. Is You WanNa keep the habit alive. The habit is writing every day. It's not the word count doesn't matter you. You WanNa keep it alive in as long as it's alive it's like a plan as long as it's alive it can grow growing but you just don't want it to die off so if hugh f you amp up I mean you can do more on the days that you want to. But if you raise the bar expectation higher and higher than your ultimately knocked GonNa China. It you're GONNA be the time when it breaks so that's why in the tiny habits mindset. So what you said is like right on. You know. It's if you need to scale it back do that and it's really hard for David really hard to do. Even when you just do one hundred words words feel good about that. Don't feel bad about don't feel like I only got under words. No good for me despite the craziness of my morning or despite and all the other issues I got one hundred words done good for me move on. It's almost I don't WANNA say trick a mind track but it's a mindset inset it's a perspective on your habit and how you change your life and in the tiny habits world the perspective is you'll knowledge the good things you let yourself feel good about one hundred fifty words and the days when.

writer David Five Bratsk aspirin Ryan hugh Prost
New Year’s resolutions And Carrying Out Personal Change

WSJ Your Money Briefing

06:16 min | 6 months ago

New Year’s resolutions And Carrying Out Personal Change

"Many of our New Year's resolutions go right out the window not long after the start of the new year converting good intentions into action and creating creating behavioral changes harder than it seems it takes repetition and being realistic about your abilities and when it comes to your money cracking the code to stick the the best practices can mean a lot for your wallet. Let's bring in Wall Street Journal reporter and Torgersen for more on this. So you know. We're not saying making resolutions at the New Year is a bad idea But academic research says it's an ideal time specially to take stock of your money and your finances and even do it on your birthday. Yeah so there is some Very interesting academic research. That looks at you know that that issue of motivation. So when are we you know. We liked to sort of make promises that we're going to change things in our lives jobs for the better and so there are studies that have looked at keying. Those types of promises to yourself around sort of birthdays and New Year's in particular and these are dates that represent sort of a fresh start Where people kind of take stock of how things have been going and they they have a sense sense that you know this is the start of New Year so I can begin a whole new. I can turn over a new leaf. I can begin. You know to focus on a whole new me Whereas you know just saying I'M GOING TO LOSE TEN POUNDS NEXT TUESDAY. Maybe he doesn't have quite the same resonance with people. And whatever kind of goal you set whether it's your health or whether it's your finances it's important. Give yourself small victories to enjoy along the way right. So there's a difference between. I think we're all familiar with us. You know everybody makes a lot of people make New Year's resolutions and then you know a couple of weeks later maybe we lose our momentum and we don't carry them through grew and over time. I think you know the the repeated failures to make good on on resolutions can actually. Kinda take a toll on your self confidence senior ability to do so so I think it's important to take specific steps. Not just to kind of promise yourself that I'm going to kind of revolution. Oh He's my approach to savings and spending or whatever your goal is but to take specific steps to actually make it more likely that you're going to be able to carry out your goals and in terms of your finances. A good way to do that would be to automate your savings. Yeah so that's sort of you know the advice. One zero one for people is when they make a promise to themselves. Say You WANNA increase your savings rate by a couple percentage points. You know you should just automate it because that takes out the whole issue of willpower from the equation and by all means right down down your plants. Well it's an interesting thing that I've spoken to a number of behavioral scientist for this article and One made the point that when people actually write down a plan Dan to meet a goal. It feels a little bit more formal. Maybe a little bit more like a contract with yourself so that people are less likely first of all they're more likely to remember member the fine points of their plan and second of all. They're less likely to break. Fat promised to themselves and experts recommend behavioral therapy. That sounds kind of serious. Well that's just one of the ways I mean it's not necessarily saying you should sit down with therapist. But but what it is. It's it's sort of a cognitive approach by which you can sort of identify maybe triggers to bad behavior like for example This isn't a financial example. But my one of my resolutions is to stop eating dinner out of the snack drawer at work. Sometimes when I stay late I get really hungry. I have every intention of going home and eating healthy but I'm starving starving. So I'll eat whatever's in front of me and so for me. The trigger is staying late at work so the good thing at that point. You need to kind of brainstorm will water. That's the trigger. That's the problem. What are the potential solutions. Well the potential solutions are that I can just make sure I bring some healthy food from home. Make sure I leave by a reasonable hour. Our were before I get hungry. So it's kind of thinking and all those involved willpower and changing up in training yourself to do that right right. So it's a multi step process us and then there's something that behavioral economists recommend it's called mental contracting when setting goals. What is that the first step with all this is that you need need to set realistic goals. So rather than say you know I'm just GONNA I'm GonNA retire by forty you know it's like think about what's actually realistic. You know maybe you currently save five percent of your income. Maybe you want to get to that fifteen percent that a lot of experts recommend so you know a good plan for you might be to increase your savings rate by by one or two percentage points a year until you hit that fifteen percent so mental trusting involves thinking about your ultimate goal. Which is you know? I want to be self sufficient in retirement retirement. I'm going to save fifteen percent of income to be self sufficient retirement and then thinking about all the obstacles to that for example while every year. I promised to do you this. And then there's some unexpected expense that comes along and causes me to derail myself from my plan so therefore I need to come up with a solution to that which is is maybe to save for emergencies. We talk about financial planning a lot on this show. Don't be afraid to hire a financial planner. Yeah I mean that can be appropriate for people depending on their Third Goals I mean if you have a goal to do a financial plan you certainly can try to do it yourself. That's something that a lot of people don't necessarily have the time or interest in doing a Lotta people become very kind of daunted by the idea of of hiring planner because it involves multiple steps and it's a little bit which can be a little bit complicated. So one of the techniques that experts recommend is breaking down You know what what you think. You have to do into smaller kind of mini step so with with hiring a financial planner. The first step for example might be just linking you up all your accounts to some kind of agregation site where you can see how much you're spending and how how much money's coming in and then just simply setting a goal to look at that once a month until you become familiar with how your finances are going you know then you might. WanNa think about. I'm trying to hire a financial planner but again you kind of break. That tasks down into smaller steps. No Right that's Wall Street Journal reporter and Turkson with us and thanks for coming on the show here.

Wall Street Journal Reporter Torgersen Behavioral Scientist WAN DAN Turkson
#41 - How To Make Learning More Effective

Leadership Biz Café

10:38 min | 10 months ago

#41 - How To Make Learning More Effective

"So Aaron shared with me how he took one hundred of their top. GM's for a two day Leadership Development Summit that address topics topics and issues that were of interest to his team. They also have several Ellen de portals where they offered articles videos podcasts which Aaron told me also includes this one to supplement the training session the challenges having now though is how to make sure these new insights are applied and not lost when in these leaders returned to the hectic pace of their everyday work and more importantly. How can you keep them engaged in wanting to learn even more when Aaron aren't asked me this question. I asked if I could share his story because it's a question I've been asked many times over the years when giving keynotes corporate trainings in fact it's one of the reasons one of my leadership keynotes deals with how leaders can shift from simply training employees to creating a continuous learning environment in their workplace so I know there's as many of you out there who are also dealing with this issue as well so what I'd like to do is share with you. Some simple steps that you can take right now that will help make the new the skills and insights. You learn stick to start off. Let me give you a little context to help frame these steps in their book made to stick chip and Dan Heath present. This idea that a sticky idea is something that's understood. It's remembered and it changes something now while their book was about how how to make what you communicate stick with your audience. I think we can all agree that when we learn new skills or insights we wanted to be something that's understood that that we remember it and that it ends up changing the way we work continuing with chip and Dan's book they describe how they are six principles behind what makes an idea sticky eighty and these six principles are simplicity unexpectedness concreteness credibility emotions and stories now while they say you don't necessarily need all six principals to make your message stick. I want to offer you three steps. You can take that will employ the six principles again if we go back to the problem. Erin shared one which other leaders have also asked me about the challenge we face when it comes comes to training or going to a conference to learn new insights to improve the way we lead is why were there we could see the value of these approaches but but soon after we returned to our workplaces these new insights often fade away as we return to the routines of our day to day work lies so the first step you need take is one that. I often get my audiences to do at the end of my talks and that is to identify one simple change. You'll make based on what what you've just learned now. This one thing you choose has to contain two characteristics. I it has to be something. You can start doing now. With these this and second it has to be something that's personally meaningful. The reason stems from the work of two different researchers Stafford behavioral scientists scientists. BJ Fog who found that the key to changing behavior is taking small steps and Harvard Professor Teresa Mobley who was the second guest to appear on on this podcast who found in her research that making progress on personally meaningful goals leads to enduring success and happiness on the job in other words. You want to focus on applying a new behavior or skill. You've learned on something that matters to you you so that this becomes something that you don't have to do but it's something you want to do and this that lines up with the sticky principle support of simplicity as we're focusing on one specific thing that we can do right now that will improve our work in personally meaningful fashion this also ties into the emotion principle because as chip and Dan right this sticky principle is driven by answering the question of what's in it for me me which you've already answered by this exercise of picking that one simple change you want to make thanks to what you've learned so now that you have this one simple behavior or skill in mine the obvious question becomes. How do you make sure you apply it every day. Well that's the next step and for for this. We're going to use the example of very successful person and one of my favorite comedians Jerry Seinfeld well. Let's start the insanity now. It doesn't matter whether you like it or not as this has nothing to do with his sense of humor but more to do with what he's identified as being the key to his success comedian Brad Isaac Isic once as Seinfeld for tips on what he could do to improve his success at comedy and Seinfeld told him that what he needed to do was to commit to writing every everyday because writing jokes every day would help him hone his craft. Now what's the Real Jim in the story is what Seinfeld told Isaac as being how he pushes himself to write every day especially when he doesn't want to basically what Seinfeld does is. He gets a wall calendar that shows every every day of the year and every day that he writes he puts a red X. in the box for that day once he's done that for a couple of days he's created a chain of XS on this calendar and as Seinfeld told Isaac you like seeing that chain especially when you get a few weeks under your belt. Your only job is to not break the chain now the reason why this is a great strategy for anyone to us is because it embraces braces something that I'm sure you've all heard and read about gamification as Seinfeld says himself he transformed the task of writing into would game where his only job is to not break the chain now. You don't need to get a three hundred sixty five day wall counter for your office us but what you need to do is get a notebook that you use a journal to just write a quick note of what you did to practice this new behavior or skill the reason why is because you need to be able to visually see this chain growing which is critical for this to work because this allows allows you to shift from focusing on how well you apply this new behavior or skill on a given day to the process of applying it regularly elite and consistently towards making it a habit going back to the principles of making things stick you can see that this step ties into the principle of of concrete nece as you can see visually for yourself how you've applied this new behavior or skill on a given day and also links to the principle of credibility because as you re back how you apply this new behavior or skill and not qualifying how good are bad you were at it you can. I can see how this new behavior or skill can be used successfully everyday and hopefully also noticing some positive benefits growing along on with and this leads to my last step that will help make those new behaviors and skills you've learned stick and this one revolves around one of the points. I share my keynote talk on how the shift from training people to continuously improving talent and that is you need to treat learning as shared experience now to help illustrate rate the value of this step. I WANNA share a story about one of the leaders. I wrote about in my book Leadership Vertigo. Billy Taylor was the plant manager for the Goodyear Vale Plant. When he joined the plant? It was one of the most poorly performing appliances goodyear and was at risk of being closed within two. Oh Years Taylor transformed it into one of the top performing manufacturing plants a good year and was promoted to an executive role at goodyear while there are many things Taylor did to achieve this outcome. There's one I wanNA share in the context of making our learning stick and that is how he put up information boards throughout the plant that identified which manufacturing team was working on a given product line and the level of output. They were creating now the reason he did this was was not simply to hold the different production teams accountable for their productivity but so that's different teams could learn from one another about what they were doing to improve their performance performance. In fact Taylor facilitated this cross learning between teams by putting up other boards throughout the plant that showcase projects is employs initiated improve the plants productivity and cost effectiveness as a result of the lessons. They learned from one another working on the plant floor. Now remember remember that the first step I told you about was to pick that one behavior or skill that you've learned that you WanNa make stick because you not only know no you can make this a part of your leadership tool kit but also because you know it's going to have a meaningful impact on how you perform your job well well. The wonderful thing of identifying this at the start of this process is that it allows you to not only attain some early wins but you also now have something something of value to share with other leaders in your organization in terms of how they can apply this behavior or skill to improve their leadership and conversely when when they share with you how they apply other behaviors and skills to the way they lead you gain better insights on how you yourself can apply these other behaviors and skills to continue learning and growing the key point. I want you to take note of is that learning can't exist in a vacuum or silo but as I pointed out in the first step it needs to be connected both to why you do what you do and how you go about getting things done in your everyday the day work and again going back to chip and Dan's principles of stickiness we can see how this step clearly ties into that principle of stories in how we're sharing sharing our stories our experiences with learning to improve ourselves but it also ties into the principle of unexpectedness because in en- sharing your lessons learned you stand to gain both new insights into how to build on what you're currently doing as well as where you can start next in that process of applying applying what you've learned

Jerry Seinfeld Dan Heath Aaron Billy Taylor Brad Isaac Isic Leadership Development Summit GM Ellen Goodyear Vale Plant Erin Professor Teresa Mobley Harvard Goodyear Plant Manager Executive Three Hundred Sixty Five Day Two Day
Creepy crawlies, Quarks and Counting

The Naked Scientists

11:33 min | 10 months ago

Creepy crawlies, Quarks and Counting

"Now with me to help answer the questions that you're sending us from the University of York behavioral scientists. She works on insects. Eleanor drink water. What have you been up to you telling elements yes. I'm very keen beekeeper and I made the mistake of not zipping up my the other day and and I can tell you that that that was bitterly regretted. The next day is very much a mark of pride among beekeepers but you're not appropriate beekeeper until you've at least one and flexes yeah. That's a bad thing when that happens but if you work with do occasionally gets stung how's it. How's it going the beekeeping fund. We've haven't absolutely lovely queen in one of heights at the moment. The other one's a bit more grumpy so they're a bit more of a it's true what my brother keeps. He says the same thing he said as the Queen's get older odor and also certain colonies just have a particularly aggressive behavior exactly something to do with the Queen's squirting out ramones that keeps everyone calm as the Queen Ages. She makes less all of them. Yes exactly that's that's. That's exactly it in the end the character of the Queen or you know the chemicals that Sheikh producers has a really big impact on on the behavior of all the other bees in the colony so so yeah so if you have a really nasty queen than you can swap out for really friendly Queen and some of the hive becomes a lot more friendly to work with credible. Yes some no. It was much opening unfortunately but yes definitely enough to be getting on with you so any questions you have about insects. Perhaps even bees stings beekeeping. Ask Ask Elinor. Dan Gordon's also with US dance and exercise physiologist is Anglia Ruskin University. He's also a Paralympian and it's going to world record and there was a lot of coverage in recent weeks about athletes using sports drinks and not been terribly good for their dental health. Yes about I think about ten days ago quite solarge raging study that was looking at elite athletes and they reported the dental health and elite athletes was was far far worse than the general population of Oh. The paper didn't fully attributed it to they wanted to make conclusions was they thought it was down to the con- sports drinks that are consumed which mostly these high carbohydrates looked sugar. How's your dentition during you got away with it. I think what an advocate in sports the practitioners do then just because you don't have energy to do the events no and I think in the end what they're really getting exposes has got to be greater scrutiny of the health of the teeth and the athletes when competing one of the things we have to do before we went to the Paralympics. We every athlete have dental check which sounds crazy things the limbic games actually you wouldn't think that teeth of that important but actually the worst thing you can have an. Olympic Games is fake and so one of the things that's really really being advocated. Now is that part of the Athlete Support Program Part of lifestyle management should be to actually monitor the health of the of the teeth warning people there. Is this risk they'll. They'll probably take more. Oh care about washing their mouth outs to get rid of that. I think yeah more used to math clean teeth more regularly for example as part of the training routine not so any questions about exercise exercise physiology how the body works sports and sports fitness. Danny man now next to Dan is friend. Let's see what did the wonderful. Fran is Cambridge University physicist. She is an astrophysicist cosmologists interested in how the universe at large works but you're a stand up. Comedian allows guys right. I'm GonNa do the horrible thing because then tell us a joke I won't do that going. It's going pretty well. I'm in writing a new show at the moment by kind of the philosophy of science and what we're doing when we're doing science so that has been a bit of a step back from the day to day if my research are you poking fun at it or you kind of making light of what life is a scientist and researcher is like is that I'm poking fun at but also I think a serious a serious element over and I hope people will come away knowing a bit more by you know I've been told I'm participating in the scientific typic- methods that I never really examined what that meant until now you're gonNA find out you're also saying to me just before we started about the story that came out earlier this year the first picture of a black hole or rather the first impression of of a black hole and that's going to be made into a movie rather than just a bunch started pictures. Now you're saying yeah that's right so you might remember the event. Horizon Telescope a few months ago published the first image of a black hole or more pedantically the shadow of a black hole support and then I can do a full color movie of the black hole which is going to be really incredible both in terms of what it will teach us about astrophysics in general relativity and also just just super cool you can just you'll be able to watch your black hole on youtube or you could just watch SANTELLI programs which amount to much of the same no content visible whatsoever. Thank you very much so anything to do with how the universe works and space anything that please send those questions in from be happy to consider those also with this bobby seagull who needs relief introduction. He's originally for comb -versities. Mathematician and teaches maths taught teach kismet and actually doing teddy program their movement have new going around the country looking at inventions and things going for those who made a reminder minded is the universe challenge icon the icon of icons. I'm his friend were. You're pretty you're pretty optimistic as well thank you that's very good areas and outgoing outgoing but we had a first series initially looking at a genius guy to Britain's traveling around minicar imagine like top gear meets. Qa but sort of exploring all the curious bits of Britain and the new series is called a genius guy to the age of Invention Sarah can I get back in on minicar go around the UK but this time it's quite chronological so looking from seventeen fifty thousand nine hundred and exploring Britain's discoveries and inventions in that period. Why did you pick that period because it's particularly golden period. There was some of the reason I I think it's the golden nature that period because if you look before that is sort of Britain still pre enlightenment before industrial times and then in that period of seventeen fifty nine hundred lots lots of invention discovers chemistry's discovered physics signed the word sign scientist comes into being Darwin Thompson so lots of great figures of science emerge any particularly stand out moment because there was are when you making telly programs they're always funny things that we never see on screen or or other things that are just well moments that you never thought you'd find yourself doing so so what am I stand up moments as she isn't a stand up moment for me but is a silent moment for the show so we visit the cabinet Cambridge and we get to hold one of the original cathode ray tubes at J J Thomson used. I was too much of a chicken to hold it. No I think it's like someone else's baby you can look at. I admire it but if you want to hold it no no no. I'M NOT GONNA hold the baby the big quite tempting to hold it and they go oops because the same thing sort of happened to me because because when I was in South Africa when I first went to South Africa when I was at a conference in this big American guy came up to me at the conference and he said tomorrow going to pick you up from your hotel and I'm going to take you somewhere and show you something something GonNa Change Your Life forever now. Of course you never met this guy you think I can arrange things and actually he took me to the University of the voters rand in Johannesburg where he's professor of Paleoanthropology. This is Lieber. Who's now been on this program. A number of times in this discovered not one not two but three new species of early human ancestor and he had in this wooden box the university the face the complete facial skeleton of the Taung Child which is the specimen which is the australopithecus holy type in other words all all of the Australia with specimens that we have early human ancestors maybe three million years ago so they're all compared to this one which was discovered by Raymond Dart at about one hundred years ago now and it's really fabulous. They've even got the endo cost the fossil remnant of the brain of this thing and I was holding this in my hands is three million years. Old is the only only one in existence and am I did get tempted to go whoops but Lee was very very cordiality hands undermine all the time. 'cause you think how this is just prices but I know exactly what you mean now for your home. If you guys in the studio we've got a little guess who that we run through these sorts of programs we give you a sequence of clues across the show and as the show unfolds unfolds we give you more of them and the first one. I've got here. It's it's an animal. Give you that much but can you work out. What makes this particular sound okay. That was the sound it makes any clues. you want to hear the other very fussy this lot. They won't hear it again. Okay anyone got any ideas seagull. It's not a bobby seagull. No okay more clues coming up eleanor. Let's kick off with this one view from Marianna. What which is the most intelligent insect do not base because maybe they well okay so I have been asked this before and this is always a really hard question because I am incredibly and I believe that all insects are incredibly intelligent in all sorts of different ways and we haven't even begun to scratch the surface of what insects can do it could be the case that we haven't even discovered the cleverest insect but if I was to choose one based on research about an individual it'll who's pretty clever. It might have to be the bees. I'm afraid some really cool research has shown that bees can tell apart the difference between different painting style so if you showed them a monet and Picasso you can get them to learn the differences and then be able to generalize to other paintings and also prefer. I don't know maybe that'd I'll be a follow up paper. I hope it would also they can tell the difference between people's faces and they can remember a face for two days which is incredible. There was also study that the the researchers at Queen Mary Invest of London published a couple years ago where they showed be another be rolling a ball into a goal and the be that was watching then how to get the B The ball into the into the goal and got a treat yeah it was social learning and more than that they they did a follow on from that which was even more cool so trained on one particular ball and they had other balls in the area which they blew down while they were learning but then in the in the second round they unglued the balls goals and the B. would learn the concept and then would apply it to closeable so then they would perform the same action but on a separate they weren't just learning out this ball goes in in in the hall they they could like generalize which is incredible if you think about it and what else could have favorite insect in the studio. Everyone should the CICADA. I know why you're going to come on prime number years. Don't every thirteen or seventeen years. Carter has emerged don't they they do to minimize the chances of their mating year. Coinciding with predators credited exactly that on a Friday afternoon these cicadas smarter than mice from Friday to look. Maybe even smart in nature eh provocative for Dan favorite insect realize possibly the butterfly just purely because I just love the whole process from Chrysalis the butterfly but actually just the sheer variety of butterflies just it's just mind boggling liotta amazing feats of navigation butterflies and monarch butterflies example all the way from Canada down to New Mexico geico kind of thousands of miles

Dan Gordon Britain University Of York Scientist Queen Mary Invest South Africa Queen Ages Anglia Ruskin University OH Cambridge University United States Bobby Seagull Raymond Dart Horizon Telescope Carter Geico
Cats Recognize Their Names--But May Not Respond

60-Second Science

02:16 min | 1 year ago

Cats Recognize Their Names--But May Not Respond

"Scientific Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Jim David. Almost any cat owner will testify to the felines apparent indifference to humans when we call their names. But according to a recent study cats do recognize their names, or at least that we are indeed addressing them. It's just that they still may not respond techs associate talents of the names with summary laws or punishments. Suco syto a behavioral scientist and so fear university in Tokyo site. Oh, previously demonstrated that cats recognized their owners voices in the new work. She and colleagues investigated the reactions of cats to hearing human say their names, the study included, seventy eight cats from Japanese households and from a cat cafe a business where patrons can interact with felines Sitel. And her colleagues had owners say four words that sounded similar to their cats names until the animals bitch elated to those words and stopped responding next. The owner said the felines actual names. And indeed the cats had more pronounced responses moving their ears heads tails or meowing than they did two similar words or two other cats names. This study is in the journal scientific reports. The researchers also had people unfamiliar to the cat speak the names, although the felines responses were less prominent than when their owners called them. They still appeared to recognize the words when spoken by strangers. But does that mean cats know they're being called by name, very smell evidence? That cats have the ability to recognize themselves like us, so theoretical nation above van names is different from ours. But side Toews says she thinks we might be able to teach cats to recognize other words in addition to their names, our colleagues investigating whether cats Reaganite of cohabiting kids names, could this knowledge mean that humans could eventually train cats to respond to voice commands the way dogs do her. Her taps. Thanks for listening for scientific Americans sixty second science. I'm jim.

Jim David Toews Behavioral Scientist Tokyo Sixty Seconds Sixty Second
How Payless Tricked Influencers into Paying More

Business Wars Daily

04:45 min | 1 year ago

How Payless Tricked Influencers into Paying More

"Business wars daily is brought to you by the podcast the growth show each week. They explore inspiring stories that get to the heart of how people grow a business an idea or movement. Stay tuned at the end of this episode here a little more about this fascinating new show. Frahm wondering, I'm David Brown. And this is business wars daily. Hey, how much would you pay for a pair of shoes? If you didn't know what they were worth. That's the question discount shoe brand PayLess wanted to answer. And so it conducted an experiment right out of the textbooks of behavioral economists, the company created a fake luxury popup store and called it policy. They built it in a former Armani store in Los Angeles. And stocked it with PayLess products from Stella does to embellish sneakers. It had to look, right? So they added soft lighting gold mannequins and gorgeous sales people, then PayLess created a grand opening and invited internet influencers, so called fashion easter's who profit from showing off designer where on social media on the day of the big party, a long line formed outside the store inside champagne snacks and lots of self fees. The shoes whose prices normally ranged from nineteen nine. Eighty nine to thirty nine ninety nine were either marked up or left without tags. Guests were asked to bid on the shoes with no price listed some fell so hard for the stunt that one woman paid six hundred forty dollars an eighteen hundred percent markup videos recorded guests, impressions of the fake designer shoes. They call them elegant stunning in obviously made with high quality materials the shopping environment. And the online ads are the farthest cry from PayLess his actual barebones strip mall stores and branding, which usually appeal to budget minded pragmatists. And so the Gotcha moments when PayLess employees admitted to the influencers that it was all a hoax elicited shock for PayLess. Those reactions caught on video where priceless and viral, by the way, PayLess refunded shoppers money and gave them each of free. Pair of shoes while listeners might be skeptical. The. Experiment has roots in social science behavioral scientists have evidence that both language and environment dramatically change. Our perceptions of value. We happily pay more for grass fed beef on handmade buns and served on China plates than we do for McDonald's hamburger PayLess proved that often it's the environment and the language that influences to pay more in this case. Hundreds more been a product is worth and the company which has been struggling also scored a crucial point for itself. If people can't tell the difference between PayLess is nineteen ninety nine shoes and designer wear. Why not save the money? Think about that. The next time you need a new pair of stilettos. From wondering this is business wars daily. Did you know you're an influence while you are. And we'd like you to share our podcast with your friends and colleagues posted a little something online send it tweet. Whatever you do. We certainly appreciate maybe it'll go viral. Thanks. I'm David Brown. Seed them on. You know, it's never been easier to start a business, but it's never been harder to grow that business. I want to tell you about a great new podcast, call the growth show, which is created by hub spot. They make free and paid tools that help you grow your business each week on the growth show. They explored the inspiring stories behind how people grow a business an idea or a movement. You'll learn about the challenges entrepreneurs space in starting a company and you'll hear about some of the most interesting topics in business like social media marketing, the future of bots and the rise of subscription services. They also have some amazing guests on their show like Allie Weiss of glossier and Joe dessino creator of Spartan race, the growth show is chock full of great stories. Amazing guests and helpful advice. Subscribe to the growth show today on Spotify, Stitcher or wherever you listen.

Payless David Brown Los Angeles Spotify China Allie Weiss Easter Mcdonald Joe Dessino Glossier Six Hundred Forty Dollars Eighteen Hundred Percent
"behavioral scientist" Discussed on Perception Gaps

Perception Gaps

04:20 min | 1 year ago

"behavioral scientist" Discussed on Perception Gaps

"As you know policy is is one of the most divisive science policy questions if very tied to partisan views. So if you tell me your party affiliation. I have a pretty good idea of a lot of your ideas about them policy. Andrew morale is a senior behavioral scientist at the RAND Corporation for the last few years. He's been leaning project called gun policy in America, you can find it on their website. And you should look it up because it's really cool and interactive the project shows the different research that's been done around the effectiveness of various gun policies. One problem. They've identified is a lack of research and another problem is the quality of the research that has been done. Let's pick up here with our conversation. You mentioned that it kind of seems like there's not actually that much research or data or studies that kind of look at the effects of policy. I'm just curious. Why is that why isn't there more ADA out there? Well, one reason is that for the past twenty years. The US government has systematically avoided funding research in this area up until about nineteen ninety six the CDC was investing some money in a gun violence research, then in nineteen Ninety-six congress passed a era rider to to the preparations Bill called the Dickey amendment. That said that citizen couldn't be engaged in research that was advocating for different types of laws, and since then the CDC really hasn't been engaged in any research or very little research on gun violence. Do we know why the federal government decided to stop? Well, congress was upset about the research that was being done at CDC and some. Members of congress believed that it was serving an advocacy function rather than primarily research function. And so they pass that amendment. I don't know about you. But that fact, right there blew my mind, the federal government hasn't been investing in gun policy research, which makes plane why one there isn't that much research out there and to some of the research out there has questionable quality. I can't help. But think that maybe agreeing that we need better research could be the common ground away to start identifying are blind spots. So we can better identify the right solutions. Anyways, I wanted to talk to Andrew about the research that is out there, and what exports agree and disagree on. So let's pick up. So looking at the project that ran corporation is done based on the research that you guys are able to look at it seemed to me that most experts, and maybe even the public agree on what the outcome should be such as reducing deaths, but that there's a lot of disagreement over which policies would be the most effective in cheating. That is that accurate. Yeah. That's right. We did a survey of about one hundred than policy experts in advocates asking them what they thought the effects of different than policies would be. There were several laws where there was sharp disagreement on the effects, and as you said, we found was that the laws that people like our laws that they believe will reduce ten deaths that seems to be a top priority for everyone on these laws where there's disagreement about the likely affects there's real disagreement on whether they're good laws are not. So for instance, stand your ground laws. The experts we surveyed who favored more permissive gun laws thought that standard ground laws should reduce gun deaths and homicides in particular because they think that it will serve as a deterrent for people. If they know that other people are armed, and and don't have a duty to retreat in the case of a confrontation in contrast, the experts who favor more restrictive gun laws believe just the opposite. They think that laws like stand your ground much more likely to increase Thomas sides and convince..

Andrew morale CDC congress federal government RAND Corporation behavioral scientist US America Thomas Bill twenty years
Are Any Superstitions Universal?

BrainStuff

04:40 min | 1 year ago

Are Any Superstitions Universal?

"My father is Keith hunter just Persson. He's known as the happy face serial killer. On one side of the coin is a loving family, man. And then on the other side of the coin he is everything that could hurt he goes from protected or predator. Happy face a new series from house to forks, new episodes out every Friday on apple podcasts or wherever you get podcast. Welcome to brain stuff from how stuff works. Hey, brain stuff, I'm Lauren Bogle bomb. And even if you don't believe in the power of superstition, you may sometimes find yourself knocking on wood crossing your fingers or wearing your lucky baseball cap during the World Series. Although we know scientifically that these things don't actually affect the outcome of anything we still find them comforting eight twenty fourteen study by behavioral scientists at the university of Chicago suggested that when people perform a physical action to avoid bad luck or harm. The ritual comes their mind superstitions span cultures countries and centuries. Every culture has its own unique set of superstitions. However, MS raises an interesting question are any superstitions common. Across cultures superstitions revolving around numbers are abundant worldwide. The specific numbers may vary. For example, the number thirteen is widely regarded to bring bad luck in western cultures. There's even a name for this fear. Triscuit deca phobia other cultures have superstitions about different. Numbers in China and Japan. It's the number four because the pronunciation is similar to words for death. The number nine in Japan is feared because its pronunciation sounds like a word for torture. Some Italians consider Friday the seventeenth to be bad luck because the Roman numeral for seventeen xfi I can be rearranged to V I X I A Vicky translated from Latin means my life is over in many parts of the world the appearance of a cat is considered bad luck. Although this isn't true across all cultures. Black cat still hold a place in global superstitions in ancient Egypt. Cats were worshiped as gods and kept in homes to bring prosperity in Italy. If your cat sneezes, good luck is on the way in some parts of Europe. Black cat crossing. Your path is good luck. However in the new world Puritans believed black cats were related to witches, and therefore were considered a bad omen the action of knocking on wood or touching wood for good luck. Goes back millennia and exists across the world. Some people. Is believed fairies or spirits lived inside trees, and they would knock on or touch the tree wants to request a wish and one more time to express thanks or they believed that the knocking would distract any evil spirits living there similar expressions to knock on wood exists today in a Rebac Brazilian Finnish. German Czechoslovakian English Greek and Finnish. Other superstitions across cultures include crossing your fingers for good luck four leaf clovers as lucky charms and sneezes causing some change in luck. Be it good or bad as human beings in an often chaotic world, we all try to control our destinies one knock number or bless you at a time. Today's episode was written by Deborah Ronca and produced by Tyler clang for more on this and lots of other lucky topics. Visit our home planet past works dot com. Attention vans of stranger things. Hey, everybody. It's Chuck Bryant for movie crush, and I wanted to alert you to a couple of very special episodes stranger things specials part one and two with joke. Erie, David harbour and Brett Gilman. We talk a lot about stranger things. And you get a really good inside. Look what it's like to work on one of the coolest shows on TV. Here's a little famil-. What about the duffers where those guys give you a lot of leeway in finding your character where they had pretty specific things in mind. I think I got one note the entire season. So and I was doing crazy stuff. Like this stuff. There's like little scenes in there that were written in a certain way that like there's one scene where I come out of the house, and Jonathan follows me out in his like, I want to come with you. And I just like I hit him like in the shoulder. Stay with your mom. So check it out stranger things fans on the apple podcast app.

Persson Apple Jonathan Keith Hunter University Of Chicago Lauren Bogle Baseball Japan MS Europe Italy Vicky Egypt Chuck Bryant Erie Deborah Ronca China Tyler Clang
Can Bees Understand The Concept Of Zero?

A Moment of Science

02:00 min | 1 year ago

Can Bees Understand The Concept Of Zero?

"Don, some behavioral scientists claim that animals can understand the very simplest mathematical concept. They can tell the difference between different numbers of objects monkeys and some birds can do this even insect the honeybee can distinguish numbers of objects from one to four and can understand the concepts of less than and greater than bees can be trained. Choose the smaller or larger number of dots on a page to get a reward of sweet nectar. Of course, scientists have done. Lots of control studies to make sure the bees aren't using some other cube sides the number of dots. Hard or move. I believe in Yale the single in quantities isn't the same thing as understanding the concept of number. What about something more abstract can any animal understand zero as a quantity, maybe they can in two thousand eighteen a team of Australian and French. Researchers trained bees choose between two cards with different numbers of dots. From one to six the beheaded choose the smaller number of dots to get a reward when a card with zero dots was added to the test. The bees chose it is having the smaller number of dots. This show. They think that bees understood that zero is smaller than the other numbers are still don't know if I'm convinced the bees brain could be doing something simpler understanding the concept of zero to solve this problem. This finding is sure to be controversial could be that. Only. Humans. Were there symbols and culture are smart enough to understand the concept of number? This moment of science comes from Indiana University on the web at a moment of science dot org. I'm Don glass, and I'm ya Cassandra.

Don Glass Indiana University
"behavioral scientist" Discussed on Love Your Work

Love Your Work

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"behavioral scientist" Discussed on Love Your Work

"At the end nutshell that's great advice um and there's a lot more online that you can discover for me and others um but yeah giaffone dot com or tiny habits dot com and i have a whole set of videos coming out at right now the new year this coming i have a video series on habits so um check those out great thank you so much bj david great to talk to you it was a blast thanks again the new i hope that conversation with bj fog helps you build healthy habits in 2018 make 2018 your year to be the human at that you want to be and if you want to make this new year the your year to bring your art into the world check out my new book the hard to start i believe they you have something special to offer the world and this book will give you the inspiration and motivation to make that thing real by the heart to start on amazon at tatta v dot net slash heart is love your work helping inspire you to pursue the life and work that you love if so i could really use your held the show takes work at a takes money to make to keep making the show and to keep it free for everyone it needs your support beside subscribing and reviewing a show there's one big thing you can do to help and that is to donate i work to make the show nourishing and thoughtful in an economy that's all about grabbing attention this is not the short route to success if you believe in love your worst message of living a balanced life in finding fulfilling.

amazon david
"behavioral scientist" Discussed on Love Your Work

Love Your Work

01:32 min | 2 years ago

"behavioral scientist" Discussed on Love Your Work

"Just end up with your brain fried because you through a million different news feeds items but when you when you gained momentum in reading a book that now you're on the book now you're duong's slower more methodical thinking and the design of the artefact the your interacting with is shaping their behavior uh i i love that as an example let let me give a method uh a a a method than i teach and my boot camps or deriving back in other options so up at the little cloud up in the aspiration cloud regions right a downing that ceo use facebook lesser stop using facebook or don't use facebook meetings whatever the your ask rations and then imagine and i call this method magic wand imagine you have a magic wand you can get yourself to do any behavior that would lead to using facebook plus while we're jewish would you have yourself to write that job and then the of another wish same thing you could what else do bit yourself to do indeed well maybe it's delete facebook for my front correct what else you come up with a whole bunch of different hidden by thinking i can get myself the unity what would it be not abbas dako books and flip through uh call my mom were you and so generate ten to fifteen of those behaviors and then choose among those so in other words you're looking at a range of options drew the magic wand ing method.

facebook duong ceo
"behavioral scientist" Discussed on Love Your Work

Love Your Work

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"behavioral scientist" Discussed on Love Your Work

"No that's that's it right there i mean that's what you want now that that being a helped to eat or doesn't generalized i'm the kind of person who tries about my finances are the kind of person who gets a lot of sleep there are these it seems to me these identities are connected with different domains yeah i've seen this is the i guess i think of it as sort of like a like the way that a crack grows on a sidewalk her something or wait at grand canyon has been carved happens over time if you just get that first thread started i have a relevant story to one of the listener questions we were on twitter there was one of listeners who is asking is there any tiny habit practice to break social media addiction and i actually had an experience like that where i was scrolling through facebook sometimes an hour at a time literally saying out loud i do not want to be doing this and the way that i overcame it was i was having a conversation uh when i first met when when it first met her friend he was saying oh you know i get like a pile of books from the library and i just set him out in front of me in a pick one up and i look at it for second and picket pick another one up in a look at it for second in i said okay well that's interesting because when i pick up a book i feel pressure to finish the book so it was interesting that he had completely flipped everything so that he had permission to pick up a book read just the sub heads or pick up a page and start reading it there or read the tapes that he more contents and so i started doing that i got a whole bunch of books i set them out at any time i felt the trigger trigger of wanting to go on facebook like a little tinge of anxiety or something uh our horta pick up a book and i had total permission to read as little as much as i wanted but at least a thing was that when you gain momentum in picking up facebook then you're just you.

grand canyon twitter facebook social media
"behavioral scientist" Discussed on Love Your Work

Love Your Work

02:07 min | 2 years ago

"behavioral scientist" Discussed on Love Your Work

"The value of compromising yeah but i i think it's just there there is a skill to quiting the internal critic is is for some people i think well god and in some people will be able to do a better than others i i think it's kind of a a trust issue of this doesn't mean i'm lorry my standards everywhere it's just means to kickstart to get this because we're really talking about how minutes at the end of the day in and reflects i think we're talking about is to kicks to get that habit together routed into your life and i say rooted after thinking for many years about how habits for habits work a lot like plans if you think of a habit like a plant you'll understand that at the beginning it doesn't matter how much of the plant is above the surface which you want as you want the routes to grow and take root you want a routes from plan another route for like the autumn it just city it sucks i i'll automatically how reliable lead you do the behavior and it doesn't matter what's above the surface because once the roots of their them the part on top in grow if the part on top grows in the routes are there and just like an plant what happens lance not gonna survive so by artificially nosing ongoing a right for an hour a day and i haven't quite figured out work fits in my lives in a where the word white put this tiny hamlets of a method for that where does this spent much life and so on and just like you know a few planted a new tomato plan ahead like you know an inch of routes and but it was crazy tall that tomato plan is not gonna survive so just really you know the process works like that it's it's like how do i get this habits firmly rooted in my life no matter what the sizes and once that's happening or donnas growing than you can increase it if you want um and it's.

"behavioral scientist" Discussed on Love Your Work

Love Your Work

01:49 min | 2 years ago

"behavioral scientist" Discussed on Love Your Work

"Who is an early reader of the hard to start thanks for making my brain explode that was very cool to see the hard to start spread so far it ended up right back where it started in a cafe in which i had worked on the book this episode is sponsor free which means a big thank you to the love your work a lead members supporting this show on patriotic we've had some new members trickling in over the past few weeks thank you to our newest member janice hostelries now we aren't yet at the level where our episodes are fully supported by members if we were able to get about thirty two of you just thirty two of you to pledge just five dollars a month that would be the break even point so while almost half of the expenses a publishing this episode are supported by patriotic supporters a little bit more than a third almost a half the rest of it comes out of my pocket so as you think about who you want to be and what you want to stay in foreign 2018 please consider supporting love your work on patriotic vote for a healthy definition of success vote for satisfying work vote with your dollars at l y w elite dot com that's l y w elite dot com here is bj fog i'm here a dj fog who is a behavior change and a habit building expert from stamford and bj this is going to be the first episode of two thousand eighteen i think a lot of our listeners are going to be having a cow or resolutions on my on their minds so what should they be thinking of as they are deciding upon resident funds for them so david thanks yai while it's an honor to be uh.

janice hostelries david five dollars
"behavioral scientist" Discussed on Freakonomics

Freakonomics

01:46 min | 2 years ago

"behavioral scientist" Discussed on Freakonomics

"We're also really good i think at changing people's knowledge and beliefs we're not so good at changing longterm behavior example okay one is the five day fruits and veggies anyone remember that this was really successful in one way it was a tremendously large scale intervention it was successful at changing our knowledge we now know that we should eat more fruits and vegetables it had no effect on behavior and fat consumption has gone down since the programme started yikes the challenge of changing behavior long term was echoed by todd rogers a behavioral scientist at harvard most treatment affects dump resist and sometimes they do and when they do we have no idea why and it's hard to predict which will persist in which will uh the economist david leaps and also at harvard used his speed talk to cover a particular problem he's identified in his classroom the use and abuse of laptop computers there's a huge negative extra nowadays for other students in the class you're sitting there and the person next year was clattering away and your distracted by the sound in your occasionally looking at their screen and then it makes you want to look at facebook to so there's all sorts of problems like that it's a classic short term versus longterm dilemma the web offers instant gratification that undermines our very good intentions to get the most out of class and i think that's all about present biased we go into the classroom and we are convinced i am going to be a good student and suddenly other things.

todd rogers behavioral scientist harvard facebook david leaps five day