35 Burst results for "autism"

How To Support Your Child With Autism

Healthy Eating For Kids

04:45 min | Last week

How To Support Your Child With Autism

"Joanne. I thank you so much for joining you today. I'm eating for kids podcast. Thank you. Thank you for inviting me. My pleasure. Tell me more about your work. It sounds really interesting and we've been chatting a little bit this morning, but tell me a joke. Yeah, so I've been working for two with children now for about twenty years and I specialized in supporting children with additional needs and special needs. So these are children who have autism like you already HD sensory processing disorder any variety of needs including communication difficulties and behavioral difficulties. Wow. And do you ever come across children who are very picky eaters? Yes. Absolutely. Yes. Yeah, absolutely. And that's one of the things that we do support at home as well. And it's supporting the parents of the obviously to put a plan in place for their child. Okay. So tell me a little bit more about your services. So for example, if a family listen to the podcast today and thought wow, they really loved the sound of Joanna. How exactly do you support your families. So the we have a number of Specialists and these are dead. Sleep specialist tutors. So we do have an academic approach but these because we're so specials. We're also able to support children in their communication and in their behavior, so when it comes down to communication that links directly with eating and nutrition as well because nutrition is about how a child can communicate their wants and needs which is of course includes the hunger and their thirst as well. So cheesy will come in place and talk about any variety of need that their child is experiencing so it could even be fine motor and gross motor skills that you're that HR need to develop and so the tutor will come and provide in a sense three support communication School support nutrition support behaviors off anything that that term is and it's all completely TaylorMade. Wow, it's nicely. You've got quite a big team of Staff working with you. Yeah. So searching my rolling is dead. 2:00 is when a client or new parents phones me. I have a really in-depth discussion with the parents as to what they're looking for in a specialist or a specialist user and then took my role is to match that client or that that students with that child with the specialist immediately making sure that that matches absolutely perfect with regards to the skills and experience of the Specialists. Okay. Perfect Well, I obviously do work with families with children from the autistic spectrum and I generally help them with regards to either very long selective eating. So not yet a Ford Explorer as I like to call them. But also they may ask me about some of the special diets out there and we might explore the evidence around them to see if they were wanted to try an Elimination Diet. They me then we might go down that path. But obviously it's really difficult if your child only eat a really small dog. Except sometimes children who come to see me are eating less than 10 foods or less than 20 foods and I discussed strategies to help them expand that page list of foods that list of safe foods really and it sounds like you do a little bit of work around it as well genetics time on that. Yes. So what we really do is discover the sensor needs of the child with the environment. So there's some things that parents aren't really recognizing it could even be found for example, so what sound is going on in that child's environment is and is that having an impact in a diet e and therefore in that willingness or unwillingness to taste new foods and and to explore and obviously taste but even light and the feel obviously the feel of them food in the mouth and the look of the food so I'm will talk heavenly father about obsessions and colors of food and and ideas around that but its rebirth Thinking about that texture in the child's mouth and some children really like no strong textures some children like quantity text textures and it's how to age gradually introduced different textures into the child diet. Let alone, you know, different nutritional values in the foods as well to being really really aware of that sense of yeah, that sensory needs that that the child is exposed to as well

Joanne. Taylormade Joanna
A$AP Ferg Interview

Toure Show

06:58 min | 2 weeks ago

A$AP Ferg Interview

"Plain Jane. Is a monster song. Thank you and I wanna hear about writing it making it is multiple take. So you punching in You know and it's an interesting vibe to it because you talk about family talk about pain and trauma but you also talk about hanging out having fun a lot of in the choruses. Crazy. Thank you. I love the fact that you broke down everything I talked about because I feel like playing Jane. People love it. I don't know if everybody knows why they love it all like if they can pull out those parts, the trauma, the the cookouts that you that we used to have to dodge gunshots and You. Know me going allow barrier for the first time and come back and feeling like I had to do more from our community Irma's link official village in our Beria that came from me spend like one hundred thousand dollars on a chain with Ben Abimbola and then going to. Liberia Sei starving kids is out there announced I came back. I wanted to give all my jury away and I was like man like a link can literally feed village area and I'll give some money to them. I was gone out there to put uniforms on kids 'cause out there like they can't. Go to school without uniforms. So going out there and put uniforms on the kids. was with. This. Brand, called uniform okay. Chit Liberty. Is My partner's name that he started his brand because when the Ebola outbreak happened out there in Liberia a lot of people were scared the by product out there. So he had a lot of materials and things like that. So he brought a factory a All of these women that an average jobs and things like that. To make uniforms out of these materials and he will use autism has influences and and just influence period to collaborate with to sell clothing. And partner. Rela. Bloomingdale's so that's what. I did I basically partnered up with him and Bloomingdales to make a line with some material. I designed a line with trap Lord and uniform. We sold it. The money went towards putting some of the money went towards putting the uniform on kids. Wow. Yeah. I WANNA talk about design because I know you're into that to like. Talk about making this record. So Plain Jane did was the beat I wrote in the studio or so I'll listen to juicy j slob on my knob like on on a cop I was in La and me and my uncle was just listening to the radio and it just came on and I'm like Yo this song is amazing like it hit me is like I had a perfectly like. Nobody did this song over? And I'm like, why doesn't this happen in the song? Check me and everybody screams I mean the whole song is like a hook. Really off bridge is sold sticky is to start with the hook instead of a lot of people start with verse and into it. But when you start with it, that's the beyonce's loves to do that right but the song don't even have a hook. It just really does suck a NIGGA. dickerson. So that comes one time and then it's like back into the verse but I don't have enough. That's really a hook and juicy J. that's his first song. That, he put out a rope. Like, which is intriguing to me because that's a huge song. So Our Rights at a soon as I got to the hotel stuck in traffic. I. Had this idea GIS Brewing, in my head. To write to the Slough Manabi. And then I was like man I gotTa, make this shit new I gotta make it feel like young the young people got to own it. They gotta be anthem for the young people and I gotta say something I had so much to say on his record because I just came back from Africa I've been traveling the world and. I'm always got the New York state of mind but I'm like everywhere. I was like Yo and I wanted to get an underdog to going to be Saga Kirk night. Okay. Yeah. To Do to be over like elbow, I got a Bangor for us to do kirk is like. He's amazing like he's amazing I I can't think of anything else like genius. And I, feel like he doesn't get enough credit on people don't even know taking can goal with his music as musicality. So when I approached him I knew he will bring me different sonics in different sounds but also understanding bpm how important Edelweiss Susannah trump's and everything like that. And I the verge down and. I recorded the whole thing I didn't even put that for the. Recorded the whole thing on my apple on my computer. My laptop in a hotel. No the. Studio. Okay. The whole process of Mea Kirk working on it

Mea Kirk Jane Liberia Dickerson Partner Bloomingdales Slough Manabi Africa Beyonce Ebola Ben Abimbola Apple Beria Official Susannah Trump Bangor New York LA
Concerns over food insecurity grow amid COVID-19 pandemic

Symphony Financial Group

05:21 min | 2 weeks ago

Concerns over food insecurity grow amid COVID-19 pandemic

"Has created an economic disaster for millions of families, one that the nation's safety that hasn't been ableto handle. Millions of people have been thrown out of work with no new jobs to be had, and many of the measures designed to help them. Things like supplemental unemployment benefits and eviction moratoriums have run their course. They engaged in a lot of necessary coping strategies and trade off folks. They're making difficult trade off between painter of food and medical care, food and utilities. Food and transportation and helping Jessica Hager is director of health and Nutrition for Feeding America, a nationwide network of more than 200 food banks and the country's second biggest charity, she says Before the pandemic about 35 million Americans or 1/9 of the population lived in households that were food insecure without the resources to get adequate food. Since mid March. It's gotten much worse family's air having to decide whether to pay the rent or buy food. Food banks are crowded. We have projected right now that there'll be 54 Million people are one in six could be sued and secured this beer in 2020. We've also projected that food and security Rachel increase in every single county in the United States in 2020, so this could be a 21 and three adults and one and two Children could experience it in Korea this time again due to that. Economic impact that has been in effect around the pandemic. No individuals whose job individuals relying on their savings to make their way through experts in hunger, No, that family's suffering from food insecurity have a variety of goto strategies to try to stretch scarce food dollars. Hagar says. 55% of food insecure families have used at least three of the strategies are things such as receiving help from friends? Purchasing an expensive unhealthy food, which we, of course know in the long term has an impact on health, telling their personal property where, if possible, which isn't for all, of course, but growing food in their own garden. Anticipate. Families have continue to engage and they trade off in coping strategies while also trying to manage the difficult circumstances of managing the disease and being out of social distance increased normally have even in normal times. Many families go in and out of hunger, depending on economic circumstances. But today a lot of people are gig workers or freelancers whose income is far from consistent. What is certainly common or not unusual for there to be seasonal food insecurity or one coming in and out of the security and that against you Point gig economy. It could be our essential workers who are farmers, and much of their income is based on seasonal rotation of crops. We also know of course, that folks began as they're making tree off. Sometimes their assets are coming in, and they're able to live off those for quite some time. But a situation may come or a health crisis cooker that's unexpected in that put someone in a food insecure state, though it does change depending on a variety of circumstances, and also note that we have a lot of built in inequalities within our structures institution in this country. And so though helpful, maybe doing Well and being able to make ends meet for many years. There may be the circumstances that change the last idiotic cetera. That family made their individual, maybe food insecure for a period of time until they're able to re secure that financial foundation for their life Being food, insecure, even for just a little while, is a major risk factor for poor health. A recent study in the sage journals shows that independent of all other factors, food insecurity, Khun drastically increase the chances of an early death. We found that the drift of the people in America who are secure Eventually have a high chance of dying from any cause of that heart disease. And that is a striking finding good extended dance of death for insecure people After 10 Years of increases, 50%. That's Dr John Dee, scooped on Donny, professor of Public Health at New Mexico State University co author of the study, not a sophisticated multiple models. Adjusting for different types of actors. And yet no matter how much you account for just being food, insecure from a few years after a long duration, profound impact on someone's help. On the train, the heart, the liver, the kidney, and so any cause of death is more prominent in for insecure people essentially being food, insecure challenges your body medical autism, and then you're depending on your supply in the body, putting supplies. And those declining over time and eventually the challenger system so heavily but a liver stops function and people underground Club Gen. Donny says the increase in heart disease death as a result of food insecurity is especially striking 75% greater over 10 years than in people who are not food in secure. The reasons are fairly clear. Cheaper foods are generally less heart healthy. And there are few things more chronically stressful than not knowing where your next meal is coming from when an individual is going through this difficult and very stressful, my nontoxic, stressful experience that if they're making a stray off, perhaps again purchasing, inexpensive and healthy food That can lead to perhaps previously controlled diet related diseases becoming uncontrolled, uncontrolled diseases. Such a society that can lead to complications like kidney disease, identities and nerve damage. Often food insecurity and poor health combined to create a vicious cycle with no way out. If someone enters a cycle of food, insecure or their household is experiencing an unexpected and extensive medical crisis are often forced to engage in the financial coping strategies. And it includes the consumption of cheaper foods often that are hiring calories. But Lauren nutritional value and the reliance on the left healthy food can lead to poor nutrition and chronic diet, really, and diseases. Ensuring these diseases can worsen existing disabilities or other illnesses and results in an inability to work and bring in that previously the cheese income. What's more, the

America Gen. Donny Kidney Disease Heart Disease Jessica Hager Hagar Korea United States Rachel Lauren Dr John Dee Director Khun Professor Of Public Health New Mexico State University
13 Former Devereux Residents Sue Foundation for Sexual Assault in Philadelphia

KYW 24 Hour News

01:01 min | 2 weeks ago

13 Former Devereux Residents Sue Foundation for Sexual Assault in Philadelphia

"Is being sued by 13 former Dent's accusing the behavioral health centers of negligence, sexual assault and other crimes that happened while they were Children. Hey, What about use Kim Glovis reports. The lawsuit claims Deborah and its affiliated businesses did nothing to stop systemic sexual assault of Children in its care for decades, and that resulted in severe and permanent issues to these 13 victims who are now adults. Deborah was a behavioral health organization founded to provide care for those with intellectual and developmental disabilities, including autism and other mental health needs. Attorney Kristen Fed is one of the lawyers representing the groupies were vulnerable Children. Placed in a facility responsible for their protection, and you really had a horrendous betrayal of trust by the Devereaux. Staff members. Complaint alleges Devereaux created a predatory hunting ground for its staff, in a statement. Devereaux says it hasn't seen the lawsuit but is conducting an independent audit of policies and procedures regarding safety of the Children's programs. Statement says there's hard work to be done and that Deborah committed many years ago to doing it. Kim

Devereaux Deborah Kim Glovis Assault Dent Kristen Fed Attorney
Companies seeking out potential employees with autism

Dr. Lee Yardley

01:01 min | 2 weeks ago

Companies seeking out potential employees with autism

"Found about 30. Large companies actively seeking employees on the autism spectrum. Including Microsoft, J. P. Morgan and Ford. But there are still so many people with autism who are unemployed, and the numbers are growing in the next decade. Researchers at Drexel University estimate as many as 1.1 million Americans with autism will turn 18 back at autonomy works outside Chicago, Brian Sarah Brennen, Philip and Eric told us they hope more companies will start to recognize the untapped potential of people on the spectrum. What is having a job mean to you. For me? Having a job is important because it provides me with much needed structure in my life. Having the job is important to me because otherwise I would become very financially depend on my parents asking them. Can you buy me this? Can you buy me that? It's just been nice to be ableto Go home and talk to my parents about what I did during the day. They must be very proud of it. Yeah, they always say they're not surprised. So

Philip Brian Sarah Brennen Drexel University Microsoft Chicago J. P. Morgan Ford Eric
Companies seeking out potential employees with autism

KCBS Radio Weekend News

04:13 min | 2 weeks ago

Companies seeking out potential employees with autism

"Autism is a developmental disorder that can affect how the brain processes information. People with autism have a spectrum of abilities and disabilities. Some are unable to speak or care for themselves, while others can live on their own have unique skills like excellent memory or attention to detail. No matter where they are on the spectrum, many adults with autism have a difficult time finding a job. Even making it past the first interview can be challenging. But that may be starting to change. As we found out more cos they're discovering the potential of people with autism, and some are now actively recruiting for talent on the spectrum. All right, and then just head on over here Doing a television interview could be nerve wracking for anyone. But for people with autism. It's potentially overwhelming cameras, lights, microphones, not to mention having to shake hands with a stranger. But last winter before the pandemic, five adults on the autism spectrum agreed to talk with us about their struggles finding work. I was unemployed for three years. I just kept receiving one rejection after the other. Eric Roland has a bachelor's degree in sociology. How many jobs do you think you applied for? Countless can't even count about 100th. How did that feel? T get so many rejections? Well, I I felt useless. I felt Feel like I wasn't getting anywhere off life. Brian Evans and Philip Mitchell were diagnosed with autism is young Children, Sarah clients, and Brandon Novak. Not until high school. I was being a person with autism make you different than a person who doesn't have autism. You see differences? Oh, yes, I do see differences from person to person with me. For example, I'm good with numbers and good with mathematics. Differences in communication were pretty common. On what I've seen, like, especially with like nonverbal communication like body language and stuff. What would you like people to understand about autism, black of thie ability to communicate doesn't equal intelligence. Clearly they have talents and skills. We stay, Friedman hired Sarah and the four others at autonomy works. A tech firm. He started in 2012 to proof read digital content. And manage data for dozens of companies like Nike and Nissan. There are 32 adults on the spectrum here now working from home due to cope in 19, including Friedman's 25 year old son, Matt 102 yet Nothing beats sort of sitting in my office and looking over here and seeing mad at work, and the job is really given him sort of a whole nother purpose in life. Do you like the job? Yeah. I like that. It's a quiet office environment. Remember getting your first paycheck? June 22nd 2015 today. That's AH Did you worry a lot about what would happen in that when he became an adult for a long time. We didn't really talented with numbers really good with detail. So we figured that there had to be jobs out there for him. What we found was horrifying. Like there's there. No jobs, a child with autism, reaching 18 or 21. Suddenly it's Cliff. People talk about a cliff. We're graduating to their parent's couch. Winds up happening is a transition from structured school, setting into their parents house with really very few prospects Back in 2011 I was the idea for autonomy works came to Friedman when he was head of marketing at Sears, He oversaw hundreds of employees checking the accuracy of advertisements in newspapers. And the thought occurred to me. Matt could do this. This appeals to exactly the kind of way that Matt thinks and processes information. A lot of very small, detailed information. Yeah, it seems like a small thing. It seems like 21 24 verses 29 24, But there's tens of thousands of dollars of costs that sit in that error. Autonomy Works employees monitor more than 2300 websites a month for accuracy and quality. Friedman says they're extreme attention to detail has led to a 90% reduction in product and pricing errors, and they're so good at

Developmental Disorder Friedman Matt Autonomy Works Sarah Eric Roland Nike Brandon Novak Brian Evans Head Of Marketing Philip Mitchell Nissan Sears
Joe Montana and wife rescue grandchild from attempted kidnapping

KCBS Radio Weekend News

00:25 sec | 3 weeks ago

Joe Montana and wife rescue grandchild from attempted kidnapping

"Intruder attempted to kidnap one of their grandchildren, according to a report from TMZ. A couple was at a house in Malibu yesterday when a woman reportedly came in through an unlocked door and took an infant child right out of the arms of another woman. Was she trying to walk away with that child when Montana and his wife rustled their grandchild away from her, the woman Has been arrested. A leading voice in the Bay Area, autism community and beyond, has died along with her son in a Fremont house fire

Malibu Bay Area Fremont Montana
Fourth-Largest U.S. School District to Allow Students Back in Classrooms

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:50 sec | Last month

Fourth-Largest U.S. School District to Allow Students Back in Classrooms

"School system is making plans to bring some students back to the classroom. Starting next month, A small percentage will resume in person Learning in Fairfax County School Board approved that planet. It's meeting last night. Nearly 7000 students in about 640 teachers will return to classes next month for what the school district is calling in person. Cohorts Superintendent Scott Bray Brand says students in the greatest need of additional support like preschool students with autism and English language newcomers will return. But it will be up to parents. We're going. Tio just confirm that parents have made the choice they wanted. And if there's a need to make a switch in choices that we would honor that which social distancing will be enforced, parents will also have to complete health forms. Daily. Teachers will also be asked about symptoms and exposure. Melissa how w. T O P NIS Now. The

Fairfax County School Board Scott Bray Brand Superintendent Melissa
The Good and Bad on Oxalates

Diet Science

05:11 min | Last month

The Good and Bad on Oxalates

"So D- what's top Richard this week this week we're talking about something called oxalate S- oxalate. Yes. This a type of compound that is found in certain types of foods that can be problematic for some people. Okay. So a so I Wanted to talk about because it's not problematic for everyone. But I. Think sometimes when you hear something is problematic, everyone gets freaked out and then they all everyone says, oh no, we can't eat those foods because they have oxalate in them, right? Right right. Right. So these were these naturally occurring foods exactly. So you know one of the things that I've talked a lot about in my books and my classes about these particular compounds are foods called anti nutrients, which are there in nature to kind of protect the plants you know in nature oftentimes, the idea with plants was that. It was to prevent predators from wiping out a whole crop of something. Right so we have things called fight AIDS and electons and things Fido Estrogens, and you know that will harmon insect some other things like make it. You know. Prevent. Absorption of certain nutrients so that a Predator may not continue to eat that. So there's a lot of things. oxalate is one of these types of anti nutrients it it is known it's an indigestible compound and food that prevents the proper absorption of calcium. from from that particular food if if there's also calcium in it or sometimes from other calcium containing foods that we eat with the food that has oxalate in my yeah. So it's kind of interesting. So some of the the biggest concentrations of oxalate are found in foods like spinach. and. Peanuts and chocolate. So you know that that tells us you know that sometimes people are eating a lot of these foods thinking that Oh. Yeah. This is great because these potentially healthy foods we have seen the Charles time. Yeah but we don't. We're not eating it in like mass quantities like we don't eat like huge amounts of spinach every day as salads or we don't eat it like we eat it but it's always a part of something else so. That's true. We haven't really ate like a salad you decide that you that you would start right? Right. So you know in in fact, you know when I was reading about this at said years ago these types of foods didn't pose a problem because few people ate large quantities of these foods other than Popeye, eating a bunch of spinach and we we didn't have a lot of people that. another food that that it's found in his rhubarb been fewer even fewer people rube bar back then. So but now you know a lot of health conscious people are eating gigantic spinach salads every day thinking that it's like the best thing ever and but it can lead to kidney stones and some other types of health issues tree. So and there's even some theories that maybe it's linked to autism. And that's kind of a theory. You know, I'm not going to go down that road, but I'm just reporting in case anybody else heard of that. They might WANNA research on reported statement about right. Well, the there doesn't seem to be there are studies, but there doesn't seem to be a definitive link to it. Probably more research is done on that okay but we do know for sure that it causes kidney stones will help us advocate this. So what happens is when oxalate is a compound that likes to bind assert to calcium specifically, but also iron so it can bind to both of those and. So, there's calcium in spinach. Spinach as a source of calcium as well. But we don't get much of that calcium out of it because because it because the oxalate binds and when we say bind would it means it's like a chemical reaction that when they get together like once chew up that spinach goes down into your gut and all that the it like forms a chemical reaction in the attached to each other and form a compound called House useful right? That's called Calcium oxalate. So. You know so that now it's bound that that calcium is now bound up in that molecule called Calcium oxalate and we can't really now absorb that calcium. Persist today's in the Gut and what what's really interesting is Our some of that Oxley. is broken down by bacteria in the GUT. and so you know one of them's called oxo oxo, b-actor foremen genus, and it uses that as an energy source the the bacteria uses that as an energy source. So so some of it gets used that way in the so we don't really ever get the benefit of that calcium that we eight. So

Richard Aids Popeye Oxley.
What is Play Therapy?

Latinx Therapy

07:32 min | Last month

What is Play Therapy?

"Are. Right we are back with another episode and I'm really excited to have on the body guests on the show with us on the data. Vargas is a licensed mental health counselor. She's a registered play therapist and supervisor, but also she's trained in em Dr and not only that is certified as a I play practitioner. So we really have an amazing guest with us that's going to talk about safe air. I want to share a little bit more about her Andrea is also the south chapter. Chair for the Lord Association for play therapy and she has specialize in child and adolescent counseling. Since two thousand six, her practice is located in a western. Florida. where she serves children of all ages teens and their families, as well as college students and as passionate about helping parents and strengthen their relationships through able therapeutic interventions and the I was born in. Columbia and emigrated to the United States with her family when she was a toddler growing up, she remembers that therapy like in most Latin families was believed to be or what unquote people with problems crazy people. So thank you and the wrath or coming on after talking about this for so long welcome to let the next therapy. Hi Yes, and so excited to be here. Thank you for having. Sat. We're GONNA talk about play therapy and I. Know some of the listeners may be hearing this modality for the first time. So let's go ahead and get started with just explaining what is play therapy. Okay. So play therapy is what you would translate regular talk therapy to the developmental age of a child rates. So when we picture adult going to therapy normally command area having a deal more or less than what they're gonNa work on on what they're going to talk about and they sit. On the couch and then the dialogue starts right. But with kids, they necessarily come up with the idea of wanting to go to a therapist. So their parents really bring them in talking to kids like most of you know if you guys are parents, it's not the same. You know some kids don't have the words and even if they do, they'll more than like me say things like, I. Don't know for energy look at you like the really. So with great, you meet them with a yards of elementary. So kids play and they also stare feelings and they even crosses all the changes that are happening around them or maybe negative events that have occurred in their family or in their life and. Of play therapies is a therapist train specifically to enter a child world and pickup themes that the child might be playing out to get a better understanding of how this child feeling what they're struggling with, and then working closely with the parents to help their parents understand them, and then giving parents tools to make certain adjustments and also the child helping them. Understand better ways to communicate or better ways to manage and culprit their Felix Okay and so play therapy involves the children, but it sounds like it involves the parents as well. Yes. Yes. I. Mean. If you think about it when a therapist needs to do child, they might need them once a week but that's not enough time to really change or enough. It's almost impossible to king somebody a child when you're not thinking about the whole family or even school. So if the child is having a problem at school, just working with the kyle limits you to what how much can you really made so if you work closely with the school, you Greco see if the parents and if maybe they're have grandparents, for example. So part of working with. A calendar understanding that they have a lot of adults involved in their life, and if all the adults get on the same page and work together that child is going to be way more successful. Okay. What about children that have caregivers or are in the foster care system? Are they eligible to receive play therapy like with IBM modality for them as well? If they don't have a consistent caregiver? Yes. I mean, when we think about foster, can they definitely need a safe face to process all of those feeling that? You know that they're feeling because of their foster care placement. So it's a little tricky because like you said, they don't have consistent caregivers, but you know if they are in a foster home, you can work leash with the foster parent and then whatever school they were going to. So maybe not as consistent because they might change the foster home or maybe they are still working our reunification with their parents with their biological parents. You can always include depending on the case right whoever is currently taking care of the child and if they still have contact with the biological parent involving his okay that makes sense. What are the ages that play therapy is best for? So people say like play therapists say that they're play therapy can work with anybody from three to one hundred and three right by it been studied and studied have found that it's most effective with kids between the ages of three and twelve. So it is possible and what about the children with special needs is play therapy also something that they can do? Yes. They are just like in adult therapy there's different specializations so they are different type. Training. Somebody would take in order to work with children on the autism spectrum. Can called off play. There's other stuff likes floor time so. Underneath play therapy, there's different branches. So as long as you are there, understand the child special need in your trine in working with that special needs population than we can definitely use sleep there.

Child World Supervisor Vargas Lord Association Andrea United States Columbia Florida. Kyle IBM Greco
Kids facing charges after teen with autism filmed with pants down in New Jersey

Bernie and Sid in the Morning

00:46 sec | Last month

Kids facing charges after teen with autism filmed with pants down in New Jersey

"Carolina Jersey Students are in hot water. The students ages tend to 19 are charged for allegedly surrounding a 14 year old autistic boy at Brodin Grove Park. The boy's pants and underwear were pulled down. A video was posted to social Media Snapchat and Tic Tac. This Farrell on residents know better. We're taught in the high school to respect everyone, too. Treat people with kindness and so to see this happen is truly troubling. Mayor occur. Pollution really disturbing is at that Park Road and park. That's an access for all playground that this community invested a lot of money in To be especially welcoming to those with special needs. The students, including 90, year old Alice for dry a face various charges, including cyber harassment and harassment.

Park Road And Park Brodin Grove Park Harassment Tic Tac Carolina Jersey Farrell Alice
Police shoot 13-year-old boy with autism

WBZ Midday News

00:34 sec | Last month

Police shoot 13-year-old boy with autism

Interview With Ta-Nehisi Coates

Longform Podcast

06:12 min | Last month

Interview With Ta-Nehisi Coates

"Tallahassee welcome back to the podcasts what numbers this? Number seven. I think it might have been six. It's crazy. I can't even remember it used to be when we did a new one I would go back and listen to the old one. To See what we talked about before make sure no repeat myself. I just can't do it anymore. I can't listen to six. An, our audio. Preparation, so I gotta go off my My Memories. Yeah. It's been a lot. It's been a lot I WanNa say I feel very fortunate. I feel honored really that you are willing to have this conversation because I know you recently. Lost Friends Chadwick Bozeman, who is you know the world is experiencing that loss but I know you're experiencing it in a different way. Thank you for taking the time to do this even despite that. Now it's okay I mean we had committed before and. It's an experience to. Meet somebody. And you know I don't want to overstate Khushab was like a really private dude. And I think whenever you have people who are up at a certain level certain currency. That people try to deal in in you know overstating their proximity. So you know this wasn't a cow who I talk to every day or anything. But we did know each other we did it on. You know pretty much in the same circle. You know this guy met. Jesus. Nineteen Ninety seven ninety eight when. The students in the fine arts building decided to. Take, the administration building at how to prevent. Called it the absorbing of the fine arts college into the broader Liberal Arts School Indus- turn basically terrifies into a program as opposed to independent, which was crazy because. So much of what you know how a calling card is turning out autism Donny Hathaway To puffy to Tony Morrison just this long history. So it seemed crazy anyway him you another close friend of mine basically led the takeover and. are coveted for the hilltop for. You know some like at the beginning of my career I've probably been working for David. been mentioned several times. You know in other caucuses we we've done a couple of years at definitely maybe a year two years something like that. But anyway else coming in for the student newspaper and I say all that to say to watch him. On this arc. To see him you know student plays at Howard. He was always such a serious serious office. An intense and probably like the dude, I would least. Be Likely to pick to become. A major Hollywood leading man not because he lacked the talent. But he was so serious I'm. Dead dead dead serious about his art in and you know he really really didn't play and didn't have time. For Shenanigans. So just watches I mean he's one of those. Really really rare case, there's so much in the world it makes people feel like. Taking shortcuts in messing around and And Chad. Rare case that did it on principle and. Basically you know. Hard work you know. I know when people pass folks alight. They say this I never did any wrong or you know, etc. That's not what I'm saying. But I I was privileged to watch his as office. By went back and watched the onstage interview you did with him at the Apollo. And one of one of the things you said there was you sort of started off by saying because it was about Black Panther obviously, and and you said something like I didn't know that I needed this movie until I watched it you know and Kind of wonder how much of that? Connected with him being in that role or just. Yeah. No I mean. I would that was part of it. You know what I mean chat always had like this kind of you know otherworldly About himself. When he got past it's not like I was like, oh, he clearly can't this. You know what I mean is I said it was unexpected. You would be on this rise like this. I. Guess I'm more doubting. The system Hollywood. I think like an by point or somewhere around I point started writing a comic book. So it was like crazy. You know that you know he would be Erin I'll be right in the book and then I just so proud of that. So You know and even at that moment. He agreed to do conversation at the I mean you're talking about you on a billion dollar film. Again I knew. That they were. Promoting film it you know how exhausting? Because I think this was after they had gone on this global tour promote I knew how exhausting that was. After they had done grueling Toyota, he would just sit there and you have to remember what we know now was he was diagnosed about it. Yeah. Yeah. So he's been diagnosed with. You know what I mean and he sits up on stage in. But we had a pre call? His Russia with very very assistant. You know about that. You know we cheat the time limited data and I'm like, okay I'm. Trait. Up there with that, we got on the stage he has so much to say. And you can tell if you look at the interview, he just has so much to say and I think there was some point isn't Chin who has a black me the mask could come the and wants to get. Out At enchanted signs it. You know he was very conscious about what they're meant. And what what their moment met and it is. I just spe is it is hard to be sitting here talking to you about this in the past tense. Yeah. He has so many lighters just enviable qualities that relatively brief moment you know he really was king you couldn't have picked a better person to to carry it.

Hollywood Liberal Arts School Indus Tallahassee Khushab Chadwick Bozeman Donny Hathaway Toyota Chin Howard Tony Morrison David. Apollo Russia Erin
Vicki Wickham on Ready Steady Go

Rock N Roll Archaeology

05:01 min | Last month

Vicki Wickham on Ready Steady Go

"Well, the rocks pages podcast. This is Mark Pringle with me is my colleague Jessica Murison Bowie I'm mark and in third zoom window is very, very special guest Vicki Wickham Hi Vicki Hi both. The keys perched on her. New York, city this is eight o'clock in the evening London Time I've had my first Jones Hannukah Day and we'll be hearing sirens all of that sort of New York City soundscape. So for those who don't know I mean is legendary carrot tourneys business over the years I think as I say, produce on the fantastic pioneering pop TV series, ready steady go subsequently manager of La Belle, and in many ways, a CO create of La Belle was an artist and a friend and manager of Dusty Springfield and subsequently of the likes of Morrissey. Marr and Vicky tell us about how you got into pop music and as a professional activity totally by default. I would inland I was working. I had several jobs and I had one job that I really liked which I was working for radio BBC like entertainment it was cold. And My job was a production assistant and the writer, my producer, my boss Charles Chilton wrote these wonderful one hour specials. Flooding Allen or the moment or the songs from the First World War and so we have. Autism singers, musicians, actors, etc, etc etc and my job is to put all together. And I learned a lot needs to say but I I was thinking that it conciliates should be doing television radio and I don't quite know why but left thinking everybody would want me nobody walked in. One Luckily one of my really good friends Carolina with Carter was seeing somebody at associated rediffussion. Sunday could Elkin Allen. Let detail who set don't have it at the moment but. A secretarial job will come up. No I don't want to be the secretary. So he was great. He's lectured me and said, you want to be anything. You can just get your foot in the door and about a week later called me up and said come in. For you sat me down and said yes, your secretary but I promise you anyways cut a long story short. He had this idea for music show cooled ready steady go and by the time we will put together. The pilots can get at I was producing it. Did I know anything about pop music for? Thing but no did anybody else. So the show was picked up and luckily a couple of other young people we were young came in and we started working on a program could ready steady go at elk was mabus he left us alone. Yeah just great. It's it's amazing I mean ready steady go is so different from anything that come before it. Really I mean I suppose some the Jack Goods shows sort of pointed in direction to some extent but then you had a lot of really stiff stock not much pop music television full stop did you feel that what you're doing with revolutionary from very early point? At all we we just going out to you know as as you would our age going to clubs seeing people listening to Radio Caroline talking to people, and you know suddenly became very obvious that we could have these people on the show that when we went to see the rolling stones when we love Brian Jones who had the best hair in the will We could say come on the show and they did it was on the sleep. It was just gut reaction and knock I. Mean did anything to see any of this? No. Fantastic. I mean also. Undid you love always love music yourself. Personally was was all be something which is always chime to you because ready steady go was fantastic. Inner suspect it really focused free. Key American black music I didn't even know about black music I was. Gilbert and Sullivan. And South Pacific I knew nothing as we started ready steady. Very. Few black axe or autism in England. So inevitably, booking although the white exit cetera and the Springfield we became friends and dusty would play me these great blue soul rb records and that's when I fell in love with them and suddenly when we have these people own and literally would call agents and say other coming over, we could use the. and S Luckily, the show became big enough that it was worth people bringing them over because they knew they would be on the

Elkin Allen Brian Jones Jessica Murison Bowie Secretary La Belle Vicki Wickham Production Assistant Dusty Springfield New York City Morrissey BBC New York Charles Chilton Springfield Carolina Marr England Jack Goods
How to Schedule Your Time More Effectively

Marketing School

04:48 min | Last month

How to Schedule Your Time More Effectively

"Super committed to your success online. We've worked with them to a special offer just remarking school listeners. All you have to do is go to dream host dot com slash marking school to learn more and get your website online today. Welcome to another episode of Marketing School. I'm Eric Su and I'm Neil Patel and today we're GonNa talk about how to schedule your time more effectively. So I don't have tons of tips on this one. I know air probably does more than me but I'm GonNa give you the two tips that I do and then the rest is all eric. The first is I have assistant that helps me a law you can always hire. A virtual assistant, there's a lot of sites offer that, but that's one way. The other thing that I do is a checklist everything that needed accomplish during that day. Literally I have a checklist for each and every single day and I accomplish it. You don't go to sleep unless you convert your sick you better still combat ship before you go to see and you'll figure out how to get it done and then sometimes like. I want that extra time on. Monday to do x Y and Z, or want to take that vacation while if I had a checklist the next two weeks, which do because they start creating bands. Okay. If I want that vacation that time off I need to go and complete. Things. All those checklists of coming weeks. If we're GONNA, take that time off, and that's my way of just getting the most out of my time. The funny thing is even when you take the time off, you still have a new checklist. So we're. On vacation onboard. My wife loves sending places I and stuff like that, and I don't care for the sending places some psycho. Yeah you go on the beach and do what everyone and I'M GONNA. Go critic neutral rethink more work than. So similar I used to have a really long list as an early my career really long list of things I. Remember watching this video is like you know a lot of people have a lot of these TD's right STD's can mean different things but in this case is has shit to do so you don't WanNa do that 'cause the problem is if you do that, you don't have any priorities and so what I learned over the years this is very similar to kneel as well. I, have a checklist right in fact now have physical. A physical checklist. Now, where I write things usually I try to keep it to three main things i. get those things done like it's a good day. So that's up what I do and in front of me I, have my top goal for the year and I tried to center everything I do around those my checklist based on those. So I don't try to do all these other things because otherwise I'm like I really work on too many things and if I try to add all these, here's this other. Here's is like I'm always bringing. Neil are talking about these ideas all the time Oh what do you think about this? What do you think about this but that's too much. You have to be able to focus otherwise it gets crazy. So that's one piece I do definitely recommend in EA I actually use a service called belay solutions recommended by our mutual friend said I got this great year by the way most as don't work well with me I think difficult to work with but I remember that time we interviewed a all prisons. Amazing. You should hire them I'm like, no, thank you too expensive. Do you remember that? As like two years ago you're like I read this EA. They're awesome at. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. I, was like one thank you. Two hundred grand super expensive and like no thank you. Don't, but it doesn't have to cost a lot of money to do the stuff that Eric and I are talking about even with the h you can get someone to help you out for like I. Kid you not like a few hundred bucks a month virtually. So there's couple services there's one called Shepherd support, shepherd, DOT com. So type in that and you can get they actually have a really. Good vetting process for Filipino, Vase and some people might complain about that. But there are some really good ones bolaise a little more expensive I think it goes up to forty or fifty bucks an hour but my ea comes military background. So she could take the heat when I bring the heat boom boom boom boom and she's like, yeah, give me more give me more. She gets stronger from it. Unlike, yes, exactly what I need. So you gotta think about your personality, they will help block time off for you. I think I still use my scheduling links. So you schedule once I don't know if you do this the old but I, think there's a season for things right there seasons where you try to keep your calendar completely empty and their seasons words like scheduled like crazy. So for me right? Now a Mondays, all my one on ones. All of I have themes, all ones, autism meetings those are Monday Tuesdays and Wednesdays are more free for Friday's like this. I have no meetings. The only meetings I do are what Neil like this fighters are all for strategic thinking time blocked out. So I can I have the space to think about things Neil how do you do you do know meetings right? Eddie meetings but not that many period like I just cut back on the meetings altogether and I realized like meetings are inefficient. Yeah. I just call I need something. Yeah. I'll be the first to say, yes, he does that the other thing too is instead of doing like forty five minute meetings thirty minute means cut it to fifteen minutes US county or whatever make default your fifteen minutes 'cause usually you'll find that you can fill that time quickly you drag it out to thirty and it's just like people start it's called

Neil Patel Eric Su Marketing School Virtual Assistant Eddie Shepherd Vase
The Ancestors Are Plenty and Petty with Alexis P. Morgan

Revolutionary Mystic

06:19 min | 2 months ago

The Ancestors Are Plenty and Petty with Alexis P. Morgan

"Hello and welcome everyone to another episode of the Revolutionary Mystic? Podcast I'm your host. Mets Lee Alexandria. Joining me today. I have the privilege and honor of chatting with our guest Alexis P. Morgan. I am so stoked I can't even tell you. Just for reference right now were let's see. Moore in August twenty, twenty were stolen the middle of a pandemic and. Like. Alexis mentioned to me earlier. The world is like basically on fire and as a disabled person who is pretty homebound it is a very awesome opportunities today to get to chat with Alexis P. Morgan who I have a lot of in common with and like so much admiration for their work and I'm. Thrilled to get to connect with somebody who? You know understands and it's just it's refreshing. You know we live in a pretty abled world. We live in a pretty neuro typical focused were held. And so I'm really excited to get to talk to them and share their magic with you and. So rather been telling you all about who they are and what they do. I would love for you to hear it straight from them. Hi Alexis. Thank you so much for having me on. This is I think this is the first. PODCAST appearance I've done in a while. So that's exciting. So about Me I am twenty eight turning twenty, nine in a couple of months very exciting in the throes of the Saturn return which is. Home. I'm black and ice that I'm the child of indigenous mothers because my second adoptive parent, which is a story will get into in a second and I'll clarify what I mean by that. Is Indigenous and I'm still trying to figure out if my biological mother was truthful with my adoptive parents about my indigenous heritage, it's not one of those leg. My grandmother was like a such and such kind of situations It actually has to do with my paternal grandfather So you know we're figuring that out but in the mean time I say I'm a child of indigenous mothers to be really clear about a WHO I am in that regard m professionally, I am a writer, an artist and a sorceress. My pronouns are she heard they I identify as FAM- 'cause my gender is really weird and complicated. and has layers of Wu mixed into it too. So sometimes, it's just easier to be like yeah okay. This is folks do what they want and I'm also queer so and I have autism I was diagnosed at twenty seven which is funny because I studied autism for like four years in high. Slovenia with a thought that maybe I would have On something but Nah. but I did but I didn't. Add I'm also disabled I have a multiple sclerosis I was also diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis at twenty seven. During my birthday month it was a very exciting bursting. That see in a nutshell. Wow. Yeah. I just want to say like I love. The amount of representation you're able to bring for folks I. I know when I hear you speaking about who you are I'm hearing things that I I can really to and I also have seen like out there in the world. I. Know isn't really being said, and one of them is that you mentioned about how? You like had been studying onto them for some time and like how did you not know well A for folks that don't know. Much about my professional history I was a social worker for a long time and I had a long like eleven year long career and towards the end I was a teacher for kids with autism and I loved it absolutely loved it felt super at home and just like you didn't reach diagnosis until I was around like twenty, seven, twenty, eight I, think. It's just kind of funny like how it works out that way you know Ray Lake and like I think my so it's funny 'cause like in my particular situation, my first set of adoptive parents. Okay. So let me back this trailer up a little bit. I was adopted twice I was adopted as an infant and I usually call that set of parents by foster parents because it helps make things less confusing to the wider world. And just because I usually don't have time to explain my family tree with the. Diagram. Like New People. So I was. Of Infant, and then I was adopted again as an adult adoption by my mom she is my mom. So when I usually when I say mom speaking of her and what I'm speaking of my adoptive parents who were a queer couple I was raised by White Lesbians, which is who boy that's a Latin to wrestle with in hindsight but. I'm usually not referring to them, but sometimes I'll slip and I'll just call the MOM and everybody gets real real confused because I got like twelve of them lying around it's great. Twelve months I mean but when I was a toddler, I showed some of the signs of A lot of lake professional clinicians would probably deemed autism

Alexis P. Morgan Ray Lake Multiple Sclerosis Mets Lee Alexandria Slovenia Moore Writer
Michigan To Pay Flint Residents $600 Million Over The City's Drinking Water

All Things Considered

02:43 min | 2 months ago

Michigan To Pay Flint Residents $600 Million Over The City's Drinking Water

"Million settlement with residents of Flint over the city's drinking water crisis. The problems began in 2014 when improperly treated water corroded the city's pipes. And leeched lead into the tap water, making people sick. We wanted to hear what Flint residents thought. So we called up Jenna McDonald. She's a substitute teacher and mother of two young boys. When my co host Ari Shapiro, met Jenna four years ago in February, 2016 she had taught her boy's a really important lesson. We've continued to check in with her throughout the years, and she joins us again. Now. Welcome back. Thank you. So Governor Gretchen Whitmer called this a step toward making amends. How do you feel? What's your reaction to the settlement? Is like a little ray of sunshine it for me and for my family. My biggest fear is that everyone will forget about Flint. It would get swept under the rug, and no one will remember. So I'm very excited to know that our wonderful governor kept her promise about keeping this on her four part of her mind in their Flint residents matter. Much of the money will be devoted to Children who are six years or younger when first exposed to the contaminated water and your son's justice and Josiah fall into that category. Will you be seeking compensation? And is it enough? There is no amount that will be enough ever if each of us got the 600 million apiece that's still will not replace the damage that was done. I have very close friends who lost parents two Legionnaires. I'm still under the belief that my son's autism is a result of these lay a tainted water, so there's no amount of money. Deca, replace or even tried Tio comfort lifelong things like that. Are you going to see compensation? 100%? Yes. And you know, I've been thinking about this. You haven't been on the programme since the pandemic started. And I've really wondered how Cove in 19 has impacted you and your neighbors, especially with all this necessary, extra hand washing big, big amount of stress. You already tried to kind of limit how much you were playing or in the water are trying to wash your hands. But now you don't have a choice. I can live with whatever little damage that that late is possibly doing to my body and just meant through my skin. But I can't live through Cove it I have. Ah, you know, auto immune disease with my Lupus, So I think it would take me out. So I'll take my chances washing my hands with the Flint water versus getting called it. You know, during that last interview, you told

Flint Jenna Mcdonald Cove Gretchen Whitmer Ari Shapiro Josiah Legionnaires Deca TIO
Grieving the Loss of Alcohol

Addiction Unlimited Podcast | Alcoholism | 12 Steps | Living Sober | Addiction Treatment

04:52 min | 2 months ago

Grieving the Loss of Alcohol

"A grieving process. I'm sure many of you have heard about the stages of grief right I think most of us are familiar with that and we're definitely GONNA dig into those today and I want to work on some perspective around this because you know I am crazy about your mindset in your perspective being right because that so much sets in motion what your experience is going to be if your perspective is good and healthy and your mindset is good and healthy, you're going to have a much different experience all the way around in everything that you do so I really want to dig into some of that stuff too. And as people with addiction, we tend to be very sensitive and we like to blow things out of proportion good things and bad things. But even just the simple fact of being an alcoholic we go it way out of proportion and convince ourselves that our problem is so much worse than other people's problems and no one understands us and we got the short end of the stick and it's so hard to be one of us. And it is hard to be an alcoholic. But it isn't any more difficult than being a million other things. Also what is so hard for one person may not be challenging at all for someone else. So making it seem like your problems are so much bigger or more difficult really doesn't even make sense in it doesn't serve you to have that sort of perspective in that outlook on it. There are so many. Mental health struggles disabilities, special needs that people have where they would love to be in a position to have support groups all over the world where they know all they have to do is show up for free by the way. And their problem can be solved. I promise you people with major illness like cancer or COPD or Ms. They would love the opportunity to just walk into a support group and let people love and support them and have their illness become manageable and almost non-existent. Would love that. Opportunity. I bet people with chronic depression were some people with bipolar disorder schizophrenia. They would love to have a solution so simple that would manage all the symptoms. and. Allow them to live a comfortable and amazing life full of love and community and support. And just think about all of the you know autism all the hundreds of learning challenges and thousands of physical challenges. People get hurt and injured every day and it changes their lives for ever. I would be willing to bet all those people. would. Love to have a challenge where the solution was so straightforward. And required a little personal investment and energy and willingness. Instead of. A lifetime of pain and pharmaceuticals and declining quality of life. You see what I'm saying. As alcoholics, we paint this picture for ourselves that we're so unlucky that we have this thing that is so awful and terrible and Whoa is US feel bad for us because we can't drink alcohol. But when you put it in perspective. There are much bigger challenges you could be facing. And I promise you, you will have bigger challenges in your lifetime because it's just the nature of life life is challenging. Life is hard. I really want you to keep this in perspective. You can't drink alcohol. So what? You only care so much about alcohol because you have an unhealthy relationship with alcohol. Non Alcoholic people do not care about alcohol. They don't obsess over how will they ever have fun again if they don't drink, they don't obsess over not having a drink because their lives in their brains don't revolve around alcohol. There are thousands

Copd Bipolar Disorder
"autism" Discussed on Autism Spectrum Teacher

Autism Spectrum Teacher

04:44 min | 4 months ago

"autism" Discussed on Autism Spectrum Teacher

"A an autistic individual may not use the communication. And also. Have Challenges Understanding verbal communication. It might be that they have. That communication use the communication, but. No in a meaningful way, so for example. Saying phrases. The rows of context now. Let's dive deeper into this. The ton ECHOLALIA. Is often used to describe when a child repeats back. Something that's being said so if we think about their understanding of. Communication on that An ability to express communication. Perhaps it could mean that. Then, not too sure how to answer that question or understand that question all to use verbal communication in a way to. To. Express their meaning, so for example it might be that you've lost a child a question and they repeat the question back to you. It could be that. A child has remembered or learn to phrase that had been said to the previously so for example. I know a child who would say the phrase I like it. And, she didn't actually mean I like it. She learned that phrase from a previous time and had used it to try to tell. That said that she didn't want to do something now. That's a good example of. Communication and language being used in a way that was meaningful to her. She had learned the phrase. I like it. But the meaning behind. It was very different to what she was saying so this is really important to remember because it could be. The child is saying a phrase. It could be in the right context, but actually has a different meaning because of their challenges with expressive language, and actually this is a really important point to say that when we all teaching and modeling. Questions on language that we modal. Responses! To questions, because often is quite natural for us to say the question and say Gee, want this or this. We also need to muddle the onset as well so say for example. I want the drink. Now. This will be explained more so in the module. Help me communicate. This is just really thinking about those challenges, all expressive and receptive communication and thinking about the ways a child might use communication to express themselves. Another example is a child learning phrases from maybe one of their favourite TV shows thinking of a child who uses EPA pick phrases very often, and quite often they are in the right context for example, using a phrase with the word would Toyota when he's in the toilet. The phrase is. necessarily. Repainted in the sense that he'll use the same phases in the same. Context and in response to answers so. That's an example of using phrases in a way that was meaningful to him and he'd love them through watching his favorite shy. And this can be quite coleman. Sometimes you might have had children using phrases that they had heard. And they may be in the right context, they may not be sometimes. We have to really observed. Children's to know what they mean from what they're saying. If. You'd like to learn more C. Talking Abou lots more in terms of understanding autism and learning. Download, the resources take part in the reflections asks them please visit. The website causes autism spectrum teach dot com, the causes of flexible. You can do it in your own time, and when you complete it..

Gee Toyota EPA coleman
"autism" Discussed on Autism Spectrum Teacher

Autism Spectrum Teacher

01:37 min | 4 months ago

"autism" Discussed on Autism Spectrum Teacher

"Landing. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> And here's your <Speech_Music_Female> host. My favorite <Speech_Female> teacher jaw <Laughter> staff. <Speech_Music_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> Going <Speech_Female> to fight console, <Speech_Female> autism and <Speech_Female> social communication <Speech_Female> interaction. <Speech_Female> So <Speech_Female> if we think about communication. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> We can break <Speech_Music_Female> it down to <Speech_Music_Female> the expressive <Speech_Female> part <Speech_Female> of Communication, <Speech_Female> so how <Silence> we? <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> Give <Speech_Female> a communication <Speech_Female> message to somebody <Speech_Female> else and express <Speech_Female> it, <Speech_Female> and then we have <Speech_Female> the receptive <Speech_Female> part of communication, <Speech_Female> which is <Speech_Female> undestanding <Speech_Female> I'm receiving <Speech_Female> that <Speech_Female> communication message <Speech_Female> from somebody <Speech_Music_Female> else <Speech_Female> say that undestanding <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> off <Silence> communication. <Silence> <Speech_Female> Now it may <Speech_Female> be. The autistic <Speech_Female> individuals have <Speech_Female> challenges <Speech_Female> with <Speech_Female> receptive <Speech_Female> and expressive <Speech_Female> communication <Speech_Female> may be that they <Speech_Female> also have challenges <Speech_Female> with perceptive <Speech_Female> communication. <Speech_Female> Now <Speech_Female> let's think about <Speech_Female> if we <Speech_Female> further breakdown <Speech_Female> expressive <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> and <Speech_Female> receptive communication <Speech_Male> because <Silence> within bud. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> With Galt, <Speech_Female> verbal communication <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> and nonverbal <Speech_Female> communication <Silence> so. <Speech_Female> Using <Speech_Female> the nonverbal <Speech_Female> communication <Speech_Female> in a meaningful <Speech_Female> way and <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Understanding <Silence> receiving <Speech_Female> verbal communication <Speech_Female> known, <Silence> Rabbi Communication. <Speech_Music_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> And <Speech_Music_Female> it could be <Speech_Female>

"autism" Discussed on Autism Spectrum Teacher

Autism Spectrum Teacher

03:35 min | 4 months ago

"autism" Discussed on Autism Spectrum Teacher

"Now this episode and the next seven Polka step sites are going to sound very different to previous episodes in the fact that they will be a lot shorter, and it will just be May and there is a theme that's going to be running through this and the next seven podcast, and that is that I'm very pleased and proud to announce the I released a series of online training courses, which gives a lot of concise and digestible information as what is practical strategies and how to apply these in real day life. There's a lot of information out there I've designed these courses to give you. The key information how to do different types of strategies in order so that you can go away and apply them straight away especially because we know how personalized strategies. Tailored strategies are really needed because every child is so different, so this is my way right now to be able to support. Teachers Teacher Sister Sankoh's parents, carers, anyone who is supporting an autistic child and eight courses are all based around different themes, so this Polka sets sight and the next seven episodes I'm going to introduce each course, but of course I want to give you. Value wants to give you free information, so you're going to hear snapshots from the training to give you some information, so you can still listen and hopefully take something from it, and of course if you. You want to learn more than I'm GonNa be directing you to the site. Courses Dot autism spectrum teach dot com where the course is being hosted. I've been working really hard on these courses making sure that they provide really beneficial information in bite sized presentations. What has reflection tasks to help you think about those individuals children around you and their own pass. NO APPENDICES NEEDS AFTER I've gone through this transition period. We'll get back into those meaty juicy. Episodes where there's interviews and lots of information. But bear with me while I'm going through this transition period, it's difficult time for all of us I know, but as much as it's a difficult time. I know the support is even more so needed so I really wants to get this information to the people that need it the moist. The first course I'm going to present to you and also play you five minutes. Snapshots is cooled understanding autism a learning, and it's all about that background information about autism, really understanding those key areas of difference of challenge that autistic individuals may face, and therefore what we need to do, or what we can do to support to help to adapt ourselves to adapt the environment to really meet the needs of autism, individuals and everybody. In fact, one of the testimonials from the course already has said everybody should know this information and I completely agree everybody should know. Good background on the standing about autism, so that we know how to effectively help and support. Here's a snapshot from the Coast Understanding Autism and.

Coast Understanding Autism Sister Sankoh
"autism" Discussed on Autism Spectrum Teacher

Autism Spectrum Teacher

02:42 min | 4 months ago

"autism" Discussed on Autism Spectrum Teacher

"I. Don't know how to describe it been absolutely crazy been very strange, been difficult been challenging. There's been highs has been lows, but fundamentally. Fundamentally. Things have changed things at different things are uncertain and I know that we've all had all own experience on our journey. And our own challenges. So I hope you and your loved ones a safe and well. If you have your own children. I hope that you are all in one piece and you have managed to have some kind of quality time together. If you're a key worker, we love you. Thank you Paris. We love you teaches. We love you. Thank you to everybody and the main bottom line is a hope that you're well now. Things for myself and and spectrum teacher, which is myself. have been very challenging because like yourself or others you know. I was without any works so my work. Before the COVID, nineteen pandemic was in schools, supporting staff supporting families supporting Sankoh's teachers developing send provisions in practice, and of course then schools closed and unable to support the schools unable to support the families in the same way that I would have done before. Now of course we've all been managing the best that we kids and supporting from a distance and to a point that's helping some people. But, of course I wanted to do more, and essentially I needed to keep everything that autism spectrum teacher, and myself does all the projects this podcast and this is the reason why I've had to put on hold for the past couple of months because. It is fully funded by myself and without those means of ensuring. Stability for the PO- cost like kids and continue it however i. have some plans. I have things in motion I. Want to tell you what about that and tell you all about the future plans and. The adaptions we will hat so adapt right, and to be honest, I've been really pleased with how some of the children have adapted when we've sometimes, we really do fear the worst way. Of course there have been many challenges on a lot more challenges I would say, but we've got to stick to the positive here. There have been some children that have really surprised.

Sankoh Paris
"autism" Discussed on Autism Spectrum Teacher

Autism Spectrum Teacher

17:02 min | 7 months ago

"autism" Discussed on Autism Spectrum Teacher

"You find the peaceful on his yours. My favorite teacher staff. I I think I think this is live saw. I'll I'll start festival. My name is Jeffrey. I am an autism specialist teacher and consultant and firstly. What a wonderful group. Well done toward the admins fantastic support and everyone being involved with clearly living in some very difficult and unpredictable. Times just to give a quick introduction. I'm set free and I was born in Jersey. I GREW UP IN JERSEY. I now live in London and my background is teaching mainstream teaching in autism specialist schools. And also I've been especially coordinators. Were Sankoh and who side. I developed a program for outreach support so supporting schools to develop that autism practice and I've been invoked instruments national projects as well so developing an autism education program in Amman in Moscow. Right so yeah I was as I was saying. We're living in some really difficult and unpredictable times and of course it's really challenging for all of us but especially those who additional needs and of course everyone's situation is different. Everyone's needs a different. Everyone's family is different. Therefore we've got to really think about all circumstances on what's manageable for for us in the situation that we have some people have more access to more space than others so yeah really thinking about i. Guess what I'm saying. Is We want to get stressed because stress for the family stress for the parents will only makes the children's stressed. I learned this very quickly in my career. I tall of children with very high sensory needs. Hi Communication needs and you know I could sense or I could tell you know if I was feeling relaxed and confident I could see the you know. The children felt safe around around me. If I was not feeling you know. Maybe there was a day that I wasn't feeling myself you know I could see from. I'm thinking of one child in particular he would be. That would make him anxious. Now we've got to think about I. No it's very very difficult and very challenging circumstances but if we can be calm ourselves that's going to have a big impact on the children. Firstly as it's really important to mention that you know for a lot of our children young people adults they can have a lot of professionals involved and you know of course use all of the information you have in terms of supporting them at home. Some families have so much paperwork in terms of advice for professionals. But you know go back through it use it. The there'll be some things that maybe can implement at home. Just I've mentioned like that's really important because everyone's needs again is so different and going back to being. You know being calm and having a sense of calm at her there are Maybe some things that that can be can be implemented for example may be doing some calming activities together now and when we think about it about calming activities you can always look at calming activities on one end of the spectrum and then you have alerting activities which are those things that make us really energized and lots of movement and we can support children sensory needs by using these different types of activities and it might be helpful to think about times in the day that you have maybe some calming activities. That could be listening to some really Calming Music. Or maybe it's doing some some massage on the hands with some cream or maybe it's reading a book it depends on on the child or or your family were awesome calming activities. That you can implement. During the day it could be multiple times a day. You not to support the regulation of the child and have that calm time and likewise is to think about other times in the day where we can make sure. We have some movement and some and some active awakening activities. Maybe that's doing doing a youtube exercise videos. There's loads there's absolutely loads a free to watch us all really great children's Yoga movements while I can Post the link to that as well after new. Write that down so times in the day. Were we're doing some movements and times in the day? Why we're doing some calming activities. What's going to be really really important for everybody? Especially those of additional needs is having a structure to the day or having some routine so as I mentioned we. You know we can have some times in the day where we're doing some khar-ming activities. Sometimes in the day were doing some Alerting movement activities things like you know. Maybe it's even rolling a ball to each other or doing some star if we can make a predictable or kind of consistent routine this conversely help the children to become familiar with something that's going to happen. For example. School is incredibly structured and incredibly routine based if we can not not do not try and do a whole school routine at high. It's it's not and it's going to be very stressful. Of course let me just say hey your schools and your teachers of course will have given you the information to support your your child with learning this thinking about the actual routine and how it's implemented is really going to help the child to understand what's coming next so if we can implement something that's maybe follows a similar pattern each day. So we're breaking up the tasks and way going to provide some some clear routine so let me give you an example. There was a parent the asked a question before about supporting child to focus on some learning tasks at high it was mentioned about implementing a visual structure in the environment. So it making it really clear to the child that this is where we're going to do some some work awesome learning and making it really clear that we're doing activities and these are going to be in. Maybe an book says or they're in Wallets. And when you look at that in the environment so for example visit desk or table having that space and implementing a visual structure so that the child comes familiar that this is going to be a space where. I'm going to be doing some learning activities having said that it doesn't mean that that's the only space that you can do the learning activities and I want to stress the importance of practical learning. And there's lots of opportunities at home where we can implement parts. Of course it really depends on the learning objectives and learning outcomes specifically for your child so it could be that. Let's take counting. Maybe they're doing some Counting activities provided by a school. Or your all your teacher. Spoken about some counseling activities and then to support the child to to generalize learning it'd be great to do some Practical activities maybe. It's counting the plates on the table. Counting the the cloves. Maybe it's going to be something. Maybe it's a turn taking activity and doing some time taking. Maybe there's going to be other opportunities throughout the day were turns aching can take place maybe with siblings or going back to what. I was saying before about that routine being so important. Maybe it's doing a turn taking activity at the same time every day and so be afraid to to repeat activities over Pete things that you're doing. Globally that gives us gives an opportunity for the child to become more familiar. More settled with doing something. Especially because it's it's new. We're doing this doing some learning at high and also gives the opportunity for the child to maybe do it with less support the next time you do it or maybe it's going to be yet doing it more than they might be able to do it. More independently please ask any questions. I'll try and help as much as I can but let me just go back over the points that I was making. His thing is good just to think about things that could be helpful in how they could be implemented because our situation right now is just so different that I've seen a lot of families getting very stressed. And this is obviously one of my biggest concerns. Do what's manageable so it might be that you off with if we thinking about The home learning. Maybe you you could just start off with doing one thing or one learning activity and maybe after a couple of days you could build up to doing to maybe after a couple of days build it up to three what will really help alongside this. And you may already do this. You may have seen this at school is presenting this in a way that it's like a visual structure. What we want to do. Try to help the child to understand. Exactly what is it is going to happen. And what's what's expected in that session and when it's going to end because this can be it can cause a lot of anxiety and support with all of those things that can help to have a visual structure. Which could be you know just roaring during the different things on a piece of paper. Maybe it's finding some pictures From Google of the different activities. So let's just just think about some of those things that I've just mentioned before so it say. For example a few is setting up a routine to implement some calming activities some learning activities and some kind of awakening alerting activities. Maybe you want to have a visual structure. That looks like maybe it starts off with massage. So you have a picture of if you have access to using using the Internet. You can google up a picture of massaging hand. Maybe WanNa take a photo of you doing it with the child. Maybe he just wanted to draw rights so you could have. That then maybe. The first learning activity is Reading a book Sakaba Book. Maybe the next one is counting counting pitcher and there may be. You're going to finish off with doing some rolling the ball to each other last just an example but it in pictures you know you have the images some symbols but to show you the child in a way that's going to be meaningful to them. Some some children may you know may look at a symbol and not get much meaning from it but they might get more meaning from an actual photo. So maybe. What's take a photo of a make. Timetable Hagen. Any tips for an artistic seven year old. Who now leave the house at all. And do you have any idea why your seven year old doesn't want to leave? The House. Is it due anxiety around? The situation is around the understanding of the situation that this is the thing I guess if we can understand the reasons behind a specific behavior or if a child is doing something and sometimes we can can work out straight away. Why they're doing something you know. We're recognizing that as a form of of communication and understanding okay. So that child is doing that that can help us to think about how to help and support for example if it is going to be because it's it's a very different difficult situation to understand because it is so unpredictable. Now they're awesome really good social stories one when I just held up before I'm GonNa send right so if I put a link in here. This is Sheffield. Nhs they've done some really really good free resources. The are acceptable to children of calls. It depends on on on your child's needs. Let me this link here. There's some really good resources to help children who try to understand situation and the the reasons why we're having to stay at home how we can help ourselves. I'm just wondering whether teague in the is the reason you fink. Due to to that anxiety of of of the unknown I would highly recommend the stories on that link and talking about it. If if if your child can in a way that your child can understand. It's as I mentioned earlier. It's it's the way that we are going to wear really anxious and showing that that could also make every body or the children also feel anxious about that. So it's it's very difficult but it's also recognizing is there something that we could help to make ourselves feel calm in such a uncertain situation? I don't know whether that was helpful. Teagan but any I'm trying to think of this Some Some other resources if you child is used to using symbols at school which it Free access to the online program which is really good because quite often it can help.

Jersey Google consultant Sankoh Jeffrey London Sheffield Nhs Amman teague Teagan Pete Moscow
"autism" Discussed on Autism Spectrum Teacher

Autism Spectrum Teacher

02:49 min | 8 months ago

"autism" Discussed on Autism Spectrum Teacher

"Perhaps it's a science lesson where you're doing a really exciting experiments about difference using different materials. And maybe it's choosing which color to us or maybe it's having a choice. Sport of the materials being used in the science experiment and that child choosing which resources to use of course all of these different strategies need to be tailored to the needs of the child. It may be. The child doesn't recognize symbols for example and a object is going to have much more meaning to them so making a choice between two objects is going to make more sense to them than than being offered to symbols. So it's all about thinking. What is that child understanding from that choice or from this method of communication and providing them with the best opportunities to take part in interactions and communication. Maybe this pocus episode has sprung some ideas into your minds oil. Think Oh maybe I can give that a try or maybe I should try this. Write it down. Don't forget to write it down because if anything like me and you probably are. I think we all are. We will forget and if we just write that one thing down. Think about how how you'll be able to do it. What resources your needs and then just give a guy? Implementer see if it is enhancing those opportunities for communication. Now I always love to hear from you from the listeners. So please get in touch with me. My email is Steph at autism spectrum teacher DOT COM. We also have a facebook group where we were always talking about. Lots of different. Teaching ideas is code autism and inclusive teaching ideas. So come and join. Come and take part in the conversation. You can find on social media at autism spectrum teacher on facebook and instagram and on linked in and twitter. I am at Steph. Read A S T. If you'd like to hear more about the training workshops the outreach support and coaching that I provide two teachers to provide them with support for the needs in their class so for example through observations through coaching sessions with the teacher was teaching assistance with the whole team. I'm.

Steph facebook twitter instagram
"autism" Discussed on Autism Spectrum Teacher

Autism Spectrum Teacher

07:06 min | 9 months ago

"autism" Discussed on Autism Spectrum Teacher

"With your child Them as long as you can as long as you can't beyond the junior rem unite into the middle phases of school. And that would be something that is interested in Dinosaurs thank wouldn't cope with themselves but radi does give an opportunity to spend that time to give up a little bit of snuggle time with the parents can only just manifest that love of reading and continued to keep them interested in books. Even if it's something that is A challenge for them in the school environment united to have that one on one time. We you reading something that you really enjoy not interested in And and we say it doesn't have to be something that they are reading themselves but broke into Sel to to a child It just keeps love of reading along. Aw Yeah no that's really important especially to see your parents enjoying reading as well already. That's going to spark and interest from. I'm from children. I wonder if you have any success stories you could share. I really love to hear about you. Know when things go really well Maybe it's a specific child or a group of children or something that something that's worked pretty. Well we we have. We do a specially around Sellafield intervention Where we have parents coming in with children you joined went to lead and honestly task is difficult? They're not going to want to do it so we you know. We put children through the interventional with with him in the remedial environment. And we've had feedback from parents. When childhood wit with headed convergence issue so she had official pricing delicacy and she waited individual therapy but because of the visual processing difficulty? She had wanted to read those she was on reading age and remain. He just wanted to bring the older tree individuals individuals given we put her through the Southfield Intervention She was one of my favorite silcon sexually and who mum fight me a couple of weeks after the the socal treatments and to me I just had to share with you that I was walking down the passage law smacks US undock. Tate at posture remain as dominic book until fat. Latin says. Stick back into the passage echoed. Armagh good news. Is that Radi. The child all that. I just said those words. She was a child who had never wanted to read. And what a sudden she because it was not something that was easier for her she just developed developed this love of reading and discover the world of books came a little book Quim And she went on to you to study Manson actually Hands from childhood was struggling with reading to have this big academic Korea. Something quite remarkable and and Just to to show children. That can be something that they can overcome and something that can be used as a tool for them. You know reading Kasumi. Children isn't obstacle coal. The imaging any as opposed to something that should be easy and something that shape they should be able to use to And Yeah we we've got a couple of stories like that but that one really is very special to me because I shoulder become my children With the children that you work with the radio take his struggles on board to to give that kind of feedback. Yes especially sleep when you see the impact that it has on their life you know to hear that. She went onto to study medicine. That's yeah that's brilliant the impacts being able to to read and want to read Andrew before we finish It's been so great to speak to you new sets. Let's you've given so many tips here Tips and advice yeah. Is there anything else that you'd like to share with. The parents or teachers are listening. That may I. If they're they're they have a child who's perhaps learning to read or having reading difficulties there is. Is that something thing that you would like to say to them. That would be the first thing they try or any advice or a takeaway from this conversation. I think it it. You know a child can succeed. I think that's important to me. Just keep in mind that every child is different and they can't succeed eight domestic what they do is gave the supported. She need Get the assessments done. The as with the schools. I'm and radio as much as possible. Try and keep that chance confidence and self esteem intact because we see people that are successful in all black with whatever difficulties they have so. I think we have to keep that as as a big picture on the way that we can work through this The is a lot of support report and it can be done. Yeah brilliant thank you so much thank you with you. Yes Nj and Yeah left the Catch view again in the future and left to let me know when you're coming to London. He will be well well. I hope you enjoy that conversation with Angela. Charalambous from the workshop reading Sensei in Johannesburg lots of strategies there to help our readers be more confident faded and support them sit enjoy reading. He can find more information about this site on the podcast page on the website autism spectrum teach dot come. You can find me on social media on facebook and Instagram at autism spectrum. Teach our Switzerland then at Steph read. Ast Ast also come join our facebook group autism and inclusive teaching it is where we're supporting each other sharing information strategies good tips. Oh come and ask a question I would really appreciate and love to know what you think about the podcast. So if you can leave a review on the podcast platform platform for example on apple costs this would be so helpful to Maye anno side of the people who are looking for this type of information and help them to find. Find it if you haven't already subscribe to this podcast in your chosen. pocos platform such apple. PODCASTS spotify Google the android and then you get the next episodes sent straight to your device. If you'd like to find out more information about how I could support you your family or your school or service. Fees semi an email to Steph at autism spectrum. TEACHER DOT COM. I K- enjoy the rest of your day. Hey an I was beach in the next episodes. Take Care bye-bye..

apple Steph radi Southfield official Armagh Johannesburg Korea spotify US Tate London Manson Switzerland facebook Andrew dominic socal Angela
"autism" Discussed on Autism Spectrum Teacher

Autism Spectrum Teacher

09:29 min | 9 months ago

"autism" Discussed on Autism Spectrum Teacher

"About sharing sharing information and practical advice related to the teaching and learning of autistic on neuro diverse learners. Now good autism practice. This is good practice for everyone. Today's special guest is Angela. Chara Landis who's reading specialist at the Workshop Reading Center in Johannesburg South Africa. Angela gives some really good advice about supporting children. Who are having reading difficulties and Nisa advice isn't just great for autistic children but a lot of different learn is so if you're thinking about helping and supporting a child in your life life who's perhaps having some difficulties with reading? There is lots of great information coming up. This is also a particularly personal subject for me I I am dyslexic and have experienced reading difficulties throughout my education. And still do now so there are different strategies. The I have myself to help me as a reader data so I hope you've enjoyed this conversation with reading specialist undulate charalambous. Here comes the Android on his your favourite teacher staff Angela. Thank you so much for joining me on the PODCAST. Now you run the workshop reading sensor in Johannesburg. I'd love to hear how you're helping children with reading difficulties difficulties show. Thanks for having me. We based yes in hemispheric and FAC- came we work with children with with renamed the vacancies in the areas that we kept our gang assessments for children that struggle we do dyslexia screening tests as will oh that mandate in anything that follows on from that for mediation with goal tended. Intervention from Australia would sell field which works with the way that the brain processes information attention during reading. Have some lovely improvements with that intervention. It's other method. Instruction reading but it's insulated A program way children will on computer and it works with the way that the brain processes information for reading and they having come out of that we we ran us that parents and teachers also need support with children with difficulties and that lead to the the development of various workshops that we run for children comprehension influential skills that type of thing and for parents as wet as teaches this ends. Do you support many logistic children. We'd save need whipped central That functioning And I think just you're in the in the costume environmentally. We really need to be ensuring that on teachers have the tools to be able to support children. What if the tea is? Yeah and I think you're not trying to find a statistic of walked percentage of autistic children from have reading difficulties and the information that I found very from what intend to full intention children with autism having reading difficulties. So I don't put my head on the block and say the you know percentages but certainly if I if I look at skills the classroom environment way teach can do things to us. Children that are not near as vehicle. things like making learning multi sensory. He's an audiovisual information. I'm flash pictures and things like that in allowing children to she presents in a different format maybe in a powerpoint presentation as opposed to being a pricing on nine to work in the area of interest radiologist m accommodating children in ways that they need a lot of children with with that are very a lot of sensory issues whether they artistic or not we need to accommodate them in across from by making sure that be sensitive took to whatever song is in the environment and we want him to be relaxed uncomfortable in that learning environment in the way that we are teaching children with difficulties by breaking up releases into manageable tracks revising. What's been doing what's been done before? Unfold giving an account of wavy going so just making sure that the child is comfortable of way we being Going James of listen cannons on and Starting Eighty Direction explicit instruction breaking up instructions into manageable chunks. All of those things I think we we need to do with with children. That struggle was learning would be relevant four to six children as well. Yeah Yeah and everything. Can you just said that would help all children. Yeah ooh although strategies that you know I'm really make loaning visual multi sensory and and like you said breaking down tasks into into manageable chunks and revisiting learning. Yes they can help all children and I'm I quite often have conversations with teachers and headteachers and talking about how good autism practice on good inclusive practice is good practice for children processing agreed he really is And thank you know they statement the into sake of children with Winstons attention difficulties to some you know. So Instance Instance Saints repricing. Malcolm's on social skills could be an interesting for both of those areas so I think we just really need to be educating and supporting teachers so that they can support children and I think that worldwide is is something that needs to be done. Yeah Yeah just say that we can make teaches away. Bet Child has reading because he doesn't like the region law in costume situation so that we really can accommodate children Rita schooling system as state with confidence a Mesa esteem as intact as possible. Yes definitely I can really relate to that I'm dyslexic. And when I was at school I was filled with so much anxiety and dread if I knew that I was going to have to read out loud or if the teacher just randomly pick somebody so. That's something that I don't do in my own teaching practice when we're thinking about children with reading difficulties he's boosting. Confidence is important some strategies that help me as a reader because to me text. Looks like it's vibrating. Thanks I bright lights really. Don't help and a color filter all colored overlay over a page or screen can make reading a bit more comfortable. What exact? It's such a simple thing. Any put on urban onto a whack page and and if that's going to assist the child it's such a simple little tool not used to make him more comfortable with reading. Yeah we need to just be saints. took to all of those things again coming down just awareness on off from the appearance on the teacher to speak to those tune. What tools can be used in the classroom just to to accommodate children? Yeah and I really liked what you said about using the child's interests because especially for young children to try and engage them in reading when they've got something about their favorite characters or they're you know they love cars or they they they love superheroes having a book about that is already going to capture the their interests no matter what their needs are serum. Yes it's really important to us and harness those interests interests absolutely. We want to maintain a love of reading even for children that struggle with reading we recommend reading from three three different areas so reading really easy material which Bruce Confidence Comic Book or reading a simple book to a younger sibling or something like that that is below h label. Something that they cooperating. Well that's really does boost confidence and give them that feeling of irate already can do this reading at age appropriate levels. A school reno was something where they cope with most of material but the on new words they push semi little bit so that they grow had a skill develops and main reading at a difficult so when about age label Maccabi. Something as you said that is an area of interest and it may be a book that is difficult And I would say to parents continuing.

Workshop Reading Center Angela Johannesburg Chara Landis South Africa Nisa reno FAC Australia Winstons Bruce Malcolm
"autism" Discussed on Autism Spectrum Teacher

Autism Spectrum Teacher

06:58 min | 9 months ago

"autism" Discussed on Autism Spectrum Teacher

"Here's your host like favorite teacher staff free. Well thank you. Jane and Helen Feel Time. Today it's really appreciated and be really interesting to talk about the evidence base guide to anxiety and autism and I mean this guy is really informative and it really gives clear explanations of current understanding over in autism as well as what potential causes of anxiety could be and also strategies that can help individuals managing Zaidi but a link to guide and the show notes and BA firstly Jane and had them before we we talk about the guide. What is your experience in autism on your current roles? Okay so my. I came into to the world of autism rarely because I was teaching in a primary school and It appeared that there were more children having social communication difficulties and also taught couple of children who had a diagnosis of autism. So I had. I became fascinated by it really which led me to end up applying to join the autism and social communication indication team eleven years ago and and then we as part of the role I studied at the University of Birmingham Distance. Course for yeah so And then it's been my pleasure to lead the team for the last eight. Yes and so. The experience really is just the hands on experience within schools and then sport in children that we do now cross county not slightly different routes in So I worked in corporate world. I'm became pregnant with my first child and my very last job was to go to the National Society heavily pregnant I pick up a brief from them and while I sat in reception I sat there thinking thinking about autism thing. I wonder what it's all about two years later. The baby's been carrying was diagnosed with autism at two years old And it's been a journey for me ever since he's going to be eighteen in a couple of months so he took me on a journey. I did reverse older As a parent obviously interested became more and more interested in autism. So I took the distance learning from Birmingham and then became a Ta and then became a teacher. And then I landed where I call monitoring job to be working some of these individuals every day for six years. Now Oh that's great great to hear the different journeys and rates and okay so let's talk about the guide anxiety and autism. So how did this come about okay social so I met Dr Sebastian Gag. WHO's the doctor who has done the research that this is all? Based on at an event we were both presenting. I listened to his presentation and then he listened to us and afterwards we met and basically we said we must have some things we could do together because he was doing the theory on the one side and we were doing the practice on the and one of the tenants. Silence of our team is to recommend things that all based on evidence so this was a perfect opportunity to look at what the evidence was for the strategies that we were recommending ending. So that's where it started. So then it developed from there to Oscar tending an event of his talking with him and then he attended a copy. Spokane spoke conference of ours and then out of the natural evolution of that was to work together on this guide so the guide really gives a good good summary of what is commonly understood about anxiety in autism. It would be really great to hear a summary very of this. I found really helpful. In because I've I've shown this booklet to parents and teachers and to think about anxiety as separate from autism. Perhaps you think I think that is the key Lynch of the the guidance and it is that it is a separate entity yes. I think it's been very easy in the past but people just dismiss it and say well anxieties poverty. Some you have to learn to live with it. It isn't there may be some parts of your automatic condition that may be contributing to your anxiety. But it's a separate entity and we can work on anxiety. Exorbitant develop strategies make life much more comfortable for autistic individuals definitely from our assets of practice in in the county. That was good news for us to hear because we've always thought that was the case. But but it's really good that is being it'll cheer definitely for it to be really clear sky. I think that helps people's understanding I think also it's the fact that it can be difficult to identify that sometimes are just because it may present in quite unusual new way and that that might be part of it so for example if the guide it compares social anxiety and a new roof typical person and so they they worry about what people might be thinking about what they're doing that wouldn't be the case of how social anxiety present for an autistic person they would be. I am thinking more about what kind of barriers they need to overcome what they need to do next rouse them. What other people so it? Presents is quoted to inquire what differences same thing is both of those scenarios of social anxiety but they present quite differently in an autistic individual. And I think the difference is is that the typical where they're they're social anxiety comes from wanting to impress their mates and not making a fool of themselves. I I think the difference is and why possibly it's a higher level of anxiety and somebody with autism is because there is that level of panic of. I don't actually know what I can undo. I don't actually know how to overcome this builds and builds and builds and it is something that we try really hard with our schools is to them to see that some of the behaviors that they're commenting on to us the underlying thing. Obviously the autism awesome is related. Actually there is an anxiety there is so it's been helpful as well. So looking at the differences.

anxiety Jane University of Birmingham Dista Zaidi National Society Dr Sebastian Gag Spokane Birmingham Helen Ta Oscar Lynch
"autism" Discussed on Autism Spectrum Teacher

Autism Spectrum Teacher

09:39 min | 10 months ago

"autism" Discussed on Autism Spectrum Teacher

"Expectations on the part of the people supporting that child and that might simply Jesse too much they both. I would argue elements that can be really really useful for the child for the professionals for the family. That's about kind of taking what works sharing intimation and yet fixing on going back to the point that we again said before about making sure that whatever you are intervening with they will ever. You are supporting the child to change or to adapt is is actually appropriate functional. For that child I think on the side Daca doc night potentially I was thinking about Eilly intervention and specifically in the UK. I always worry that parents will access this this amazing resource that we have available to us. which is the Internet? And you'll get all of this information again as I was saying a rabbit hole. You have some people telling you this and other people telling putting you that but you'll also have just so much information and maybe you're informed to the point where you decide this intervention. This program is exactly what you need for your child. We need to be aware of the resources that we have available to us and it regional in the UK. So you might in one place and you would have certain programs available to you. Then you'd be different place in that wouldn't be available and these things can be really really suit per expensive expensive and time consuming and put huge amount of strain Oakton even distress and like the family environment. So think again. It goes back to what I was saying about these programs at great and they are evidence base. But it's taking what you kind of what works from those programs and applying it to your environment. You're Brian Context. And I'm maybe token European more incentive like the parent or the Guardian at that point but another link that I really would love if you could include adopted. Compensation is the nice guidelines which cover diagnosis will do some fool under a under nineteen. There's also adult version and the written By experts and I feel that many people know about them but a really fantastic guide about way. You should be looking at each stage. They pre dyke Mike Nicest. You have any consents though. I light some things that could direct you to go and seek advice from maybe a paediatrician or doctor and then they'll kind of fully in three stages of that process even into intervention price diagnosis. I really recommend just anyone interested in kind the fort is in the UK. And I went to check out thank you I completely agree. And I'll put a link in the show notes. Okay let's talk about an example who of an area of intervention that poses a question of whether there should actually be an intervention or not. So we've got a a child who is four years old recently been diagnosed with autism. Their parents are still coming to terms with the diagnosis named named occasions on the life that they had may be imagined for this trial. Also that ran lives is family something that they particularly finding finding difficult at the moment. Is that this child really likes to wave. Their arms in the air is a typical example of a stemming behavior so that yeah kind of thing okay. She's artistic bought. We just can't handle the fact that she's doing this and we want to stop doing this so then. Should there be an early intervention around that already intervention about Mata. Well how do you do that. Yes and this leads onto a much bigger theme think about acceptance and understanding and is there actually any issues here all the issues more to do with external factors and other people's opinions and views about how people should be behaving. I would like to explore the parents. What do they feel? The issues are here. Is it actually helping the child. How is the child feeling? They expressing themselves. Well is the function of the behavior and looking at this with the parents or carers one's a stand by why the child is doing why they are waving their arms is it because they the happy and excited they angry. They regulating themselves to try and stop the child from doing this then there could be other consequences consequences because this behavior will be having a function. Full that child so interesting because then it's almost like people mice described actual functional analysis switch switch. We wouldn't necessarily say was early intervention such in the doesn't directly target the child or any aspect of that behavior but functional analysis where you're trying understand. The function of here is kind of going back to our earlier conversation more all over support for like the professionals of the family. And it's it's almost like you're kind of still intervening in a way by showing them. This is why she's doing. This is the reason and so. That's again like kind of another way looking at early intervention is it doesn't necessarily have to be targeted at the child. I think that's kind of capturing something that's really important. Yeah early intervention specifically as with any intervention can also be targeted people around the child. Maybe yes definitely and research shows us that supporting parents have families with understanding needs and supporting areas such as communication play leads to better outcomes for children and also the same of supporting supporting teachers and educational settings. I actually completed a research project a couple of years ago which highlighted that when the knowledge edge of school staff was improved this leads to increase confidence of teachers and most importantly better outcomes for children and especially especially when we are perhaps working with a child. That isn't able to effectively express their needs and their wants and how they're feeling we saw. Aw The people the family the professionals we are the people that are trying to understand what is happening in that child world. How is that child feeling feeding and that is really important? Especially when you think about all responses to the child and how that's going to have an impact on them when you're present but then I think another aspect of this which is interesting specifically in terms of early intervention. She say generally we might be working with children who approvable or at least half substantial stunt communication difficulties so we have like the mental capacity. Act which was introduced to protect tsk adults. He might not necessarily know if they had the capacity to make a decision about something like say an interventional rather questions in the way they would live et Cetera so the mental capacity act was introduced to to protect these people and I think the key principles are basically that anything has to be done in the interests. If that person who said that all efforts have to be made to actually support that person to decide and fix really interests me especially in in context at intervention another key principle is even if you think that decision is unwise. That doesn't give you the right to make the decision on that. Aw How often do. We think that we're just wise it and say children and therefore we sort of decided that they shouldn't be playing with that because that's inappropriate. Actually David maybe expressed an interest in that. And I'm not saying him with them in danger but like if a child has a really strong interest in one particular toy and you think it's unwise but they have that toy with them too much because they might become overly dependent on it then. I feel like you'll you'll going against that principle which is basically that that this child is is selecting something and it's working for them and we kind of have to be empowering children as with as with anyone to to make it's decisions and yet the mental capacity yet obviously doesn't apply. I'm not saying either. The in necessarily ship because there's a degree of Karen responsibility ability that is needed. If you're discussing child but I think the principles really interesting to take into account again going back this conversation. What are we trying to make happen for this young person what we try to change what we're trying to develop yes? Most importantly everything must be done in the best interests of the child I owed and therefore the CO context needs to be considered maybe with the example of the toy it may be that parents and professionals does agree on a strategy to support the child to perhaps develop other interests or take part in some activities without that favorite favorite toy but again everything must be in the best interests of the child. And this is where it's also very important that there is a multidisciplinary approach. The impact of a range of professionals are specialists. In in those different areas speech and language therapists occupational thera `pests perhaps physiotherapists specialist teachers. Are you've got the impact of different people and most importantly the family I think the challenges.

UK child world Jesse Brian Context Mike Nicest Mata Karen David
"autism" Discussed on Mommies Tell All

Mommies Tell All

04:22 min | 1 year ago

"autism" Discussed on Mommies Tell All

"This is Jade this Carly. And this is mommy's tell all. Hey carli. How's it going? Oh, you know. It's always an adventure in my life. That's true. It's going good. I'm glad to be here. Again. This is episode five of mommy's. All yeah. That's exciting. Right. That is I feel like we're kind of get it into the group of things we have a really good episode for everybody. So I'm really excited about that. Yeah. Me too. We talked last week about how it is autism awareness month, and that we were going to be bringing on a guest to touch on autism. Because as Janai said last week, we don't know a lot about it. So we are so excited to learn. That's one thing that we wanted to do in this podcast is we want to you know, we wanna have fun girl chop. We we also want to bring light to. I mean, gosh, all the mommy topics out there. And this is one that that we definitely wanted to touch on. And we have a mommy on from our Facebook group named Jesse that we are. So. Excited to talk to her daughter has autism. Yeah. So a lot of you. If your listeners, you probably don't know. But we have a Facebook group for mommy's tell all, and it's about twenty two thousand women strong right now, which is awesome. It's a great place for moms to connect. But we had put out there that we were looking for a mom who has a child on the autism spectrum to come on. So they could share she could share her story and her child story and just share. What is really like? So we can we can understand a little bit more about I guess the challenges and the rewards of having a child who has autism. Yeah. So Jesse Errington is with us today. And she's been so wonderful to be so open and willing to share her story. She's just a regular mom. So I feel like we all can relate to her. She lives in Alabama. She's got the cutest. Exit and we're. Yeah. So we'll be chatting with her. And then also we wanted you guys to stay tuned. If you've been following us on our Instagram accounts, you've seen that we are launching jewelry line that is really near and dear to our hearts, and we're going to be talking about it after we talked to Jesse and giving you some inside details, and the inside scoop on what that's all about. So also, stay tuned for that. Because we're giving away things we haven't given away on our Instagram. I mean for this episode for autism awareness. We do eventually want to get on an expert because we'd love to hear about autism and the spectrum from somebody who has a professional opinion, and understanding and all that. But we really wanted to bring a mom on because we wanna have a variety of guests. We wanna bring celebrities on we wanna bring regular. Mom's on from our Facebook group or any of our listeners, and then we also want to bring experts, so we're just trying to bring you variety. And I feel like the more people we have on that have different. I guess point of use the more that we can actually learn from each other because when we start sharing our lives, you realize that we're not so different after all we all have something in common. And that's we have our own struggles. And we have our own joys. And we're all just human. We're all just trying our best to get through this life together. Right. Oh, yeah. This is what Jaden I chat about every single day. On the daily every hour on my gosh. This is what I'm struggling with this five minutes. But that's that's like. Podcast. Yeah. Totally. It's about all supporting each other through the struggles..

Jesse Errington Facebook autism carli Jade Janai Instagram Alabama five minutes
"autism" Discussed on All In The Mind

All In The Mind

04:08 min | 1 year ago

"autism" Discussed on All In The Mind

"Up, you a molded your parents knew and your school knew what it took to be, and it was gender to be a man and a man needed to be able to do certain things. I remember just how much pain I went through a terrible swimmer height the water trying to learn to swim. Because Heckert I be a man if I couldn't swim. And you know, what was grind up? It really hasn't met at all that much put on a life jacket and get on with life. So you've got this mold version versus the kid be themselves. But if you do that sickened approach at what point do you say this could bring themselves. Is key causing a lot of great. They're not coping window, intervene and help give them the skills. Now, if you ask me sort of philosophically where I stand I would say you don't try to change the child you try to give them the skills to be themselves, but to interact with the rest of the world philosophically, but it's a fine line. Tissot people often do not get jokes people with autism often have poor physical coordination or Tissot people who are at deception autistic people may repeat a phrase mechanically Tissot, people are poor at analogies. People with autism are poor at recognizing emotions. One of the techniques you use in the book to break down, some common meets stereotypes is you make I Ron statements written in italics like Auty stick people often don't get jokes people with autism often have poor physical coordination, or to seek people are poor deception to what extent do you believe that those myths are based on reality? And how important is it to break them down tremendously important to break them down. A particularly empathy move. There is this. If you say to people water, the number one characteristic of autism or the word that is included autism s burgers, and I can guarantee you that the most common so because so many times will be they don't had IMP. Athena, Elec empathy? Now, the empathy is one of the things that makes us human. So you are really on the path to the humanizing you'll sign they let a really intrinsic attribute of being a human being. I would say from all of my observation. That is absolutely untrue. And what we have mistaken is an inability or problem reading signals and so forth or communicating for a lack of empathy, and that is going to happen whenever you have different cultures different tribes. I mean, if I meet somebody out of a foreign culture, maybe I meet somebody who's mainland China. Who's never traveled? Am I gonna read what's going on in the history will probably not be inscrutable, probably not? And I think what happens with autism is. We have a group of people who find it had not to read each other necessarily, but to read neuro typicals who are in the majority, and the funny thing is funny is that we say we knew wrote to because I Magnin assumption about you that we neuro- typicals have just as much trouble. Understanding what's going on the autistic persons hate it. But it was like we did where are they coming from what's going on here? Heck, can they think that we are having exactly the same problem? Reciprocally problem that we accuse them of having and that's one of the places that the humid comes from because the book. Very funny and often you often the humid comes from highlighting the way in which neuro typical people those not on the autism spectrum savings. Absolutely. I didn't want any of the books to be from the outside looking in and saying look at this guy. Dawn doing weird stuff. Let's laugh at that. I wanted it to be in don's hid watching the world. Do weird stuff. Sometimes you realize that Donna's got it quote, unquote wrong. But a lot of the time. It's the euro typicals who are doing things that logically the number of people who come to me and said, you know, that standardized system of don's that's a lot of Simpson. That's why don't self. So are you wanting to get across the sense that Don head learned social skills and learn to modify his behavior throughout his life. And that's what he wants to pass onto Hudson. Look absolutely, even as we begin the Rosie result..

autism Don head IMP Auty China Ron Hudson Dawn Donna Simpson
"autism" Discussed on Autism Spectrum Teacher

Autism Spectrum Teacher

07:15 min | 1 year ago

"autism" Discussed on Autism Spectrum Teacher

"A completely different experience and through doing those observations on yourself being reflective when you watch those things back and think about okay well could I have done differently there. Actually I can see now that he's not engaged at all and it was because he wasn't engaged in its later those disruption in Alexei which may be actually made the lesson quite as good as it could have been Space despite his parents in Caras of say. You've got to do the same thing he since I'm going to take a step back and just thinking subjectively and just think to remove yourself from day to day stress and the emotional and just step back a K.. What do I want to change? Won't be will them to be able to save day will express little yes. I think sometimes is very hall to save reflect or think about change. When you're on the treadmill as like treadmill you call stop flack because they can certainly flying off the back of the treadmill but you have to create some gaps. Still poses is is a spice feeds Think to make a strategy to try this and then they give yourself self time to try it to see if it works to save fuel Child again peasants responding if it's going to help them And not just if not get cold in everyday being the same if every visit bloom there every day than that. You're either going to go on without problem every day. Oil At some point you have to take a step back. I'm not going on this. We've got to do something about out that I have. I mean I mean the big thing with a lot of parents food items of Fussy eaters and children awesome very restricted diet since the And I think that's a big emotional parents. As well as the parents of the students I work with who all very very fussy is. It can be difficult for the parents because they have concerns about that child's health some children don't inch by drink fluids also concerns about that in quite emotional testing for them. So yeah I would say try and give yourself time and space to step back and there's like commission as well can be ready hall. I think it can be very hard spoil things young children especially it's different different by different age groups present different sets of challenges as parents of a child with autism. Then let you'll save needs when the child's may be real for doesn't is not long had a diagnosis is. That's quite different for the needs of parents wants who Sixteen year old children. And give yourself said permission onsite. UK Decay for. Everything will be okay. Like life's hauled fretting mice people alone habits of children with severe disability. Give yourself permission for not to be. Okay say that. There's something here that we won't affect some positive change create a strategy and stick to it consisted late Half any work Mike my favorite thing to do with the children's intensive instruction which is just kind of engaging with them on ever level and initiate the interaction and then you following safe the direction which I think think is just like the most lovely white interact with children with autism and encourages that communication. And it helps you to get into. They will understand them so yeah I would say enjoy. Your children are are lovely Adam. Thank you very much. Thank you so much for being my my. I guess I really appreciate it. Appreciate everything he said and I think a lot of people can be learned from some really important points. So thank you for sharing good. Thank you for listening and go enjoy your children. Carlos the and that brings the conversation to a close. I really hope you found the episode interesting. Or you've taken something away from it. I absolutely agree with the last point at a made their about intensive interaction and interacting with children young people at their level and that's their level all of communications so for example if the child is non verbal interacting and joining in with them with their vocalisations or their actions and ensuring they are the ones that lead in that interaction. I'll put some links in the show notes to some further information about intensive of interaction as well as some links to some blog posts. I've written about implementing different emotional regulating strategies. I'll just quickly highlight some of. There's really important points that Adam just made including knowing your students really well understanding an observing and listening to what they are finding challenging and what areas of emotional regulation do we need to focus on to help and support them controlling any environmental factors that are having an impact and this comes hand-in-hand with sensory sensitivities is something to do with the noise always or the visual stimuli or the physical environment the can be changed and adopted in to help that student feel more comfortable being consistent in our approach and not changing too many things at once. Another important point was understanding the function of behavior. And why child might be behaving the way they are is causing or triggering them to be feeling this way and therefore behaving a certain way at a mentioned about implementing think functional communication support to help the children to communicate and express themselves. He also mentioned about teaching functional regulating eating strategies that can replace harmful strategies that perhaps the children have have developed so finding something that works for that particular child diode and to help them regulate which is going to be safer and less harmful to them..

Adam Caras Alexei flack UK Mike Carlos
"autism" Discussed on Autism Spectrum Teacher

Autism Spectrum Teacher

13:24 min | 1 year ago

"autism" Discussed on Autism Spectrum Teacher

"Language cognitive abilities very cognizant of ability range of needs Z.. And ability okay. So today's topic we're GONNA focus on emotional regulation so first of all. I guess to think about what exactly emotional regulation means. So how would you define an nationally. Well especially national regulation as a skill we all have varying degrees. It's not something. The thing that we are taught in schools mentioned something that we learn from parents and pays obviously this many reasons why CHILDREN YOUNG PEOPLE WITH AUTISM MAMA bill to regulate emotions in the way that you are right. Come about define it As your ability to keep you Gerald immediate surroundings acceptable to not not not not how things in your of your own small world causing distress or anxiety not say knowing knowing how to safely manage emotion. Yeah Yeah especially Crying when you're upset is away regulating your emotions So is if you want to go out full of save a Walker by cried sit. Help yourself calm down missiles the vessel aways regulating your emotions knowing for example. What you said about going to war maybe your you first of all need to identify how you feeling young? I'm feeling a bit Maybe side I went to think about make making me feel silently myself for world strategy. Am I think we can all empathize with what it's like to be to be disrupted for some things will be wrong You'll you'll will will your immediate of mood and you've not radio identified that feeling yourself yet so you don't really know what to do because you'll it just you'll having that emotion not manifest itself is not in people but I think most typical people when they do recognize how they're feeling they've got a tool kit of strategies to help them deal with emotion could just be asking asking someone if you're a bit of space till you're lanes. which if you think about the North cystic child in a school? If they don't have language they don't have the ability to say. Can you just just give me a little bit of spice please. They don't have one tool that they don't have immaculate an essay if we think about how old Things that you can do to regulate your emotions than a low of you'll save behavior and all the things that you do are or about regulating your emotions feeding side. It's about sharing yourself if you feeding worried about reassuring yourself if you're feeling nice and calm and hop is about sustaining nice in common. Happy feeling say we're all doing it all the time just to keep ourselves else on even keel is not just as if is not just to save a bringing yourself up when you're feeding down thing it still say a so when you're feeding Avis stimulated what you can do to to bring yourself Down I think everyone I mean the struggle sometimes if Getting on a busy train and the train stops at the station. The does Abe and someone has to rush onto the train before people get off. Then I use my regulation at that point. Quite rates The train so we'll do it all the time and I think when you you know an undescended how children with autism trying regulate themselves you can see in them all the time as well they all constantly and they it said because as the Along the time constant full than the anxiety navigates away for some some children. They are just kind of sometimes. That can these leaps regulation behaviors which two people died understand. That doing can look kind of strange. Not socially appropriate list of things that maybe you wouldn't want to take your child to the market because if they get upset Soleil stall regulating themselves in the way that they usually do. You know that someone's may be going to come in so someone's GonNa give you some Flight YOU'RE GONNA receive the understanding. Yeah and I guess for fourteen years like ourselves. I guess I've always looked At the area of emotional regulations as so important. Because like you said before if you're not regulated you're not gonNA be able to take part in a lesson for example you're not going to be able to to join in with the learning and therefore it's even more important to focus on learning and understanding some strategies to regulate reservations so in the classroom. What are awesome? Shush used to teach children how to regulate their emotions. It over well I mean everything in the With said nothing your students in knowing that profile and knowing what it looks like when they all trying to regulate their emotions in different ways because a meanwhile meanwhile child might be a sensory May Be lighting the nails of the skin around the the finger something for another student that might be a sign of very serious anxiety and distress in some save like the something is GonNa happen very soon. Intensive like a breakdown of their emotional their ability to save. Hold it together. So I think having doing your students is firstly K. tonight Signs looked like Kim -Ation Zoll things that the child is saying saying or doing when she know your student and if you leave of the same group of students coming to class every day and every day goes joins insist however one mice in common a well-regulated ready to take on some save. Like skilled. Participate ached in us a learning activity. The second thing always do is to just like to look at the classroom and see just if remove remove anything which is causing distress anxiety and not can pay almost anything. I mean for children. They don't have a clock on the wall. Maybe they can hear the taking of the second hand I guess we didn't knowing full them so removing things that like some of had students who just you just cannot have the window of history might been. Maybe because there's a sound outside they can head of people come all children will opposite. You need need like a soft area on the floor to like sit down with the children like to sit on the flow transmitted. Adopts the Riemann. The layout may be this. June doesn't like to sit anyway by students in your Rangers have seating formations. They are as if not doc class together. Say Yeah just three because I think the is easier to control environment than it is to you. Adapt to the behavior says. There's something in the room or the environment which is save triggering anxiety all the distress then just delays things as much as possible Z.. Outside With nothing students nine while the signs of that if it just regulation then secondly looking at the rear if you're going to be a number of everyday getting rid of everything is a possible source of if any if Arkansas have you any any particular examples that as something particular in the room that you've noticed taste like the time that's perhaps who was then to become this regulated. I made you aware of at the beginning. I think I think I think a lot of it is probably relates. Like sensory intolerances. Nate wellness is like lights being turned on and sometimes the rain is like dog that people coming DC. Well they're doing but the student will not let you down white on the windows. The Evan lots of things means So they can pick up on sometimes really tiny little a buzzing coming from from like a computer. I can kind of empathize because I've got quite high pitched hearing and sometimes I can hear if like a TV's off it listen to instill make him very high. Pitch Sound of Maine drives me crazy in other people can't hair will say full of as a AH young person with autism if that something that is driving them around the bend that they one else can radi hail interpreting. And then you've gotten way way of saying like like an hey. This noise is a radio. Annoying May Then you've got to try and zoom out or anything about it. Sometimes of China is a lot of trial and error. Yes which also comes with its own eh problems because of the say the children light said things to be consistent in the same and sometimes when you then I have a commission you gang food electron in our prices which means you're changing things all the time And I think sometimes it's just good good to if you've got us at a decent theory of maybe walks bothering this. June is than just let try a solution Rickett cricket period of time and tried to bed in June get used to it because when she got into the city of the routine of trump to swap walpin change things around. But try this and try that. Then there's no consistency for the students or on the go like a baseline of what to expect when they come in on Tuesday. You try and different things on Tuesday a for example. Those something happened. If you're walking to go swimming pool and one one in St Louis if like a bit of an incident with a dog will thing and the next week the students not want to walk by back that way because worried about the dog but then if you start looking at different route to swimming every time then someone else is going to get like seth I said I sometimes yeah I think it sometimes hauled today with trodden era if you own radio show while the.

AUTISM Rangers Gerald St Louis Walker Avis China Abe Soleil Kim Evan Arkansas seth DC Maine
"autism" Discussed on Autism Spectrum Teacher

Autism Spectrum Teacher

01:47 min | 1 year ago

"autism" Discussed on Autism Spectrum Teacher

"And here's your favorite teacher staff. Welcome to the second episode of the Autism Spectrum Teacher. podcast my name is Steph. Read and I'm an autism specialist teacher teacher and I provide outreach training coaching and consultancy to schools and services. And you can find me at. WWW DOT autism spectrum teach dot com the autism spectrum teacher focused is all about developing understanding of autism for having conversations with or individuals parents parents teachers service providers educational professionals and. I'm really excited about today's conversation with Adamson Demar all about emotional national regulation here. We Guy Adam. Thank you for joining me today. I really appreciate it. It's a pleasure to be here. Thank you so adam is as being. A friend is an experienced children with autism. And we saw by you just giving a background background of your experience the schools you've been teaching at should've say I've been working with children and young people with autism for the last ten years prior to that I worked in mainstream education During the ten years of worked with Peoples from all of key stages from key stage one up until post sixteen students Had some experience with the whole range across the spectrum from the children with sieve night language to you children with lots of.

"autism" Discussed on The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"autism" Discussed on The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

"Is the notion that some disorders may be a disorder of this predictive coding and the the threshold of the filter so specifically some people with autism autism is hard to talk about because it's not a homogeneous disorder heterogeneous right so it's a lot of different things that we call autism because they superficially very similar but there may not be identical in terms of the underlying neurological affects but with they're saying is some people with autism that maybe they have a disorder of their predictive coding so they don't know how in what to filter out or yeah mean yeah that seems like i've read things about how people with autism where everything is just about bombarding their senses and they and failed him and that's that's that's part of it they get sensory overload but happens to and people i turn their new census on like people who get cataracts removed or people who ho clear implants it's they describe it as noisy because their brain has learn how to filter but also that some people with autism really are obsessed with having very predictable unchanging environments yet and ridge like rigid in their food or yeah to watch judge wapner gotta watch the twelve ner everything's gotta be very predictable because their brain isn't doesn't have an ability to be there's an isn't dynamically or adaptively being able to predict their environments valley to keep everything exactly the same to reduce to help their filters.

autism
"autism" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

KNBR The Sports Leader

02:08 min | 3 years ago

"autism" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

"To the measles vaccine and autism and just to be completely clear in case there is any doubt in the room there was one study that supposedly showed a connection between the measles vaccine and autism but that study was debunked multiple times it was found to be fraudulent study some of the people who are involved that said he actually lost their licences and all the result of that has been is that is propagated misinformation to millions of people and they are people who may decisions and not to get vaccinated as a result of that now we shouldn't who designed mean that we should never our question science because we should we should be thoughtful we should ask ourselves is a quality of the data that we have good enough it's always the important question asks in the case of the measles vaccine the quality that data is incredibly high there are few things that have been more scientifically proven and supported than the lack of connection between the measles vaccine and autism so this is why it's important for us to see to know that we need to be soldiers in the war against misinformation each and every one of us i i went over surgeon general part of my responsibility was to get information of the public but i knew very well that they were many circumstances where the most effective messenger was not necessarily me but sometimes a person's best friend or their mother or their father or their wife or husband and sometimes their kid i end so each of us our someone's friend someone's my son or daughter in some cases you might be someone's mother or father and you had the ability to help educate and inform them and that's what we have to do we all have to be soldiers fighting for truth in this day and age because the were battling against is a a wave.

autism