30 Burst results for "atlassian"

Gitlab Courseware as Code with Ben Allison

Software Engineering Daily

03:00 min | Last month

Gitlab Courseware as Code with Ben Allison

"We haven't done very many shows about military and the software used in the military. Could you explain how software is used in the military and give get as an example of a piece of code that is used in the military? My particular experience I am a signed as a faculty member at the Army Cyber School House. So my experience with using getting. As a software development tool is primarily focused on that environment. Instead of the rest of the army are organizations that use different tool suites get being one get lab, Atlassian different Damore positions across Dod's different toll sweets. But the army cyber school, we use get lab and get primarily as a way to manage our curriculum. into the way that came to be prior to me arriving at the school around two, thousand, fifteen and sixteen timeframe the school I was created until fifteen in. So there are there are kind of the The for students creating tells fourteen excuse me at first students two, thousand, fifteen into. So they're kind of acting like a never meant to start culture. So they had the flexibility because they had such a torch short timeframe to. Build their their courses for the first students, which usually the army gives you three years they had less than a year. So they had the flexibility more or less the political flexibility to do what works and get things done rather than to wait bureaucratic systems of what may be in the past. They had a lot of opportunity to innovate in a way that might not otherwise be possible in a more established institution within the army. So for them they were looking at how can we manage course where the army traditionally has a three year cycle that updates at a very slow pace it's all using binary data formats such as we're documents powerpoint to get stored in a Web interface where the upload the documents in download them when you need to instruct and so for us, we wanted to be able to have more flexibility where we could manage course where in applying agile software development principles, and then also be able update in manage the course, the corser without having to go through the tedious process of using these other outdated systems designed for more a static types of curriculum that don't change very often. was a natural choice for those of US coming into the school house over background experience offered engineering. So I am at your centimeters haven't worked in the army in a development role personally, but many have in that influences the decision to use Gab. So for US instead of using a word documents, we use markup languages to track our curriculum, and then we use the CI pipelines to build that curriculum same. Thing with infrastructure code, use a different four-match for us at t templates an open stack pipe last play. So for us, that's that's the the framework for how we chose to use primarily because it was available and we had the freedom to do so because the organization organizations just being stood up in the leadership was willing to assume risk by allow us to innovate in ways that might not otherwise be possible.

Army Army Cyber School Army Cyber School House United States Faculty Member DOD
Gitlab Courseware as Code with Ben Allison

Software Engineering Daily

07:30 min | Last month

Gitlab Courseware as Code with Ben Allison

"We haven't done very many shows about military and the software used in the military. Could you explain how software is used in the military and give get as an example of a piece of code that is used in the military? My particular experience I am a signed as a faculty member at the Army Cyber Schoolhouse. So my experience with using getting. As a software development tool is primarily focused on that environment. Instead of the rest of the army are organizations that use different tool suites get being one get lab. Atlassian. Different Damore positions across Dod's different toll sweets. But the army cyber school, we use get lab and get primarily as a way to manage our curriculum. into the way that came to be prior to me arriving at the school around two, thousand, fifteen and sixteen timeframe the school I was created until fifteen in. So there are there are kind of the The for students creating tells fourteen excuse me at first students two, thousand, fifteen into. So they're kind of acting like a never to start culture. So they had the flexibility because they had such a torch short timeframe to build. Their their courses for the first students, which usually the army gives you three years they had less than a year. So they had the flexibility more or less the political flexibility to do what works and get things done rather than to wait bureaucratic systems of what may be in the past. They had a lot of opportunity to innovate in a way that might not otherwise be possible in a more established institution within the army. So for them they were looking at how can we manage course where the army traditionally has a three year cycle that updates at a very slow pace it's all using binary data formats such as we're documents powerpoint to get stored in a Web interface where the upload the documents in download them when you need to instruct and so for us, we wanted to be able to have more flexibility where we could manage course where in applying agile software development principles, and then also be able update and manage the course the corser without having to go through the tedious process of using these other outdated systems designed for more a static types of curriculum that don't change very often. was a natural choice for those of US coming into the school house over background experience offered engineering. So I am at your centimeters haven't worked in the army in a development role personally, but many have in that influences the decision to use Gab. So for US instead of using a word documents, we use markup languages to track our curriculum, and then we use the CI pipelines to build that curriculum same. Thing with infrastructure code use a different four-match for us at t templates an open stack pipe last play. So for us, that's that's the the framework for how we chose to use primarily because it was available and we had the freedom to do so because the organization organizations just being stood up in the leadership was willing to assume risk by allow us to innovate in ways that might not otherwise be possible. Core. Swear is a term that this conversation's going to focus on explain what the term course where means and how it applies to this conversation. Suddenly Army when they have curriculum development coursework can be affirmative. This way when you when you joined the army every, there's different specialties for different sexually you have armor would be people drive tanks. You've got infantry that people go and do the very stereotypical army infantry things. You've got field artillery they fire cannons have got aviators to fly helicopters and they've got things like signal or does communique shipment in the Cyber Branch Cyber Branch was created. Ciller Signal Corps signals more it. Cyber is more focused on using P centric art centric computing space to create offensive and defensive effects of. The army in the government department at large, and so what that really means for us at the school is we're developing courses to support soldiers coming into the army in the officers enlisted and warrant officers who need at the Technical Erie that supports all of the operational context. Racial context is all stuff that in the ranch they can't really talk about what they're doing or how they're applying the theory in some cases. But but for us, we are strictly worried about technical theory that underlying. All. Of the operational applications. So for us, it's Windows Fundamentals Lennox Demento is understanding operating systems in how they work. And then understanding networking, TCI than full stack of networking and understanding enough to apply it an insecurity concepts both from offensive and defensive perspective whether you're trying to defend offensive actor or you're on the offensive side, you need to understand all of that theory that goes behind exploitation out of defend attackers hide in so on and so for the school when they talk about course where they're talking about, for example, the cyber common technical core is a module. Every cohort whether the officers enlisted are required to attend ends up for them. This is the overview of operating systems networking insecurity into the course where is the facilitator guides that go to the instructors, the student guides that go to the students and then the. Is. Code that deploys interactive ranges for the students due to work on from the classrooms or in this case during in nineteen up from wherever they're working from a remote location of again. Okay. So you've mentioned course where you've mentioned get and you're talking about curriculum management technologies like powerpoint and Microsoft and PDF. These seem like separate worlds if you're talking about office management tools that's at a higher level than something that you would need to version control on. So what's the relationship between the version control stuff and the traditional office suite? Right so and the traditional army you would this is something if he's ever been to a government scores in the romantic government, you often new to course it's kind of the general stereotype is kind of have a pulse and you sit in class and you sit through powerpoint slides in answer some very canned questions at our checks learning. Then you move onto the next thing and nobody ever fails and it's not hard. You just exist you get through it and then you go to your unit you actually do your job Leonard, job your unit that's the stereotype of of how training is done in the army and that's Not always accurate of course is stereotype. So that's that's health in some cases it's Not, how the OSCE wants to involve improving but that's that's A. Character of of how could be in. So when people talk about office documents in the army, you'll death by powerpoint sometimes there's certain models that are designed such a way that the army says you are not alone about this and you sit in powerpoint and someone flipped through slides and you're done you do it for a certain length of time they briefed the sides you. In you're done to the school severance doesn't want to be slide driven. So instead of being slide driven in powerpoint, we instead are facilitation guides that are stored a markup. We can also do slides using or ask you doctor and revealed a technologies run through ask Dr, which is a tick, the markup language in spits out issue on the backside, and so we do sometimes use slides, but we're not trying to be centered on. powerpoint dead were trying to use this after vine principles to facilitate learning through hands on

Army Army Cyber Schoolhouse Army Cyber School Powerpoint Cyber Branch Cyber Branch United States Faculty Member Atlassian Osce DOD Ciller Signal Corps Leonard TCI Technical Erie Microsoft
"atlassian" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:40 min | 3 months ago

"atlassian" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Are cities or countries apart more about Atlassian's products at Atlassian dot com slash remote and we're back this is the take away and I'm tending a Vega Colin Dickey is a writer and the author of Ghostland and the unidentified and he recently wrote about the lack of national mourning over Colbert nineteen victims for the medium publication Jan it is PC talks about quote the trend away from morning toward revenge Colin thanks for coming on the show thanks for having me on so why do you think collective mourning has largely been absent in the United States so far in this moment I mean we're out a hundred and four thousand Americans last time I checked right I think there are two different things happening I think you have the singular failure of the trump administration which is unique to the current president's own self interest and kind of incapacity to feel empathy for others but I think you have a larger and longer history that's been going on in this country for the past twenty years I think in some sense ever since nine eleven which was the last time we had what you could say as a sort of communal national outpouring of grief over at a national tragedy and we have been moving more or less away from that and in peace I you know I I talked about the difference between nine eleven and hurricane Katrina with nine eleven it was possible to channel that grief into some kind of political action namely the war in Iraq and Afghanistan with hurricane Katrina the villains were less obvious and in some cases they were the federal and and state officials who fail to prepare for the catastrophe and that kind of grief was more likely going to be turned back against politicians and so politicians found it was better and simpler to simply deny that creep altogether the corona virus has affected black and Latino communities disproportionately here in this country but at the same time we're looking at a hundred four thousand if not more Americans of all races and backgrounds and ages how important is it to have a dedicated day to mourn this many American lives I think it's hugely important I think that we have not even begun to scratch the surface of what the psychological and emotional impact of a death count at this scale is going to do to this country mean obviously individual families have gone through you know immense pain but they have also in many ways been prevented from some of the normal rituals that we associate you know not being able to gather not being able to hug their loved ones not being able to hold funerals that is going to compound the trauma and that late in grief because it's it's lacked the traditional modes of expression and I think what we're going to find as we go forward is that that need can only be suppressed and repressed for so long and I really do think that it's incumbent upon us as a community to think about how we go about finding some way to collectivized this grief so we can make some kind of larger meaning out of the suffering for the benefit of all of us the president of the United States so far has not declared a formal national day of mourning leadership in many parts of the country have not formalized mourning for corona virus and covert nineteen victims the media however has tried to in some ways to fill the gap I'm wondering your thoughts on that do we need a formalized from the top down this day we will see you know pause to remember you know I think it's not exactly clear what the means is ultimately going to be and I think a good analogy to think about is the aids quilt you know the idea of a Cup of quilts representing you know a memorial was not something that existed prior to you know the aids crisis but it became a kind of testament in eighty unique and unexpected way and I think that both media and the population we're gonna be in some some sort of experimenting until we find that that thing that conveys something significant and and specific to the crisis that we're going to go through and I don't exactly know what it looks like and I don't know that any of us will know what it looks like until it appears and I think at that point we're going to seize on it and sort of say yes this this is what gives us a sense of solace during this time it's something that I think a lot of Americans are are looking for solace Colin Dickey is a writer and author of.

Atlassian
"atlassian" Discussed on Marketing Scoop Podcast

Marketing Scoop Podcast

06:08 min | 4 months ago

"atlassian" Discussed on Marketing Scoop Podcast

"If that's still a word but I think so that kind of the concept to keep it light into. Keep it approachable in order to do that. We've found a great partner in a company called shoot stuff who turns videos around in twenty four hours for editing. And they're all local editors that you can contact by phone if you want to talk to them directly so I think that connection was really key to making sure that the creative vision was still at the quality that we wanted and it wasn't just kind of tempted saying however we did create templates so all the videos have kind of the same graphics and Animation. So that we could cut as many videos as we needed with the same kind of cadence in that template library lives on. Now we use it all the time so there was a lot of up front work on the strategy just to get us to a place then. We could start to turn videos pretty quickly. The other thing that was really awesome. Was that shoot. Sta actually rents you these kits and then teaches you how to use the cameras in there like really high quality cameras in all of that and so basically put the power in the team to create the videos and it was like the scrappy startup type operation but it was really exciting because we were able to produce a lot of pre great content Muslim and just video at scale. What would be your personal three top tips for creating a high quality video at scale top tip number one. Have an awesome story to tell. The video is only as good as the content and the story. So I would say if you're going to create a bunch of videos. Make sure that you have something really great to say. I think like the ad hoc stuff where you just kind of like man on the interviewing somebody you know. It's really hard to control that. So what we did is we took our written content. That was really highly performing and we turned it into scripts that made sense for video. And that's just might advice for any content. Ever Mary of an Awesome Story to tell number two the templates. I think the templates are huge. So you want to have a creative vision for what the look and feel of your video is where somebody were to sit or stand how you want the kind of general feel of that video to be and then you keep that consistent throughout all the videos so then you can just rinse and repeat and we worked with our creative team to develop the actual motion graphics and that Motion Graphics Library took a long time but it was really really helpful. Once we had it and then number three I would say patients. It takes a while to prove strategy. Like this and you have to be creative about how you track it so you can't just publish a hundred videos at once like when you publish videos matters because you're publishing to your subscriber base the call to Action Matters. The thumbnail matters. Actually I shouldn't say patience. I should say agility as my third tip because you want to continue to operate on all of those things on all those aspects. Because then you'll get higher click rate a good combination of both and let's talk a little bit about how you guys are debt into the current climate. So it's obviously no secret. That might work is now the GNOME. It seems to be revolutionizing several companies but many teams at Atlassian have already been working remotely fees. Was your team one of them and tell us. What else has changed about your current workflow? Yes my team was one of them. So half of my team is located in Sydney and the other half is in San Francisco and then we have other teammates scattered around the globe. Like in Bangalore and we have folks in Austin Texas for example so even though we weren't one hundred percent remote we were still used to working in a semi remote world but the biggest changes that the people that I work with on a day-to-day basis. Were all CO located in San Francisco for the most part and we do a lot of strategy and brainstorming and white boarding and really face to face. Contact is is a big deal and one of the things that life was like at Atlassian before. Kovin was a lot of travel a lot of travel to Sydney. I went to Sydney twice this year already before it got shut down which means I was. There in January and February and not travel is because of the face face contacts between the teams and building those relationships which is just really really crucial so when we shut down the offices and everybody went remote we scrambled a little bit on. However we going to continue to build that relationship in that culture that you would get face to face and it's funny because we're seen as leaders in remote work and even at that moment we were like well we have to change. Thanks and luckily the team has been working and thinking about practices you know every single day and toxic customers about best practices and that's what we just fell back on. We just said okay. We'll we're going to really dig into our routines. We're going to refine the agile rituals that we know work and we're going to kind of fall back on that as our way of of making sure that we can continue to be productive so. I was really thankful that we had that kind of internal knowledge. You didn't have to train anybody to know what that meant. And we just really dug into it and yeah it's been really interesting to say the dimension. Yeah you mentioned a million on different time zones just then and coming from Sydney myself and working in London and then dealing with you as well. I don't know how you can handle older team meetings. It can be really long days but teammates are really aware that the time zones are tough and people will set their workdays and set aside ours. Where there's crossover so that you can have those meetings that are across Chitose. You can have that time for.

Sydney Atlassian San Francisco partner Motion Graphics Library Bangalore Chitose Mary Austin Texas Kovin London
"atlassian" Discussed on Marketing Scoop Podcast

Marketing Scoop Podcast

05:30 min | 4 months ago

"atlassian" Discussed on Marketing Scoop Podcast

"Of the world. But I think that the things that I love about it and what it's like on a day to day basis that I work with the biggest productivity nerds on the planet. People are sharing tips about how to be productive and efficient every day. And it's not to be annoying because we like genuinely loved being organized and we love management of big projects and I think that's something that everybody shares across the organization so I would just say you know I work with Jira nerds and I wouldn't change it for the world because we're all pretty obsessed with that so yeah I love it. I mean if you did work with deer nerds. You'd have to be organized person so definitely tells us a little bit about. Your personality does Taipei. So let's dive deeper into your case study so today we're talking about how. Atlassian uses youtube to grow their marketing funnel. Can you tell us more about this? Youtube centric content strategy definitely. This is something that we've launched over the last year or so and the concept came from a bunch of customer research and surveys that we did to dive into where our customers were actually going or content so it lasts from the content strategy side. What we do is we offer a lot of really great tutorials and Best Practices and in some cases. We call them play books. Which are basically workshops that you can run with your team. We offer all that content for free so in a typical B. Two B. Organizations. You get the content you ask for an email address and then you nurture the lead. We don't do that so what we do. Is We try to educate our perspective customers and existing customers with great stories so if you're a developer and you're trying to learn get or you're a product manager in you're trying to learn scrum for the first time we don't want to hide that content from you we wanna put it in front of you. We WANNA make it super accessible because the more you learn and the more you understand these concepts more productive you'll be in our products and you'll also see the value in our products faster. So that's the concept behind our content strategy and then I would say on the Youtube side. We found that. There's a couple of stats. I have opened here. But there was a stack overflow survey that basically said that the two most social media sites for developers one is read it. What is Youtube and Youtube is a lot of things but I think especially now when you see people just like eating up content like all the time. It's such a great place to learn something and I think it's become known for that and we wanted to make sure that we went to where our customers were so the downside to doing a youtube centric content strategy is tracking. Because what we found as we dug into Morris that Youtube wants to keep people on Youtube which is a counter to what a content marketer wants. What a content marketer wants you to read their content and then go to your website because that equals entrances eventually equals evaluations for your product. So if you're creating content on a platform like youtube is highly optimized to keep people on Youtube. You won't see the impact directly in your funnel but on the flip side if you look at what I laid out what our strategy is is. It's less about pulling the traffic to our website directly from a youtube video and more about educating and helping our customers with these concepts so we decided to take a bit of a risk and double down on our Youtube Strategy and we took our written content that does live on our website and we produce something like fifty videos and we posted them to Youtube. And we Kinda let that grow and we did a distribution strategy where we posted those videos on the original articles as well and that helped but really the viewership happens on the youtube platform so that was the idea and it took a while for us to get the views that we were hoping to see but the more that people refer to those videos the higher that they ranked in the referred video side of of the panel in Youtube. Which is what you want. And we're starting to get all kinds of great feedback about them so it was a bit of a risky campaign but actually turned out to be really careful and waited. The idea stemmed from. Was this something you guys are trying to solve by creating this project. The idea actually came from me and a few of my teammates digging into opportunities and gaps that we found in our buyer journey so we did a big buyer journey projects for your software to really understand what people are thinking feeling doing throughout their experience and when we did that project we saw a trend that through every stage of the funnel our customers were saying that they to youtube to learn something and we saw that trend. We realized that there was a big opportunity there so we dug into that and said well how many people are actually going into youtube. And what are they looking for? And when we appealed away the onion we realized that this was a golden opportunity for us and that we weren't actually digging into it in.

Youtube Taipei developer Atlassian Morris product manager
Tech Lead Engineer: Herding Cats & Drinks

Front End Happy Hour

10:36 min | 1 year ago

Tech Lead Engineer: Herding Cats & Drinks

"We often talk about our growth path as engineers. One of those pass could be attack need engineer in today's episode. We're joined by I Tony Edwards to help talk with us about the role and responsibilities of a tech lead engineer. Tony can even brief introduction of who you are what you do and in what your favorite happy hour beverages sure I'm Tony. I'm a Sophomore Inter net flicks. I spend about twenty percent of my time coding favorites vagrancy my favorite happy hour beverage is a Manhattan Bliss. You're eighty percent of your time. Doing I help run. Projects and attend meetings readings all right okay interesting. We will definitely be getting into more on that before we do. Let's give introduction of today's panelists jam. You're started off Jamyang senior software engineer Netflix Stacy London senior front and Engineer Atlassian and also a feature lead for the last year plus on a project which isn't discussed later. I'm definitely curious on that High Mars Julian. I'm a front end software engineer at AIRBNB so a little different than nomad had lost and yet. I'm not a netflix anymore. So I'm a little bit sad yeah a little bit sad and I'm Ryan Burgess. I may suffer engineering manager at Net applets in each episode of the Front Unhappy Our podcast. We loved choose a keyword. If it's mentioned it all in the episode we will all take a drink. What do we decide today's keyword. It is projects so we say the word project projects new all take a drink her. Let's jump in. How would you describe what attack lead role engineer love listening listening like that out of attending meetings the little writing code some architect? Ing squishy socks thing softens architect teens not necessarily really soft yeah. It's not but ultimately gotta lean on your fellow engineers but it's important that you set so the broad strokes folks so a lot more like planning and off front work but then letting other engineers run with something yeah you gotTa Transfer People for sure all right anything else that odds that definition. I think it's an interesting I did ask for definition in the first place because I think every company will execute it very very differently and so it's interesting to hear obviously everyone's perspective here. I think we all have a slightly different definition in mind where the like coating to sort of management management ratios might be very very different depending on where you work. I think that's a fair point is they're completely different. Depending on the company say a lead engineer sewing that is honest honest with themselves about the amount of coding they do. Tony said Yeah. I feel like your son no matter what as a tech lead you're likely coating less. I think in general is engineers in years. We overestimate how much coding we do like Oh. You're you're seeing yourself engineering. It's cutting your your pilots seventy eighty percent of the time and it's probably more like sixty percent of the time we we we got a lot of meetings yeah. I I do think as you become more senior and more complexity of your role that grows hashing that's really funny as your coating actually goes down. That's definitely the way I've seen it in in my house yeah and I like put enough. I've had a conversation with our director about this much. Hey you know I it turns out. I'm starting most of my time. I'm doing network which is like writing. Docs meetings and organizing people in wrangling different projects and like. I don't feel like I'm doing my job. He's like that. Is Your job like your job to get stuff done. No matter what it takes sometimes coating more often than not it's not coating and that's kind of what lead engineers do by the way for the word projects as Mars for wholeness countable thin sharp. I think so I mentioned Fisher lead with the introductions and that's a role. I guess I really haven't heard of that particular. Taylor role until I got to a LASSEN and it's not official like role as in like senior engineer and like a future leader or anything like it's an addendum addendum. It's like a thing that you do as senior or you actually be any level and do that particular role but it's like somebody that let's say you take a team. That's pretty big and you break them up into smaller. smaller teams to work on a particular feature so like maybe on on screen. There's like some small. thing like you're building. They are a card that does X. That's a feature you feature lead it and what that really means. You're trying to help the product manager and the designer figure out anything that needs to happen to get that done from like the technical side so they're gonNA define. Maybe what the product manager and the designer according to define like you know what is and what it should look like and you're gonNA figure out the how and it doesn't mean that you wouldn't figure out how with let's say let's say you're on a future team and you have other senior engineers or junior all levels that you're working with. They're gonNA also figure out how to build this thing but you might run interference or maybe make make it so they don't have to go otas many meetings as you do about the technical implementation. see figure stuff out. Maybe a little bit more so that they can just like go and bills and and not have to be distracted too much. I think that's that's one way to think about it. A switch that up by future too is meaning is you could be the the lead on this feature and insulin so it could be on the lead on the next feature like is it something that's kind of interchangeable totally on insult for the last year more than like a future lead on a huge each screen Bisley redoing the entire poll request experience and that is a massive thing. That's like many many many many many features and actually actually to be honest it was it was too much that was me like almost never coating and doing a lot of like interference in all sorts of stuff and recently. We decided to break that up so now we we have many feature lead. You know people from different levels not all senior. I'm just taking over and owning a little piece of that page in working through plus really Likud. I didn't actually know to feature lead was but it sounds very similar to like attack lead lead engineer whatever it is it's very similar but is very narrow focus on on this particular feature year leading this ever yeah. It's really cool. I think another area that we miss maybe defining on how to describe attack lead. They feel like you're dealing a lot more with cross functional teams. I feel like as an engineer. You're always working really closely with your team. Maybe maybe you're working with the PM the designer but oftentimes there's other requirements come across cross functionally. There's like other engineering other disciplines that need to be brought brought in and you might be that person on goes in Shepherd's that and brings a technical perspective to it. He drew clarify cross functional for those who don't speak Silicon Valley. I don't know if it's is just silicon valley but I've not heard that too much. Okay that's fair. I mean cross functional to me means different functions of the business so that might actually be like like I mentioned PM design but it could also be even cross functional engineering teams. There's like A. Ui Team is a back end team Thurs networking team. There's like who knows what your project needs but you might actually be involved in a lot of those discussions where you're talking about okay how does the the back in interface with the Ui how does the backend interface with a database and those are the types of conversations where I feel like a tech lead might be involved. It's some of those meetings that you may not. I have to have all your engineers involved in like if you're a front end engineer you may not want your entire team there but you wanNA representative and to me that someone who is tackling exactly that can represent your team in those discussions that are broader function of the Costume Sean seeds that good jump. That's okay. I'll take it a home uh-huh affair all right well since it's okay. How could you make it better. I would simplify it right I would I would say it comes as different parts of the business that may not be. It's more than one product area so start with you. Did I think you compile all right now. That was project. Project Project Tares when you're a tech lead. You're the ambassador for engineers and you may be the first point of contact that he was ever had with with your team and so it's really important to make really good impression and if you're trying to get something done obviously that's why you're at a meeting with. This person is really important. He said good context high. Make make sure to explain why what you're doing is important because why should why should they help you. You gotTA show them. Show them the lights instead of make them light. It's very you can get people to do what you want by making them do what he wants or from top down. Maybe you can depend on organization do a top down thing but much better to get them to buy into there. You have to convince people that this is a great idea. That's like psychology right like that's that's like that's. I think what's been interesting choosing to about some of the definitions of this very outward facing and there's a lot of metal work involved but there it's been alluded to before here like internally also at least looking internally within your team. engineers are really really good resources for decision making so we've talked architect eating and making decisions based on unlike technologies to move forward with given the long term context in the projects cutoff line. I think there is external and internal responsibilities as house while put yeah. I guess what kind of skills like we kinda talk about some of the responsibilities but like what kind of skills goes into Vena technically you have. I've been around the block engineering wise. You have to see and you have to have failed. You have to have succeeded. You'll have to have done something of a biggest cope before I I like the failure part because you really do learn from all your past failures of like these are the types of questions. I need to ask front so that my team doesn't fail again. I if you don't if you haven't had that experience you might get engineers that are in that that team that you're on there like this is amazing technical challenge. I can't wait to go down a rabbit hole and work on this thing forever and you're like man. Maybe that there might be a different solution. That doesn't happen before I like the I've been around the block that is added to your point failure that is such a big part is like learning what not to do just as important as learning what you should

Engineer Lead Engineer Tony Edwards Software Engineer Senior Engineer Manhattan Bliss Engineer Atlassian Netflix Engineering Manager Product Manager A. Ui Team Airbnb Ryan Burgess Silicon Valley Stacy London Jamyang Director Fisher Shepherd
Building the State Departments Website with Tracy Rotton

How I Built It

28:04 min | 1 year ago

Building the State Departments Website with Tracy Rotton

"Then there are aspects of the state department's work that maybe i'm not a particular fan of of and so maybe i will you you know opted not participate in particular sub sites or whatever but that remains to be seen the next the next goal on this overall project project is to take all of the <hes> embassy websites for united states embassies around the world and move them into this new design and just one more common. I know this was like a small question with a very big answer but what are the first <hes> tweets tweets that i saw when it when it was launched but nobody made any announcements is is somebody who oh they redesigned the website to be part of the administration's propaganda or something along the way and that tweet ended up getting deleted but that sure that kinda hurt because we really didn't design zayn this with any particular political view administration ethos in mind. The design is really meant to be agnostic hostak. The content is whatever the current administration is going to put in as content you know in in two years. We may have another administration. Their priorities are gonna shift and we're going to have different content or it. May stay the same anymore who knows what the future bricks but the goal of this was not to support anyone political view support any particular party eighty ninety nine point nine percent of the people who work in the federal government in this area are career civil servants who served through the trump administration the obama administration situation bush administration back to clinton in some are in some cases so it's really not a political objective. It's <hes> you know. Let's <unk> promote. The priorities of our particular agency and the state department has priorities that i can support whereas other agencies not so much. This episode is brought to you by pantheon starting a new project looking for a better hosting platform pantheon is an integrated traded set of tools to build launch and run websites. Get high performance hosting for your wordpress sites plus a comprehensive toolkit to supercharge your routine and help you launch faster on pantheon you get expert support from real developers best in class security and the most innovative obata technology to host and manage your websites. You can sign up a new site in minutes with a free account. You only pay when it goes live. That is my second favorite feature to pantheon only to the easy ability to create dub staging and live servers and push to get hub. It's very easy to set those things up on pantheon so you can head over to pantheon dot i._o. Today again to set up a free account pay only when it goes live thanks so much pantheon for their support of this episode and this season of how i built it people think that every federal agency adopts the face of the current president didn't but i mean it's not like you put any presidential like any campaign slogan on the website right. It's this is the state department. These are like you said people like you and me. Maybe people slightly better than me 'cause they've dedicated their life to to civil service and they're they're serving the they're serving the cause and the constitution and <hes> i think that's <hes> that's a very admirable viewpoint. I'm really glad i asked that because i was hoping you you would enter in that vein and you definitely did so <hes> that's fantastic <hes> now as far as let's talk tech now right. That's why we're both talk. Talk about all absolutely so you are the technical architect for a federal agency's website <hes>. This website is probably existed since the clinton administration. I'm gonna gas in some way shape or form. What was that <hes> just in general what was that like well as i said they had a proprietary customized cms <hes> that looked look like it had been built in the clinton administration to be frank <hes> and so basically if if we just scrap that the whole thing and started from scratch there was a lot of content migration that happened because some things got preserved but you could actually see what the old sites lights look like because they archive after every administration they don't take the site down so you can go back and see the obama era <hes> website. It's all it's all archived on on sub domains and then go back to george w bush etc <hes> so those sites will still exist and will continue to exist permanently in their existing form <hes> from you know as of last week in may fifteen twenty nineteen onwards. It's it's going to have this new design. <hes> they've poured it over a lot of the content <hes> into the new format but that was a very painstaking process. There was has no automated like migration tool. It was really a bunch of people on the state department just going over documents. Ten thousand of them ended up getting moved over <hes> so that was an entire atlassian task on its own to do that well. That's wild <hes> as as you were talking. I managed to find some of the it looks like it's a year range. <hes> rights for example nineteen ninety-seven hyphen in two thousand and one dot state dot gov is the archive for the most recent clinton administration state <hes> state department website. I'm so that's that's super interesting. I think i caught the last one before your redesign which looks very interesting. I want to say big improvement. <hes> your design over the most recent one <hes> but that's not so that's a very interesting thing that was archived and i guess they hired you knowing that you were wordpress person so did did you have to make the word press cell or they knew they wanted to use where now they had they had picked the word processing technology before hey come and then had found me out because of my association with bert press part of the driving factor was that the embassy websites that i am mentioned before actually are already on wordpress and that's actually a multi instance so one sub site for every embassy around the world so about two hundred give or take so kind of using that synergies to use fancy buzzwords was one one of the driving factors of moving this word press because they had the competency in place they actually already have contractors who are responsible for the maintenance of the embassy sites so it was kind of leveraging known technology on that front gotcha and that makes sense if they want to bring the new design into the fold presumably it'll be a little bit easier since they're both on wordpress <hes> and <hes> we will talk about that when we get to the title question but <hes> as far as <hes> the research that goes into this position right because they had already chosen wordpress for a number of reasons <hes>. I'm sure they had other contractors but what how did you prepare for this job. What kind of research went into. I'm about to do a redesign. I'm going to help the redesign for a government agency. How's that going to work so a lot of it was handled by the firm that hired me and i am purposely not naming names because of all the contractual issues you know some companies are allowed to take credit for things and others are not so. I don't want to step on any of those issues so the firm that had hired in me at all ready started doing the u._s. Work a lot of the visual design work and they what they did is they were working like one sprint ahead at the tech team <hes> when that came in and this is like april of twenty eighteen so this has been thirteen months works yeah it's definitely the longest project checked ever been near us like three months move on but they had some contractors hired for for the positions that they needed so the couple of back end developers couple of front end developers who were staff of the agency and they were like looking for one more and the goodness of friend of mine who i had worked with at a previous agency <hes> was available and came on board <hes> and he was like like just instrumental so we basically that was most of the early work was putting together the team <hes> through the mixture of people who were already working for the agency and people who were brought in as contractors like myself <hes> and then it was just basically you know. Where do we start. What do we use as a starter theme well. That's where kind of it was less research and more of while you hired me so i'm going to do things my my way and that's where we used underscores as the starter theme and we used sas as the front end <hes> c._s._s. kind of processor and a lot of those kind of decisions. Were were just kind of driven by this is the way i always do things so it's going to be quickest if we just kind of keep those practices involved because they've worked for me for for years and might as well stick with what works yeah that's great and i mean you're basically coming to a blank slate right because you're switching content management systems so it's not like you're like we need to support these plug ins or we need to support. There was no legacy code to have to deal with at all the plug ins that we brought in were the ones that i've used in the past or or we researched and and we're the ones that met the needs <hes> again i we can we can dive more into tech now or we're gonna die more into tech later but i'm some other early decisions. Were not to use gutenberg which was ask actually got that question on twitter yesterday the reason in for not using who was a this was before wordpress five point zero was released. <hes> in gutenberg was not stable and for the amount of development. We had to do <hes> it. It was just not going to be a good choice to go with something that was still so much in flux and so instead we used a <hes> heavy heavy use of a._c._f. Pro advanced custom fields pro to build custom templates that the state department needed they meet a variety of different aren't templates to meet their content type so different template for bureaus which would have a particular information that we have you know different template for landing pages ages or policy issue pages or those kind of things that each require different information so it was just a better better way of sticking with the classic editor and using a c._f. Perot as basically or continental system for most cases yeah. That's i mean that sounds like an incredibly good approach approach. <hes> and i know it's something that i've heard other agencies doing right like they'll. They will generously use a._c._f. Pro- <hes> or some other her <hes> custom fields thing but i'm a big fan of a._c. Of pro- <hes> and they'll just straight up in some cases hide the editor <hes> and they'll have of you know these boxes that are specifically designed to display this information and to your point right. If you started this thirteen months ago that is when enberg and five point out we're supposed to launch and then it got delayed so kind of making that decision early on in the process tesla was probably a good one right <hes> do you do you have plans to support gutenberg in the future or not at not at this point joint. I mean at some point we can re re. <hes> you know come back to that. Maybe we also as i said we have to. The embassy see sites to work on neck. So do we go but also the amount of content just even today i have worked on other projects since then <hes> one of which i'm using gutenberg and one of which i'm not and i just find that the the content entry process using gutenberg a lot slower than it is for the kind of the old fashioned continents are classic editor way so you're dealing with the volume of data <hes> they had to migrate over slowing down if it took twice as long to enter in one page of content that was going to significantly impact further. You're not that we did have some impacts in schedule. It was the one month furlough did not help his is that state department was one of the agencies that got furloughed so that was not conducive to the time line obviously but anyway any any kind kind of slowed down like that would have just introduced more delays and at some point you just say no more delays yeah absolutely i i mean i think it's it's <hes> gutenberg is in this weird middle area between like content editor and page builder and it's it's certainly good for some things but <hes> again i it's a case by case basis and i think in this case it probably would have hurt the project more <hes> so as as we're talking talking about kind of the tech stack you mentioned underscores in sas tools. I'm a big fan of a._c._f. Pro another another great tool. <hes> let's get into the title question. How did you build it and as you answer this question. I m curious to know if you designed with the multi site project it in mind if they told you up front hey we're going to do this next or if they told you that like halfway through the project or whatever okay so first of all. We're gonna have to change the name of your podcast because because it's not how i built this. It's how we built this. This was a team a cast of dozens we had u._s. Designers continent architects rex front end developers back end developers full stack developer such as myself so it wasn't one person and i really we don't want to fall into the the the hacker news like she should like ten percent of the work. It takes one hundred percent of the credit. I'm not taking hundred presentiment presentiment anything. This was a huge team effort and so again. It was an agile process. The designs per template were happening. A sprint ahead of the development work which i really wasn't a fan of because as designers honors moved onto next template. We didn't really foresee certain modules being reused that ended up getting reused because they decided okay this macho macho works for this page in this context and so we had named things in a certain way and and <hes> constructed the file structure in a certain way and now we have to go back and change it because something that is specific one template is now shared across multiple templates so would've loved a little bit more or of a holistic approach in terms of the design but you know you we did go back and retrofit things as we had to so so so that was that part of it as far as designing with the mission and the multi site in mine that was even the cards and then was a little bit because of how the structure of the contract worked so this agency that initially hired me came in and all they were tasked with with state dot gov and not even to get it to launch basically the initial build. The contract ran until like the end of of last october. I remember going into a meeting the tape before halloween as basically this is my hand off. This is how it works. This is where the code is. This is my email if you we need to reach me by sia. I thought i was done. I thought that was it my contract with the other agency and it and and i was off to do my other things under tokyo studios then about a month later i got a call from the contracting firm a federal government contracting firm firm who had taken over the contract and they were like well. We have this project redoing the state dot gov website and we won. Ah we heard your name and we thought you might be good for this project. I'm like well. Let me tell you something about the history of this. You know i was on the team that built that right and ed. I think they were just a little coy so they ended up getting hired by the federal government contracting for that was taking this to launch and then they were the ones who were told like in the future after the state dot gov launch. You're going to be working on the embassy sites so that was my first inkling like ah after i thought i was done with this thing i was going to move on to my next thing. I'm coming back in michael corleone everything every time. I think i'm <music> out. They pulled me back in yeah yeah so so that's where we are now and actually now one of the things i'm working on. Actually in the next brand is like a piece of the site that the original agency never actually got to we just didn't have the time <hes> kept kicking connect down the road and now it's ending back on my play and guess what i'm going to be coding in about two weeks. Is this piece of functionality still being done so take with

Gutenberg Clinton Editor Clinton Administration United States Obama Administration George W Bush Atlassian Barack Obama Technical Architect Michael Corleone Content Editor Perot President Trump Twitter Wordpress
U.S. Sanctions Take A Toll On Ordinary Iranian Families

NPR's Business Story of the Day

04:40 min | 1 year ago

U.S. Sanctions Take A Toll On Ordinary Iranian Families

"Support for this podcast and the following message come from frame bridge. They make custom framing easy and affordable frame. Your art in photos at frame bridge dot com or visit their new stores located on fourteenth street and Bethesda row. Get fifteen percent off your first frame bridge order with code NPR. How are American sanctions affecting ordinary families in Iran? Well, Orion sticking a break in Istanbul Turkey, spent some time talking with NPR's Peter Kenyon about how they're coping. Is to close street is bulls. Most famous commercial boulevard and on a recent afternoon street musician, serenaded people from all over Turkey Europe, Asia, and Iran for Iranians heading next door to Turkey for a break is both easier and less expensive than trying to get to Europe or the US. I met several around ins who were nervous at the idea of having their views recorded worrying about possible retribution by thirties, back home, but some agreed to speak if their family names weren't used corrosion. A young man with sunglasses says Iranians have grown used to economic hard times run on by political clashes beyond their control. About my son is I have nothing to do with sanctions. I don't even really understand what they are. But I do know many businesses are struggling and some are closing that includes his own small business, the textile, shop, he opened with his brother to produce shirts. Perot says as President Trump sanctions reduced, incomes and spending money. He was forced into bankruptcy and closed. The business now he comes to extend bowl to buy items to sell back home, but even with the scaled-back business, he's grown used to not being paid on time Magnier style angel. My mom in audio I have been doing business this way for a year now. And in the past few months, it has become harder, especially after this last announcement by the US about new sanctions. Mariam also from Tehran is strolling down the boulevard with her husband and young son. She says inflation is terrible. Everything is three to four times, the usual price. Tonight at gay, and there's no stability, you cannot feel secure things are very uncertain than Iran right now, there's no way of knowing what might happen in the next year or two, and on top of this. There's a lack of trust between the people and the government Mariam's husband Ali, who towers over his wife says he works in the manufacturing sector in Tehran for him. The biggest impact of the recent tensions has been losing hope of seeing his older son, who studying in America Ali says they haven't seen him in three years as to get on the bus to the mobile since Trump has been in office. We haven't seen our child, we only see them online, and I really miss him as father Ali says, getting a US visa has been difficult for some time. But with the way US aronie and relations are going now travelling to America seems less likely than ever, it was a of panic, and then they go now everything has gone wrong, and we're here to go to the Canadian consulate. If we can get Canadian Musa we will go to Niagara Falls. And if our son comes to the other side of the. Falls. We can wave at each other. Under the American sanctions. Iran is facing double digit unemployment, and inflation is running at some forty percent. Sixty two year old Tehran resident for Johnny breaks off a conversation with friends to explain that there are so many ways people are suffering these days. It's hard to say which is worst, but she thinks it's the loss of hope in the younger generation he javelin hall Yankees issued the unemployment is very bad and young people have no motivation. Everyone is lost hope the ones who are out of work feel the pressure of not having a job. But the ones who do are always worried. They're about to be laid off when asked to people are blaming for all these troubles for noses response echoes the views of most of the people interviewed for this story, of course, the Trump administration is to blame. But so is the government in Tehran, which is riven by fierce infighting. She says some even believe these hard times could lead the government to be more responsive, but she doesn't think so. Judical Ozzy boat on the people are so desperate and hopeless to save themselves from this crisis that some even turn to the US government and the US president to save them. But I don't think this is the right mentality. She sighs and gives a wry smile as if to say, please just let her enjoy her few days in Turkey before she has to think about what awaits her back home. Peter Kenyon, NPR news is Bill support for this podcast and the following message come from atlassian, a collaboration software company powering teams around the world committed to providing the tools and practices to help teams plan track build and work better together. More at atlassian dot com.

United States Iran Tehran NPR Turkey Frame Bridge Peter Kenyon Us Government Niagara Falls Mariam Father Ali President Trump Turkey Europe Perot America Atlassian Donald Trump Asia Johnny
High Court Strikes Down Law That Barred Trademarking 'Immoral' Words

NPR's Business Story of the Day

04:20 min | 1 year ago

High Court Strikes Down Law That Barred Trademarking 'Immoral' Words

"Support for this podcast and the following message come from frame bridge. They make custom framing easy and affordable frame. Your art in photos at frame bridge dot com or visit their new stores located on fourteenth street and Bethesda row. Get fifteen percent off your first frame bridge order with code NPR in the next couple of months. There will probably be a rush to get trademark protection for brand names that use obscene vulgar, even racist language. That's because the supreme court struck down a long standing federal law that bars federal trademark protection for immoral and scandalous language as NPR's Legal Affairs correspondent, Nina totenberg reports the challenge to the law was brought by the owner of a clothing line called, I'm going to let Nina take it from here. The line is called f you see T. You can sound it out yourself. I am not allowed to now. Anybody can trademark brand, but a government approved trademark gives the holder. Extra protection? And in this case, the government denied trademark for F U, C T, citing a federal law that bans such protection for immoral or scandalous names yesterday. The supreme court struck down that law by a six to three vote an odd coalition of the courts, conservative and liberal justices declared that the law violates the first amendment guarantee of free speech because it disfavor, certain ideas, an equally odd combination of three justices disagreed and would have upheld. The law, applying it only to profane, vulgar, and obscene, brand names, and now experts are predicting a race to trademark all kinds of sexually explicit and racist, brand names lawyer Jacqueline lesser specializes in trademark matters. I do believe that this will open the door to indiscriminate applications for terms and words that many or most of us find to be really awful. This is not the first time the supreme court has struggled with this dilemma, though, in a somewhat different context in the nineteen seventies in the pre cable era, comedian George Carlin set out to determine what words he could say on TV and radio I wanted to list because nobody gives you lease. They don't give you a list, wouldn't you think it'd be normal if they didn't want you to say something to tell you what it is, as he put it there were at the time. Lots of descriptions, for forbidden words dirty filthy foul raunchy rude. Crude lewd, less sivvy's indecent profane, obscene blew off color Carlin ended up with seven famous dirty words. All I could think of. And those were the so called seven dirty words that the Federal Communications Commission barred from the airwaves and in nineteen seventy six the supreme court upheld that list ironically in yesterday's F, U, C, T, case dissenters, and at least one of the justices in the majority suggested that the trademark office should have made a similar list, or in the alternative. They suggested congress should make a list like George carlin's in a new statute as chief Justice, John. Roberts, put it in his dissent, the first amendment, protects the freedom of speech. It does not require the government to give aid and comfort to those using obscene vulgar, and profane modes of expression or as Justice Samuel Alito in the majority, put it in a separate opinion. For himself, only our decision does not prevent congress from adopting, a new statute, more focused on obscene, vulgar, and profane brand names. It's not at all clear. However, that the five other justices in the majority would uphold such a statute. So stay tuned. And in the meantime, prepared to dislike a lot of trademarks, you see, they won't be your father's, Nike Swoosh, Nina totenberg, NPR news. Washington. Support for this podcast and the following message come from atlassian, a collaboration software company powering teams around the world committed to providing the tools and practices to help teams plan track build and work better together. More at atlassian dot com.

Supreme Court George Carlin Government Nina Totenberg Frame Bridge NPR Congress Justice Samuel Alito Atlassian Federal Communications Commiss Washington Nike Jacqueline Lesser Roberts John
Li-Fi Makes New Waves in Aerospace Industry

WSJ Tech News Briefing

05:10 min | 1 year ago

Li-Fi Makes New Waves in Aerospace Industry

"The university of Alabama school of law online, choose between an l l m and tax or business transactions for lawyers or jurists master in taxation for non-lawyers. Connect. And learn with live lectures details. Had Bama by distance dot U, A dot EDU. This is tech news briefing, im Tanya, Bustos reporting from the newsroom in New York. Coming up, you've heard of wifi. That's old news. It's all about life. I now much faster than WI fi. It has become one of the biggest innovations in the aerospace industry. Lightning fast internet on aircrafts is about to take off more after these tech headlines. The FBI is looking into whether lab testing startup, you bio used improper billing codes in claims and sought payment for unnecessary tests. You buy ohm had been trying to build a business on testing patients microbiomes the microorganisms in the gut, and other parts of the body based on emerging science that suggests microbes can play a role in health as the Wall Street Journal. Previously reported FBI agents searched the company's San Francisco offices in April step to date with the very latest on the probe and the tech behind it at wsJcom. The CIO journal says information technology executives are pushing to make their systems, more energy efficient developing and tweaking software to cut waste. And now tracking how much energy their operations consume. IT leaders are choosing to play a bigger role in reducing the energy consumption of the hardware, and software as well. A crucial part of this is the companies moved to the public cloud, which of course, cuts down on energy guzzling data centers. Take atlassian Corp Sydney-based maker of online collaboration tools for business. For instance, the company aims to run all of its direct operations primarily buildings on one hundred percent renewable energy, including wind and solar by twenty twenty five and care for one of Europe's largest grocery retailers is unloading most of its operations in China were big box retailers are struggling to keep up with nimble delivery providers the kind that are currently winning over shoppers. The move also marks. The latest retreat by a western company in China in the face of stiff competition from home, grown rivals care for is selling an eighty percent stake in its Chinese business, including more than two hundred stores. This comes at a price tag of about seven hundred million dollars. The French company wants a dominant force in many tiny cities saw its sales in the market fall, five point nine percent last year. This comes as western companies are finding the country, brutally competitive and fraught with regulatory hurdles McDonald's. Hewlett Packard and Uber. Armone those who have pulled back or chain strategy in recent years. Coming up picture this lightning fast internet on aircraft. That uses light to transmit signals have the airspace industry is taking it to the next level with life by the university of Alabama school of law online Jews between an l l m and tax or business transactions for lawyers or jurists master and taxation for non-lawyers. Connect and learn with live lectures detail. At Bama by distance dot UA dot EDU. One of the biggest innovations showcased at the recent Paris air show. The one that still has all the airspace enthusiasts talking is life by French company pardon. My French and I mean this, I'm sorry let's say co year. Claims lie fi is up to one hundred times faster than WI fi. Here's surge Barringer senior VP for research and tech at the company explaining the difference. So the wifi is working with a radio frequency. Where was your life fibroids with, like making life by even more notable? It eliminates the sensitivity to radio frequencies, a frequency was impacting health, Folsom, people addict sensitive fall some others that doesn't work but know not lots of a wifi embedded in the prophets. It will impactful her of people in town and for all the five G hype. Here's where something like five G really comes into. Play for WI fi. It's by cutting the costs of satellite operations, which then makes more of the tech free for airlines and passengers to use for the satellite communication gonna do the across to the rest of the will does have limited bandwidth, but in the coming years to sip all to the five G deployment, launch number of satellites willow to reduce the cost of set. Calm and enable and support the deployment of five G himself countries will be faster than in others, but in a long term, you will have a better and cheaper connection than in these today to from from your cuff to the rest of the will catch up with more of what you may have missed. The Wall Street Journal, has full coverage of the latest in airspace technology. That's it for the tech news briefing from the newsroom in New York. I'm Tanya boosters. Thanks for listening.

WI University Of Alabama School O FBI Bama New York China The Wall Street Journal Barringer Tanya Hewlett Packard Atlassian CIO Paris Europe Bustos Corp Sydney-Based Maker
PagerDuty Sends a Message to Wall Street

MarketFoolery

06:22 min | 1 year ago

PagerDuty Sends a Message to Wall Street

"Pager duty went public on Thursday and shares were up more than sixty percent. Now, Ron this is off wear company with a really really bad name. That it is unfortunate. So what exactly is hatred and why the excitement here? So as a motley fools techs expert. I think this is certainly appropriate for me to answer. Thank you for governor to me. I appreciate it sarcasm. So it's it's a software company that basically it absorbs the signals from all the software that your company is throwing out there, whether you slack or October or all the different software systems. It's your company it's a lot of signals the interpret it they decide if any action is needed if there's anything going wrong and the glitches and the problems, and then they'll send that information to the appropriate person in the organization. So the problem can be resolved makes perfect sense. Lots of companies need a software such as this. They are not the only people in the world that that do it that atlassian spunk have a presence in the space as well. But they have some great clients. They are growing. Really quickly. And there's a lot of excitement around the company and its growth. And that's why you see the stock really pop on its first day of trading. Yeah. They went public at twenty four dollars a share it as we're talking up in round three nine dollars. Really nice first day for for page of duty. It's pretty interesting business. I've been digging through the one which is the public filing. When when you and now that you're going to go public on they specialize in this on call management. So like Juan said they call incidents response. So like, the really the software layer in they're trying to to monitor what's happening at the from all this all the digital signals that Ron mentioned, and then help companies make sense of it. It's built by developers. Founded was founded by developers who used to be at Amazon the and co founder, Alex Solomon's more than seven percent of the stock, and it's CEO and co-chairwoman Jennifer to hate Ashi owns more than six percent of the stocks are really nice day for them. It's very heavily venture capital back. Obviously has a lot of these companies are more than one hundred million revenue. Now, maybe the the Mark cap is up near three billion dollars. So kind of around there. So really a nice day for a company that's pretty interesting, and like Ron said like competes with atlassian has more than eleven thousand clients, including a third of the fortune five hundred so it it's planning really big space with a lot of excitement now estimated twenty five billion dollar potential market that these companies are selling into company's not profitable. But it's only the heard losing only say only around forty million or so last year that's not actually big loss. They they probably with just a little bit of growth. Good could turn profitable, which one would hope with the three billion dollars. And they spend significant amount of dollars on research and development north of thirty percent, which is exceptional and their Bill. It's really developing platform. They have more than three hundred fifty thousand people who are. Hyde into the paid clients who are tied into their platform and their developers, and it's really trying to play in provide solutions in this debt developer operations DevOps space allows these companies to collaborate and work closer together. That's that's a really hot space of right now that investors and and engineers are looking at and guys let's pull the lens back because probably a good reminder here that the first day IPO pop. Well, that's not how it always plays out. We have lift which went public in late March. So just a few weeks ago, and it had a nice first day shares hit a high of around eight dollars. And now they trade around sixty one dollars a new all-time low well below the IPO price does lift in that I experienced give us any caution. Or does it? Tell us anything about pager duty. Yes. Well, tell you a lot about IPO's in general, which are all based all-stock pricing. In fact, his based on the supply and the. End of the stock and sometimes the demand for an IPO gets a little bit out of whack with the realities of the business and the fundamentals of the business, and sometimes, you know, it's hard to it's a case by case basis. I'm not saying that's the case here with pager duty. If I was CEO of a company, and I found out that my investor been bankers underpriced by fifty percent, I might be a little bit angry about that actually because I would want to capture more of that cash in the actual peo- price than just in the aftermarket. I'm so just be careful. Sometimes these the demand is a is a little bit too hyped. IPO's are somewhat hot right now. There's no real rush, especially for long term investors. Nothing you feel like you're going to have to miss out on it's fine to just watch company and learn about it. Yeah. Somewhat high there smoking right now. I mean lifts performance was kind of a drag. But there's a lot of excitement in the IPO market right now. And patriots one of these cloud based companies that came out I Ron, right? Like, you know, if you're if you're one of. The companies and saying, wow, gosh, there's a little bit of money left on the table. So it's a fine line and how they kind of price. These actually pager duty was originally price it somewhere in the below twenty dollars. I think nineteen twenty and they ended up going at twenty four. Now, the stock was up near the in the high thirties. So a kind of fine line. How you think about that? That's we had to be a little bit careful when you're vesting because not all your stocks your IPO's when they come out public on day one. They're going to go up sixty percent. Okay. Guys. Well, we were talking before the story about before we came on air about how bad the name is. So as we wrap up here, I've got to ask you, what's the worst part of the name is the pager or is it the duty? Because I genuinely don't know. I think they're both so bad. If you could only replace one of those words, what are you replacing? I would have to replace pager to be honest with it just it it just so such an old kind of, you know, dude, fine. It's doing double duty. It's working overtime doing. What it does? I don't know what pagers about. Okay, I'm going. I would change the second part of the name duty. Okay. Okay. Fair enough. I'm gonna leave it out there. Let that flowed out there. Yeah. I'm also a character, by the way in

RON Atlassian CEO Amazon Juan Hyde Alex Solomon Developer Co Founder Jennifer Ashi Three Billion Dollars Sixty Percent Twenty Five Billion Dollar Twenty Four Dollars Three Nine Dollars
#139 The Reply All Hotline

Reply All

53:03 min | 1 year ago

#139 The Reply All Hotline

"Restaurant. That's amazing. 'cause I was like I was on yelp. And I did like dollar dollar. And then there was all. That's a pretty savvy move wondering, wouldn't it? I mean, I told him that it was that was what I did. He thought smart. How the day go. Go while he thought it was. But I got a dollar out of it. I like the restaurant that much what you were telling us about congress internet interesting. It's no problem. After the break. We take some more calls. This episode of reply all is brought to you by squarespace squarespace. You can easily create a website that stands out all by yourself. I made this website called gopher grapes dot com, which is a place where you can grape about the world. And maybe I will read it in an ad like this ad right now, here's a great bills. With tips included. I like bills tips included. My crayons aren't sharp enough sharpener friends every time I get a haircut. It just goes back. You just need to make peace of hair. So maybe not everyone agrees with your grapes. But if you have a gripe with your fully, customizable, squarespace website. You can tell it to their award-winning twenty four seven tech support go to squarespace dot com for a free trial. And when you're ready to launch us, the offer code reply to save ten percent on your first purchase of a website, or domain. This episode of pile is brought to you by atlassian. They make collaboration cipher that helps teams open up seeing worked better together. They leave it. Open communication and open wave working in an open mind to better teams and happier. People Alex feel like you're probably one of those people. I know literally point where I had to recreate you from scratch at this point. You know enough about me that you could upload my opinions to computer, and it would be a reasonable ExIm leave me actually humour that most people. That is so messed up. At the robot making plan, they'd be like, well, we don't really know how to program like the robot like reading your emotional cues. That's fine. More accurate. Atlassian their philosophy is openness does more than just produce. Better. Hypothetical co host teams feel safer less. Stifled more ready to do great things. To learn more about atlassian, what openness can do for your teams, go to last Sian dot com. That's AT L A S S. I N dot com. Hello. Who's that? My God I got through again. Do you? Remember your second question. Are you eating right now? I was I'm not anymore figured you guys gonna answer. Anyway, we've the phone twice for you. Now, I feel like the idea that we don't answer the phone is not something you're allowed to believe. Oh, I know. I don't eat more. Now. I'm a firm believer that you guys are not full shit. The phone. Fucking fall. And you're so full of shit. Back again. Do you? Remember your second question. Oh my gosh. Oh, all right. What is different between a proxy server, a whole and VPN and what what is your better choice between the free. Okay. Allison answer. This question doing from. What are you trying to figure out how to browse your net anonymously? Yeah. I yeah. Because like, you know, you go on the dark web and shit, and I have a VPN and all that. But like with this you need to bridge. But like, okay. So what if I have a VPN what's the point of having a proxy or bridge? You know what I'm saying? Like, I I don't understand like why you need all that shit. So I don't totally know the answer to your question. Okay. When I know is VP N is essentially like, basically, it's a virtual private network that that's what stands for it. What it means is like you are now part of a network that is elsewhere on the internet. So it's not technically a server it's more like you are. Connected to a different network and in your your traffic, all when it hits the internet. All looks like it's coming from this network which have somewhere else. I don't know. Exactly what a proxy is. So I don't know the difference between that and the minor saying is it's it's a server that you're that is between you and the place you're connecting like, you're sending your traffic. I try to you you send it to see so. Okay. So I guess that's the difference. Proxy servers like an actual, computer. You're hitting whereas of APN is a network that you're connecting to. What are you doing on the dark web? You know, just off and stuff. Hello. Hey, are you there? Hello. Is there way at can you chat with him? I mean numbers are coming in so fast. I don't know how we would do it. Can't you see which ones like connected with like, no. Because we connect over that phone. Country for jerky is ninety. Well, hey, we're still here. Don't hang up back. What's your what's your question? Okay. So I like ever since like ninth grade or something I've been like working real hard on my English. I don't know if that's parents. Your English is your English is amazing. Oh, thank you so much and ever since like twenty six I've been really working hard and trying to like get into college abroad. And so towards the end of last year December last year, I take the tea and I get a fifteen forty grand. That's really good and like in two thousand sixteen Trump comes into office at obviously, there's a travel ban. And I'm the longer allowed into the USO Cup. I really attack. Oh, that's okay. Just take your time. We're here. And so like the only option I had then was Canadian universities. And I try to register to the best of my ability on the internet. And I just like there was the west sites all of them were so bad and like just like hard to actually use like so many problems like, for example. My name is all cats and English. But because that's how we do it in Syria. I don't know who decided that. And so like on a lot of the like websites, I put my name, and they were all like, oh, your name is case sensitive. So you need to capitalize it as it is in your life passport and. I go in there and put it in all caps because that's the way it isn't my passport. And they're like we can't accept that. And so I literally hit him up. I. I call them. I call the university. And they're like, we don't know that they're just like, we don't know flat out that that's like McGill. Oh, yeah. I went to McGill there. I had very bad experiences. When I needed help with them. You went to got. Okay. Yeah. So like, I kind of missed all of my deadlines now. And it's like these three months have been super depressing roomy. I like, I just don't know. What to do? I've been like searching for counselors on the internet. I put Hurley pointed anyone and like, I don't know if that's even something that like you said anything so. Yeah. I don't know what I'm doing. Let's try to help. So it sounds like you need somebody. You literally need somebody who can help to navigate the college admissions process. I mean, it's not like we know first hand, but we can will help. Yeah. Well, that that's I get so much. I'm really sorry that you're going through this. How long have you been in Turkey? I've been since like twenty thirteen and are you with your family? Yeah. Can't gather. What's your family like like what mom dad siblings? I have three siblings. All females. That's how I grew up younger or older. I'm the youngest kid and what like what's your life like in Turkey right now. Like where are you talking to us from on from Essen like I've been in mesh on this whole time ten and I can't like go to Ghazi and tap. I can't go to temple unless I have a permit. And what does it take it? That. You have to have either family somewhere off, and they don't always accept that. Or you have to have something like a test or something like when I took my say t's I had to fly out on car. And so what do you do your done with school? What are you doing with yourself? I like, I skipped I went to school year earlier like like, I get your and so yeah, I'm done with school now. But like, I'm most old as a senior your student, and are you working? Not really Alex said that like he was your dad, and it's okay. You know, I'm not trying to. Yes, it's fine. Not working. I was just curious to know like the thing is as Syrians were not allowed to our care, regardless. If you have like a college degree or anything, I think we simply instated some sort of process for people to you know, convert their diplomas college diplomas and try to work here. But for now, it's mostly like educational field, and like markets and stuff that get the jobs that can work. But otherwise, no can do anything. How do people just like survive financially? We've just been like borrowing money from my grandpa from my own call for the past like three years four years. And that's what we've been subsisting off for the whole time that sound. Really, really, really hard. Yeah. Tim has a question for you. Go ahead. Hey, how's it going south? Okay. This is a kind of uninformed question. But I'm just really curious. So I live in Berlin, Germany, there's a huge Syrian population there. And I've met a lot of Syrians. And I'm just curious is that I don't know. I'm I'm genuinely cares. I don't know. Is that a thing that you guys think about is Germany so possible to emigrate to or has is that become really difficult. We wanted to go at some point back in like twenty fifteen my dad and sister wanted to go to Sweden or something like one of those countries. And basically what you do that is be get on a boat, and you go all the way there. But right, all it's very dangerous and a lot of the smugglers are, basically criminals. Do you might get still income? I get you're definitely gonna stuff stolen on the way there. You might never get there. You might think whatever. But like my dad and sister, we're going to go the way it works. Is that like once a family member goes there like your parents like your dad, he can reunite and with all of? With all of his children as long as they're under the age of eighteen and so my sister was above eighteen and if you had to go. I feel like it was really scary. You know, the days weighed in to it. And eventually. The day came they were going. I went to school, and I turned and turns out they hadn't gone and. Like right about that time. There was a law that was put in place that would prohibit Syrians from traveling between states between Turkis states or cities without a permit. And so my dad was on his way to like wherever the city was where they were going to get smuggled, and they didn't let him get get through. And so here turn and that was that. Did it did it make you feel? Did they make you feel disappointed or sad that he wasn't able to make it or were you just glad that he was not in harm's way. Obviously, I was come freighted. But. A lot of my friend had gone meant that we're going to reunite with them. And it's really not good here in Turkey, and no jobs. Yeah. I obviously, I I don't enjoy my stay here. And so I would have been happy had he like gotten there safely and reunited with us. They're put this e you know. Yeah. Totally. You don't like anyone hawks pay. picks. So Alex day has been asking people on dude. It's really important to know that reason to me to know he said he wants to with pretty much everybody. Whether they think they're PJ or an Alex foundational thing. Alex. Recklessly? Thank you sow. We're the same height. How tall PJ? Hey eleven. Yeah. You're on six feet. I can't I'll walk around on my knee. All right. We're gonna try VR. We can help you. Okay. Thank you so much. Yeah. I love you so much. I I'm both in Alexander PJ. No on your an ally year. Okay. Everyone has all right. Take care love you. Bye. So we have our conversation last Thursday since then we found too many the McGill admissions department who's looking over sows transcripts and helping him navigate their system. Macgill's student run Syrian student association is also helping out if you are one of our listeners any working college admissions in North America, and you want to help out just in this an Email reply allocate media dot com. Obviously, the problem sows having is way way broader than just him. There's tons of smart Syrian kids who have been displaced who want to go to college, and it's very hard for them to get there. If you're interested in this. We found to organizations that seem to be working on it. There's one called juicer J U S O R. It's a group of Syrian ex-pats trying to help kids. Find opportunities. The other one is the institute of international education. I e they've program called peer where they tried to find scholarships and opportunities in connect them with refugee students said he keep us updated. So if there's more news with him, we'll let you know. And finally, just thank you to everybody who called or who wrote in it was fun to ineptly trying to solve your problems. Thanks.

Alex Day Turkey Squarespace Atlassian Yelp Congress Alexander Pj USO Institute Of International Edu VP North America Germany Mcgill Allison Berlin Syria Macgill Hurley
US Stocks on the Move: HP, Fitbit, Box

BTV Simulcast

07:35 min | 1 year ago

US Stocks on the Move: HP, Fitbit, Box

"A handful of tech names got dragged through the red Thursday after reporting disappointing earnings results Fitbit HP Inc. Saw some of the biggest swings. Poor results. Come on the tail end of a fourth quarter earnings season that has helped fuel a twenty three percent rally since the market rout bottomed out on Christmas Eve, I want to get to New York where we're joined by John flax, Neuberger Berman senior research analyst and Chiro day with Bloomberg opinion. So Daniel all of these are different companies. But certainly tech is a common theme. What do they have in common aside from tech? Emily. I think if you look at some of the companies that disappointed today, there's some very specific stories like, for example, with Hewlett Packard, where people are worried about the printing supplies growth in printing supplies, contributes. Now size percentage of the prophet. If we look at booking or box or Fitbit. Ultimately, those are concerns around competition and the need to invest to help differentiate. But if we step back and think about what's going on in technology. A lot of the key secular trends remain, healthy, the move to the cloud, really the digitalization if you will of society. So we see a lot of opportunities even with some of the macro headwinds. So for example, we would highlight Cisco which is a leader in networking. That's really transformed its mix towards more software and services, and we think margins and earnings will be better than the market expects another name we like is Motorola solutions, which is a leader in public safety, and they're pivoting to faster growth areas like video they have an excellent. Management team. That's been able to execute on transitioning the company to new areas and expand margins. Another name we like is alphabet. We think the core. Search businesses healthy YouTube has very strong growth and newer areas. Like, the Google cloud platform are somewhat under appreciated and then longer term. They have opportunities in areas like autonomous driving with Waymo and the other one we would highlight is apple where we think the strength of that ecosystem is under appreciated while sure their concerns about the iphone and China. The install base is growing user satisfaction is high and they're doing a good job in newer areas like services and wearables and the wearables, I would say helps demonstrate that innovation is still alive. And well, so we expect the environment to remain choppy. The macro obviously is going to be a focus for some time. And none of these companies have great visibility. But those that are able to innovate and differentiate with products and services, we think can create. Additional shareholder value over the next one to two years. So here's some names. We talk about their on the show all the time apple alphabet, but some other shape names that we don't hear very often along with HP Inc box fitted as we're discussing today. How does what's happening with them fit into what's happening with big tech, Dan's point? I think was right about there is this general secular shift towards cloud technology. But what that's meant is that they're handful of high growth cloud software companies names like workday, and Viva systems, and Salesforce, and atlassian, and they've had really impressive stock price. Runups even accounting for the dip in stock market prices around September October last year, and what that's meant is that. Now, those stocks are looking pretty expensive relative to themselves and relative to the overall stock market and. The piece I wrote today was basically saying look the growth rates are coming down for those high growth software companies and the multiples of revenue their valuations are going up, and so that sets them up for a crater if and when there's any kind of hiccups in performance or the macro environment. Dan, I'm curious for your outlook on some of the big tech names that you didn't mention of course, you're talking about apple you talked about alphabet. But what about the others? Of course, we know Facebook has struggled net. Flicks is certainly in a unique position. Sure. Emily, so we like Facebook. And while we think there's a lot of work that they need to do around data security privacy. I think the company the management team is appreciating the severity of the situation, and we're seeing a greater willingness to change and try and improve the health of the platform. What's interesting there is despite all of that the metrics of the underlying business remain healthy. And if we look at some of the other platforms underneath the Facebook unbrella, you've got Instagram, which is showing very strong growth. You have newer newer properties. Like what's happened messenger? That we think could be increasingly monetize over time. So with the core Facebook, you do have this transition to stories, and it will take time. But the results to date in the outlook suggests that there is quite attractive growth shifting to net. Flicks. What we think is interesting here is that the company is continued to push ahead with differentiated and unique content. And they've coupled that with a direct relationship with their users. And so they're helping to really redefine the television experience. And so all of these companies there is execution risk. Sure. There's competition. But we think they're very interesting. Another name we would point out that we continue to like his Amazon, and the reason Amazon remains interesting in our view is they're executing well in their core. Ecommerce busy. But they're doing a terrific job with the Amazon web services. And when we speak to customers to buyers, this shift to the cloud is really very much in its infancy. And we think that they're going to have attractive growth for several years to come there. And the last piece we would emphasize with Amazon is that they have an advertising business, which is smaller. It's growing quickly. It's a creative margins and we think that's somewhat underappreciated, and so pulling this all together. The key trends around cloud mobile, social, they're not without complications. Certainly in terms of the social elements and data and privacy. And we do think more regulation is necessary. But if these companies can invest appropriately and continue to innovate than we think. There's additional value to be created and more regulation could be coming especially with the FTC forming a new task force to look at past acquisitions, even speaking of the cloud share. You've got a piece out today, titled forget fangs. Doc bubble could be in the cloud. Explain. Yeah. Yeah. And it's it's really again about looking at how expensive those clouds stocks have gotten relative to their expected revenue over the next year. I came up with the I apologize for this acronym. I came up with the fake acronym. Putin's for those to describe the socks because every grouping of stocks needs its own acronym. These days, and I looked at basically the median multiple, right? So how much investors paying for each dollar future revenue and all seventeen of this kind of grouping of cloud companies? I looked at they're all trading above their two year, multiple average. And again that implies that the expectations are now very high for those cloud software companies like atlassian and work, Dan, Salesforce, and so on to deliver on the growth promises. And if they don't we might see the kind of stock cratering that we see periodically from these high growth, high expectation kind of cloud

Facebook Amazon Apple DAN Emily Atlassian Salesforce Hewlett Packard Fitbit Hp Inc Daniel Neuberger Berman Motorola Solutions New York Google Research Analyst Youtube
"atlassian" Discussed on MacBreak Weekly

MacBreak Weekly

02:02 min | 1 year ago

"atlassian" Discussed on MacBreak Weekly

"So again, you're not you're not expending energy as fast as your charging. It. Must be a Canadian thing. Because I don't see it on my. If you for the first time ever candidate gets it first. Well, it just as well. On the link Alto. The Lincoln the show notes. Okay. That that saves you money the number of times I've had like an iphone in a battery sled, and it's thought, oh, I'm connected to power now. And can do all of the all the photo and video uploads that I'm not supposed to do until I'm connected to actual wall. Power. I just bought four not one not two but four Ocoee type c power banks. They're very thin, and they don't affect anything because he just plug the phone to them. And I I have four of them because well poke mongo. I know they're nicer because they're the power delivery. So it's over type c so they're very they charged very quickly. They're nice. We we definitely have definitely crossed over a certain mountain recently because this was the year that star I've started replacing all the old power bricks old power chart battery chargers that I keep in one in every single computer bag of mine with you a spec- ones. Because now I've got enough you spec- stuff that makes sense for me to plug directly into USB type charger or a USB charger that can charge an entire laptop rest before it was like as long as I can charge a phone. I'm good. Yep. I think we can take a little tiny time out and come back if you will prepare your picks, we will be doing that next. I word from atlassian. We love atlassian here, we're in a atlassian shop, and I think if you talked to developers IT professionals, and you say are you at Lassie in shop, they're going to they'll certainly know what you're talking about. And most of them will say, oh, we wouldn't be anything else atlassian creates collaboration.

atlassian
"atlassian" Discussed on Download This Show

Download This Show

04:24 min | 2 years ago

"atlassian" Discussed on Download This Show

"The language. Our job ads to just overhauling our careers page to show a broader set of benefits, and you know, photos of everyone did Lassie in and those types of things making those process changes have helped us improve our hiring for example, women in technical roles globally by almost two hundred thirty percent over three years, not because we're taking gender into account in the hiring process because we're removing the barriers that women had to imagining themselves at atlassian so often when people talk about. Diversity lodge? It really comes down to two axes, which rice Ingende. But of course, there's a lot more to it. And I'm wondering how you go about making sure that there's a mix of people with different kind of mental health statuses parents personality differences, the mixture of introverts and extroverts because all of that comes into play here. They are they whys in which you can account for those differences because they also changed the makeup of a team that can build something. Absolutely. So I think you deal with this inherent contradiction of I don't have access to all of the data. I would like for lots of very understandable reasons. But so for that I look for a lot of qualitative signs. So atlassian was the first tech company to include age to ticks in our external diversity reporting. And what we've seen is that we've grown hugely in our representation of atlassian over forty I'm so three years ago that was about twelve percent. And now we're at about twenty. And so I think. Part of attracting folks from a variety of backgrounds is actually just writing and allowing the people internally who identify that way to talk about their experiences. So you'll see, you know, we have on the atlassian flog things about ageism in about working with different personalities, and what it might be like, you know, when someone shares challenges with their mental health, and we try to reward those folks internally for being open about themselves, and I think that that has a self reinforcing quality when you said reward, how does how does that manifest one of our team members wrote a blog about his struggles with mental health with things -iety and some other things and we saw this. We actually reached out to him and our content team asked if he would be willing to adapt it for external plug because we we loved how open he was. And then we also asked if he was interested in presenting it as talk there was great feedback internally and externally and his talk was actually one of the highest rated. At the event. And so that's what a reward looks like, and we know from our research that when you feel that you can show up entity at work and on your team. That's when you feel like you belong, and that's something we all need when people are trying to introduce more diversity in the workforce. What is it the people get wrong? I think that actually getting stuck on the word diversity is a problem. So lasting. Yeah. Atlassian 's twenty eighteen state of diversity report, we actually showed that diversity is actually strongly associated with women and especially with black Americans. And so the reason that's a problem is because when you say diversity, so many people have counted themselves out, right? They have said that's not about me or I'm not diverse, and that's an issue because it means that you're you're getting low engagement or people think that it's it's a programmer department meant only for small set of people. As opposed to something that everyone collaborates on. So we talk about building balanced teams. And then that helps us have a productive conversation about in. What ways is this team imbalanced in? What ways is it inbalance and helps us actually get it are gaps really quickly. And the third way that I think companies are getting it wrong is we're focused on corporate level metrics when in fact balanced belonging happen at the team level. You'll see that companies often released their sort of overall corporate statistics, and you can see those on on our report as well. But we also released ticks about the average team an distribution of different groups across each of the teams in our departments. And the reason for that is we really just believe that it's it's balanced. It's diverse teams where that happens..

atlassian Lassie programmer three years two hundred thirty percent twelve percent
"atlassian" Discussed on MAD MONEY W/ JIM CRAMER - Full Episode

MAD MONEY W/ JIM CRAMER - Full Episode

02:35 min | 2 years ago

"atlassian" Discussed on MAD MONEY W/ JIM CRAMER - Full Episode

"Development. Basically, atlassian make Sofer for software developers. This is kind of a medical prints. In fact, it might be the purest way to play the cloud because many of these companies developed cloud based software are using atlassian tools to do it now atlassian. It's already at twenty one billion dollar company. It's large enough to be actually cloud king, but it doesn't quite the track record yet. Still the company's putting terrific results and they recently announced a big partnership with slack was that company worth and comes the usually popular business collaboration platform. This is giving us a gigantic run since we had the CEO, Mike cannon Brookes on the show December. But I think it's got more upset came when he wasn't exactly dressed, like I am. Trust me. Bottom on these princes are are more speculative. All right than the kings. They're fast growing them, but they're also lot more expensive. When average they sell for twelve and a half times next year sales estimates versus less than nine times sales for the kings. But if you're willing to take the risk might want to own some Kupa some Tableau hope spot New Relic Okhta atlassian. As long as you know that what goes up can also come down and come out hard, of course, lower levels. I like all these stocks even more. Help that we go to markets in California police, Marcus high, Jim marquess. To hear from you first time caller three year watcher. Thank you for having me on man. Keep watching. Thank you so much. What actions should I take with my stock? I I during their pretend. We nailed that identity. I, we said it might take it over. We had them on repeatedly. I think you just take the money and run. It's it's certainly a Steve Miller situation. Let's go to show them kansin Sean, Jim Shaw, what's up. Just calling to your opinion on one of my best performing dot Ariston network. Oh, man, rich and networks is terrific. And you know, look, they set all that nasty stuff with Cisco, and they're still nobody is good as Jay street. You all we had her on the stock is a winner. I say, stick with all right. These heirs, the throne are Lou more speculate. If you're wouldn't, you think the risk. I think you want to own them and I won't be adding to them. Okay. Now much money, they don't call us the most records show one television for not mind to names that were put on my radar screen. Thanks to you. Pay merica then swap this is off through Serse was highest level ever what it means for for the market in for your money or your cost, rapid-fire. It's nice just lightning round. So stay with Creamer..

atlassian Lou Mike cannon Brookes New Relic Okhta CEO slack Serse Creamer Steve Miller Jim marquess California Cisco Jim Shaw Marcus high Sean twenty one billion dollar three year
Atlassian invests in Slack, kills HipChat and Stride

Daily Tech News Show

02:38 min | 2 years ago

Atlassian invests in Slack, kills HipChat and Stride

"Words to degrade if Disney launches their own a service, it will take probably a couple years of four net flicks to do decline. It will take a long time for apple products to become unfashionable. And as we discussed with Amazon, they've got two horses kind of leading their cart. Facebook is Facebook. If Facebook, if they can't get people into the tent and then convinced advertisers that this is the place where they need to buy advertising to get in front of those people, it gets bad fast for them in a way that doesn't for the other companies. Yeah. And and honestly, I mean, diversification is the thing you need to have to survive alphabets doing it in a couple ways. One is other bets, Waymo, etc. Those are our long-term bets, but they're they're planning on and it looks like they're right to plan on Google, still being a cash generator for a while so they can be patient with those other bets. Facebook's diversification is Oculus which you know as a bit of a long-term bet right now, Instagram, which is doing great, but is smaller than Facebook. And at right now, I'm not sure Instagram would save a faltering Facebook. So most of the eggs are in Facebook's basket. They're in a way that they're not so much with Amazon and alphabet. Hey, Sarah just reminded me Carl in our slack or in our. I'm sorry, inner slack in our discord actually alerted us to a story about slack. Slack has bought hip chat and stride from atlassian and will discontinue them. Well, it's funny because I don't know if anyone here has used up check more than just trying it out. I have not, but I know that when slack became kind of the darling of enterprise jabbing software, there were a lot of hold outs. We're like hip chat is actually quite quite a bit better at this was before discords days. So I don't have a lot of personal experience with it, but I know that there are some people are going to be really bummed hip chat is going away. Yeah, I, it sounds like he's wanted the brains. Yeah, exactly. And they're, you know, they're in a defense movement against Microsoft as I think they're accelerate said in discord as well. So smart. Move for slack and sad for the hip chat, trans and the stride fans as well. The only constant is change. Thanks to everybody who alerts us to breaking news over doing the show, and also thanks to everybody in her sub Reddit..

Facebook Slack Amazon Instagram Disney Apple Google Atlassian Waymo Microsoft Sarah Carl
"atlassian" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"atlassian" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"If the port is attempting to access data your phone will prompt you and say hey do you trust this device the reality of the situation is that's really interesting research but it's not something that you really practically see in the wild as far as things that you want to spend your time worrying about i wouldn't worry about it even at airports places where there's a lot of you know there's high amounts of traffic i mean sure you should think twice before you plug your phone into something especially if it's asking for a data connection but the reality of the risk is there's a lot more legitimate things to be worried about than having a usb port that could potentially be hacked it's it's really really interesting research but it's honestly not something that's really seen in the wild very often the broader flavor of attack surfaces that we're talking about is attack services that are very wide you could sit in room and probably enumerate lots and lots of attacks on a whiteboard that could take place across sharing economy apps and when i'm thinking about why the tax services big companies also come to mind you work at atlassian atlassian is a large company with lots of products how does a company like atlassian secure a wide attack surface will the first thing is we have a pretty incredible security team and security is something that's taken extremely seriously here so really the first thing to secure an organization as big as lesson is that you have to make it a priority and even with our security team we go far beyond that because no matter how many people you have on your security team you're going to have less than the amount of people that are attacking you just by being exposed to the internet so one of the things that i'm really proud of is that atlassian is been using.

atlassian
"atlassian" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"atlassian" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"If the port is attempting to access data your phone will prompt you and say hey do you trust this device the reality of the situation is that's really interesting research but it's not something that you really practically see in the wild as far as things that you want to spend your time worrying about i wouldn't worry about it even at airports places where there's a lot of you know there's high amounts of traffic i mean sure you should think twice before you plug your phone into something especially if it's asking for a data connection but the reality of the risk is there's a lot more legitimate things to be worried about than having a usb port that could potentially be hacked it's it's really really interesting research but it's honestly not something that's really seen in the wild very often the broader flavor of attack surfaces that we're talking about is attack services that are very wide you could sit in room and probably enumerate lots and lots of attacks on a whiteboard that could take place across sharing economy apps and when i'm thinking about why the tax services big companies also come to mind you work at atlassian atlassian is a large company with lots of products how does a company like atlassian secure a wide attack surface will the first thing is we have a pretty incredible security team and security is something that's taken extremely seriously here so really the first thing to secure an organization as big as lesson is that you have to make it a priority and even with our security team we go far beyond that because no matter how many people you have on your security team you're going to have less than the amount of people that are attacking you just by being exposed to the internet so one of the things that i'm really proud of is that atlassian is been using.

atlassian
Microsoft to take on GitHub with $7.5 billion deal

Daily Tech News Show

02:03 min | 2 years ago

Microsoft to take on GitHub with $7.5 billion deal

"Decor arm cpu a volta tensor core gpu to envy deep learning chips and vision video and image processors xavier is capable of thirty trillion operations per second and if you are a developer who works on robots you want to get the jetsons aviator sock you can do so starting in august for thousand two hundred ninety nine dollars all right probably the biggest news of the day to be honest just not the most numerous lines in it is what you're justin's about to tell us about indeed microsoft confirmed it has agreed to acquire get hub for seven point five billion dollars in microsoft expects the acquisition to close by the end of the year microsoft corporate vice president nat friedman formerly ceo of zamaran will become ceo and get up founder chris wants roth will become a microsoft technical fellow microsoft says get will operate independently being a big big thing get up also a get hub if you're not aware allows open source projects to use the service for free and charges for others microsoft uses git hub and his thought by some to be its biggest contributor some developers are already switching to get lab and atlassian bit bucket get lab says it is seeing ten times the normal amount of repositories her day i think there are a lot of backlash from people with a historical sense of microsoft as the company that tried to kill open source and get up was the darling of the open source community when it launched in twenty eleven because even though it's not open source it uses the open sort get package that was developed by linda's torvald same guy developed lennox colonel and it said look if you're doing an open source project on get hub we won't charge you we're only going to charge you if you're trying to make money off of it.

Developer Justin Microsoft Nat Friedman CEO Zamaran Chris Roth Linda Corporate Vice President Founder Technical Fellow Atlassian Lennox Thousand Two Hundred Ninety Ni Five Billion Dollars
Microsoft to take on GitHub with $7.5 billion deal

Daily Tech News Show

00:43 sec | 2 years ago

Microsoft to take on GitHub with $7.5 billion deal

"The these are the daily tech headlines for monday june fourth twenty eighteen i'm tom merritt microsoft confirmed it has agreed to acquire get hub for seven point five billion dollars in stock microsoft expects the acquisition to close by the end of the year microsoft corporate vice president net freedman formerly cu of zaman will become ceo and get hub founder chris wen strath will become a microsoft technical fellow microsoft says get hubble operate independently get hub allows open source projects to use the service for free and charges for others to use the service microsoft uses git hub itself and is thought by some to be its biggest contributor some developers are already switching though to get lab and atlassian bit bucket get lab says it's seeing.

Microsoft CEO Founder Tom Merritt Corporate Vice President Chris Wen Strath Technical Fellow Atlassian Five Billion Dollars
"atlassian" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

01:53 min | 2 years ago

"atlassian" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Your services from each other but that again really that enter sat vastly on on what you're running in high rebuild things to begin with so that pendulum swing either direction very easily are there any efforts to move to something like cougar netties it atlassian right now yes that is something that's very interesting to us i can't comment exactly since i'm not since that team is not industry in how that's being addressed but yes that cuban ity is something very interesting it'd be interesting to see how that factors into because you have this home grown pass you know maybe it'll be working cooper netease into that pass or well again i guess you can't you don't you're not the personnel about it tell me about your day to day like you walk into the office on a given day what does the head of 'sorry do well you know i go get some coffee i no really the first thing i do is i take a look at what some of the incidence have been the over the last day or whatever i look at some of the low party wines minutes or aiding that was higher party take those star following in on another part of my day is usually in a lot of planning meetings thinking about what do we do we give the data that we're debt reflected about incidents about a different metrics from services how should we be planning our next our next quarter next year and what are the needs of your guys looking evolving towards elsa how does improvements in liability intimidation hr reduction s low teammate things like that factor into you know the overall organizational plan so that's generally how i spend spend my day obviously other meetings a more tactical things of sprinkle in here and other administrative things but yeah generally that tout plays opt giving you advice for how to conduct a planning meeting for.

atlassian
"atlassian" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

01:35 min | 2 years ago

"atlassian" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Life cycle the company is what like a decade older or moments decade old something like that was definitely whether it'll okay yeah so okay so let's say eleven or twelve fifteen years old i'm not sure but the products in the company were started different times in atlassian life cycle and so the products are assume are backed by different kinds of infrastructure so to set the stage for the discussion of the cloud migration how does the infrastructure vary across the different teams across the organization right so a limited history obviously atlassian is our expert urine influence than later we picked up other practices desk and yeah a lot of these did develop in different times by different engineering teams and often in different parts of the world so they're tech stocks and how they manage things and how they develop things varied quite a bit but we have been working towards by grade everything into the cloud into a cloud platform for awhile no i would say right now at this point most of our infrastructure is now out like atlassian operated unity's enters on i think that were for the most part in the cloud at this point there is a lot of variance in the technologies that we use but our platform are less is going quite a bit in the value of it has been it has so far been very very clear in terms of getting to devote experience easier and actually even improving reliability on all the services that have adopted so this is a purely internal pass.

atlassian twelve fifteen years
"atlassian" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"atlassian" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"I think this goes back to our transparency on how he deals incidents in how we manage just our infrastructure and how we manage engineering here but especially within cyber reliability injuring transparency is basically must be need to be a front of our mistakes when he learned firm states we can't blame each other about anything that happens and we just need to have you know a very open mind to how we solve these problems and make sure become the best and most innovative always doing things in tactically you've done infrastructure and operations for pretty long time is there anything you any unique practices that have come up at atlassian the differ from other 'sorry or operations teams you've had in the past i would say that with the way which we manage incidents i think is something that we're definitely you know proud of a we have a we do actually go to conferences and we talk about our incident values in how we deal with problems and we have our own atlassian the value of detect respond recover learn it improved message nba's he's might sound they're actually very nick and how we deal with things how he's learned from from arniston how we manage medications so i think that you know if anybody has a chance to to silicon this more yet they're very fascinating in that's something that i think is very out we're very proud of i can't say it's necessarily unique to how we do things but they definitely lineup with our company values as well i think going back to the company values aspect of those company values actually just drive quite a lot of what we do as as a team culturally how we prioritize things in what our pain is on many areas let's probably useful for any company to codify their incident response values and plans you know i think that piece of advice ended up itself would be useful i wanna get into talking about the cloud because you're in the process of migrating to the cloud and i think 'sorry in the context of moving an organization to the cloud is a worthwhile discussion so the products in atlassian were started at different times in last.

nba atlassian
"atlassian" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"atlassian" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Yes they are what we have so far we have things like operational readiness are practices incident management of things of that nature we are we are also keen on expanding that portfolio into other areas that maximize the to scale we have in addition to tooling automation you know our practices also enables atlassian engineering teams themselves to be a little bit batteries in their own rights in that manner you know it makes ourselves as a team much more salable in increases our reach by that much more it should give standardized practices do you also standardize tooling like standardized logging in monitoring and the pipelines for those logging and monitoring systems yes we do we have a team that's part of essary which basically develops and maintains all monitoring log in systems is like a platform engineering team this is not a platform engineering team this is actually a part of although all the tooling does integrate with the existing that lesson blackthorn team so if i'm somebody in team atlassian and i want to spin up logging and monitoring for my service what kind of interface do you want to give give that team that engineer so typically will we want them to do is use the alaskan platform we do have a platform as a service organization which as a partners closely with a when you use their tooling in when you provision resources tools allow the instrumentation happens through that process i'm so that is the fastest and easiest path lease resistant path to it if you're outside the platform in some services still are then yes there is more like a more elaborate instructions nor to in guidelines to use resources but our best recommendation is just use our platform and a lot of pain goes away.

engineer atlassian
"atlassian" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

01:53 min | 2 years ago

"atlassian" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Your services from each other but that again really that enter sat vastly on on what you're running in high rebuild things to begin with so that pendulum swing either direction very easily are there any efforts to move to something like cougar netties it atlassian right now yes that is something that's very interesting to us i can't comment exactly since i'm not since that team is not industry in how that's being addressed but yes that cuban ity is something very interesting it'd be interesting to see how that factors into because you have this home grown pass you know maybe it'll be working cooper netease into that pass or well again i guess you can't you don't you're not the personnel about it tell me about your day to day like you walk into the office on a given day what does the head of 'sorry do well you know i go get some coffee i no really the first thing i do is i take a look at what some of the incidence have been the over the last day or whatever i look at some of the low party wines minutes or aiding that was higher party take those star following in on another part of my day is usually in a lot of planning meetings thinking about what do we do we give the data that we're debt reflected about incidents about a different metrics from services how should we be planning our next our next quarter next year and what are the needs of your guys looking evolving towards elsa how does improvements in liability intimidation hr reduction s low teammate things like that factor into you know the overall organizational plan so that's generally how i spend spend my day obviously other meetings a more tactical things of sprinkle in here and other administrative things but yeah generally that tout plays opt giving you advice for how to conduct a planning meeting for.

atlassian
"atlassian" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

01:35 min | 2 years ago

"atlassian" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Life cycle the company is what like a decade older or moments decade old something like that was definitely whether it'll okay yeah so okay so let's say eleven or twelve fifteen years old i'm not sure but the products in the company were started different times in atlassian life cycle and so the products are assume are backed by different kinds of infrastructure so to set the stage for the discussion of the cloud migration how does the infrastructure vary across the different teams across the organization right so a limited history obviously atlassian is our expert urine influence than later we picked up other practices desk and yeah a lot of these did develop in different times by different engineering teams and often in different parts of the world so they're tech stocks and how they manage things and how they develop things varied quite a bit but we have been working towards by grade everything into the cloud into a cloud platform for awhile no i would say right now at this point most of our infrastructure is now out like atlassian operated unity's enters on i think that were for the most part in the cloud at this point there is a lot of variance in the technologies that we use but our platform are less is going quite a bit in the value of it has been it has so far been very very clear in terms of getting to devote experience easier and actually even improving reliability on all the services that have adopted so this is a purely internal pass.

atlassian twelve fifteen years
"atlassian" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"atlassian" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"I think this goes back to our transparency on how he deals incidents in how we manage just our infrastructure and how we manage engineering here but especially within cyber reliability injuring transparency is basically must be need to be a front of our mistakes when he learned firm states we can't blame each other about anything that happens and we just need to have you know a very open mind to how we solve these problems and make sure become the best and most innovative always doing things in tactically you've done infrastructure and operations for pretty long time is there anything you any unique practices that have come up at atlassian the differ from other 'sorry or operations teams you've had in the past i would say that with the way which we manage incidents i think is something that we're definitely you know proud of a we have a we do actually go to conferences and we talk about our incident values in how we deal with problems and we have our own atlassian the value of detect respond recover learn it improved message nba's he's might sound they're actually very nick and how we deal with things how he's learned from from arniston how we manage medications so i think that you know if anybody has a chance to to silicon this more yet they're very fascinating in that's something that i think is very out we're very proud of i can't say it's necessarily unique to how we do things but they definitely lineup with our company values as well i think going back to the company values aspect of those company values actually just drive quite a lot of what we do as as a team culturally how we prioritize things in what our pain is on many areas let's probably useful for any company to codify their incident response values and plans you know i think that piece of advice ended up itself would be useful i wanna get into talking about the cloud because you're in the process of migrating to the cloud and i think 'sorry in the context of moving an organization to the cloud is a worthwhile discussion so the products in atlassian were started at different times in last.

nba atlassian
"atlassian" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"atlassian" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Okay what gets me what will move that needle hardest and i will spend more time on that than those things out of very basic level yeah sure probably hard to generalize their incident response is obviously core component of 'sorry can you tell me about an interesting incident that you've been a part of it atlassian interesting incident at a lesson while i think that the most interesting ones are unfortunately the ones that are somewhat out of out of our hands when we look at some failures of somewhere providers and these things happened is unfortunate in watching how all the different teams in atlassian a coordinate and communicate with each other those have been extremely the most fascinating for me as a company which builds software to help empower unleash the potential all teams you know vena part of a major incident which i see a lot of different teams involved incident trying to fixings strengthening things up try to understand what the signals going on communicating in collaborating on a common goal towards restoring service mitigating impact communications and then on top of that using our own tools that we built our last year facilitate all that communication those are extremely you know fascinates make there's a lot of improvements that we could claim from with it with their own processes internally how we function as teams and how we make ourselves more efficient when an incident occurs how does it bubble up through the organization so i laugh scenes is a big company.

atlassian
"atlassian" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"atlassian" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Yes they are what we have so far we have things like operational readiness are practices incident management of things of that nature we are we are also keen on expanding that portfolio into other areas that maximize the to scale we have in addition to tooling automation you know our practices also enables atlassian engineering teams themselves to be a little bit batteries in their own rights in that manner you know it makes ourselves as a team much more salable in increases our reach by that much more it should give standardized practices do you also standardize tooling like standardized logging in monitoring and the pipelines for those logging and monitoring systems yes we do we have a team that's part of essary which basically develops and maintains all monitoring log in systems is like a platform engineering team this is not a platform engineering team this is actually a part of although all the tooling does integrate with the existing that lesson blackthorn team so if i'm somebody in team atlassian and i want to spin up logging and monitoring for my service what kind of interface do you want to give give that team that engineer so typically will we want them to do is use the alaskan platform we do have a platform as a service organization which as a partners closely with a when you use their tooling in when you provision resources tools allow the instrumentation happens through that process i'm so that is the fastest and easiest path lease resistant path to it if you're outside the platform in some services still are then yes there is more like a more elaborate instructions nor to in guidelines to use resources but our best recommendation is just use our platform and a lot of pain goes away.

engineer atlassian