17 Burst results for "atlantic theater company"

"atlantic theater company" Discussed on Good For You

Good For You

08:10 min | 11 months ago

"atlantic theater company" Discussed on Good For You

"You were hiding your talent behind that neon poppy or amplifying. You're being too loud. Yeah. You headlines even when you are talking. In an ensemble sometimes he needed to shine. Still Focus is always stealing. But I tell you of fucked up story is that. I would I studied at the Atlantic Theater Company acting school and and. Yeah. I'm going to say on this podcast David Mamat came and gave us a guest class and said to me He called me he was sort of like famously gruff and. Super scared when when you like 'cause he would show about an hour and you have to like. Dad. You have to put something up for him right now, claw pair to like a scene the whatever, and he was really such a God at that school and you know in in the community at large and And I put up a scene that I had written and it was really scary. But I was like fuck it I'm going to want to see what happens and he. He usually would cut people off halfway through so brutal and he let me get through it and then he said who wrote that and I said I did he you should you should keep writing and it was so beautiful. But then afterwards, he came up to me and he said, why are you here and I said like I was I was like, what do you mean his? You're acting school like I'm here to learn a craft and he was like, well, your shelf life is short. What is an why are you could be a writer? Not An actor acting though I, think acting wise he was like you should just be allowed there. No go out there and start working. Oh Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. As a as an on camera presence because you're all the matter. So don't worry about the crafts because and at the time he might have been right. He might have not known the shift to that was coming. Well, you know what I mean. I mean he was right in that. I'm on his sign mazes amazingly, but it was so discouraging like as a young woman who was who was so excited to be. So if your career now if this is you discouraged. Imagine like David Mamat held you back. This is you this is you at your like lowest success Because he you. Well Wow. I. Remember we were at the practical I didn't I don't think I knew that so practical handbook, right? Yeah. Whatever, yes, my my. Training. But don't tell me you don't do that. Shit. Insane. Prep the. Prep Ray I, do not I hate that crap. On Lipsticks train there that's just the book Beta where I was I remember we were at a wrap party for Whitney. A wrap party and I always thought the key 'cause I was reading books on how to be a boss I just like I was like I'm trying my boss now I have to figure it out. So I would like read these books I'd like to in the morning. like how to win friends and influence like how to you know and one of them is like know everybody's name all the time. So I'm GonNa know everyone's name because it was like I'm a woman I'm in charge people already hate me already actress. So the writers in the room hate me because I'm the actress in the actress hate me because I'm also the right. Are you know it's like I'm I, ever triggering everyone and I'm You know also have no idea what I'm doing right and then So I learned like snow everybody's names and that was my whole thing. I'd stay up at night now in memorize the whole cast cast I had to learn your names finding. Probably. Would memorize the whole cruelest right because I was like, Oh, they're gonNA think I'm leak will to them and like Hey John Look them in the I like no one's GonNa feel abandoned and rejected by me in they're gonNA do their best work and this is all going to go get fixed and the ad campaigns are gonNA come to. Or whatever I was hoping you know I'm GonNa stop being like you know humiliated in the press and and size of the wrap party and someone whose name I didn't know and it was like, oh. No, you know I've to go introduce myself to this person I was like, Hi, know you your name and here's like I'm John was like Oh. What do you do on the show like I'm a good News like, Oh, I fix your face in post. Like what I was like, what do you mean? He's like, oh. Yeah. I take out your circles and post and I was like, Oh, I beat fair he did it needs to be that specific no. Oh, to be fair he has asked Burgers. Yeah he panicked. I'm impose I'm in post she said, I. Don't WanNa, take that. Well, he was proud of his word I mean that's the other thing is like I'm the one that told he and he thought he was. You know he thinks good. He was helping. He was you know he didn't know that I didn't know. So I was told you have to turn and cuts five days sooner I didn't know I would they lied to me and they didn't tell me. which is probably the right. Probably the right thing to do in retrospect. But yeah so I looked like. Marzipan in the show, it's just I looked like a piece of cake. I looked like a pound. yeah. Is that? Is it a favorite food like five or six words she like? She called the craft legacy. Visual Marginal Marzipan. It's so are you mean it looks like it's like Oh God. I was on bad wi fi. Arabs. Jet Blue. It's animated, right? It's The whole thing out of focus on. Make it a dream like say? It just took her two hours to watch the trailer. So bad your wedding. Oh my God. Mary still engaged. Take your time the best. Aber so hot so hot it's really hot. So we waited nine years to get married. Yeah. That's right. That's right. Yeah. How long what how long till the craft until this talk over we've got three or four more hours on. I. Comes out on October twenty eighth today today. Oh my God. We love you. Thank you for doing this. This is our reunion, our Whitney rain again, we'll do it real when they get back Yes for sure Congrats the both of you I. Love You starring everybody. I mean, you're better call Saul unbelievable. Come on unbelievable work. Thank, you give her all. The awards. Let's give me all the awards. Yeah. You don't have time to do all the bullshit brunches and shed are actually what got people the awards by awards. Because, you're working get more money than. Like people know there were like the bullshit of awards it's all like who's willing to go the most breakfasts I Love Yeah and then the studio has play all. You're missing I feel like we're not the takeaway which is was aligned that Roxanne said in her audition, not the takeaway. Not to take away, not take away. All right I'm going to set. We're doing an all night shoot. Oh my God I love you. Happy to be working. Right by guys. Come on let us surprise I might take these. Yes. These now come off invention. What was your question about? Well right back it s OK. P. I have a lot. It's your turn so First of all I just WanNa know or say for everyone that's going to watch assist the maybe have my expectations at the way that you go about introducing us into these moments from the original craft. Is So. New in respect for like the way that you threw in lights stiffen as a board where it was a moment and like this thing remember this thing guys everybody remember this we remember and you gave us so many new moments too attached to was golden. Thank you. There's once I don't want to give too much in the movie whip. There's one scene specifically in this movie that really stuck out to me were they are. Talking with This mellow character who has had this like rebirth into this new identity and how he gets there anything but where they?.

David Mamat writer Atlantic Theater Company Ray I Whitney Saul wi Burgers John Aber Roxanne Mary
"atlantic theater company" Discussed on Life is Short with Justin Long

Life is Short with Justin Long

13:19 min | 1 year ago

"atlantic theater company" Discussed on Life is Short with Justin Long

"To pursue acting. At what point did you discover? You did work at Circle in the square with Mamat. Is that when I went to Nyu? That's when I started studying with him. It was a class and he at some point shows like twenty of us and he said I'm going to have a thing over the summer here is and that was the beginning of the Atlantic Theater Company. All my God A. He's one of my favorites and I've heard I just fascinated by him and his place. What were you aware of? You read his place of him and I thought he was a really incredible teacher. I learned a lot Although when it was time to like do they're like okay? This is GonNa be the company and you guys write this. I mean I liked everyone but I knew they weren't my people for some reason and I'm not even sure if I got ass back I have to. I can't I kind of a murky feeling about those member like teacher because I know his whole ethos is all acting. Ethos is that you just say the words you say this this dictates everything. I think that's where I had probably. That would be time. Oh no I remember what happened. YEP so basically he's like Oh Strasbourg feel the music with your toes and he was saying and I understand. He's just like do the words. Get your intention figure out what you're doing Blah Blah Blah. Which to me is like one on one. You have to do all that stuff and even stink do it anyway. And it's it's a good technique But then when I went back Anyone who says oh you these other people. I'm like I'm going to go study at Strasbourg. Now I'm going to go study with playwrights. I did what you weren't supposed to do it. And why you move around but oh I I would think that would be a good thing to kind of sample. They don't let you did it anyway and Because I'm a I'm a rebel. Rouser no I I was. I was curious about it. And then we'll soon as I graduated college I kind of had my own gang of friends from Nyu and just from around like Fisher Stevens and Oh yeah your house line again and you know frankly lazy and bill and all of a sudden and said fuck it. Let's just start our own theatre company and so we start naked angel. Oh that's right. That's yeah oh it was born out of that. I mean I didn't go that way and I kept. I love the idea of it but something didn't feel totally fit for me and I thought I mean I do think they really go by David's. I think there was so much it was like the Sanford. Meisner method that. I think it's really great but I also wanted to do big emotional crazy shit. That didn't really fit into what he was doing as much. And so I wanted to learn methods stuff sensory work and so you started doing actual were you doing original Kenny. Lie Naked Angels. Can you WANNA again right there? And Robert John Robin Beta lawn again more and light while we had an insane group of writers. And we're all just doing one action. We're all just saying let's put on a show because no one was hiring us and would you say of the original members of the naked angels. Your parts were the worst or I had the silent ones the SMELLY. That's what I sure. I would usually like blame like Fisher. It's easy to blame Fisher. Es Flames looks like a far look. At what point after that? Did the film career really kicked into high gear. Was It showgirls. No showgirls was a little bit later. I had done Sinatra mini series. Okay so you were working consistently I was working. I was either doing theater. I started the L. A. T. C. In La or I was doing Like dumb movies in trying to do stuff and then Michio girls is definitely the biggest high profile. I noticed you've never done anything longer than six. You've never done a series like a six year long one of those long term commitment. I do. I was wondering if that's what I you know I actually. I think it's one of the one things. I'm not a big believer in regrets. I think things happen for a reason. Why am I love? Regret but book on do you do. What do you regret Don't get me started really relationships you know. I'm not getting into the relationships but staying in them. I suppose because of my own guilt in whatever reasons that it now seems so silly and petty. They just weren't ready to get out. Yeah but it's like I know it's a waste of time waste of time and I have a couple of those talk about that after especially when it comes to doing a character like the idea of doing a character for more than let's say like a year or two years at that to me seems like it might not be as yeah. I was nervous about that. And then the my first series that I did that I really did was a David Kelly show and I didn't really want to do it and everyone's like Oh David Kelly. He's great but I just saw part was there and then I went in and they ended up offering it to me and I just talked about really. I had just had a really bad break up so I was in L. A. and I just wanted to get to New York where my friends were and where I felt safer for some reasons your family still in La at a but my relationship and my whole big break was just like. I need to get a then date I was like. I don't know David and done alley. Mcbeal Yeah Yeah Oh okay. Let's coming off of that and so I said I kind of like the guys parties like right you. You could be the guy and I kept saying you know I'm GonNa get sick of playing the same part. He said. Well you'll be something different every week and I'm looking at anything I said. I mean there's a reason why he's David Kelly. I'm like Shit I can't turn this down and so I said yes and Michelle pfeiffer to be. Eventually she was like fine. I'll be with you. Make It really fun. He's like the nicest I heard. I heard he's great and we kind of made a side deal. I'm saying I'm really in a weird place right now. One if I get scared about being on this show one if I want if I got. He's at anytime you're sick of it. Just give me the word. Well stop it and everyone's like Oh you're stuck and I said I trust the sky and it was fun. I got to play different parts and I didn't realize how great I had with him but he was doing like four other shows so when he wrote I loved it wasn't I was like wait a second and I didn't even know what a show runner was be like. What's worth your hair? I'm like what's with your shoes with the right attitude what After a year I got out of. I said I was very depressed. Doing what was the show called? It's called SNOOPS. Oh yeah remember soon. Not just because they're not as show. I was just snap now. I was just in a bad head space during that time and I I think I was just too affected. I couldn't think straight but looking back. We should've kept going would have been like let's change it become a producer on like he was so and. I didn't understand how how marred that was to get someone like him to do. Show now trying to get showed under Michael Davis and take my call remember. Remember the lightning that we can work together. I guess you lied. And what happened to the show? The show just folded Wow Wow what. What kind of thing are you looking to do? Now we're Kinda Show and David Kelly's listening David Kelly so gina he doesn't talk about where that came from. Hold on Michelle's texting me again. How does the worst? I've never heard him talk and I don't know it'd be fun to create a show. I JUST WANNA be at this point on a show. Maybe not such as Improv as kermit certainly the freedom with really good people who I know who I like and I've sold a couple of shows with a nave. Never actually gone so. I'm really trying to figure out what I've done. I mean the last shows I've done had ended up being musical stuffed. I did a car you didn't you weren't here when I did my residency. The Cafe Carlyle. No I heard about. How long was that? Fun is two weeks and I wrote a one woman show that I keep thinking maybe I should bring that back and do it somewhere. But Oh things he's doing music and I did another one woman show that turned into a book. The might remember my cat booked How I found my pussy and lost my mind I search of Cleo was about my hat American but I wrote a one woman show about that. That was re I really liked. I'd like to do something like that again. But if you pussy something involving a procedure one does now. I liked him music with your brother. Yeah like a young adult book and what inspired that? He came up with this idea and he told me about it he said. I wrote this book at this idea and I was like. Wow that's really great. Where did you steal that idea from you said I didn't I wrote an Hannity's pages? Alternate you sweetie stolen a writer. When did you start writing? What does he do He's kind of an entrepreneur. Has some crazy thing on the Internet now with color and It's it's pretty out there but it's pretty great. Zen Color Occur But anyway to make a long story. Short ice looked at it. I said you could write this book as a this is a great movie and he never wrote it and then it just kept bothering after three years. I'm like you need to write that things. I WanNa make a movie out of it and I. It was like back and forth. You do it you do it. Yeah finally we wrote it together and cool after about a year and a half And then it turned into a book and then Spielberg bought it like before it even worn out Frank Spielberg Francs Filbert. No Steven Spielberg even know. Gilbert side only gone to market and so then Richard Lebron as was stream play. We had kind of a Dream Team and then it went into that development howl and kept Langley. Why are you making it like this familiar story? A why is it now? I mean I actually own everything I took the rights back. I keep seeing all David Kelly. Kelly it's cute but then it was before Diary of a teenage kid and before twilight okra. To end it there. Is You know vampires where we'll send it to kind of kid who cries wolf. It's really cute. Yeah but I feel like there's just such There's like an unending appetite for stuff like that and I know I think I need to get an agent. I was wondering. Why aren't I going out? Roy Forgot why? Why don't you have in this case? I saw you doing. Okay all my jobs I need to get. I decided today I need to get an agent but a good agent well. Yeah ideally You're an actress in Hollywood throughout the eighties. Nineties two thousand. You've I'm sure you've seen your share of deplorable behaviour. That is you know. Thankfully coming to light with a lot of these You know I kinda I had Maybe the closest with one time I have to say like the audition. Nagai said something creepy like. Oh you're so cute when you get up and walk around and I was doing theater then need to make some money. Yeah and immediately. I was like us if you're going to be gross. I'm just GONNA leave. Well he's like all off you. Delete 'em like see later. Good luck and I left and guess what I still got the part no shit and then on the set. I'm like you know we're GonNa get along great if you just don't talk to me. I was there for two days with money but I I don't know I always maybe because out of big brother or something where I grew up In the valley and a lot of weird stuff was going on. I mean I just always kind of learned how to really. I've gotten very close to very bad situations. I always had to kind of get out of situations and being very vocal and very directing getting out of there and you would probably be because of your upbringing. A six tenths of of when there was trouble or danger a foot during the air. Yeah I'd been a couple of situations where you kind of learn how to defend yourself a little bit and but I have to say I have to say I think out of all of this you know I just hope like remember when like just say no to drugs. I just hope that girls. 'cause everything is shifting as you're growing up and boys whoever you know as a young person or a vulnerable person you need to really learn to look someone in the eye and say don't do that right and because it makes all the difference in the world and I understand how people are scared of that but you know also I have to say even. I think when I got showgirls. I was so excited because I thought Oh my God I grew up a dancer and it was like I thought it was like Fosse like movement. Yeah I was looking at basic instinct and I was thinking had done basically Just before that was this movie well and all his Dutch films it was obsessed with his dot com. And I thought Oh my God. This guy's a director in basic instinct. I that was cool. And so when you know like. I said I had grown up being a modern dancer so like dancing around like that. It wasn't that big of a deal for me because I thought I'm dancer I could. I could marry that with acting. Oh my God this is fantastic screen. Part a great part in part that. I didn't think I was going to get. I thought I was too young by lake kind of lied about my age and said it was much older because at first. I read it. Which part of my plan not old enough to play? Oh Yeah you're supposed to be like the kind of more seasoned leg. It was like all about eve and I thought wait a second the Margot instead of evening so I think I'd put on so much make up and I think I lied about my age and I.

David Kelly Fisher Stevens Atlantic Theater Company Nyu Strasbourg Mamat Steven Spielberg Michelle pfeiffer Cafe Carlyle Michelle Sinatra Rouser Meisner Sanford Kenny Robert John Robin La Mcbeal
"atlantic theater company" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:51 min | 1 year ago

"atlantic theater company" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Backwards to bar the sharing of law enforcement relevant information much more on this controversy a developing story coming up after news headlines tonight rain temperatures rising to around forty six degrees overnight currently it's forty two degrees and it is raining in Central Park at five thirty on the brain there so we cover the news and take calls from all types of listeners from people who work on Wall Street the people who had to sleep on the street because people need a place to make sense of what's going on and decide for themselves how to be constructive American set this intense moment the Brian Lehrer show weekdays ten to noon on ninety three point nine FM and AMA twenty W. NYC support for W. NYC comes from Atlantic theater company presenting the US premiere of anatomy of a suicide and exploration of mothers and daughters by Alice birch starring Carla Gugino now playing through March fifteenth tickets at Atlantic theater daughter work if you believe democracy requires a free press your station is W. NYC ninety three point nine FM and am eight twenty NPR news and the New York conversation live from NPR news in Culver city California nine to Wayne brown present truck broke with tradition this morning at the national prayer breakfast in Washington DC one day after the Republican led Senate acquitted him on articles of impeachment the prayer breakfast is one time when Democrats and Republicans try to be kind to one another several speakers stressed the theme of the day to love your enemies as way to defuse some of the tensions in the country but at that breakfast sent again later the White House trump struck a very different tone taking a swipe.

Central Park Brian Lehrer W. NYC Alice birch Carla Gugino Senate NYC US Atlantic theater NPR Culver city California Wayne brown Washington White House
"atlantic theater company" Discussed on In Conversation w/ Busayo Olupona

In Conversation w/ Busayo Olupona

06:51 min | 2 years ago

"atlantic theater company" Discussed on In Conversation w/ Busayo Olupona

"Climate. I as as as those of us that are children of of people who came on these journeys right And perhaps forged our own identity as Americans and now. I think for the first time when we when I got here. I was told daily that I didn't belong but I think for a period of time. I kind of could pretend that like you know things were messed up. But like at least that immigrant identity wasn't getting challenge sort of my my legitimacy as citizens perhaps being challenged as a black person but that immigrants might immigrant life could kind of maybe. It's living in New York. I didn't feel like assaulted the same way And so in terms of this this political time that went in and really looking at your work and yourself as a Nigerian American in this time comment I like. I don't have a question I don't question. I just feel like as an artist. You know can't be you know. I don't know what my parents in ten. When they came here they came here late. Sixties early seventies this peak civil rights as black people but Africans hearing the N. Word and they moved into Jersey or they manziel Chicago came to New Jersey New York over the first game so they came very political places they weren't like in like Nebraska. Whatever and to be here now. It's like dad jokes like like literally clown you know In our White House got elected he was like Ghazi Julian now right the loudest else ridiculous person win. Why did I move for Ya? So you're just like yeah but at the same time. I feel very empowered not unfazed. I'll tell you that much I'm constantly like oh we live in a new place slash old place. Now we all see it from me. The struggle for me is like why does what I make matter with the things that are constantly going on. And how can I make my work matter? And how can I? What can I do with an artist so for me? It's like how can I get more Africans to the theater more black to the theater? How can I get more people to walk into this play and maybe have a sense of healing because we walk out to the world more healed we can be stronger to fight against craziness? Yeah you know what I mean. I'm like okay great. How can I crack some hearts open people who look at me and hate me just because I've used my existence bothers them because I'm African and empowered because I'm a woman and empowered because I'm black and empowered? Maybe if you walk into this play you might go. Oh you're person and it. It makes me more sort of ferocious about my empathy and relentless about my kindness. I'm trying to crack hearts open because people are walk into a theaters. Like this going to play when the world is fucking coming to an end. And hopefully you're like going and I'm seeing people go an open like an unfold their hands and I've seen these people and walkout collectivism literally. You know what I mean and yeah I feel like that's the job of what we can do with our theater with my theater. That's my that is how I have made my theater matter so I don't quit. I WANNA quit a lot and go. No one cares. It doesn't matter the world ending. I should have went to school to become a lawyer because no you should be trying to send us all back so I got. I got to figure out how to get. Hey but yeah no about heart. Art Does something I think incredibly powerful right like it just. Does you know and people in that audience who may not even know a Nigerian. I in or maybe you know like there is there moments of connection or people who see their own immigration journeys their negotiation of identity in the struggle that this woman is going through. I think the place certainly succeeds. Yeah and I love the idea of being ferocious swith empathy. I love that you gotta just be like. It's like literally trying to light bulb and doesn't play. It's like how do I get and you just gotta be relentless with it because it's It's easy to let people be in their unkind circles. And it's it's easy to let people go. It's easy to let people go. I've let some people go around my. You Are Training. But what happens if we actually go? You take a breath you go. I'll try again. Let him go let him go. But yeah it makes you feel like a what what relationships are worth it. And what what what art is worth. It is worth it you know and it makes the only right thing that I feel like are worth it you you know. We're Mike I don't feel like that story doesn't I'm working with a play that that was the first ever tried to write ten twelve years ago. I tried to write this one plane. Mikey and it didn't matter at that time as it doesn't matter I can get paid any team and then I wrote bureau to earlier this year in like four days causing. Oh now now. Oh that's what I'm trying to say. Oh now this matters. Now I have to be aware ear to the ground my heart to the ground as far as what's happening in our world and now I found based on the craziness of a world why this play matters to me when I can keep going with it. And for this I had no spoilers. Obviously with the way that we're we're at fisherwoman women nece and things like that. I have to be responsible when I say this. Play about some things and I have to go. What is the point that I am trying to make about things that happen to women in this play and for me? It's like that you are not the sum of an event you can you? Can you know and you should and I don't know how but he was in. Here's one here's one example And it's okay. That doesn't look like let's get into the Senate because he right. That's not realistic. But here's a here's a here's a way. Well thank you you you for this amazing play homecoming Queen at the Atlantic Theater Company. It closes on February eleventh February eleventh. May lessons reviews. Come out and go total February. Seventeen O okay between till February. Eleven of the opportunity to see this amazing. Get your tickets now because it selling out very quickly and hopefully extended until February seventeenth. Yes yes fingers crossed. Thanks much thank you. Thank you so much for being here and keep me..

Atlantic Theater Company New York Ghazi Julian White House Senate Nebraska Mikey New Jersey New York Chicago
"atlantic theater company" Discussed on In Conversation w/ Busayo Olupona

In Conversation w/ Busayo Olupona

13:01 min | 2 years ago

"atlantic theater company" Discussed on In Conversation w/ Busayo Olupona

"So there's something really cool going on in the New York theater scene. I don't know what it is but over the last two years I've seen some amazing plays by young first generation African American playwright so children of African immigrants are killing it on the New York stage. And it's been really exciting as an audience member. I recently saw a great play by Anglesey on Yahoo called Homecoming Queen at the Atlantic Theater Company. It runs through February eighteenth because he is a actor. She's a playwright. She's the CO founder of the now Africa playwrights festival. She is sort of amazing and in just a renaissance woman and I wanted to have a conversation with her about identity and some of the issues that those of us who live at the intersection of these cultures really face on a regular basis. So I am so excited to share this conversation with you and I hope you enjoy it as much as I did. Oh was he is a playwright of this amazing play that I just saw today Homecoming Queen at the Atlantic Theater Company. Stage to say to the play is I don't even want to. I don't even know where to start. The sort of tagline. It's a story of a young Nigerian woman. Going home for the first time after being away for about fifteen years. But it's so much more than it is they're like what's your law blind. Now's like pick something many different. I've read so many different long lines for this. I thought when I was coming clean about the sort of funeral rites led a young woman was going through or preparing for. And then the play really. Wasn't that yet but I knew I read that somewhere so I knew I wasn't making that. Yeah but Anyway so I just play today and I I have so many questions still processing it. So the character Kelci she is coming home after being away and there's a tension anxiety that is is palpable coming from her. Yeah and it's not even a question it's like for me reminded me so much of my first visit to Nigeria in two thousand. What did you start like how to in creating her? What did what did you come into her? What did you tap into this this character and that the experience that she's about to embark on? I mean I went back to Nigeria myself when I was twenty seven after I haven't had been gone for fourteen years and I had a bunch of friends actually at that town is twenty-seven all not been back since they were like young teens with their parents and like all of a sudden. We're going back and I was like. What is that em? So a few years ago we started a thing called the first version. I dream project and in the beginning incarnations was like me Like we were just talking about stuff. And and she NASA this woman the Omah and then eventually it was me. The group eventually became me money. So Yvonne G was how that's also how we met. This girl told margin of blue and we were pressured. Nigerians and I was like what is like. There's something here. About being artists in females and having daddy issues being sort of strong minded women that were raised in a very patriarchal culture. You know So that was the beginning of the seedlings of that and then I had written i. I play good grief and then My grandmother had passed and watched that be really hard on adult people on like adult people in their fifties. You know how they had a really hard time letting her go and they went to go bury her and then my dad actually to go back the following year in bury his father but he'd been gone for fifty years his his his father had passed for fifty years. And you never done a proper burial and I was like. Oh God so. This was a fifty year anniversary of his father's death. That had just been passed for more than two years that he had never done like the formal. He'd never done like the formal thing that your school to do. And so he went back into that and I was not able to go with him and I was like really like like I would. Just I know what that is for my father and then talking to him and my mother and being like you know this'll you have to do for us and having a very real commerce really really talking about this now. But like their sixties late sixties or seventies and you know having a very real conversation about like though you were born and raised here. They're just things some things you have to do their positions you have to do and being being like. I don't even know what you're talking about. And so that was the starting point for this play. It said about a woman who goes home to this culture that is close to her very distant from her for many reasons and I think the profound sense. I certainly remember my first trip back on and this profound loss that you you have you know the sense of some of the things. The what's bizarre about the losses that you can usually articulate what it is. You've lost in other scenarios but in this one it's almost like there's a sense of belonging that you may not have any long like anymore. There's a sense of like you kind of recognize things but you don't quite know them the way the people there know them or you don't have the relationships that they have and so this amorphous sense of loss. That can be so powerful because I was trying to understand. Why is this woman so anxious in difficult? Yeah but I got it in my body into the That sense of loss. Can you talk a little bit about that? Like did you feel that when he went back home and how racking it was you know? There's this place that they see me and they know me because my father and my mother so well to the point where I walk around my dad's villas a big hit and it's name that's my dad's name me and my dad essentially also. I mean besides the fact that I may female as a male we are literally built the same. You see me like your Kennedy's daughter Josephine's daughter and so and so like even the way you stop you know Emma. Heavy footed stocking woman and my dad's a heavy footed so to walk around my father's village and having this can you know and had them know something so clearly about me that that might be you know but they just with grabbed me up and grit me up and like just you know and it was just law and there's just so familiar with people who don't know you kind of take liberties with how they touch you take a liberties with how they speak to. You know personal face no person but it's like with great love you know but that also comes with if elise for my anxiousness burden because it's like I probably the New Yorker in me is what do you want from me. What do you what what do you want? You know as opposed to like they just WanNa touch you and see you and feel you and like you came good good you know you come from good but like I'm also not bilingual so I think maybe if I was bilingual I would probably have less of a time walking around and stopping village because people are talking shit. I I know what you're saying. You know what I mean. 'cause deep connection room like. I feel Very Nigerian. My walk into my parents home. You mean their home here. Their home here and I was raising my uncles and aunts as well. They had the Nigerian associations in the church situations. Major your raids around other Nigerian kids and other Nuba Kids but at the same time. I don't know my language at the same time I don't live in Nigeria the time I don't know my way around. I actually do now actually because I actually. When I was twenty seven. I went back and called every uncle and cousin I had him was like I'm going to attack about I'm going to pick Tory island like travel and I just would be like Kinda backpacks through Nigeria to my parents complete and total dismay and just my mom was like you've been to more than jury. That's actually amazing. 'cause I would say one thing they do to really do that and then going to be like your Tau Jazz while you like. I remember once my parents one trip. I said I really want to go to their niche market. And they were like who do we know? They're literally for them. They were like everyone so afraid of like each other. Sections that it's like I also did not have my visa. Because I'm I've never travelled out also tonight dream without a Visa Nigeria. I knew the question. I have a green passport now. Yeah I love. My grandpa comes in very handy and we need to know how to do the switch right Did you consider acting in this life? Yes I acted in the workshop of it But it's still had work to do and when I would get in the Pitney as a writer. Amock rehearsals cancelled And I had known for some time and I and she'd workshop it sort of earlier this year and she wasn't available for the workshop that I stepped into So I was like oh I think this this to me feels right for her and her journey as an as an actor because she does not say yes to a lot of things as an actor. We're sort of on the opposite. Journeys writer actor issues like sort of like blossoming just prolific writer. I'm like my maybe have three plays total and I'm sort of more of an actor. That's where I come from while she's really become like a writer ended just ascribe But I've always when I performed with her always found it to be sort of really wonderful. Oh this yeah I think she. I think she's. I think guitar interesting. That you you bring her up because you know been thinking about her infamy so Jocelyn on you really ray. I'm probably forgetting somebody but I feel like this last year last two years. I've been seeing a lot of or not a lot. But compared to like five years ago it was like none but did I do not Jackson's from Ghana but that playfield so Niger claim as an HR V. I literally was the exact same. Yeah without the Glamour Glamour at our boarding school sort of the young Nigerian Ghanaian American playwrights. That are sort of writing these stories. That are at the intersection of of our culture negotiating. These things I'm really hopeful that this is going to be like explode and absolutely because it's time that's the reason we're told and what I loved about this play. Is that the texture of the play like you. It took me immediately to a mistake I'm someone that maybe has a little bit of Intrigue Rain into into the images in the scenes but what I love is that the authenticity of course. Which is what you get when the playwright is from that place but also like it. Grounded me so immediately in this particular culture In such a specific way which I think is so necessary for just reshaping the presentation of Africa on American or New York stage. I'd seen some terrible things that I won't talk over time out to. I can't but also going on visions and things like that kind of stuff that you I will say. The Nice thing about being a writer now is that I feel very empowered as a performer. because I'm also surrounded by a lot of black female like and African and Caribbean and just black American writers. I feel very empowered to say no to things that wanted there when they are specifically African written by non Africans and I find it particularly dislike. You know what I mean I find I find myself I can say no now but Yeah I I'm I'm particularly more empowered to not even I don't. I don't regard those things the more that you're that you're hearing it from the authentic voice. The less I think people can get away with it quite frankly absolutely good luck an feeds each other right like I feel like with funds. Plays coming out back to back the way they're enwrap is a beautiful feed leeway into Joscelyn's Nali with dreams schoolgirls was a lovely freeway homecoming queen. Because you know it just it gives you more of an entry point whether you're from that place or not that when you start to see things that are inauthentic and this is any world when you started to see things we see something that is authentic. You're you're you're just more curious about more of that as opposed to like this. What does this other thing you know like the character is from Africa and they don't they wear from our General? Yeah I mean I. There's one place particular where the character of Africa and the whole way I guess but from and no one they never win the country university. The country. And I'm like this is like no African I can. I cannot play. No African I know would be in a room. For more than ten seconds of Nazi ex players are from down..

Nigeria Africa writer New York Atlantic Theater Company CO founder Yahoo NASA Tory island Caribbean Yvonne G Joscelyn elise Tau Jazz Jocelyn Ghana Pitney country university Emma
"atlantic theater company" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:10 min | 2 years ago

"atlantic theater company" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"And he's a fan. That's a really nice wine aircraft the control feel to it is really solid. It's a quiet airplane. Extremely fuel efficient American has twenty four of the max aids. It's ordered more than six. More over the next few years southwest and United also fly the max, but Goldberg was stunned to learn that a new automated flight control system called M S may have caused the crashes. We were not informed gist of the cash system, not to mention how to deal with any particular malfunctions that might occur with that senators pressed government officials about that this week, and although Boeing has announced a software upgrade, it could take months until regulators around the world approved the plane to fly both the airlines and Boeing need each other to succeed the other major producer of fuel-efficient single-aisle aircraft is Europe's Airbus and it also has thousands of planes to build pan says, even if airlines like Indonesia's guru could get out of their contracts would not have the capacity to fulfill these orders financial advisor, Susan Kaplan says she still has confidence in Boeing it's got more than a century of aviation experience. And until these two crashes it had a stellar safety. Eckard? It's also probably too big to fail their businesses. So many whether the fighter jets helicopters guided weapons satellites, they're just an enormous colossus. And the assumption in the field is they'll fix it. American southwest and United all say, they're sticking to their orders. The stakes are high southwest revised its revenue forecast downward for this quarter in part because of the Boeing groundings Germany's T U I group did as well and Lufthansa says it will soon replace at least one hundred single-aisle planes, and it hasn't decided whether to go with Boeing or its rival Airbus, but CEO karston spor says we have not lost our trust in Boeing Daniele Chesler NPR news. This is NPR news. Support for WNYC comes from Atlantic theater company, presenting the US premiere of the mother.

Boeing Airbus NPR karston spor Lufthansa Susan Kaplan Goldberg WNYC Indonesia Atlantic theater company US Germany CEO pan advisor M S producer Europe
"atlantic theater company" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:06 min | 2 years ago

"atlantic theater company" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Excess. About two dozen food Bank. Volunteers are working to set up. A makeshift drive for a special food distribution day in a vacant parking lot in Saint Louis. There are six pallets each stack. More than six feet, high with half gallon jugs of whole milk waiting to be putting the trunks of the cars that drive through Lenora Gooden is in charge of operations for the Saint Louis area food Bank and says this is an unscheduled distribution. So it's a blessing to us because it's also milk and the stuff that can go back quickly that we don't have to purchase because we don't get it donated so much in these quantities. So we'll take whatever they send us. This extra food comes from the US department of agriculture as part of the effort to help farmers hurt by tariffs. The USDA is buying two hundred and fifty million pounds of meat and sixty five million pounds of cheese and milk to distribute the food banks across the country in Saint Louis today. It's just dairy the meat should arrive next month with cold storage. Capacity and foodbanks inundated. Something's gotta give Scott Brown is an agricultural economist with the university of Missouri. He says production has been outpacing demand for long enough that he sees a breaking point it is sending the signal to the supply side of these industries to at least slow the growth that we've seen for the last few years. So as I look ahead in twenty nineteen twenty twenty in particular seems like we're going to be finding a little better balance, but meat and dairy producers don't see it that way. Economist Bill Roenick works for a number of meat and trade groups and says despite the surplus and lower prices more efficient meat production has many farmers in the black checking making money certain parts of beef are making money certain parts of fog industry, making money. So in that sense, you're making money the signals all you should continue to do what you're doing or produce a bit more. There's been an increased demand for some of the food piling up. China's pigs were hit with an outbreak of African swine fever. So China bought twenty three thousand tons of US, pork, despite the tariff that's meet that would have otherwise gone into cold storage or two overloaded foodbanks for NPR news. I'm Jonathan all. It's all things considered on WNYC coming up next the conversation with Katie sewers about how she became only the second woman in history to hold a full time coaching position in the NFL. Also, just ahead. The song old town road reached number nineteen on Billboard's country charts, but then it was removed for not being country enough, which has as thinking does country music have room for new sounds in. It's John we'll consider that question up next on all things considered. Stay tuned. Next week on all of it comedian and actor Bill posing on a seller show the day I between black plus the star. And director of a new side film highlight, Robert Hanssen and director Claire Denise and Ross Chaffetz. And Patty marks of one line advice and 'lustration is called. Why don't you write my you do now? So I can correct it. I'm Alison Stewart. Don't miss all of it. Weekdays at noon on WNYC. WNYC is supported by Atlantic theater company, presenting the US premiere of the mother a new play about a woman grasping for stability by French writer. Florian Zeller starring Isabelle who pair and Chris noth tickets at Atlantic theater dot.

Saint Louis WNYC China Bill Roenick Scott Brown US department of agriculture Lenora Gooden Alison Stewart US Florian Zeller director Billboard Atlantic theater university of Missouri Atlantic theater company USDA Robert Hanssen
"atlantic theater company" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:32 min | 2 years ago

"atlantic theater company" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Absolutely, right. Because that person I think if I'm guessing wrote that knows me, you know, and that person knows that I am very very very good on my feet, and that that actual piece of criticism pushed me to where I am now as a performer, and like, you know, I sort of rehearse with my band a lot, and I rehearse the music a lot. But then the pattern. Has a much broader swath just talk about what I want to talk about. Right. And and when I do these shows that's the best part of the shows. Like when I go I'm going on this tour, and I'm really excited, I'm going. I'm starting on the west coast. Like, I think it's the third week of March. Right as soon, I know, I know I'm really excited about it. And those shows the best part of those shows when I'm not on script. I just kind of go off and start talking about stuff, you know. So and that was one piece of criticism that I remember that really really like pierced through and like said something to me and helped my guess is is if he were talking about his memoir, I am a memoir. There's an interesting tension between the fashion industry. Which can be very exclusive is really exciting. You wanna be a part of the club. And then somebody's telling you can't be hardly club because your shorts. Why y'all darted curly-haired straight? There's a lot of there's a lotta to your to all this kind of stuff. How did you navigate that giving, you know in the book, you really clear, very honest about your insecurities, and you know, have somebody who has issues going to fashion just seems like let me step on the fourth. The pitch hitting me in the face. You're so right. It was my way of like sort of gaining this kind of bird's eye view over people. Right. Like, yes. I was fat. And I talk about this like it was okay. That I kind of early on knew that I wasn't the most gorgeous thing in the room because it allowed me this kind of way to step back and kind of dress in black which I still do and kind of stand there and go, no, you know, it would be better for you is this or that, you know, and I will tell you this which is that. At some point. That changed right? And my whole perception of the fashion business change when I first started when I was eighteen and I worked at Perry Ellis. And then I worked at Calvin Klein, and I got myself my own line. And then it blew up and there I was and I was kind of in this world. And then I went like, oh, my God this world, which excludes this person, and that person, and basically everyone, you know, and the way they sell close is just so obscene. It's this. It's this thing where people, you know. They convince you that you don't have anything until you have this, right? Like throw everything away and get this. Right. And then they tell you. Well, you're too fat for your legs you short. You're the wrong color. You're the wrong gender. Whatever it is. You know, it's really really exclusive right at that point. I feel like it's broadened itself. A lot bless fashion. Because it really is the word fashion is changing its own definition. Right. But if you look at the definition of fashion, it's what everybody thinks they want at one moment. And but at some point on getting at here is like at some point I looked up and I was like, I don't wanna do this anymore. I just and I tried to do the opposite of that. I I I decided at that moment that I was going to do this thing at target, you know, and really commit to it, by the way, speaking of Todd old, and we were talking about. I mean, he did a collection for target before me, but it was a promotional thing. It was like a season, right or a little tiny collection. I literally committed to this for years. I did it for like seven years. I was like really designing clothes for target. And you know, and I think I was sort of democratising reaching out and going like, here's what's beautiful, you know, I remember having like plus size models and the like, I really tried to push it. I had old people in the ads. I had like all kinds of people in those ads for that time. It was something, you know. And that was my effort that was my effort to kind of like, you know, hey fashioned like start changing your definition 'cause it's not working professionally. What are you? What are you? Most proud of you look back at the end of your book your life. Battled Sonya anxiety. I'm not gonna lie to you. I'm gonna tell you the honest truth. Oh, please. The thing that I am most proud of that I have accomplished in my life is that I am on the brink of like changing the definition like really adding hyphen to the multi hyphenate and becoming this kind of performer. Like that is what I'm like. That's why the book ends with this scene. The carlisle. I don't know if you read the the last seen yet. I mean, you just got it. But the point is like I literally shaking under the covers in that room and the Carlisle right going how will I do this? And then I do it, you know, and it's become really like a big part of my identity. Like, I'm not kidding you. Now, people stop me on the street and go like, oh my God. I saw your show in Indianapolis. It was amazing. I was in your show in Chicago. And it was fabulous. And that is that makes my heart that I'm the most proud of because as you know, it's really hard to go. You know, this if anybody. Knows this. It's really hard to go from one thing in your world. One thing to be known for one thing. And somehow get spin yourself into a whole other universe and get to be known in that universe. You know? So I'm not that is really what my biggest thing is when people say, oh, I saw in concert, and it was fabulous. Boom. When are you going to be here in New York and good question? I'm not sure I don't know yet. But I go to my website. Hello, Isaac dot com. And you can see where I'm going to be appearing in the next month or two but enjoy your book tour van exciting tonight. You're at symphony space that's Jabber messing at seven pm. I bet it's going to be a really good time to she's a doll, right? The name of the memoir is I am a memoir. I hope I see you again sooner rather than later me too me too. Thanks for coming by. Thank you. Listen to all of it on WNYC. WNYC supporters include Atlantic theater company, presenting the US premiere of the mother new play about a woman.

carlisle WNYC Perry Ellis Calvin Klein Atlantic theater company US Indianapolis Todd old Chicago Sonya New York seven years
"atlantic theater company" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:25 min | 2 years ago

"atlantic theater company" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"He had had a breakdown and she helped him get back to painting and he was picked up by a gallery dealer, and he was doing well as an abstract painter. In fact, his painting was chosen for John F Kennedy sweet and the Carlyle shortly after Kennedy was before Kennedy was inaugurated. So he was he was having some success again as an artist, but when the March on Washington came and he decided he and another group of of African American artists decided to call together a group of artists who may named spiral. He began in his conversations. With those artists to get very much connected. Not only to them but to images that he said it just began to flood from his past. And he began to experiment in his studio, not showing anybody publicly, but just doing these experiments in collage and his dealer happened to see them Monday and said, that's your next show. And that would come to be a great part of his legacy. I know you you met him when you think about what his legacy is in the art world. What is it? So I I have constantly been surprised at how young artists embrace Bearden. And I think what they see in in him are several things one that he did struggle to get to where he needed to be as an artist. But then he never stopped that that he kept going and that he made he faced these issues of race and representation head on any kind of struggled his way through them. I think they also feel very much that he decided what voice he wanted for himself. He's on his integrity that he decided he was going to be the artist he needed to be. And so I think they feel comforted by that fact that he did that early on as an African American artists, and then there's just the sheer mastery of his of his work, the collages are exquisitely done. It's beautiful craftsmanship. He opened up himself to the entire world of art. Whether it was European art or African American or African or Persian miniatures he just allowed himself to pick and choose through the world art what he needed for himself as an artist. And I think finally Bearden was incredibly supportive of the young people around him other artists curator's scholars he was a genuine activists over and beyond. It wasn't enough for him to be success. He wanted a community of artists writers and scholars to be successful. Well, if you would like to learn something, this is a great book American odyssey the life and work of Ramiro Bearden management Campbell. Thank you so much for coming to the studio today. Thank you, Alison, even listening to all WNYC WNYC is culture editor Charlie Herman is up next. Support for WNYC comes from Cohen media group, presenting a new two K restoration of between the lines starring Jeff Goldblum from Joan McLean, silver, director of crossing Delancey now playing at quad cinema. Atlantic theater company, presenting the US premiere of the mother a new play about.

Ramiro Bearden John F Kennedy WNYC Washington Atlantic theater company Jeff Goldblum US quad cinema Charlie Herman Alison Carlyle editor Cohen media group director Joan McLean two K
"atlantic theater company" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:44 min | 2 years ago

"atlantic theater company" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"With blood blood from like cow beef blood. So I had the idea to recreate the roar shirt and black tests because when I was a kid in foster homes and stuff like that. I h evaluations. So like all the trauma, and like urban society in violence black on black crime police brutality prison violence, a lot of violence that we deal with is traumatizing. So I revisited those memories of the psychiatric evaluations. So that's what made me come with it. And then I wanted to use the blood to highlight the seriousness of the situation because I if I just like a regular pain, it'd be like, you know, people who've you have been in forget about it real quick just like how they forget about the victims of the light goes those injustice. So I wanted to use up more extreme to give people attention. In some of the pieces on painted, the eyes of the victims of police, brutality disturbing the people as like a reminder because we become numb to like the Dan de out befall kinds of crime, especially with the emphasis on the police brutality because it's like no Justice being served. So I wanted to like that that is like the main reason, but then this other like traumas and other violence that we do with like foot ourselves on each other black on black crime. And if you wind up in a prison system synagogue is stabbed over some Cooley like some juice because he didn't give the other guys juice. Jesse was telling me a story about some guy. Stay Ruben about he didn't do the other guys laundry. Do we wanted it and stuff like that? So it's just like as crazy. So even if you're not a victim of the witness in is traumatizing, what do you hope people think about after they go through this exhibit? They see this beautiful art, the thoughtful are what do you want them to think about what he wants them to talk to their. Friends about. Leave from personal aspect. I will want people to late. Carry the torch. I spark a flame and other people so McClay Cononica call action. And as I call the duty for myself to create some kind of or meet change, and then hopefully like people in positions of power and things they can make changes or if you're not dead powerful is a person. Do you can be creative or influential whatever just like pass, the torch and hope that things change. Not just like, oh, look at this. We all know the issues is it'd be nice. If people just keep pushing towards resistance against the injustices and asked Jesse this question already, it'll be your last question. How do you think art can influence policy? The gives people like a different look because I like the norm the norm. But then this is a different way to stop in. And you'll start like Dr dialogue and things about the issues and just a different way. Like, and I can't really explain how other people minds work. But I think our does give us a different path. Maybe like an Elaine peoples in a way that they wasn't used to my guess been wrestled Craig's and Jesse Craig and Jesse crimes. The name of the show is the OJ experience at fit studio five to five in Chelsea the show is up now through February twenty fifth guys. Thanks for coming to the studio. Thank you haven. Come back. We'll talk to veteran journalists and CBS Sunday morning contributor, Alina Chow. Stay with us. WNYC supporters include Atlantic theater company, presenting the US premiere of the mother a new play about a woman grasping.

Jesse Craig WNYC Cooley US CBS Ruben Alina Chow Atlantic theater company Chelsea Dr dialogue twenty fifth
"atlantic theater company" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:53 min | 2 years ago

"atlantic theater company" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Continuing. My home. You need a rag there, darling. How how has been what do you go home her? What do you do while, I'm not from Brooklyn, I'm from scarsdale and also trained so I was trained in mid Atlantic. Mid Atlantic speech by warm and Skinner when I put my mind to it. So she has another speech pattern and a lot of it's from Brooklyn. And then she kind of cleans it up. Sometimes if you're going to do something for me, you better do it perfectly or you don't belong here. So all of a sudden, she has a hard are coming in from across the Hudson from New Jersey, and it may be her sense of elocution and elegance. She had marvelous taste in in her decor of the palace. And I thought I was watching the way she dressed she just absolutely beautifully. She was exquisite very good looking woman and. In inside her little soul in the beginning. She would say things, I can you believe this this this little poor Jewish girl has hooked the greatest real estate mogul at the at the peak of her life of her career. I mean, what was her world like she would give I'm just wild about Harry parties, it was a very famous one at the Park Lane hotel. And there were celebrities everywhere, and they would come in after the party began in the and the Utah caster would would start. I'm just wild about Harry, and Harry is wild about me. So they would come in and dance to that. And everybody had I'm just wild about Harry pins and Harry's pin said, I'm Harry, so she had a very extravagant parties one she had a Barbie and Ken doll at eight centerpiece of the table as a famous couple, but with the heads of Leona, and Harry, so you had Napoleon and Josephine you had Tarzan and Jane, you had Adam and eve and eve was topless. It was furious. Do you have a sense of the relationship that she had with her husband loved him loved him? I'm sure part of her sexual attraction to him was his money. But it wasn't just for money. She thought he was brilliant. She was obsessed with real estate, and he in his own modest humble way was obsessed with real estate and together they were formidable because she had visions of beauty. And by the time he met her. He was so wealthy. He could over indulge himself and the budget in in the jewel of their crown which was the Helmsley palace hotel. We're gonna take a quick break. And we'll be right back with more from Togo felt you don't go away. You're listening to all of it on WNYC WNYC is supported by Atlantic theater company, presenting the US premiere of the mother a new play about a woman.

Harry Tarzan Helmsley palace hotel WNYC Brooklyn Park Lane hotel Atlantic theater company Atlantic Togo New Jersey Skinner US Utah Ken doll Leona Adam Napoleon Josephine
"atlantic theater company" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:46 min | 2 years ago

"atlantic theater company" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"My home. Do you need a rag there, darling? How how's that been view to go home her? What do you do? Well, I'm not from Brooklyn. I'm from scarsdale and also on the train. So I was trained in mid Atlantic's, mid Atlantic speech by warm and Skinner when I put my mind to it. So she has another speech pattern in the middle of a lot of it's from Brooklyn. And then she kind of cleans it up. Sometimes if you're going to do something for me, you better do it perfectly or you don't belong here. All of a sudden, she has a hard are coming in from across the Hudson from New Jersey, and it may be her sense of elocution and elegance. She had marvelous taste in in her decor of the palace. And I thought I was watching the way she dressed she just absolutely beautifully. She was exquisite very good looking woman and in inside her little soul in the beginning. She would say things, I can you believe this this? This little poor Jewish girl has hooked the greatest real estate mogul. Yeah. At the at the peak of her life of her career. I mean, what was her world like she would give I'm just wild about Harry parties, it was a very famous one at the Park Lane hotel. And there were celebrities everywhere, and they would come in after the party began in the the huge orchestra would would start to. I'm just wild about Harry, and Harry is wild about me. So they would come in and dance to that. And everybody had I'm just wild about Harry pins and Harry's pin said, I'm Harry, so she had a very extravagant parties one she had Barbie and Ken doll at each centerpiece of the table best as a famous couple, but with the heads of Leona, and Harry, so you had Napoleon and Josephine you had Tarzan and Jane you had Adam and eve and eve with topless. She was furious. Do you do you have a sense of the relationship that she had with her husband loved him loved him? I'm sure part of her sexual attraction to him was his money. But it wasn't just for money. She thought he was brilliant. She was obsessed with real estate, and he in his own modest humble way was obsessed with real estate and together they were formidable because she had visions of beauty. And by the time he met her. He was so wealthy. He could over indulge himself and the budget in in the jewel of their crown which was the Helmsley palace hotel. We're gonna take a quick break. And we'll be right back with more from Togo felt you don't go away. You're listening to all of it on WNYC WNYC is supported by Atlantic theater company, presenting the US premiere of the mother a new play about a woman.

Harry Jane Skinner Brooklyn Helmsley palace hotel WNYC Park Lane hotel Atlantic theater company Togo New Jersey US Leona Adam Barbie Napoleon Ken doll Josephine Tarzan
"atlantic theater company" Discussed on The West Wing Weekly

The West Wing Weekly

04:10 min | 3 years ago

"atlantic theater company" Discussed on The West Wing Weekly

"I think she's also a an Atlantic theater company a type person I remember being aware of her. Maybe knowing her back in New York when I knew all those guys, and I like that president Barlett is trying to kind of hammer at her and against further Isreaeli retaliatory action, and she poses him. A question basically says president we received information on the whereabouts of amend responsible for the repeated killing of our citizens. We had this specific location a little time. What you have done any differently. And we sort of get a moment where he doesn't have much of a response. And then just seconds later. Harper comes in and basically we have a president who is confronted with a similar situation. And we're going to find out what what is he going to do? I just thought it was cleverly in timed and well written I thought so too. I actually thought it first the first time I was watching it. I heard that line. I thought oh is she talking about Sharieff? You know, there was a conversation between fits and Leo were fit says we measure the success of emission by two things wasn't successful and how few civilians did we hurt they measure success by how many? Pregnant women are delivering bombs you're talking to me about international laws the laws of nature. Don't even apply here. I've been a soldier for thirty eight years and I've found an enemy. I can do. He can't can't reach Tripoli. You've got to tell him. He can't guarantee. And that is that ends up leading them to prompting the president. That's right. Ordering the the hit. And of course, Israel got drawn into that. And so I thought maybe she was talking about that. And then the double whammy of the next very next scene. Suddenly now, he has to answer the question that she's opposed to boom immediately. Yeah. I thought that was great. Oh, one other thing I liked that was also sort of a callback. But there wasn't really any attention drawn to it. When Josh comes back to the hospital after his spy mission. He comes back to find Donna's room is empty, and there's bloody bandages on the ground. And when you finally get some answers, he finds out that she's developed a pulmonary embolism. And they say it's we're trying to remove it. Now, he knows exactly what it is. There. Have you remember this? That's what killed his father. Didn't remember that. Yeah. Back in in the shadow of two gunmen partout. Josh. Governor your father done. Josh. I can't believe what happened. He went chemotherapy any unexpectedly developed what's called a pulmonary embolism. Yeah. It was hard. There was cardiac. Wow. Heavy. Yeah. So between the you know collapsed lung, and the pulmonary embolism thought this. It's a nice way of drawing, Donna even closer to him. Sure. It's sort of like the pilot who flew into the side of the mountain having the same birthday as Josh Noel. There these markers. I mean, she's not just endanger her health isn't just a at risk. There. These markers that bring Josh back to these other moments. Trauma is it possible that the entire series is Josh Lyman fever dream Saint elsewhere style sin? Elsewhere. Yeah. Right. We'll find out. Coming seasons. But I thought that was really nice again. There's no attention. Brought to like, oh, yeah. I know what that is. Because my dad had nothing like that that just a little moment that if you've been paying attention to the show, you get hey, don't you have to rub it in. I thought that was really great little subtle tidbit of writing. Now that I know I agree. There's a lot more to talk about. Let's go to our interview with our guest, Josh singer. And we can get into it. And find out some more from the perspective of one of the people who created why not all right? Let's take a quick break. And then when we come back, we'll be joined by Josh singer..

Josh pulmonary embolism Josh singer president Josh Noel Josh Lyman Harper Donna Barlett New York Sharieff Israel Tripoli Leo thirty eight years
"atlantic theater company" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

03:57 min | 3 years ago

"atlantic theater company" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

"I came out here and did a show on Melrose called snow, which was a musical comedy loosely based on flowers in the attic. And then I did David Mamat movie called Spartan. And then I saw. I remember that movie. I was the president's daughter and they like shaved my head and I got taken overseas and treated barbarically. Remember I gotta watch again. I mean, you can't if you want not feel good about the. No, I feel great about it. I'm just saying I'm going to be. Yeah, I'm kind of interested about it. I just interviewed Mamat did best. Yeah. I mean, he's definitely he's. He's got his way. He's a savant. I mean, he is. He's a certify -able genius, but he's also eccentric because of it. I love him. Yeah, knows great talk. And I, I like the way rights I do. I didn't really get into his movies too much because I did sort of take him to task about how he sees acting and how he teaches. It's incredibly specific, but I, I don't like favor one health. I'm going to make myself puke up your beautiful lunch, but I don't Fave one acting technique over the other, but I think they all have helpful ways to get you to be sincere on camera or on stage. And I think his Jim. You thought it was helpful. It's very practical, I, but I'm a very technical actor, but you studied the Atlantic. I studied his way. I studied, ma'am. It and I, I wasn't in the Atlantic theater company in New York. They have a section in NYU, but you know, there's still Adler, which is all imagination. And is there. Yeah, it's a still Adler. No. In within NYU they have pockets? Yeah, in all of those places. So it was through NYU, but I was in a study group called cap, twenty one, which was primarily music based, but they studied Stanislavsky and Mamat and Adler and encourage you to study it. Yeah. And they say, pick what works for you. I don't think there's one way to do it. Some people don't know how to act at all, and they're fucking brilliant. And you don't want to tell them how to act because they're already doing it, you know. But what about what if you really, but but I believe that's true. You know, just from my own experience, but also there are some actors that you know challenge themselves with characters that are far above and beyond anything that they could necessarily relate to. And that takes a different level of craft. Yeah, that's why you want a toolbox with all those tools because maybe what David Mamat teaches something more practical is going to work for you. Maybe Meisner is, you know, Meisner is the one where you sit and you just say, Hello. Hello? Hello. And you key. And each other back and forth. And then till you find something, maybe that's going to work, maybe Adler is going to work. I think you just have to have a toolbox to know all of them and then pick what works for you can do serious and and funny I can try well, my first job ever out here was a guest star on the shield at its height trick was uh-huh. What I was a girl that was captured by gang and then raped and then tattooed on the face. Wasn't as funny as it sounds hoary. So do you should do? I'm surprised that didn't get like a spin off that care, just that character a sitcom. Yeah. And then I did the first season of dead wood. So a lot of that stuff is really dramatic. I didn't fall into comedy until after I did for remember remember, I do. I do. I do remember all of a sudden you were the comedy girl and before that you weren't? Yeah, I get. Well, I guess you do when you explain it like them market is do remember it. I'm serious. I like I knew you were around before, but like it was like saving with Sarah. Marshall. Forget forgetting have saving Sarah Marshall war movie like very romantic ending. But like then you're like this comedy person. Yeah..

David Mamat Adler NYU Sarah Marshall president Melrose Meisner New York
"atlantic theater company" Discussed on Show Me the Meaning!

Show Me the Meaning!

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"atlantic theater company" Discussed on Show Me the Meaning!

"Okay well that's why it's such a good actor yeah but it was it was funny i he just looked so miserable about conning nece couple at the same time as he's doing something really terrible so watching him like in one of the i mean of course you know he gets us both kidnapped but in one of the moments in the film were he is up in somebody's face personally causing them distress that's one of the moments where i fell the most empathy for him and it was just because of how sad he looked and how sad he looked i think kind of gave the impression that he didn't he didn't want to be doing this that he felt like he didn't have a choice that there was some reason that it was beyond his control to to con this couple that this was something he was forced into doing but really no he's a good person and he doesn't want to be doing this and if you think about that for more than like two seconds it's bullshit but that was a practical aesthetic it's yeah it got me to believe got me there it was the one moment where i felt sorry for jerry sometimes it's referred to now as the atlantic method because they started a theater school in new york called the atlantic theatre school or the atlantic theater company and then they had the atlantic theater school but yeah him his wife and david mamat it's their it's their anti method approach to acting that's all about making genuine authentic connections with the other person and not with the character so they say that there is no such thing as character all it is is lines on a page and you're just supposed to make an authentic human connection with the actual other human in front of you and they have all these approaches to it so it's really interesting.

jerry new york atlantic theatre school atlantic theater company atlantic theater school david mamat two seconds
"atlantic theater company" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

02:04 min | 4 years ago

"atlantic theater company" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

"Kind of how we worked and that similar to nichols in may and you never took any acting lesson i did i did take classes at a certain point i took classes at the atlantic theater company in new york at so like extension class antithetical to improve the atlantic theater in a way now is it it isn't what i liked the reason i did it there is because it it worked with the improving as much as they weren't focused on any kind of a sense memory or asia has not in the script it really is these are the words say yeah it is just present tense living presently ah which is improper right just improv with scripted were yet with presently present tense presently bend okinawa listen the i which was which is the central like ethos of improper which has listen yeah and that's something that is very hard to do when you are panicking because you don't know what you're going to say the but like listening was such a is such a paramount feel like when you're like a like you what did you ever watch wolf hall the mark rylance show on pbs anyway you this show it's a fine show but mark rylance is like maybe the best actor working currently just like stonecold genius here and the in the show he doesn't say a lot but he's listening constantly in watching him listen is one of the most compelling performances i've ever seen really to listening was so paramount and we'd been like taught to listen for so long that that was very easy to get into at atlantic yeah yeah yeah it was helpful like i you know because at a certain point i was like who i'm big i'm too big like when i go in addition when i get little jobs here and there i'm just enormous yet because i'm used to like sketch an improv broad character yeah i need to temper this with reality will you did that like yeah i thought that your role in enlightened that was a little like you know don't ever yeah i like that show love via loved that yeah really amazed you're like a guy like a real guy uruguay regular foreign guy yelling right right yeah see how to learn that yet awareness down very much and not be um.

nichols new york atlantic theater asia wolf hall pbs okinawa mark rylance
"atlantic theater company" Discussed on You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

01:54 min | 4 years ago

"atlantic theater company" Discussed on You Made It Weird with Pete Holmes

"This is where truth abide yes right yeah what does it look like the way people are taking it seriously now wearing scarves and smoking when they're twelve like what does it look like the their fans of certain works say go to shows lake dear yet the wall i went to like acting school okay to in william on new york university and earth felicity called it the university of new york to remember that no like could legally couldn't say in y you like so it was like you and why i'm taking classes at you and why was so funny and great but yeah no i know i mean i guess a complete to contradict rijaset people actually did take it very seriously work because i went to atlantic theater company which is like that was the program that i did and we'll use in that's like david man we made me see ethnic very mask yeah it's very like likely game asca yeah yeah i mean david riina yeah it couldn't be more mass and i and it's very like theatre is work renat special like it's it's a set of skills that everyone to crown and if you're willing to put in the work uh like yeah it's a very regimented and like and in some ways i found that extremely seductive 'cause i was like coming out of like you know like religion like i was i was like i was again nothing's match our coal like fuck that like known special like do you feel that way now com and i feel a healthy mix the two mamitt said i say that is one of my mamic clint he said interesting actors are interesting people and when i watch you one of the things that's great about you is i'm just watching you you are interesting kate he is interest she is like the way she picks up a piece of pizza is going to be funnier so i.

william atlantic theater company clint kate new york university university of new york david riina