19 Burst results for "associate professor of English"

Supervolcano Eruptions Aren't Single Events

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

01:57 min | 4 d ago

Supervolcano Eruptions Aren't Single Events

"You study ones that civil kano eruptions on singular events but can continue with follow up last for thousands of years after the first eruption super volcanic eruptions are among the most catastrophic event in any planet's history then includes the earth they vet tremendous amounts of magma almost instantaneously they impact global climate here on earth that means triggering volcanic winter with abnormally cold temperatures causing widespread feminine population disruptions and e findings reported in the journal nature based on a study of volcanic debris from the turbo eruption indonesia. Seventy five thousand years ago. There's no other way to say it. Tober was the largest volcanic eruption in human history. It had a volcanic explosively index of eight the highest possible score on the chart. The volcanic explosively index is a lot of rhythmic scale for an eruption depend on how much welcoming materials thrown out to what hide it's thrown and how long the eruption lasts. Well people these days talk about events. Such as the famous eighteen eighty three eruption of krakatoa in the sunda strait between the islands of java and sumatra or more recently mount saint helens eruption in washington. State these with thousands of times smaller than tober. Thankfully super volcanoes like turbo. A few and far between the last was new. Zealand's taboo volcano. Some twenty eight thousand five hundred years ago. Should volcanoes often erupt several times with evils of tens of thousands of vs between bigger options. But it's not known what happens. During the dormant periods one of the study's authors associate professor martin denny shake from curtin. University says gani understanding of these lengthy dormant periods hope scientists workout. What to look for an young active sipa volcanoes and help. Scientists prick future eruptions

Tober Sunda Strait Mount Saint Helens Indonesia Sumatra Java Martin Denny Washington Zealand Gani Curtin
Why ARiMA Is Not Sufficient

Data Skeptic

01:50 min | 3 weeks ago

Why ARiMA Is Not Sufficient

"Name is chung show carney associated professor and the southwest johnson university in trump province in china. And can you tell me a little bit about your specific research areas. What do you study my research areas. Congress daytime my machine learning and data analytics gender most specifically focused on forecasting demand focusing in retail and time series focused sich of sees. So the main pay for. I asked you on to discuss. Today is wire arena and serena or s arema not sufficient. You'd mentioned you have a good background in machine learning. I don't necessarily think of a reema as a machine learning technique. How do these two areas fit together in your mind. Actually because the site focused teams all problems and can be served by machinery and when the approached this focusing problem with fines and attorney time service models are very important solutions to forecast team problems. Other side focused is very important in today's areas because you're low many many data so always Focused in problem. We find penser is very important and we also find iron man. Sarah map and armagh. Those are very classic. Run divided news time service motives and when we do couldn't this i remind saruman model. We're fans than actually the classical extre nation or classical. Modern for iran. serena is northern sufficient sarichichekli. Either way actually approach. I remember sarim from elisa angle which is spectral lenzi's digital delivery and in your system theory so we use elisa angle to do countries a romance. I remember motive defines onto loads dench a sufficient from the rich porno view. So this is the whole ground

Southwest Johnson University Carney Chung Penser Sarah Map Congress China Saruman Sarim Elisa Angle Lenzi Serena Iran Elisa
The Life and Loves of Elizabeth Taylor

Even the Rich

02:18 min | Last month

The Life and Loves of Elizabeth Taylor

"Img thank you so much for joining us today. We're really excited to chat with you. Yeah we're super stoked to get into. Elizabeth taylor's filmography thank you so much for inviting me. I'm i'm eager to have this conversation. Yeah so before we start. Mg can you introduce yourself to our listeners. Who are you what he no well. We only have an hour. That's going to be I guess my official title is. I'm an associate professor In the english department at usc. I've written often on popular culture Actually i started out as newsday's political cartoonist. And in there in one thousand nine hundred four. I published forever barbie the unauthorized biography of a real doll. Which did well in enabled me to leave the newspaper And of course the next woke followed logically from forever barbie. It was a cultural history of nasa's jet propulsion laboratory in a way though it is a book. End to forever barbie because forever. Barbie discussed the mid twentieth century. Construction of femininity more. Recently i wrote the accidental feminists tau elizabeth taylor raised our consciousness and we were too distracted by her beauty to notice. The whole book is the subtitle so How did you become a fan of elizabeth taylor. And what drew you to write about her life and career. Thank you about ten years ago. I was dating someone relentlessly inappropriate and yang and her friends and her friends friends and i ended up in a vacation. House in palm springs or the streets are all named after fifties era movie stars frank sinatra drive and so forth and that first night all we had for entertainment was a boxed. Set elizabeth taylor. Dvd's and we thought we were going to have a you know a long evening of champ. You started watching. And we were amazed not just by the quality of the films and her acting but by the actual content the feminist content movies

Elizabeth Taylor USC Nasa Barbie Drew Yang Palm Springs Frank Sinatra
Florida Breaks Record for COVID-19 Hospitalizations

AP News Radio

00:49 sec | Last month

Florida Breaks Record for COVID-19 Hospitalizations

"Florida sets a new record for covert nineteen hospitalizations on Sunday while an increase in vaccinations will help more immediate measures are needed that's according to Jason so Lamy and associate professor of epidemiology at the university of South Florida we don't start implementing that block transmission we're going to continue to see increased numbers of cases and not just cases but indications of severe illness and while Florida governor Ron DeSantis has resisted mandatory mask mandates other leaders are pushing for the protection there's a lot of people spreading a message that is evidence based and trying to get people you have to do the right thing sadly there is also been a big rise in the number of children with the virus at hospitals in Miami many of them needing intensive care I surely apple

Lamy Florida Ron Desantis University Of South Florida Jason Miami Apple
Opportunities for Skillful Weather Prediction

Data Skeptic

02:10 min | 2 months ago

Opportunities for Skillful Weather Prediction

"My name is elizabeth. Barnes i go by libby an associate professor in the department about miss science here at colorado state university. You told me a little bit. Broadly speaking about your interest research wise and things like that. I guess in broad terms. I'm a climate scientists. I've been studying. Climate dynamics that includes climate change but also the earth's climate as it is today as it wasn't in the past and really probably on this podcast but also might broad interest are in the data science side. So how do we use. Data and analysis tools be at statistics mathematics modeling to understand the system and all of the interacting pieces. Could you go into little depth about the data. You're interested in even what's available as most listeners. Do some data science. Maybe they're used to working on the internet where it's as easy as just tracking something but the earth has been leaving us clues for a while. What do you have access to to study specifically the part of atmospheric science i study. I'd like to say we actually really have data coming out our ears. We have so much data. That's not all good data but one of the reasons. I'm so excited about eight science machine. Learning techniques is how can we utilize the data that we have even when some of it. Maybe isn't perfect. For example we have in science in climate science. We have paleo record so ice cores that tell us what the climate looked like hundreds of thousands of years ago today satellites that are constantly there orbiting the earth or sitting still and staring at one place over and over again and they're pouring data in all of the time sometimes it's hard to just get data and process it once we have it than you know so we can do fun stuff just getting it into a processed form is a lot of work. We have climate model data so we have these big climate models that are being run on supercomputers all over the world to try to help us understand the climate system and they are out putting a lot of data in people need to look at it to try to answer and ask interesting questions about the our system and we have people here my department. I don't do this. Atmospheric scientists say with a weather balloon or radar and actually measuring thinking about the weather and the climate state. Right where you are.

Colorado State University Libby Barnes Elizabeth
ML Innovation in Healthcare With Suchi Saria

The TWIML AI Podcast

02:27 min | 2 months ago

ML Innovation in Healthcare With Suchi Saria

"I am here with suci. Saria succi is the founder and ceo of beijing and health. The john c malone associate professor of computer science statistics and health policy and the director of the machine learning and healthcare lab at the johns hopkins university suci. Welcome to the podcast. Thanks sam the long affiliation. That made me very nervous. It was quite a mouthful. But i'm super excited to have you here on the show. This is a an interview that i've been looking forward to for a very long time. I think i remember seeing one of your very early presentations on machine. Learning for sepsis. This was how long ago was that work. I've been working on it for over six years. Now so i don't know when mitch presentation you saw like. Yeah it's been awhile that's awesome. The podcast has been going strong for five so it probably early days for for both of us so nonetheless excited to have you here on the show and would love to start out by having you introduce yourself to our audience share a bit about your story and kind of give us a sense for how you came to work at this convergence of machine learning. Ai healthcare medicine all these things. Yeah absolutely so. I grew up in india in like a tiny little town in india. And it just so happens you know nerdy place. People are totally encouraged to be engineers in computer. Science nerds young age and i got into computer. Science very early in accuracy got fascinated by field and just really got lucky and trained at a very young age bitten people who are luminaries in the field which means got tons of opportunities that were uncharacteristic. For someone my age and background and in terms of Me actually around twelve years ago thousand. Six two thousand seven eight around. I was kind of going to an early mid life crisis. I realized a lot of the kinds of ideas. You exploring machine. Learning the applications at the time were advertising or like personalization on a phone or personalization on a desktop email filtering and what that made me think about was like is that i wanted to do something with more social immediate social meant i considered everything and around the time also got introduced to colleagues actor stanford who were physicians so these were physicians. Who took care of premature babies.

Saria Succi John C Malone Machine Learning And Healthcar Johns Hopkins University Sepsis Beijing Mitch SAM India Stanford
US Overdose Deaths Hit Record 93,000 in Pandemic Last Year

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | 2 months ago

US Overdose Deaths Hit Record 93,000 in Pandemic Last Year

"U. S. overdose deaths hit a record in twenty twenty the centers for disease control and prevention released an estimate that a record ninety three thousand people died of drug overdoses last year that amounts to a twenty nine percent increase over twenty nineteen the nation was already struggling with an opioid epidemic and experts say lockdowns another pandemic restrictions isolated those with drug addictions and may treatment harder to get Shannon mon it is an associate professor of sociology at Syracuse University she says what's really driving the surge in overdoses is increasingly poisoned drug supply contaminated with fentanyl she says her research found increased deaths were more likely to be people who had already been struggling with addiction along with nearly three hundred eighty thousand deaths attributed to cope at nineteen the overdoses contributed to what is overall the deadliest year in U. S. history I'm Jennifer king

Centers For Disease Control An Syracuse University Shannon Jennifer King
What Happens to All the Stuff We Send Into Space?

The Atlas Obscura Podcast

02:35 min | 2 months ago

What Happens to All the Stuff We Send Into Space?

"Since the launch of sputnik in nineteen fifty seven humans have been sending all sorts of things into space stuff like the serious eight and new satellite just launched by stitchers parent company or cargo space craft bringing supplies to space station's not to mention the most prising stuff like golden records or read tesla's an estimated thirty five thousand bits of Incentives right up to objects at the size of double decker buses up to of course international space station which is said to be the size of american football fields or five bedroom house. That's dr alice. Gorman associate professor at flinders university in south australia and one of the world's leading space archaeologists she studies all sorts of ways. Humans have engaged with space including these tens of thousands of objects rocketing around in earth orbit. And that's just stuff four inches and bigger there's believed to be millions of objects anything smaller than that. They distributed from lois little bit which is about two hundred kilometers above the surface of the us up to maybe about one thousand two thousand kilometers then. You have raged. That's just cold middle or medium business and then you get into. The high as obits. Miss includes Stationary orbit which is where bust of telecommunications satellites used to think of these orbits kind of like three lanes of a running track with satellites and spacecraft as the runners zipping around and around in their respective lanes. But note that for this analogy to work the track would be really really big and runners relatively teeny if we go out there and look at these might only say one object within your field. You so that impression. We have a stuff's closely packed together. Just together that's actually luck. Absolute worst case scenario. Which we're not at yet. There's growing concern about what will happen over. The next few decades as there are a lot of plans to launch way more stuff into orbit. And here's the thing. The vast vast majority of objects orbiting the planet is considered space junk.

Dr Alice Flinders University Tesla Gorman South Australia Lois Football United States
Listen Up: Biden Speaks Volumes in a Whisper to Make a Point

AP News Radio

00:54 sec | 2 months ago

Listen Up: Biden Speaks Volumes in a Whisper to Make a Point

"President Biden has been using a different strategy to get his point across at certain moments he whispers trump White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany calls it peculiar and crazy I think it's time to give ordinary people a tax break it does look a little bit like and Saturday Night Live skit Vanessa Beasley is an associate professor of communications at Vanderbilt University you can see how frustrated he is or give the appearance of being frustrated right so that breaks the fourth wall if you will the presidency to see what our president really thinks president Biden moves in toward the microphone talks about issues like financial help for families one point two million dollars released so far please leave says usually raising the volume gets the message across it sort of sets everybody back a little bit when you see someone going in a different direction and reducing their body on his talk show Stephen Cole bear said the Biden whispers are a little creepy at Donahue Washington

President Biden Kayleigh Mcenany Vanessa Beasley Vanderbilt University White House Stephen Cole Bear Biden Washington
How Could Lab-Grown Meat Change the Pet Food World?

BrainStuff

01:54 min | 3 months ago

How Could Lab-Grown Meat Change the Pet Food World?

"Do we ensure that what we feed our pets is not only good for them a rich in protein and all the nutrients new to keep them healthy but good for our planet to ask many of us reduce our meat intake or opt for more sustainable animal proteins. Could we do the same for pets for the article. This episode is based on how stuff works. Spoke with greg aldrich a research associate professor in the coordinator of the pet food program the department of grain science and industry at kansas state university. He said it's all doable. I can formulate a vegetarian diet for a dog. I can make a vegan diet for a dog. it's just a lot harder to get it all balanced and then to get them to like it. The pet food institute estimates that more than one hundred and eighty million dogs and cats are living in. us households and the american pet products association reports that americans spent more than forty two billion dollars on pet foods and treats in twenty twenty alone and all of that is rough on the planet a twenty seventeen paper written by ucla researcher. Gregory oaken found that american dogs and cats are responsible through the food. They eat for the release of up to sixty four million tons of harmful greenhouse gases year. But it's not as if we're feeding our pets big slabs of brontosaurus sorace ribs and live chickens pet foods in the. Us generally have plenty of grains included. Corn is in fact. The number one ingredient used overall in cat and dog foods. According to the north american renderers relation but most pet foods do have a huge animal component. The reason for that is simple dogs and cats and you and i need protein and eating meat or meat by products is often the best. I and cheapest source of protein.

Greg Aldrich Pet Food Program Department Of Grain Science An Pet Food Institute American Pet Products Associat Kansas State University Gregory Oaken Ucla United States
Strategize for Future Work Success

The Tightrope with Dan Smolen

02:00 min | 4 months ago

Strategize for Future Work Success

"Described them in the previous two episodes. My early career dreams and explorations were both vivid and meaningful as a young teen. I got to explore the world of broadcast media and my college scholarship. Amy toward a career in broadcasting as a news reporter and producer during my junior year in college i engaged with a truly amazing professor of advertising. His name was howard cogan and he helped me to completely alter my career path. Besides being much admired associate professor at the college park school of communications howard was the successful advertising executive who wrote voiced and produced most of the commercials. That ran on ithaca new york radio stations. It is without a doubt that howard cogan was the most important mentor of my professional and personal life from our first meeting. He took a deep personal interest in me and my success and he soon convinced me to refocus my career sites away from broadcast news to advertising and media and specifically towards the fast growing channel advertising called direct marketing so with graduation day in my sights. I focused my job. Search on entry level opportunities at an ad agency focused on direct marketing. But the going wasn't easy and the rejection letters arrived by the day problem was i had graduated into one of the most depressed job. Markets for entry level talent and a generation. Howard's advice to me was cheerful but sobering dan. He said you're going to need to get strategic about your career in direct mail and it looks like you may not find your opportunity on the agency side quickly

Howard Cogan College Park School Of Communi AMY Ithaca Howard New York DAN
How Will Babies Born During the Pandemic Meet the World?

The Big Story

01:41 min | 4 months ago

How Will Babies Born During the Pandemic Meet the World?

"Jordan heath rawlings. This is the big story. Dr sherri madigan associate professor psychology. Department of the university of calgary she holds a candidate research chair in determinants of child development. Hello dr megan. thanks for having me. You are most welcome i will tell you. We got the idea for this episode. from a listener. Who wrote us with a question. Can i begin by asking you that question. Yes sounds great. So this is a listener unnamed. Diana who wrote that. I've had a baby during the pandemic and he is about to start daycare. He has not been held by anyone. Outside of our household no other adults have ever cared for him although my parents would have loved to help travel restrictions during the pandemic prevented them from visiting. I'm worried for what this means for his socialization. So should she worried. Well it's a really good question actually a common one so this has been a topic. I've been asked to actually speak on a few times. Because i know that parents are thinking a lot about this and worried i guess what i would say is that it is going to be a little bit difficult for kids to transition into a daycare environment. Because it's going to be so new and novel to them now. The reality is that kids always find it hard transition into a daycare environment because it's new and novel to them so that's not different than how life was pre pandemic but i think the big difference now when kids are are doing that switch over into day care is that they haven't had a lot of interaction with other people and they're going to be thrusted into an environment where everything is really really knew and the interactions are really new.

Jordan Heath Rawlings Dr Sherri Madigan Department Of The University O Dr Megan Diana
GOP Makes a Choice: Donald Trump Over Liz Cheney

TIME's Top Stories

01:50 min | 4 months ago

GOP Makes a Choice: Donald Trump Over Liz Cheney

"Needle phobia maybe keeping some from getting their covid nineteen vaccine. Here's how to cope by terror. Law alex danley a twenty-three-year-old philisophy doctoral student at the university of illinois. Chicago doesn't seem like someone who would be vaccine hesitant. They're determined to stop covid. Nineteen from spreading and having fallen for any vaccine conspiracy theories however getting the corona virus. Shot was tremendously stressful for danley. They feared it could trigger a terrible panic attack leaving them crumpled on the floor sobbing and shaking in front of a crowd of onlookers. They were also worried about healthcare providers dismissing their fears. I don't want to be treated like a child. Because i have a phobia. I'm not a child. I'm acting like an adult with a phobia says danley. I don't believe that vaccines are particularly painful. It's literally just that for some reason my brain processes this in a way that is really intense and unexpected then lee struggles with blood injection injury phobia also known as needle phobia. Since they were a child they've experienced debilitating. Fear win receiving injections according to studies conducted in different countries as many as one in four have some fear of needles causing symptoms from butterflies in their stomach to debilitating panic attacks and one in ten are so fearful that they refuse vaccination entirely says meghan mcmurtry and associate professor of clinical psychology at the university of wealth in ontario canada. Needle phobia has long been a public health issue. Sixteen percent of adults avoid flu shots at least partly

Danley Alex Danley University Of Illinois Phobia Blood Injection Injury Phobia Needle Phobia Chicago LEE Meghan Mcmurtry University Of Wealth Ontario Canada FLU
Dr. Jean-Christophe Plantin Discusses Digital Media Infrastructures and Tech Platforms

Social Media & Politics

02:33 min | 5 months ago

Dr. Jean-Christophe Plantin Discusses Digital Media Infrastructures and Tech Platforms

"Let me turn it over to dr zone. Christoph plantain again. He's an associate professor in the department of media and communications at the doctor plantain. Thanks so much for taking the time out and welcome to the social media and politics podcast. Thanks for having me really happy to be here so to start out here. Why don't we break down a few of the key concepts that you've been developing in your research and the first one i'd like to discuss is media infrastructures which draws attention to this interplay between digital platforms. Which is kind of the services that we're all familiar with and the physical infrastructures that make those platforms work. And i think. Maybe we're not all familiar with those. So could you outline the concept of media infrastructures for us and why we should even be thinking about media infrastructures in the first place. Absolutely yeah you allow me to be a little idiosyncratic and just tell me a little bit how. I came to these concept. Maybe that would. That would be helpful just because this is a history that i guess we'll be telling on how we can put these different concepts together. My background is in a media. Medication studies and i worked a lot since my phd. On the concept of blood. I worked lots a studied. Participatory mapping google maps. Open street map and we are here. Yeah mid-2000s is still the whip. Two point zero seeking pretty strong and the type of scholarship at the time. Emphasizes the participatory nature off these pot for allowing people to post more easily to create to engage in activism or creative practices. so that was my standpoint. that's what i really started with A post doctoral fellowship at university of michigan and with my colleagues where i became much more more familiar with the concept of infrastructure. I worked a lot with polite words. Carla goes the christian. Send vague and these folks are much more on the stf side of these topics of the study of technolog- and the where of course talking about and they were talking about large distribution systems. They're put together via standards and gateways in these type of things but what was super interesting when we started working together and focusing more on the facebook and google's of the world. Is that what. I was describing. As platform there were describing as infrastructure.

Dr Zone Christoph Plantain Department Of Media And Commun Google University Of Michigan Carla Facebook
Why Small Talk is More Important Than You Think

Here's Something Good

02:08 min | 5 months ago

Why Small Talk is More Important Than You Think

"Remember when you start your day in the office with casual chitchat. How was your weekend. Can you believe this weather planning any trips this summer. It may have seemed trivial but it turns out. There's nothing small about small talk in fact it can be an aid to innovation it can build trust and rapport and just plain happier at work. But what happens to small talk when we're all working from home to learn more about the benefits of small talk and how we can still get them in the now. We went to expert. Dr jessica methods. Dr method is an associate professor of human resource management at rutgers university and a member of the academy of management organizational behavioral division. Here's what dr method had to say. Thanks so much for joining us. Thank you for having me. So you recently published a study on small talk in the workplace now that so. Many of us are in virtual workplaces. How have conversations among co workers changed. This is such an incredibly important conversation. And when we conducted this study it was pre pandemic. we could not have anticipated how disruptive this remote work boom could have been so really in the past decade. We have seen that so many companies have adopted a more open office space designed so. They've really been focused on strategically designing their workspaces to promote spontaneous casual collisions where employees can just bump into each other in the hallway or at the microwave to have small talk and the idea. There is that these informal chats can be released serendipitous. They can help build rapport and trust and collaboration and they create opportunities for creativity and innovation because these employees are talking with people that they wouldn't necessarily have interacted with otherwise but the transition to remote work has really narrowed the focus of our networks. And the people we have exposure to and who we can talk to sewer networks have been narrowed really to our closest connections are family members are very close friends and our supervisor's and those out. On the periphery who we weren't as close with are kind of in this period of suspended animation

Dr Jessica Dr Method Academy Of Management Organiza Rutgers University
Navigating the Complexities of Black Indigenous Identity

Unreserved

01:55 min | 5 months ago

Navigating the Complexities of Black Indigenous Identity

"Black and indigenous communities share similar struggles as marginalized people on turtle island that combined. History can be quite complicated. My next guest has dedicated much of his work. As an academic to thinking about these connections robert keith collins is an expert on black indigenous interactions. He's an associate professor of american indian studies at san francisco state university. He's african american and choctaw. And he's here to tell us about a history. Many people know very little about welcome to the show dr collins. Thank you very much for having me. So let's start at the beginning. What is the beginning of indigenous black history. That's a fantastic question. And actually we owe a lot of our understanding about it to a canadian scholar. Alexander francis chamberlain france as in in eighteen. Ninety one wrote one of the most comprehensive analysis that we have today and that was african americans and what we find in that study is that this is actually a history. His later colleague would refer to as the third line of colonization. We've talked about a european and native colonization. We talk about european and african colonization. We seldom talk about american. Interactions during the colonization and this is a history that brings that back to live where we actually see cultural exchanges between people that are taking place within sovereign native communities as well as nations and families we also see interactions taking place especially for like in the united states among the five civilized tribes chuck. Todd's cherokees creeks chickasaw seminoles in slavery were native americans owned slaves and have an cultural impact on africans within their communities on their

Robert Keith Collins Dr Collins Turtle Island Alexander Francis Chamberlain San Francisco State University France Chuck Todd United States
Disaster Medicine and Emergency Care With Dr Mathew Levi

Medicine, We're Still Practicing

02:02 min | 5 months ago

Disaster Medicine and Emergency Care With Dr Mathew Levi

"Well we get an interesting guest. Our special guest. Dr matthew levy is an associate professor at johns hopkins department of emergency medicine. He leads hopkins division of special operations which provides for central command and coordination of emergency medicine. Operation and dr levy is board certified in emergency medicine and a sub specialty certified in ems. He's the guy who sets up the teams and strategies that we don't even know we need until god forbid we need them. Thanks for joining us actor levy. Hey doing okay after greetings. It's wonderful to be here. Thank you so much for having me and for that. Very warm reduction so division of special operations. What exactly is that sounds more military than civilian well. It's structured is what i would say and indeed our division special operations at johns hopkins. The division really got its roots nearly two decades ago in being the central focus for all of the out of hospital medicine activities that johns hopkins emergency medicine overseas and that includes the interval syllabi transport programming includes some of our operational medical programs in support of tactical law enforcement medicine special event medicine and a few other topics and initially had some roots in disaster medicine. Which has also grown into its own unique and blossoming flourishing specialty area or focus area so we were close with some of our colleagues as well nowadays so are you coordinating and training these guys on the line. The guys who show up first. Those first responders that were so appreciative for well. It certainly is a team effort. I would say that. I'm one of the people doing that. Training in my role as an ems medical director. I certainly work very closely with our ems. Educators and helping to design implement and facilitate the delivery of educational content. And yes. i do spend a good portion of my time. An educator not only educating our physician colleagues but also educating our pre hospital emergency medical services clinicians in those lifesaving conditions recognition treatment management

Dr Matthew Levy Johns Hopkins Department Of Em Hopkins Division Of Special Op Dr Levy Johns Hopkins Emergency Medici Levy Johns Hopkins
Diversity of Voices in Journalism With Nicky Usher

Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism

02:09 min | 5 months ago

Diversity of Voices in Journalism With Nicky Usher

"Joining us today sneaky. Asha the case associate professor at the university of illinois at college of media. Journalism department keeps work focuses on news production in a changing digital environment blending inside for media sociology in political communications a festive award winning book making news at the time so space a month spent in the new through observing daily conversations meetings and journalists at work. And it's a real study of both the dynamics of a newsroom and power structures within it a second book interactive journalism hackers state-run code focused on the rise of programming and data journalism and her next to be published later this year. It's an incredibly topical. One news for the rich white and blue have placed empower distort american journalism and it examines the challenges facing journalism in terms of place power and crucially inequality while committee. I thank you for being with us today. Thank you so much for having year for that lovely introduction. I'm so delighted to speak with you in your global audience. So thank you thank you. Let's the end. Well the in your new book needs for the rich white and blue touch. Keep touch on a key problem in journalism in that. Sec say large national international outlets of pivoted observing readers. An-and will choose to pay for news and if he end up skewing coverage towards the wealthy white liberal audience in the us and wealthy white publicly less liberal. But i know or the uk could just a bit more about the consequences of that. So what. I really worry about. Is you see essentially The news that's most likely to survive is coming from these extremely large institutions and organizations that help global france right. So you can think of. And i think this is particularly the case when we look at what might be formerly called a newspaper because i don't think the guardian or the new york times of the t- Resembles anything close to a newspaper anymore. It's just kinda archaic name that we call it but what ends up doing. Is that people who can pay for news. In the people producing and writing the content thinking about the content are all members increasingly so of global

University Of Illinois College Of Media Journalism Department Asha SEC UK France United States The New York Times
"associate professor english" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"associate professor english" Discussed on Science Friday

"Issues astro biology or socia conference and we have two of them on the line now kelly smith is acting president of socia so she had professor of philosophy at clemson university in south carolina welcome thank you bye to be here are nice to have you sherry well genton is a linguist and associate professor english at bowling green state university in how in ohio welcome back to science friday thank you it's a delight so you there in nevada doing all of this interesting talk kelly you helped convenience conference set the scene for us what's the goal of that gathering you have astro biologists and philosophers and all kinds of different people yeah if we if we discover evidence of life beyond earth anytime soon and a lot of people think that's likely the implications for humanity will be massive and so i and some like minded people feel like this is something we should be dedicating a bit more effort to and so we're trying to organize an academic community that provides the infrastructure necessary for that so you know regular meetings eventually we'll have our own journal and then just you know the ability to talk to colleagues in different disciplines who are interested not just in the science but in the broader questions about what the impacts of the scientific discoveries are on society yeah and one of the big questions is should we actively engage in sending messages into the cosmos correct that's that's one of the big hot topics i think maybe a quarter of the papers that at this conference are going to be on medi in some way or another.

kelly smith clemson university south carolina nevada acting president professor of philosophy associate professor bowling green state university ohio