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Fresh "associate professor" from KRLD News, Weather and Traffic

KRLD News, Weather and Traffic

00:23 min | 1 hr ago

Fresh "associate professor" from KRLD News, Weather and Traffic

"Day, seven days a week on radio dot com or the radio dot com map de loaded today. Trying to figure out why. Good afternoon 403 93 degrees feels like 100 for around here. This is the chaos. The afternoon news. Kristen D. Has some David Rankin number of people infected and hospitalized with Cove. It continues to climb, but a massive study is going forward. It's involving tens of thousands of people around here. Experts want to find out why some segments of population arm or at risk. The CDC shows that African Americans, Latinos Those are five times more likely to be hospitalized for the virus. The disparity is similar here in North Texas, with blacks and Latinos more likely to come down with Govan, 19. The UT Southwestern study will test 45,000 people from both Dallas and Tarrant County's You understand why this is a meet? Sin Gals, an associate professor of internal medicine at UT Southwestern strongly believe identify identifying these potentially modifiable risk factors. And understanding why disparities exist is really the first step to addressing them and helping promote health equity in our local D F. W community, he says. They'll do follow ups with those tested for up to a year. Dallas County commissioners voted to give $500,000 to the study. Austin York News Radio 10 80 CARE Will D. Word came out this morning that Texas is running out of beds for the sickest of the cove in 19 patients. Texas has moved closer to the 10,000 patient in patients in the hospital for Corona virus, and that means there are only around 950 beds left in the intensive care unit and that is across the state. Dr. Gian Carlo from the governor's medical task force says all the bed numbers are going in the wrong direction. The number per day we're seeing in hospitals just growing dramatically up and up. And, of course, the I C u bed kind of follow that hospitalization rates. The state has just over 11,000 beds available right now, but this is the first time in four months at I C U bed availability dropped under 1000. Dr Carlos says Next week's numbers will likely be even worse. Also worries about the slow test results of the Ellis Davis Field house. And Dallas County Commissioner John Wiley Prices concerned about that. It's federally funded so the results can take up to 10 days. But the testing site of University of Dallas has a partnership of the private sector. Results get back in around 2 to 3 days. The commissioner wants a private vendor. Both constituents are having a difficult time getting the results. I mean, what is going on with testing sites? What are we having a difficult time? In the southern sector. Today, the county reported 1160 for new Corona virus cases and another nine deaths to school districts in didn't county or pushing back the start of the fall semester for students. Little L'M superintendent, Dr Cynthia and Mika says teachers will still come back to so come back in early August. That is, and they'll spend an extra two weeks. On training to teach in person and online in a year where we're faced with a pandemic that none of us have ever dealt with, before we felt like we needed more training opportunities with our teachers. Now, the new star date for the little My Eyes D. Is Tuesday, August 25th The Dead Nigh S D. Is pushing its star date from mid August to August 26. There's still fighting over a convention that's supposed to start in a week. That story after we check you traffic and weather together next. Ah, better tomorrow starts today with Wendy's breakfast tomorrow that says they can not bacon. We're fresh eggs. Rain like opportunity, Honey butter goodness is.

Dallas County North Texas Commissioner Govan Dallas Tarrant County University Of Dallas Dr. Gian Carlo Ut Southwestern D F. W Community Dr Carlos Ellis Davis Field House Associate Professor CDC Austin York News Kristen D. John Wiley Corona Wendy
Fresh update on "associate professor" discussed on The Morning Ritual with Garret Lewis

The Morning Ritual with Garret Lewis

01:14 min | 3 hrs ago

Fresh update on "associate professor" discussed on The Morning Ritual with Garret Lewis

"Things I think you need to know. Number One. Danny McCarthy pull out and how many polls with them shows him doing better head to head against Mark Kelly Than Martha mcsally is doing Martha's down. Eight fifty forty two daniels down six, fifty, forty four, despite only twenty study was twenty six percent of the people polled not have an opinion of them. But they gave information the more they knew about him and Martha. The more his approval and up and hers went down incredible. It's on my facebook page. FACEBOOK DOT com slash gear Lewis Radio. I can follow it on twitter as well and parlor looser. Both of those second thing that I think you need to know now. There's about twenty bars that have a class action suit. Against Doug Ducey for shutting them down. And the attorney representing them Ilan warming and associate professor at Asu says Yes doozy does not have the constitutional authority to shut down these bars or any other business. We'll get to more of that in just a second. That's a big flip and deal right there third thing. That I think you need to know here in Arizona. We had a great conversation with a data analyst. Who's part of a group of thirty forty is. On social media, they're putting together reports. They're seeing the data from all. These different states and they noticed is was kind of lamb of the interview up about forty five minutes, or so AQUINAS DOT com. He said that there is death certificate matching going on here because when he sees some data like the data guy the scaremonger up in Phoenix, ABC. Fifteen put a offered fourteen deaths today and people like all my God. It's getting worse. What Arizona is doing is they are going back months? Seeing people that have their death certificates any symptoms of covert? If there's two minor symptoms, they consider that a cova death, and then all of a sudden. It's a new death, even though it didn't happen. That's not a test by the way. and. There's so much wrong with the Arizona Department of Health reporting, they show fifty five hundred, plus people have been hospitalized with Kobe, since it started yet over thirteen, thousand have been discharged from covert. How does that? Make Sense. They're missing hospitalization stats. There's an again it literally shows. It looks like it's been.

Martha Mcsally Arizona Facebook Danny Mccarthy Mark Kelly Doug Ducey Twitter Arizona Department Of Health Phoenix ASU Analyst Lewis Radio Associate Professor Attorney ABC Kobe
Fresh update on "associate professor" discussed on Garret Lewis

Garret Lewis

01:16 min | 5 hrs ago

Fresh update on "associate professor" discussed on Garret Lewis

"Errol Louis with you here can s t a M 7 90 Tucson's most stimulating talk. Three things I think you needed to know. Number one. Danny McCarthy pull out and how many poles with, UM, shows him doing better head to head against Mark Kelly. Then when Martha McSally is doing Martha's down 8 50 40 to Daniel's down 6 50 44 Despite only 20 study was 26% of the people, the whole not have an opinion of him. But they gave information the more they knew about him and Martha. The more his approval and up in hers went down. Incredible on my Facebook page facebook dot com slash Gary Lewis radio. We can follow it on Twitter as well and parlour at Gary Lewis for both of those second thing. That I think you need to know. Now there's about 20 bars that have a class action suit. Against Doug Ducey for shutting them down. And the attorney representing them. Ilan Woman, an associate professor at S U says yes, Deuce. He does not have the constitutional authority to shut down these bars or any other business. We'll get to more of that in just a second. That's a big flipping deal right there. Third thing. That I think you need to know. Here in Arizona. We had a great conversation with a data analyst Ah, who's part of a group of 30 40 eyes? On social media. They're putting together reports they're seeing the data from all these different states. And they noticed that his name's Kyle Lamb of the interview up in about 45 minutes or so. A canister dot com Um He said that there is a death certificate matching going on here because when you see some data like the data guy, the scare mongrel in Phoenix Aah! ABC 15 put a 114 deaths today and people like Oh, my God, it's getting worse. What Arizona is doing is they're going back months, seeing people that have no death certificates, any symptoms of covert. If there's two minor symptoms, they consider that a covert death and then all of a sudden, it's a new death, even though it didn't happen. And so that a test by the way. And there's so much wrong with the Arizona Department of Health Reporting. They show 5500 plus people have been hospitalized with covert since it started yet over 13,000 have been discharged from Cove it How does it Doesn't make sense. You're missing hospitalization stats. There's and again it literally shows it looks like it's been about a month. Of a downward trend of hospitalizations one random day, but since really June 8th, it's been going down, down down and that always gets ignored. Three things I think you need to know. So this story airs on the Capitol Times. That again. Hey.

Martha Mcsally Arizona Danny Mccarthy Gary Lewis Errol Louis Facebook Daniel Ilan Woman Arizona Department Of Health R Doug Ducey Tucson Twitter Mark Kelly Capitol Times Kyle Lamb Associate Professor Analyst Attorney
Fresh update on "associate professor" discussed on Garret Lewis

Garret Lewis

01:33 min | 6 hrs ago

Fresh update on "associate professor" discussed on Garret Lewis

"Cand Esti am 7 90 Tucson's most stimulating talk sort of the Arizona Capital Times bars now taking Ducey two courts about time. An attorney. An associate professor at S u got Nema Ah, Is it Ellen Ellen woman? He's doing this, he said. There look, there is not an emergency due to the Chinese virus outbreak. There's not He said. The law that gives do see the unilateral power to do things like clothes. Certain businesses unconstitutionally delegated legislative power of this state to the governor. He wants the justices to not only avoid the law giving the governor those powers but declare any orders do CIA already has made under the law illegal and cannot be enforced. This is phenomenal, more coming up. Don't go anywhere. It is gaining several hours on the mayor's, including two sons, Regina Romero have signed a letter calling on governor Do C to do more to fight Covert 19. They want a statewide mask mandated more testing, among other things, firefighters continue to make progress against the 119,000 acre Bighorn Fire, which is now 85% contained. Summerhaven and Willow Canyon residents and employees air now allowed to return to the area without a sheriff's escort. The CEO of Goya says the US is blessed to have a leader like President Trump comment sparked backlash on social media and a call to boycott the food company. I'm John H. E. K and S T A. M 7 92 sons, most stimulating talk. Cannister is your chance to win $1000. Text the nationwide keyword home to 202 100. You'll get a confirmation text a nympho standard data investigate supplying this nationwide contest that's home to 202 100. I'm supervisor Steve Christy. We've accomplished so much over the last four years like fixing 70 miles of district four roads. But there's so much more to do. I had been the strongest partner with our sheriff and deputies demanding the county except stone Garden grants. I have been a tireless fighter against those who would close businesses, keep people out of work and ruin our economy. Keep me fighting for you. Vote Steve Christy paid for unauthorized by Steve Christy for supervisor. Hi, It's Gary Lewis. A lot of craziness going on in the world right now can cause you some pain. You can't really control that. But you know what?.

Esti Steve Christy Ellen Ellen Supervisor Associate Professor CIA Arizona Capital Times Gary Lewis Regina Romero Tucson Bighorn Fire Attorney Ducey Willow Canyon United States President Trump Summerhaven CEO Partner John H. E. K
Fresh "associate professor" from Len Berman and Michael Riedel in the Morning

Len Berman and Michael Riedel in the Morning

03:08 min | 11 hrs ago

Fresh "associate professor" from Len Berman and Michael Riedel in the Morning

"Bring a lot of rain in the tri state area is going to whip up the jersey shore around here in Manhattan, swirl things around lots of windows. Lots of rain. And out there in Long Island. So we got to batten down the hatches, folks and be prepared for Fay. As if we need Faye. We got a Corona virus Got dengue fever down there got erect economy. Now we get a tropical storm grate next week. We'll have some Locusts and then some frogs. I think that's all they were going over all some point here. Also in the big threesome, interesting Supreme Court rulings yesterday, the court and the Conservatives on the court, including two that Trump put up there. Ah, they have said the president does not have immunity. He cannot shoot somebody on Fifth Avenue and get away with it. As he once said. So, in fact, Cy Vance, the the district attorney here, he has every right, according to Supreme Court to try to subpoena Trump's tax records. If he suspects there was something going on there. That should have been going on now. This does not mean That Trump is gonna have to know that we're going to see his tax returns before the election because they Supreme Court effectively kick this back down to the lower court's Trump confided in the lower courts, and Trump's a pretty good fighter when it comes to the court, so he can tie this thing up for a long, long time to come. So you liberals out there, you know if you're salivating Hoping you can get a look at tax returns. You can see those checks signed by Vladimir Putin. Well, hate to dash your hopes The tax returns are not going to become over. There probably will become available at some point, but not before the election and rounding out the Big three Elaine Maxwell. She was the procurer of young women for Jeffrey Epstein. So she's in jail out there in Brooklyn. She's going to make a court appearance next week, so we'll be covering that They've taken Apparently, her sheets and clothes gnome away from her because they fear she's a suicide risk. So she's wearing a paper. A paper dress. The kind you wear when you get a colonoscopy. Yeah, they put you in that paper was there. You know, I thought was interesting to it. She actually is a cell mate. I, I would've thought you would be alone. But maybe they thought for suicide risk could be better for her to have somebody in the cellar. So she has a salary. Clinton. Hillary Clinton could be Hillary Clinton in the papers. You see, I'm not so concerned about the suicide. I'm more concerned about her being bumped off by somebody. That's the more of the danger to her. All right, so we're still in the midst of this pandemic, and it takes a psychological toll on us. No question about it. So who better to find out how to keep healthy? How to mentally healthy and fit during this scary time? Dr Gale Saltz. She's the clinical associate professor of psychiatry at the New York Presbyterian Hospital, and she hosts the I Heart radio podcast personality. Good Morning, Dr Gale. Good morning. Good morning. So, Dr. So here's my concern, Doctor Gail. I'm as guilty as the next person. You know, It was very depressing here in March and April, when we were locked down, it was cold. Well, now it's summer I've been out dining. I went to the beach. I've gone toe bars. You stand outside drinking with your friends. You pull down the mass, The social distancing is kind of fading by the wayside. And I, psychologically I thought, I think we're past this. We're past the Corona virus. We got through it. It's over with And then boom. We see these spikes going on all over the country and I'm starting to get a little depressed with the realization That were maybe not even in the middle of the end of this thing. Yeah, well, you know, you've got a lot of good company because obviously we're not at the end of this thing. And that is gonna force changes in the way you live day to day for the foreseeable future until we obviously come up with some sort of a vaccine. And that means that there is a lot of loss associated with the loss of, you know, as sure as you're saying, like the relief of, you know, we got through this loss of, you know, important milestones in people's lives, things like you know, people lost graduations and promise and you're losing the ability to interact with. You know your friends in the way that you were used to And that is hard. However, Humans are incredibly adaptable and resilient and there are means to continue and this is what I really am. I'm offering up I'm saying, I think the idea that you could go stand outside with friends and be cautious and mask and social distance. But still keep up relationship is really important. It is important to your mental health. It means doing it a different way. I think kids have gotten the worst of it. I have two kids at home and they've been separated from their friends. They can't go to school. It's not clear whether they'll go to school in the fall, and I wonder. What this is going to plough. It's called going to play out long term in the short term. I can see they seem to be okay. But depressed, But I wonder, like, six months from now what this is going to look like. Yeah, actually, In some ways, kids are even more more plastic more. You know, more Moldable in terms of managing situation, You know things that weren't occurring before because They, You know their way of life really depends on your way of life right? And so and they haven't been around as long. So the idea that you will find them ways to socially distantly interact with friends, so that could be for these months. Certainly doing things outside is very possible for them doing things of via social networking and zooming and so on and having interactions with friends that way very possible for them, and, of course, in many places School in some mon, if it five form is going to come back, and it's really important that you help your kid to adjust to the new way of school, which there will be a new way of school because there will be socially distancing involved, etcetera so that they can have some extra support. Some that support emotional and social and cognitive support that they do get from school, which is I'm not going to minimize Really important. We know that staying out of school kids lose cognitively. We know that socially emotionally. It's important for them to be with piers, and we know that. Frankly, educators pick up on a lot of issues for kids, including mental health issues often and so it's important to have those interactions and pick up on those things, but we'll have to do it in a different way. But it's not at all or none. You know if you do it in a different way, it's doable and you're still going to gain the important mental health benefits that you can gain and for kids. It's not going to be as hard as probably it's going to be for you. So, Dr Gail, I've noticed, speaking of the interactions I've noticed, sometimes tension flaring up, especially over the the situation with the mask. So you know, I wear my mask. I think that's the thing to do. And I wear it when I go out some people kind of wear, and then it sort of dangles from the year and they're not wearing it. But the people that kind of irks me and I just wanted to get your thoughts on this are the ones who are the mask. Police. Like you know, a woman yells, It's someone on the street. Put your mask on or, you know, I was riding my bike the other day and ah had stopped at the stop sign there. And there was another woman on the bike. She was that she was not it right.

Supreme Court Donald Trump Hillary Clinton Doctor Gail Long Island Manhattan Vladimir Putin Faye FAY Jeffrey Epstein Dr Gale Saltz Cy Vance Brooklyn Dr Gale President Trump Clinical Associate Professor
Preventing Pandemics with Genomic Epidemiology

a16z

05:05 min | Last week

Preventing Pandemics with Genomic Epidemiology

"Hello and welcome to the a sixteen. Z podcast I'm Lauren Richardson. covid nineteen pandemic has increased visibility of scientists and the scientific process to the broader public suddenly scientists working on garage and Infectious Disease Dynamics have seen their public profiles expand rapidly. One such ientist is our special guest in this episode. Trevor Bedford an associate professor at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center. An expert in genomic epidemiology he and his collaborators built neck strain, which shares real time interactive data visualizations to track the spread viruses to populations. A16 Z. Biodiesel team partner Judy Savitskaya. An I chat with trevor about how genomic. -demia. Can inform public health decisions, viral mutation and spillover from animals into humans, and what can be done now to prevent the next big pandemic. But first we discussed the shifts and scientific communication to pre prince, an open science it topic we will dig deeper into on future episodes while these pre publication and pre peer review, research articles speed the scientific process by sharing results early they can also lead to misinterpretation and misinformation. Everyone loves the alliteration of the promise and the peril of P- reprints, and I think this is the perfect use case of that we've seen a lot of work here reviewed, but out in the world, and making a huge difference for the positive and really driving the science and the public health decisions, but on the flip side were also seeing a pre prince go visit that ended up, really had their claims tempered, and so I'd like to talk to you about kind of your personal experience with this, and how you think about that balance between promise and peril. Yeah? This obviously been very challenging as a working scientists. phenomenally helpful for my own ability to do science, we look at how quickly the things move in. This reprints space, my own understanding the pandemic of Stars Cova to is perhaps a month ahead of where it would be if I was just to look at the jury, the literature where the peril comes in, and how that interacts with public understanding and media, and so forth so part of the issue. I think that we do have things that they land is a preprinted. It's frustrating when that is attached to a press release compared to something or the preprinted, really aimed at the scientists and scientific discussion, and it gets around the scientific community without needing. Needing to have a press release, you also have this issue where you'll be other papers that appear that are in period. You journals, but are bad. Papers are wrong. Like just as silly example, snake flu paper, asserting that somehow it came from snakes that appeared in period you'd article and then by having that period stamp those get run with even farther by by media as like. This is true because it's. It's peer reviewed when Peer Review doesn't actually mean truth, it's sort of a false stash of honor, and so in some ways actually kind of like. Like the fact that the pre prints are tasked with big warnings that we don't know is during, and that makes media perhaps take it with a grain of salt. The way that all paper should be, but it is. It is still a very challenging action and I think like you could probably say that on average see period paper. It is more likely to be true than pre. By the various is big enough that you can't just rely on that badge to to make that decision. Yeah, there on that. I am a big fan of reprints, but I see the much more as a tool for the scientific community and not as much. Wider dissemination exactly. I mean I do that myself where I basically don't pay attention to P- reprints in say the medical countermeasures because I don't know what's going on there. I really pay more attention to what's published in GM in Lancet and so forth whereas into viral evolution worlds EPI modeling I pay attention to P- reprints and published articles, and I don't really pay attention even where their published I can just pay attention to the Dow, underlying science, and I don't need to to rely on the kind of external validation of things kind of your own peer reviewers. But. You need to have the training to kind of hone that the censor to some extent. In the field that you're an expert, and of course, that's going to be very finely tuned, so you're ready to go. I liked that framing a lot, and this then goes just as much for twitter as goes for for Bio Archive. If we go back to twitter and January, there was amazing period where there is full like really open scientific discussion at an as we went forward, the scientists got very. Very popular on twitter and everyone's listening into these conversations, and it has made people more careful, so they don't speculate quite as much and have that open science twitter conversation be a little more careful and more grounded.

Twitter Trevor Bedford Fred Hutchinson Cancer Researc Peer Review Lauren Richardson. Stars Cova Associate Professor Judy Savitskaya Partner Lancet GM
Oh, Baby! Monitor Maker Nanit Lands $21 Million Investment and Finds a New Market

Business Wars Daily

03:48 min | 2 weeks ago

Oh, Baby! Monitor Maker Nanit Lands $21 Million Investment and Finds a New Market

"The. Pandemic may have slowed venture capital deals to crawl, but that didn't stop baby monitor maker Nat from raising twenty one million dollars in a new round of funding. The company produces high tech video. Baby monitors a subscription APP and a line of wearable breathing band swaddled in sleeping bags, baby monitors of long given parents, a sense of security, allowing them to hear and later see they're sleeping children from another room. A quick glance can. Can put a worried momber. Daddy's and Nana's monitor gives parents in HD quality bird's eye view of their babies in infrared night-vision. The mobile APP lets you access the monitor from your phone or tablet features include sound and motion sensors as well as two way audio that lets you sing or talk to your little one Nannette promises the device which tracks sleep patterns is like having a personal sleep coach in the palm of your hand. O. And it's compatible with Amazon's Alexa to. But like all technology, these smart devices have a dark side. Hackers have breached. Baby monitors the past few years using cameras to spy on family members and speak to children. PR reported an alarming case alleging that a hacker reposition to camera remotely to a point at where one mother breastfed her baby several times a day in another reported by NBC News the Hacker, told the Baby I love you through the audio function. In February a report by PC magazines, cybersecurity firm bit defender found that the I baby monitor m-6 camera had vulnerabilities that could possibly allow hackers to download recordings access personal. Using the cameras ID and even control the camera. Initially MAG said. It's attempts to contact i. baby went unanswered, but once the report became public. The Monitor Company reportedly issued fix within twenty four hours. But critics say that monitor manufacturers could do a better job protecting users. There's often a gap between knowing the best practices in correctly implementing them on devices, said northeastern. University Associate Professor David Softness in Rico report the National Cyber Security Alliance, says risks can be minimized by following the devices security instructions and using a strong password also turn off the monitor when it's not an use. Beyond. hacks critic say there are other concerns reliability for one. Last November the Alad Smart Sock, a wearable monitor that wraps around the baby's foot to detect sleep patterns, oxygen, levels and heart rate stopped communicating with a mobile APP for about three days, according to the New York Times some experts wonder if all of this monitoring is just needlessly increasing parents anxiety. Privacy concerns should give parents pause to says Jamie Williams Staff Attorney at digital rights group, the Electronic Frontier Foundation. Every company has different privacy and data retention standards, and parents may not know what happens to their babies liked us once it's recorded by the Monitor. She told the. Washington Post despite these concerns. It's unlikely that new parents are giving up baby monitors anytime soon, but global interactive baby monitor market is projected to grow thirteen percent per year through twenty twenty four. After all worried parents need reassurance and now cove nineteen has ushered in a new market of users tech crunch reports that social distancing requirements have left grandparents, aunts and uncles craving baby time extended. Family now makes up twenty percent of Nana's users. With all of those remote babysitters watching, they're weary bundles of joy. Maybe smart monitors can give parents the peace of mind. They need to find the get some sleep.

Monitor Company National Cyber Security Allian NAT New York Times Nbc News Daddy Amazon MAG Washington Jamie Williams Associate Professor David Softness Staff Attorney Rico
What does Defund The Police mean today, tomorrow and next year? What other options are there?

The Big Story

05:53 min | 3 weeks ago

What does Defund The Police mean today, tomorrow and next year? What other options are there?

"I'd be willing to bet that the phrase abolish. The police gets a reaction from you. Whether it's a sarcastic, scoff or an enthusiastic cheer I don't know. But it's provocative and that's the point. It sounds total. What about De Fund the police? Maybe. That's a little more palatable, but do you know what it means? Right now Paul say that a majority in both Canada and the United States oppose it at least as a slogan. What about stuff like bias, training and body cameras? Those things have lots of port. We also have lots of research that says they don't actually reform much. So something's gotTa give move. There is vast support and energy right now for real police reform. Nearly all of us agree that police brutality and racism is a huge problem that needs meaningful action. So what happens? What would abolishing or defunding police? Departments actually look like today tomorrow next year five years from now. How can reform advocates get the proper message across to the general public who are spooked by these slogans? And is there anything else something in the middle between superficial measures and massive reform? That could help right now. What can we actually do? To start fixing this. I'm Jordan Heath Rawlings? This is the big story. Monica Bell is an associate professor of law and sociology at Yale and she's going to help explain some of the concepts that are floating around right now hello Monica. Our you I'm very well. Thank you and I'm hoping to wrap my mind around some of the proposals right now for reforming police forces in America but also in Canada to. Why don't we start just by talking a little bit about what is being proposed a? How varied are some of the demands and requests and things being proposed even by mayors of cities, yeah, so the Bulls are extremely varied proposals ranging from probably. Probably the one that's gotten most air time a defunding dismantling than there are also proposals that sound a lot more like things we've heard in the past like body cameras is one that is still being opposed a new by some a mayors and police chiefs are there also reforms being proposed like additional training and Tobias Training and procedural justice, training among certain police departments, so it's really a the full, the full range of proposals. Both new and old are being discussed in this firm moment. Let's start with the most aggressive one and we'll get to de-fund the police in a minute because I gather. That's really complicated, but we've also heard calls to a rate of the police and when people say that, what do they mean and in a world like that? What would replace them? So I WANNA start by making really clear that I don't think I can speak on behalf of the Abolition Movement sure for for many reasons. I think you know I've been reading myself about The calls for prison abolition for about four years, but there are people who've been working on these topics for decades so I, just WanNa acknowledge that, so I think there is a range there's a very wide range of people who call themselves abolitionists right now and so some of those people for some of the I would wager a bear small minority that means dismantling the police right now I think most people who identifies the abolitionists. Would say something else, which is that we should be working toward a world in which we don't need. We don't imagine ourselves needing police prisons, the changing make right now on could lead toward a world in which we use the police less, or it could lead to a world in which we use the police more so as much more about what you imagine as the in point of reform in less about. What we should do. In this current moment so on, and there's a lot of writing that underpins that particular perspective and I think one of the one of the reasons, the conversation by abolitionist really complicated is. In the public discourse people here, wow, abolish the police that sounds outrageous timbre. because. Of course we don't. We're not in a situation where we can actually get rid of the police right now of everywhere. In part because. We don't have alternative institutions that do anything about the crime in safety concerns that people have and those are real right I mean there are you know. People are subjected to violence every day. We need some sort of response to that and so right now the only response we can imagine in the only response that has resources really are are the police. The prisons in the entire kind of criminal legal conflicts like that's what we have on everywhere, but actually you know a lot of the. Literature, on abolition has much has much more embrace of incremental approaches to getting to an end point,

Bulls Canada Abolition Movement De Fund Monica Bell Jordan Heath Rawlings Paul Yale Associate Professor United States America
How the Pandemic Has Changed the Way We Sleep

Coronavirus Daily Briefing

03:43 min | Last month

How the Pandemic Has Changed the Way We Sleep

"According to preliminary results of a study of sixteen hundred people from sixty countries, forty six percents of people reported poor sleep during the pandemic. That's up from just twenty five percent before the pandemic insomnia and vivid weird dreams, both caused by the increased stress of the time we're living through has been evident anecdotally and as indicated by a fourteen percent uptick in sleep. Medication Prescriptions Melatonin sales in over the counter supplement for the natural hormone that induces sleepiness are up forty four percents. Philip Musket a professor of Psychiatry at Columbia University Medical Center said he's avoiding prescribing medications to patients preferring to offer sleep hygiene tips. He's seen that actually staying asleep is the biggest problem for most people and says some of the primary factors causing that is that people are lacking in structure and exercise. Stain active can help you sleep more soundly and boost your immune system Dr Musk's also advises sticking to a regular sleep schedule and avoiding naps during the day. The good news according to Kathy Goldstein physician at the University of Michigan and an associate professor of neurology at the Schools Sleep Disorders Center is that what most people are experiencing is acute insomnia or quitting the Wall Street Journal having difficulty for or staying asleep a few times a week for three months or less and quotes, the third of people will experience acute insomnia at some point in their lives usually caused by some stressor. stressor in their life like say a pandemic the key doctor. Goldstein says though is not letting the issue. Become a chronic one quote. It's important to avoid associating your bed or bedroom with a place where you were awake. Experts recommend that if you can't fall asleep or wake up in the middle of the night and are unable to go back to sleep after twenty minutes get out of bed and do something, relaxing and quotes. Natasha Bouillon a Phoenix based family physician at one medical, says most people's sleep problems right now either stem from a lack of normal schedule or general anxiety about the pandemic. Some tips she recommends mindfulness through meditation, exercise or cognitive behavioral therapy. To maintain a consistent sleep schedule, turn devices off an hour before going to sleep and make your sleeping space a device free zone, consider even ditching your smartphones alarm and getting an actual alarm clock, as for anyone, experiencing vivid dreams or nightmares Melinda Jackson, a senior lecturer at the Turner Institute for Brain and Mental Health at Monash University in Melbourne, says quote. During Times of stress, there's a release of narrow chemicals that can trigger these vivid dreams and nightmares in some people end quotes. And, Dearly Barrett a dream researcher at Harvard Medical School notes that waking up frequently throughout the night can also cause people to remember their dreams better. Contribute to the sense that your dreams are more vivid than usual. guardless of how? Your sleep has been disrupted. Or why here are a few more sleep? Hygiene tips to leave with quoting the Wall Street Journal eat at regular times than snacking day. Avoid, napping or compensating for poor night of sleep by going to bed, unusually early limit caffeine and avoid alcohol avoid electronic devices one to two hours before going to sleep, but if you do use a blue light filter and try to look at content that is not stressful. Get Bright Light in the morning. Try to find a workspace that isn't in your bedroom and stop working at a specific our and make time for relaxing activities end quote.

Schools Sleep Disorders Center Philip Musket Wall Street Journal Natasha Bouillon Kathy Goldstein Melatonin Columbia University Medical Ce Associate Professor Of Neurolo Professor Of Psychiatry Harvard Medical School Dr Musk University Of Michigan Dearly Barrett Caffeine Phoenix Melinda Jackson Family Physician
"associate professor" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

News Radio 920 AM

02:13 min | Last month

"associate professor" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

"Associate professor at Dallas theological seminary thirty books on end times prophecies what is your take on the front of virus the coronavirus today is a frightening for shadow of what's coming and showing us how quickly something like this an invisible enemy can really go around the globe subscribe and listen now by going to fox news podcasts dot com I think there is a large demonstrations across New York City could mean an uptick in cases of covert nineteen another night of demonstrations in New York that were more peaceful governor Andrew Cuomo drew the line between protesting and looting very very different situations the pro testing is righteous indignation over Mr Floyd's murder and systemic racism and injustice as for the looting and the looting is criminal behavior put urine sample reminding of the need to keep coronavirus numbers down if you're going to protest protest intelligently remember the cold virus is still out there the NYPD says it made about two hundred and eighty protest related arrests last night in New York City Tonya J. powers fox news federal service approved an expansion of its five hundred billion dollar emergency program to support state and local governments it'll allow all states to have at least two cities or counties eligible to tap the fed support program regardless of population a statue of a divisive Philadelphia mayor taken Rizzo's statue will be put in storage for now they've been outside Philadelphia's municipal services building across from city hall ten feet tall bronze crane in the early morning with national and everything that you've been vandalized several times including during the current protest against police violence may result had a reputation for racial discrimination as part of his tough stance on crime the current mayor Jim Kenney had earlier pledged to have it move sometime next year saying he never liked it Chris foster fox news prince Charles has told a virtual meeting of the World Economic Forum the recovery from covert nineteen is a reset moment for the world and is an opportunity to prioritize sustainability the prince has recovered from the virus after suffering a mild symptoms.

Associate professor New York City Andrew Cuomo Mr Floyd murder NYPD Tonya J. powers Rizzo Philadelphia Jim Kenney Dallas theological seminary fox fed Chris foster prince Charles
African Americans struggle with disproportionate COVID death toll

Intercepted with Jeremy Scahill

03:10 min | Last month

African Americans struggle with disproportionate COVID death toll

"Trump is not some foreign anomaly. He is firmly rooted in the racist history of this nation. He is a product of it. So today we're going to look at that history. The history that brought us to this day and this moment. Later in the program I'll be joined by Stewart schrader, a scholar race, policing and counterinsurgency to discuss the history of militarized police forces and the current weapons and tactics that they are using in an effort to kill these uprisings. But we begin with Dr Kisha. She is an associate professor of history at the University of Pittsburgh and president of the African American intellectual. History Society She's also a nineteen twenty twenty w e B. Do boys fellow at Harvard? University Dr Blaine is the author of the Multi Prize. Winning book set the world on fire, black nationalist women and the global struggle for freedom. She recently published an op. Ed in the Washington Post titled Violence In Minneapolis is rooted in the history of racist policing in America Dr Kishan. Thank you so much for being with us here on intercepted. Thank you for having me. What happened now that sparked this broad rebellion across this country. I think there are several factors. The first that I would emphasize is Krono virus. This pandemic. is completely devastating black communities in particular and my sense is that when people saw the video of George Floyd in particular. It certainly reignited a frustration that we've long felt. And of course, learning about the killing of Briana Thomas. I think people thought well recurrently going through a global pandemic. Certainly, there's a moment where we would not expect this kind of fun rest. Certainly, there's a moment where we would somehow get a break from the kind of pattern and cycle of police brutality. Maybe it will be this moment. Of course was wishful, thinking what we learned very quickly. Is that even in the context of a virus? Once again, black people were being targeted arrested pulled off of buses for not wearing masks at the same time, not even having access to some of these are resources, and I would also add to that. It's an election year and I think. People really felt the need to push to the surface. These issues and to say whoever is going to take the highest office of the land need to address these issues, and clearly we have someone in the White House was not committed to do any of that, but at the very least in pushing the agenda, we can ensure that at least the Democratic nominee can be. Particularly mindful of the need to come up with strategies for dealing with police brutality and violence, and I should specify police killings, which is exactly what we see taking place right now. As a

Donald Trump Dr Blaine Dr Kishan Dr Kisha Associate Professor Of History Stewart Schrader History Society George Floyd Washington Post Briana Thomas Harvard White House University Of Pittsburgh Multi Prize Minneapolis President Trump
CAP Cast

The Coastal Athlete Program

05:36 min | Last month

CAP Cast

"Welcome to episode two of Cap Task. Today is the twenty ninth of May Two thousand twenty. Here is your up to the news from around the Sport Surfing Media Music. You name it news. I up Joe with what's going on in the surf line all. There's a lot of things going on in Surpli- Big notable ones is summer. Season is upon us here so I am always a big advocate. Coastal Athlete Paranthan Swim near lifeguards and guarded and protected areas. Be Smart about where you're going out and the big thing that I have a lot of press about and I've really been excited about that started. With the south there is about rip currents in getting pulled out and recurrence getting caught recurrence. Kind of how to identify them what they look like on shore from above how to keep yourself safe in them so. I don't gain. Do you know much about riptides or recurrence at all. When I was a child I got caught in one in a lifeguard ring to be real real good for it so I know like to. I'd like it's hard me so like I'm afraid of them now. All I know. Oh does that kind of explained your ocean experienced to be thrown away. I've had plenty of scarring ocean. Sounds were you at the house of Man when you got moon hall is much younger than that. There was a much much of a drunken swimming. Only Ocean House of man. I was GONNA say that's a great spot to you know. Go swimming drunken in the middle of the night as I'm shaking my head. If you can watch me so ship would what do you know about rip currents or is it rip current Riptide? I don't I always get that screwed Jess Joe. I guess the biggest difference between rip current and Riptide is that a rip current is generated by focused wave action or wave action creeping along a beach whereas riptide is generated by the flooding or draining of a coastal waterway. Or so for example. A riptide is like a steady constant thing that will basically like. It's a repeating process right because all the water that is upstream is now being pushed back out into the ocean that brackish water whereas riptide couldn't like form in something as small as a long a fifteen foot stretch of beach or it could be as long as you know a five hundred foot stretch of beach. Yes a little bit more variable and intermittent. Okay so what I hear what a rip tide is tied. Based so I think about the San Francisco Bay and how you have the ebbing and flowing tides and how those have very strong polls when they're doing that as opposed to beach contoured causing rip currents that's not dependent on the tide that can happen at any tide will. It's not beach contours. It's wave action relative to the beach so Waves that crash directly on the beach won't necessarily generate a riptide waves arrive angrily on a beach will generate a riptide consistently wall. Thank you for sharing that little bit. Specifically if you're looking for more info about visuals on it L. A. County lifeguards. La Co lifeguards on instagram. They actually have a four or five page thing on their feed that talks about recurrence and it also shows some really good visuals of it. I don't remember riposted because I cannot figure that out and then I believe wasn't a Shep you're telling me that wavelengths had an article the other day and I think I saw it but I think you might have read it. All the article was by Luke. Luke gartside wrote it and it's about the findings of an associate professor from the Naval Postgraduate School who we have reached out to an asked to come on the podcast to talk about the findings that they've published Jen the title is a little click. Beatty everything you know about how to survive a rip could be wrong. What the article is basically saying? Is that what we teach people in general the keep it simple stupid method? Is that you swim parallel to the beach until you swim out of the riptide. After which point you can make your way back in now. What they did was they used INC tests. They did all types of different trace tests and they found out that summed up type to actually form almost figure eight pattern. They recycle into themselves. And so what they advocate for is not investing energy going with the Riptide And then trying to swim once. It's kicked you out so I don't WanNa without without talking to the person who published this. I don't WanNA come out too strong here. But what will say is that when it comes to teaching water survival. What coastal athlete program has taught since its founding and that we will teach until the day that you know they shut us down is that it is better to be an active participant in the scenario than a passive victim. So if you are in a riptide it makes more sense to swim with the tide. Right you walk with the escalator than it does to relax and wait for it to potentially pull you into an even worse situation if you generate momentum by swimming with the tide you can actually get enough speed to potentially break free of it a lot sooner

Riptide Jess Joe Luke Gartside Ocean House Surpli- Big San Francisco Bay Naval Postgraduate School Moon Hall Beatty La Co L. A. County Associate Professor JEN
Summer Surfing Safety Tips

The Coastal Athlete Program

05:28 min | Last month

Summer Surfing Safety Tips

"Welcome to episode two of Cap Task. Today is the twenty ninth of May Two thousand twenty. Here is your up to the news from around the Sport Surfing Media Music. You name it news. I up Joe with what's going on in the surf line all. There's a lot of things going on in Surpli- Big notable ones is summer. Season is upon us here so I am always a big advocate. Coastal Athlete Paranthan Swim near lifeguards and guarded and protected areas. Be Smart about where you're going out and the big thing that I have a lot of press about and I've really been excited about that started. With the south there is about rip currents in getting pulled out and recurrence getting caught recurrence. Kind of how to identify them what they look like on shore from above how to keep yourself safe in them so. I don't gain. Do you know much about riptides or recurrence at all. When I was a child I got caught in one in a lifeguard ring to be real real good for it so I know like to. I'd like it's hard me so like I'm afraid of them now. All I know. Oh does that kind of explained your ocean experienced to be thrown away. I've had plenty of scarring ocean. Sounds were you at the house of Man when you got moon hall is much younger than that. There was a much much of a drunken swimming. Only Ocean House of man. I was GONNA say that's a great spot to you know. Go swimming drunken in the middle of the night as I'm shaking my head. If you can watch me so ship would what do you know about rip currents or is it rip current Riptide? I don't I always get that screwed Jess Joe. I guess the biggest difference between rip current and Riptide is that a rip current is generated by focused wave action or wave action creeping along a beach whereas riptide is generated by the flooding or draining of a coastal waterway. Or so for example. A riptide is like a steady constant thing that will basically like. It's a repeating process right because all the water that is upstream is now being pushed back out into the ocean that brackish water whereas riptide couldn't like form in something as small as a long a fifteen foot stretch of beach or it could be as long as you know a five hundred foot stretch of beach. Yes a little bit more variable and intermittent. Okay so what I hear what a rip tide is tied. Based so I think about the San Francisco Bay and how you have the ebbing and flowing tides and how those have very strong polls when they're doing that as opposed to beach contoured causing rip currents that's not dependent on the tide that can happen at any tide will. It's not beach contours. It's wave action relative to the beach so Waves that crash directly on the beach won't necessarily generate a riptide waves arrive angrily on a beach will generate a riptide consistently wall. Thank you for sharing that little bit. Specifically if you're looking for more info about visuals on it L. A. County lifeguards. La Co lifeguards on instagram. They actually have a four or five page thing on their feed that talks about recurrence and it also shows some really good visuals of it. I don't remember riposted because I cannot figure that out and then I believe wasn't a Shep you're telling me that wavelengths had an article the other day and I think I saw it but I think you might have read it. All the article was by Luke. Luke gartside wrote it and it's about the findings of an associate professor from the Naval Postgraduate School who we have reached out to an asked to come on the podcast to talk about the findings that they've published Jen the title is a little click. Beatty everything you know about how to survive a rip could be wrong. What the article is basically saying? Is that what we teach people in general the keep it simple stupid method? Is that you swim parallel to the beach until you swim out of the riptide. After which point you can make your way back in now. What they did was they used INC tests. They did all types of different trace tests and they found out that summed up type to actually form almost figure eight pattern. They recycle into themselves. And so what they advocate for is not investing energy going with the Riptide And then trying to swim once. It's kicked you out so I don't WanNa without without talking to the person who published this. I don't WanNA come out too strong here. But what will say is that when it comes to teaching water survival. What coastal athlete program has taught since its founding and that we will teach until the day that you know they shut us down is that it is better to be an active participant in the scenario than a passive victim. So if you are in a riptide it makes more sense to swim with the tide. Right you walk with the escalator than it does to relax and wait for it to potentially pull you into an even worse situation

Riptide Jess Joe Luke Gartside Ocean House Surpli- Big San Francisco Bay Naval Postgraduate School Moon Hall Beatty La Co L. A. County Associate Professor JEN
Seattle - Washington State Hit Hard By Unemployment Fraud

NPR's Business Story of the Day

04:11 min | Last month

Seattle - Washington State Hit Hard By Unemployment Fraud

"The State of Washington admitted yesterday that has lost hundreds of millions of dollars to bogus. Unemployment claims this is the latest and biggest example of an increasing number of pandemic related fraud cases. Npr's Martin Kostya reports. The crisis has created ideal conditions for scammers. By last weekend. It was already pretty clear that something bad was happening to Washington. State's unemployment system Jevon West is an associate professor at the University of Washington Seattle. I get this email from my gain that said Oh my identity has been stolen. Yours might be to you better. Check turns out. Somebody was impersonating university faculty members using their names and social security numbers to apply unemployment benefits and West found that his idea was being misused. This way too. I have colleagues across the university in the medical school in the law school and every single group that I've talked to there was at least some and in some cases many had their identity stolen there have been similar reports from all across Washington and the state now acknowledges that there have been tens of thousands of bogus unemployment claims and just a few weeks. It's lost hundreds of millions of dollars or will I did eight jaw-dropping figure yesterday the State's Commissioner for Employment Security. Suzy Levine held zoom. Press conference about what happened. She wouldn't give many details because a team of federal investigators is trying to track down the criminal network behind this and get the money back but when asked whether the state had been taking enough precautions against this kind of fraud. She pointed to the pandemic and the urgency of the economic crisis overbalanced. How do we balance getting that money out? Broadly and quickly with clamping down in order to keep out the criminals and the fraudsters cybercrime gangs always like it when governments are in a hurry to disperse money and now there's trillions of dollars in aid flowing out of Congress. The race is on. Patrick Peterson is the founder of email security company called Gary. It's been monitoring a major west African cybercrime gang watching as it attacks. The unemployment systems of at least eight states. They're trying to get to the websites to register to fill in the information to fill out claim and get those funds before the people who are actually do them can do so. Experts think the gangs are filling out those claim forms by drawing on the ocean of personal information about us. That's been stolen in recent years. For instance from facts in two thousand seventeen eve of Alaska's a CEO of the Identity Theft Resource Center a nonprofit that helps victims it. Also tracks data breaches. But she says right now. That kind of hacking isn't the priority for these criminals Ria the number of breaches occurring actually fall this quarter. But that's because they're they're no longer seeking out the data now they're trying to monetize it and they're not going after just government money. There's also been a jump. In pandemic themed scams that target individuals for instance fake warnings that you've been exposed to the corona virus to be able to use a nugget of truth and then spend their yard and now because things are so disorienting it does tend to put us in a position where we think well is that true. I mean it could be because I never thought this could happen and I'm living it and that has some disturbing implications if scammers pretend to be say contact tracers then. How will people respond to a call from real contact tracers? Jevon West. The academic whose identity was stolen at the start of this story the University of Washington Center for an informed public. He happens to study misinformation and disinformation. He calls this pandemic long-term state of uncertainty. And when there's so much uncertainty you get these knowledge vacuums. That sort of attract opportunists. Send propaganda that are either trying to push narrative that are trying to sow confusion the trying to just make a buck and there are lots of people trying to make a buck right now around it. Now that his own identities been used for fraud. West says he's resolved to do more at his center to alert the public to Cova scams and the damage they do to our ability to figure out what's real in an unreal time.

Washington Suzy Levine Fraud Jevon West West University Of Washington Seatt NPR Martin Kostya University Of Washington Cente Patrick Peterson Alaska Commissioner Associate Professor Congress Cova Founder
Exporting Authoritarianism

Why It Matters

05:19 min | Last month

Exporting Authoritarianism

"I will relate that interesting story. The president of Kazakhstan actually visited a company called hike. Vision is another one that provides surveillance technology visit their office in China and he saw how with one. Click on a person's face. You could get that person's school history work history financial situation. Wow and wait for it. How did this person spend his or her leisure time? So where did this person go to have fun? Did you go to the movies? Did you stop by the bank to go to the post office where you hang out with friends? Did you participate in a protest and his reaction after seeing all of this was we need this technology. That's not where I thought the story was going. This is probably not the first time you're hearing about China's surveillance technology and that's because it gets a lot of coverage it's like a Black Mirror episode. It gives us visions of a dystopia in future but this technology and the eagerness of some countries to begin implementing. It is only a small part of a much bigger story about China through its belt and road initiative China's in the process of building and funding infrastructure projects across the globe and loaning vast sums of money in the developing world. Some observers argued that as it does this. China is also exporting its authoritarian model of government and eroding democratic norms. That many of us take for granted others say that China is simply taking business opportunities where it sees them and providing countries with an alternative to a global order that has gone unchallenged for decades. The debate comes down to one question. How will we choose to view China as they pour money into hospitals ports and roads around the World I'm Gabrielle? Sierra and this is why it matters today is China exporting authoritarianism. I think the most important thing to understand about China's foreign policy over the past ten years or so is that it really has been transformed. This is Elizabeth Economy. She's a senior fellow and director for Asia. Studies here at the council. She's also a distinguished visiting fellow at Stanford University's Hoover Institution beginning in about two thousand and eight with global financial crisis China's hosting the Olympics. These are really moments that defined in the minds of many Chinese leaders that China was rising. Chinese have many goals for these Olympics. One of them was to announce to the world. The China is back after two hundred years. China's economy has grown faster than that of any other major country. The Asian giant has now grown into one of the most important export markets for manufacturers from all over. The world is a period of historic change in China. There haven't been many periods in history as fascinating as this so there was a real sense within China for the first time that they had always expected that at some point China was going to surpass the United States but maybe that time was coming sooner than they anticipated. But what really has changed the game on the ground has been Xi Jinping everything for Xi Jinping is under the mantra of the great rejuvenation of the Chinese nation and it is a call for reclaiming a much greater degree of centrality for China on the global stage. Xi Jinping became China's president in two thousand thirteen some observers have called him the most powerful Chinese leader since Mao Zedong. Look I think there are any number of objectives and we can find them all and Xi Jinping's writings and speeches but fundamentally what I think. Xi Jinping attempting to do is simply to make the world safer authoritarianism. Teaching is a dictator but dictators. Still have to answer to domestic constituents. This is Jessica. Chance Weiss associate professor of government at Cornell and a leading expert on Chinese politics. She has a different take on China's expansion. One that sees it as being less offensive and more defensive. China's concerned about a whole lot of different risks. Some of them domestic others ones. That emanate from abroad sparks. That might start the prairie fire and bring down the Chinese government and might take units overriding purpose is to continue to make the world safe for the Chinese Communist Party to strive at home. So this is a world that safe for autocracy to coexist alongside democracy in the international space. So it's not been as ideological I think and it's foreign policy is some admitted. It out to be so. China is trying to find a way to sort of fit in with a world. That might not be comfortable with its model of government tried to make space for its form of government to be regarded as one that can continue to exist that is legitimate than democracy isn't the only form of government so to speak and so this has made it easier for other authoritarian states to survive

China Chinese Government Xi Jinping Visiting Fellow Chinese Communist Party President Trump Kazakhstan Elizabeth Economy Olympics Mao Zedong Asia United States Jessica Stanford University Hoover Institution Weiss Associate Professor Cornell
Dead or Alive, Viruses are Everywhere, and Here to Stay

WSJ The Future of Everything

04:44 min | 2 months ago

Dead or Alive, Viruses are Everywhere, and Here to Stay

"Viruses are found just about everywhere there in glaciers crystal caves volcanoes the ocean when we try to count the number of viruses that are around. It's actually a hard thing to do. This is Neil Shubin an evolutionary biologist at the University of Chicago but we can get estimates for how many viruses say Lion Ocean. It's a number that is just genus. It's actually a number that's larger than the number of stars in the known universe. That is how many viruses around us. Despite their abundance Shubin says viruses have been surprisingly challenging to study. You know in terms of the number jeans they have and the number of proteins and so forth. It's just a handful of things really and that's what makes them so. Pernicious Shubin says over Millennia of these viruses have actually ended up making our lives better. His new book touches on the role viruses have played in our evolution and it appears that they've had a vital part in shaping our Gino but what's remarkable their number and their sure diversity but how evolve -able they are our. Dna contains protein. Coding genes they send instructions to the cells that help us to develop survive and reproduce but our genome are complete set of DNA. Keep surprising researchers turns out that eight percent of our genome werft from ancient viruses that invaded our genome got incorporated inside our genome and no longer affect us and the number may even be higher than that instead of infecting us. Shubin says ancient viral genetic material. Now helps us to perform essential functions and discoveries about these weird molecular partnerships are ongoing Shubin. Says one of the first happened a couple of years ago in Jason Shepherds lab? My Name's Jason Shepherd. I'm an associate professor at the University of Utah. In the Department of Neurobiology and Anatomy Sheppard's team was studying memory genes in mice to find out how cells in the brain store information. They were focusing on the archie. That is connected to long term memory creation in mammals take gene out of mice late. Look Normal Brain. Looks normal for the most part. They just can't remembering things so they con- store any information. Basically MICE WITHOUT THEIR ARCH. Gene have trouble learning. And there's evidence that humans who have mutations in genes have cognitive deficits so he thinks this one gene is very key for memory consolidation making long term memories especially and so we've been trying to figure out what the protein is doing in the brain while you lynn. How does it convert short-term memories into Long Term Memories? Shepherd isolated the proteins? That the chain makes what you do. If you're studying this stuff and one day shepherd's lab tech pop the ARC proteins under a powerful electron microscope they call it the em scope and they couldn't believe what they saw. He came to me and he was like I. I'm seeing these weird objects under the scope and I don't know what to make of them take a look and so they should meet them. I was like what the hell are these. These are this is crazy. The brain proteins they were looking at. We're much larger than they should have been. Shepherd says they looked like little capsule. It's like similar to the shell. Virus makes called a capsule when we took pictures we saw these lodge sackable structures that were mobile sociable structures. Well they looked like soccer balls. Shepherd pulled out his firm textbook to compare photos. Yup still looked like a virus. And then that's when I took it to my colleagues and said you know. What do you think of Bizarre? And they like well. That's virus that take J. V. Let's looks like HIV. What happened? What happens to your protein verification. That you've got viruses. Shepherd was like what the heck is a brain protein doing looking like a virus. His colleagues thought that the slides were somehow contaminated with HIV. But no it was a brain protein. It's not often that one finds something in the brain that looks like a virus. That's not a virus in fact it's like never like never before it's almost like the classic stereotype view of a scientist that they're making this discovery. They shout out. Eureka way the ARC looked like a virus made shepherd sink. Maybe it would behave like one.

Jason Shepherd Neil Shubin Gene Lion Ocean University Of Chicago Gino Soccer ARC Associate Professor Department Of Neurobiology Anatomy Sheppard Scientist University Of Utah J.
What's Up With That Mutated New Strain of the Virus?

Coronavirus Daily Briefing

02:40 min | 2 months ago

What's Up With That Mutated New Strain of the Virus?

"A new study. That is yet to be. Peer reviewed has suggested that a new strain of corona virus emerged early on in the outbreak and has become the dominant form of the virus worldwide. One of many mutations of the virus the specific mutation that caused the study authors concern named d six one four G. began spreading in Europe in early February migrated swiftly to the east coast of the United States and became the dominant strain globally by mid-march these study authors flagged eight quote urgent concern with important implications for SARS COV to transmission pathogenesis and immune interventions particularly as vaccine development ramps up the authors routes when we embarked on our SARS Cov to analysis pipeline. Our motivation was to identify mutations that might be of potential concern in the SARS cov to spike protein as an early warning system for consideration as vaccine studies progress we did not anticipate such dramatic results so early independent. Mc viruses bearing the Mutation Spike D. Six one four G. or replacing the original Wuhan form of the virus rapidly and repeatedly across the globe and quotes the authors even suggested that the mutation may make people who'd been infected with the original form of the virus susceptible to reinfection with the now dominant mutation. They said quote d six one four G. is increasing in frequency at an alarming rate indicating a fitness advantage relative to the original. Wuhan strain that enables more rapid spread and quotes. The findings have profound implications for Vaccine Development. Efforts quoting the La Times. If the pandemic failed to wane seasonally as the weather warms the study warns the virus could undergo further mutations as research organizations. Prepare the first medical treatments and vaccines without getting on top of the risk. Now the effectiveness of vaccines could be limited. Some of the compounds and development are supposed to latch onto the spike or interrupt. Its action designed based on the original version of the spike. They might not be effective against the new corona virus strain the study's authors warned and quotes not all experts agree with the study's conclusions however bill associate professor at the Harvard. T H Chan School of Public Health pointed out on twitter linked to his thread in the show notes that it's not clear whether the single amino acid change identified by the study is due to selection a result of the supposed- increased fitness of the mutation strain or mere happenstance and either way he argues it likely has no effect on transmissibility or immunity.

Wuhan La Times T H Chan School Of Public Heal Associate Professor Twitter United States Europe G. Harvard
Coronavirus: Flour industry updates

The Big Story

02:51 min | 2 months ago

Coronavirus: Flour industry updates

"The the first thing you should know about our guest today is that. He's got flower like in his house and he just bought it in a store. Really all kidding aside. He is living proof that despite what I might see at my local grocery stores Canada's food supply chain is working even for flower but if it is and why can't I find flour. And why can't my friend who lives up in the country? Get fresh bread in order to answer that you have to start with the basics of how Canada's food supply chains operate. I say chains because when you start to have it explained first thing you learn is that there are two of them and those two supply. Chains are very different so from a beginner's guide to those chains to the impact of cove in nineteen breaks and meat packing plants on them to why you should really think about eating fries while you're on lockdown and how much more you might pay for groceries this fall. We're going to walk you through with the past couple of months have done to the journey. Your food takes between farm and table. And we'll do that as soon as Claire tells you what you need to know today. The federal government is pledging two hundred and fifty two million dollars to ease pressures on the country's agriculture industry. Last month the Canadian Federation of Agriculture asked for two point six billion dollars but Prime Minister Justin Trudeau says the amount being given now is a point. We will continue to work with farmers with a stakeholders and industry representatives with provinces and territories to ensure that food food capacity in this country. And those people who worked so incredibly hard every single day to feed Canadians get the support that they need through this crisis and beyond Alberta plans to double its capacity to test for the current a virus four point five million dollars will be spent on new equipment and technology right now. The province is doing about seven thousand tests day and they want that number at sixteen thousand Quebec. The hardest hit province in candidate is lifting some of the restrictions on private seniors homes for nearly two months. Now residents have not been allowed to have visitors and they've not been allowed to go out and accompanied the premier says now some residents will be allowed to go out on their own and they can have visitors but they have to be outside as of Tuesday evening. Sixty two thousand forty six cases of covert nineteen in Canada with four thousand one hundred and sixty six deaths Jim Jordan Heath Rawlings. And this is the big story. Michael von Maso is an associate professor of food agriculture and resource economics at the University of wealth where he also hosts their food focus. Podcast

Canada Michael Von Maso Canadian Federation Of Agricul Jim Jordan Heath Rawlings Justin Trudeau Federal Government Claire Prime Minister Associate Professor University Of Wealth Quebec Alberta
We could be facing a meat shortage as coronavirus shuts more packing plants

KCBS Radio Weekend News

01:11 min | 2 months ago

We could be facing a meat shortage as coronavirus shuts more packing plants

"Enjoy that juicy thick steak why can't he CBS's Curtis camera ports you may have noticed some shortages at the meat counter why been out shopping the shortages will affect pork beef and chicken in the near future slaughterhouses are operating at sixty percent of capacity because the corona virus has resulted in a manpower shortage the property in plan for having property to reduce the hi speed or even shut down some of their workers contract David Ortega is a food economist and associate professor at Michigan State University he says much of what you see at the supermarket is from the frozen warehouse supplies but as that stock starts to dwindle shortages could start to increase over current looking at right now it's anywhere between twenty to twenty five percent of U. S. or property after the being taken off line and I seen reports up from the B. sector around you know ten percent of production being affected meat packing plants have become hot spots with the corona virus because workers are packed close together and there's a lack of protective clothing but take this as for now don't panic listeners should note that the U. S. passport frozen meat research in cold storage but take this as much as the meat destined for restaurants now being redistributed to the

CBS David Ortega Michigan State University
Child abuse cases go unreported amid pandemic

WBBM Evening News

02:36 min | 2 months ago

Child abuse cases go unreported amid pandemic

"April is child abuse prevention month and states are reporting a drastic decline in calls to child abuse hotlines but officials believe that more cases are going unreported due to schools being closed teachers are usually some of the best eyes and ears for suspected cases of abuse and neglect Anna Gassman pines is an associate professor of public policy psychology and neuroscience at Duke University she joins me now from Durham North Carolina ana how might the pandemic actually worsen situations involving child abuse or neglect that's a really great question and what we know from the research is that when families are under economic strain they are more likely to experience child abuse and neglect and one of the main thing that is happening during this pandemic in addition to all the concerns about our health is huge increases in disruptions in work huge increases in unemployment and losses of income for families and that is almost certainly increased at an extreme for many parents do you have suggestions for parents feeling stressed out about ways that they can help calm their emotions that's a really good question I think it's really hard to know the situation is so unprecedented the scale of the disruptions to daily life to workers lives to children's lives is really overwhelming at times and I think our research and our social science really almost isn't equipped to know what best to say in these situations but one thing is to just remember that you know keeping kids safe is more important than a few days of lost schooling so for example if it's difficult to try to help children with distance learning and giving it a rest for a day or two will help ease tensions in the household that's a really important thing to do and I imagine not being afraid to seek out help when you need it even though we're on lockdown and all that isolating when it comes to the welfare of children that's an important time to to figure out another solution I'm assuming that's right into trying to do what you can to improve your family's financial situation it's a really difficult time so many people are out of work even

Associate Professor Duke University Anna Gassman Pines Durham North Carolina
UW Milwaukee professor explains contact tracing and how it tackles COVID-19

Jeff Wagner

00:39 sec | 2 months ago

UW Milwaukee professor explains contact tracing and how it tackles COVID-19

"Is called contact tracing and it's a term that you're going to hear more of now in regards of tracking the corona virus cases associate professor of epidemiology at UW Milwaukee Dr Amanda Seminyak explains how the health department uses this method currently if you have a positive advocates help parents notified they reach out to you in the interview you about all the people that you might have been in contact with technology is changing as we eventually assimilated the public spaces again there are technologies being used in other countries where you could voluntarily sign up for an app you are notified if you encounter someone who is positive Melissa Barclay WTMJ

Dr Amanda Seminyak Melissa Barclay Wtmj Associate Professor Of Epidemi
"associate professor" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

05:48 min | 3 months ago

"associate professor" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"Associate professor at Duke University out Boris Johnson of course is a world leader but what he and his girlfriend are going through is not all that different from couples all over I mean you can't imagine anything scarier other than you or your family member being infected with corona virus than being pregnant at this time what are you telling expectant moms who you know at this time especially when I was joyous time in their life it's it's really scary cautious reassurance thus far in pregnancy we had not seen that pregnant women tend to do worse than other people in the population who get the virus that said that's based mostly on data from China and it's very limited data so we're very cautiously watching the pregnant population here in the US we know that code is bad for anyone obviously and even young healthy people can get very very ill from this and we have seen pregnant women get quite L. but in terms of population level we haven't seen as significant of illness among pregnant women as we had in past outbreaks for example in H. one N. one back in two thousand nine within out about a month of the disease spreading it became very clear that pregnant women did much worse than the general population and we are now I have over a million co that infections across the globe and we haven't seen that level of concern as a B. acts we do worry a bit about the fact that the American population may have more underlying medical illnesses than some other populations across the world and so like I said we're cautiously watching but thus far cautiously reassuring what about a mom who was tested positive transferring it to the baby yeah that's a great question similarly we have not seen any clear evidence of transmission to the baby while mom is pregnant there are a couple of reports that have raised a little bit of concern and that they've shown some certain markers of infection or inflammation in babies who are born after mom's work good positive but thus far we haven't seen that there is any illness related to that how about this idea that my mom goes to deliver the baby and you know contracts it and then have to be separated from her newborn for you know the very earliest parts of a life that's something that's really scary to a lot of expectant moms sure and very understandably scary one thing I'll say is that the CDC has softened their recommendation language of bets on this and that it is not a mandate that moms be separated from their newborn events but that is B. a shared decision making process with the hospital staff physicians and the patients and that women who may be particularly L. and may be shedding a lot of virus may choose to have their invent separated attention more so than women who have recovered for example and are doing well it really is recommended that this be a case by case decision I've got a friend who is daughter is expecting and she wants to go there and be with her a lot of husbands and partners have said the same thing what are you recommending for those people I mean for in in her instance she's in New York her daughter is in Atlanta should she go and be be self quarantining now the same for a husband I mean it's just so confusing for a lot of people with they don't know what to do the recommendations in general are the people not travel that they stay home if they are able to and if they can not go from city to city to decrease the risk of sharing this virus from city to city in people who are already living in a shared space the recommendations really vary from place to place as we know that we should limit visitors as much as possible on labor and delivery units most labor and delivery units if they are allowing visitors are allowing one support person to help moms do you have anything that you would like to add that you know words of encouragement for expectant moms and you know everybody anybody else who's you know just obviously high levels of anxiety I mean does that stress out the baby as well I think that the important thing for us to remember is that the vast majority of people who get this infection even if they get the infection do well they tend to recover there's a small very small proportion that ends up very L. the things that we are all doing thus far really appear to be working said that continuing to social distance for as long as possible in this area by municipality but as long as they continue to do the things that are recommended they will likely do very well in their babies will likely be very healthy and as I said the the reassuring nature of the information that we have in pregnancy thus far shouldn't give moms and some general peace of mind we actually have one piece of good news that's the silver lining around this infection for moms are going to have babies thank you so much and take care and stay safe and stay healthy thank you so much you too coming.

Associate professor Duke University Boris Johnson
Do Animals Laugh?

BrainStuff

03:22 min | 3 months ago

Do Animals Laugh?

"If you've ever been close with a non human animal you may think it's obvious that they have senses of humor. Even if most of what they think is funny. Is You know but we set out to learn what science has to say about it. Have you ever tried to tell a joke to an animal? I've done it before I I talk to my dogs. Whatever but this this brain stuff and I'm Christian Sager. So here's the question. Can Animals laugh in some cases. This might sound ridiculous. There are many different types of laughter and generally speaking these types fall into two broad categories complex social laughter where you have to know the context or have a sense of to you know get it and laughter in response to stimulation like tickling some animals such as primates seem to have a sense of humor. Meaning they can respond to situations with a hand. That sounds eerily similar to laughter. You can read numerous stories about Koko. The gorilla allegedly making jokes in sign language and so on. Additionally when adult animals like dolphins or ravens play pranks they're indicating an understanding of humor but laughter itself seems more common than humans had originally thought rats had been laughing. They're furry little keystones off the dawn of recorded history but we only figured this out a few years back. It turns out rats like being tickled and when they're tickled they chirp at a range too for human ears to pick up. It's around fifty kilohertz. We know this. Thanks to the work of Jacques Pants. Skip and Jeffrey Bergdorf beginning in the late nineties at Bowling Green State University. And if we're talking about that second category of laughter. A positive localization associated with touch than the comedy. Floodgates may have just swung open. Dr Davila Ross has been gathering as much data as possible about the reactions. Various animals have to being tickled the list of animals. That make a vocal reaction when tickled include. Mir Cats camels dolphins dogs Al's penguins and more. So what's the explanation? Well according to Michael Owen and associate professor of psychology and neuroscience from Georgia State University. That's my Alma Mater. The case may be simple at least when applied to mammals. It's just a pleasant feeling evoked by touching laughter. It seems may well be millions of years old and existed before human beings. If you think about it we're sort of late to the joke and to be fair. Most scientists aren't calling the straight out laughter. Instead they're suggesting that these positive vocalisations or as Dr Davila Ross rights expressions of joy. And when we ask whether laughter is a sign of intelligence. Dr Pank Sep notes. That intelligence isn't a requirement for laughter. Instead he suggests maybe we should look at it from another direction. Perhaps play in any species can increase social intelligence as research continues. We're learning more and more about animals laughter and

Dr Davila Ross Michael Owen Ravens Dr Pank Bowling Green State University Christian Sager Alma Mater Jacques Pants Jeffrey Bergdorf Georgia State University Associate Professor Of Psychol
Historically Black Colleges' Contributions to the NFL with Dr. Derrick E. White

In Black America

06:27 min | 3 months ago

Historically Black Colleges' Contributions to the NFL with Dr. Derrick E. White

"On this week's program historically black colleges and universities and the NFL with Doctor Derrick white in black America in their celebration of the hundred year. It was not as historical as we would like right. I think the for better for worse college football who celebrate the One hundred fiftieth year and in conjunction with ESPN primarily. Done these series of documentaries. That kind of documenting the game so they did a great set of talking about the early game when the Ivy Leagues Dominated College Football. Right you get that kind of Astaldi. Nfl is not so much right. In their part of Wigan's law says that the integration the reintegration of the. Nfl in part is done. Because you know teams WanNa move to the West Coast Right. They WanNa play in Los Angeles And that the black community the La said no in particular forced the L. A. Don's to say if you WANNA come in you. GotTa you gotTa desegregate Your Team. So woody strode gets an opportunity to play and Kenny Washington gets a chance to try out for these teams and they make these teams in the NFL so we were talking about the kind of reintegration of of professional football as the National Football League celebrated. Its first one hundred seasons unbeknownst to many sports fans the NFL didn't have any African American players for decade from Nineteen thirty four to nineteen forty-six. There was an unspoken agreement between owners to ban African American players today. They are two African American general managers for minority head coaches and one chief operating officer for the first time the crew for sue both fifty four had a record number of minority officials of the seven on the field five for African Americans the contribution of historical black colleges and universities. Acc use to the NFL has changed the game forever undrafted by an NFL team. Paul tank younger was the first African American player from grambling State University to play in the NFL when he signed with the Los Angeles Rams in nineteen forty nine the first African American drafted in the NFL draft was jaws rooks. I running back out of Morgan state in the Eleventh Round. One hundred and twenty fifth overall by the Green Bay packers in nineteen fifty one doing super bowl fifty four week in south Florida Group of area high school athletes had an opportunity to learn about the rich history of black college football and his contributions to the NFL and Black America spoke with doctor. Derrick wide associate professor at the University of Kentucky. When I was teaching a class on sports history I found that the students knew nothing about historically black college role. They were as part of their assignment. They had researched The histories of sports history at various institutions and students had cookman in Florida. And I knew that those are really successful. Athletic programs and students came back with nothing. And so I've you know I just thought chalked up. Initially students being students that they just didn't do enough but when we both begin system. I realized there was a huge gap in the scholarship. And there's a Lotta work on sports. History is a lot of work on college sports especially college football but there was very little nearly nothing on historically black colleges And so at the time I was at Florida Atlantic in so I was like Bam. You is like right up the road. Well you know eight hours away from my house but I and I knew Jay. Gator was dominant. I'd heard these stories from my uncles and I knew he was a fantastic program so I did a research trip and I went up there and they have the archivists there. And the the library's at up in Florida were amazing and they gave me these materials in there. All these letters documents and so I had budgets and letters of professional teams and I begin to understand how he organized his football program because the issue is discussed our Pamela Day. That there wasn't a lot of research money. A lot of research recruiting money not money budgets. Within Coach Gate. There was the ad coach basketball at one point. And those things. I thought those kinds of stories and that the greatness that the success that he was able to produce was Willie Gallimore Kim. Rowley Bob Hayes. I wanted to understand how that was done. I didn't WANNA chalk it up to that. These were just natural athletes that there was something being done happening on these institutions in some coaches Were better than others and so I wanted to tell that story talk about. Integration Immigration had a positive effect but it also had a devastating effect on also African Americans going to the NFL right so an integration was boom for professional football. Right then you know one of the reasons that Jake was so able to be so successful especially early on in the forties and early fifties that many of his former players gather degrees and became teachers in the high schools. All across the State of Florida and North Georgia. And so he would. They would just send him letters. Like hey coach gay. Got This really. Good kid this Willie Gallimore guys pretty good right. Like this is how he got recruiting information was from his former players but those players were talented but there was no professional football opportunities and so when those opportunities really begin to open up a specially after nineteen sixty when the AFL comes in then professional football now creates a new opportunity for black colleges in small colleges in general and so that becomes this boom and on the backside that the course the civil rights movement is happening at this exact same time right so brown. V Board of Education. This is entire push to desegregate schools Whether the high school level colleges etc and so so many ways why colleges Kinda caught between their own. Their success right. They're producing these great players in the NFL. Minium all pros as we talked about earlier. Thirty two or in the NFL Hall of fame at the same time. There are new opportunities at Florida. Miami or Georgia and that these schools especially in the deep south are slowly trying to recruit them when you look back at the history of ACC using his contribution to to the NFL. I found it amazing and the one hundred year the League. There's very little that has been articulated about a SPEC- US or the early African American players and they and their celebration of the hundredth year. It was not as historical as we would like right. I think the you know for better for Worse College Football who celebrated his Hundred Fiftieth Year and in conjunction with ESPN primarily. Done these series of documentaries that kind of documenting the game so they did a great set of documentaries talking about the early game when the Ivy League dominated college football. Right you get that kind of Nfl is not so much

National Football League Football Florida Ivy Leagues Dominated College Derrick White Espn Astaldi Los Angeles Willie Gallimore Kim Ivy League Woody Strode America United States Rowley Bob Hayes League Willie Gallimore ACC Green Bay Packers
Kathryn Sophia Belle

Talking Journeys of Belonging 2 Blackness

08:30 min | 3 months ago

Kathryn Sophia Belle

"I'm India Lorrie Wilmot. And you're listening to the PODCAST TALKING. Journeys out belonging to blackness. Joining us today is Dr Catherine Sophia Bell. Catherine is associate professor of philosophy at Penn State with research and teaching interests in African American Afrikaner Philosophy African American Studies African Diaspora studies lack feminist philosophy and critical philosophy of race. She's an author. Co Founding Editor of the Journal Critical Philosophy of race a certified Yoga instructor in founding director in owner of La Belle. Be Coaching which Offers Executive Academic coaching workshops and retreats for administrators faculty and Graduate Students. Catherine also offers services specifically under happily unmarried and erotic empowerment that provide individual and Week Group. Coaching workshops and retreats designed to support the social emotional and physical wellbeing of her clients. Thank you for having me Katherine. Let me tell you. I just love the way. You're able to demonstrate for so many folks out there. How one in academic can be multifaceted in dynamic right. Don't sit at a desk. Let's read in on this thing right and then also to how as an African descended person and woman how he can truly embrace and live in your truth when it comes to your personal relationships and partnerships and even with yourself as it is the case with happily unmarried and then I love this and open to the sixty nine ways to embrace ecstasy. Yeah I mean there's more but sixty nine such a fun number and then I'm also my son. Signed his cancer and sign kind of looks like a sixty nine so I like playing with things like Bat. I love that. And so all of this falls under your business tagline philosophical purposeful and practical approaches to La Shelby. The good life. All of that fantastic. I'm so excited to have you here. Because you are such a brilliant scholar and you also have this really great. Entrepreneurial Mindset as well. I think our audience here will just enjoy listening to your journey as to how you've been able to combine these two passions. It seems to me I love it will fall right into our first segment. If you don't mind because I have so many different kinds of questions and thoughts act one call to adventure so for our listening audience. Who may not know you changed your last name from Gyns. Yes to bell and bell spelled with an extra e honor your maternal grandmother and and as I understand your maternal grandmother named herself. And Yeah and you see this active. Changing your name as a way to honor that power and legacies. Yes well first let me say I absolutely love my name. I mean every time I see it written down Catherine Sophia Bell like I get excited at the sight of my own name. So in terms of motivations oftentimes our names are patrilineal right. So many not necessarily all women are given the name of your father in. May Take on the name of their husband and that was my experience. So my initial given name was Catherine Theresa Johnson. My mother wanted the name Catherine after her mother my father wanted to name you theresa and then Johnson was his name. So that was my maiden name I got married in. Nineteen Ninety nine at the age of twenty one between my first and second semesters in Grad School and at that point I changed my last name to guidelines which was the name of the former husband I got legally divorced in twenty seventeen and I'm now berry happily unmarried. And rather than returning somebody that patrilineal name I mate name. I decided to go with a match. Lineal named honor my maternal grandmother so her initial given name was Katherine Smallwood. Which was my great grandmother's last name. Smallwood. But by the time she got the high school she changed her name's Katherine L. B. E. L. L. Now I have no idea how she went about changing it or even if she went through some legal process to do that but my mother got me a copy of her high school yearbook class of Nineteen Fifty two where in that yearbook so by the time. She got her senior in high school. Her name is listed as Catherine Bell. And so there's something really powerful to me about this black woman in the nineteen young black woman in the nineteen fifties by her senior in high school Made her name Kathryn Bell. And that's the name that she's recognized as you know later in life she. She went on to model. She showed up in jet magazine a few times and her name is Catherine Bell knows faces as well. You know that was just a powerful legacy to me and it was important Tap into in connect to that legacy empower naming oneself Have a match lineal name as hopes to patrilineal name. I'm so I changed my name Catherine. I actually dropped the middle name. Interestingly my mother when I was changing my last name she was like. Oh well I never really liked Teresa anyway. That was your father's toys. That would choice so she got a chance to rename me. My Middle Name Sophia. She recommended because she said you're Lhasa. In philosophy us so you can be Sophia. My Mother's middle initial is S. My two daughters have the middle initial s so we were able to share that s middle initial further sophia in the bell It's still sounds the same as the way. My maternal grandmother founded by added the extra e. Just a little bit of self friendship over the meaning of beauty. I think evidence that there was so much thoughtfulness and care. Yeah even your process to say okay. How do I go about changing my name because even when we go through relationships such as marriage? And you're going through the divorce there is a lot of conscious thought around. Do People keep their names Ryan or even when you're getting married forget about even when you're getting divorced but like when you're getting married some people choose to keep their name drop the name in my case I hyphenated. I've even attended a wedding where the husband and the wife decided to both hyphenate their names just so that it would on paper as well as the presentation of this new joined. Family Union Unit. That it wasn't that someone was giving up but they were just more so adding naming oneself is so powerful. I mean I can't help but to even reflect on scene in routes where yes lavar. Burton is as as Coon to Kim. Tae Is being whipped. He ends. It's you know this holder of active submission. That's trying to happen with him being beaten because he refused the naming Tober right and he's like Kota Day trying to be broken. Think about that example. I also think about the example with Muhammed Ali. Right where he's like. You know. Say My name. Say My name right before the destiny's child came out with it up. You know what I mean and so yeah. I'm not GonNa say that that you know the cultural model my mind that I figured I'd put that out there. Once I said it I was like okay. This is GonNa be the connection that comes up celebrities name that too. But that's not quite what I have in mind right. There is something and I think we have more examples of men doing that than or the example of men don't eat more celebrated than examples of women during that but definitely for me like I look forward to dropping the maiden name when I took on the Mary name but I also very much look forward to dropping the Mary name and renaming my for me. It was another beginning for me. Like who am I in this new chapter this new iteration of our life? And how can this naming process a reflection of that kind of a launching point for me for that? So that's been beautiful. Young kids is all about identity. And the all these different phases and stages just you know what does our about us and then our names judge. We're judged by our names whether we're applying for different jobs or positions. I mean their scores and You know them very well. Also but their scores of research studies and the employment field that talked about racial bias and discrimination based on candidates nate. I think that's a fantastic way to pay homage to her legacy. Thank you

Dr Catherine Sophia Bell African American Afrikaner Phi Catherine Theresa Johnson Lorrie Wilmot Katherine Smallwood Katherine Bell Kathryn Bell Associate Professor Of Philoso India Journal Critical Philosophy Co Founding Editor Executive Week Group La Belle La Shelby Lhasa Katherine L. B. E. L. L. Muhammed Ali
"associate professor" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

Outcomes Rocket

11:40 min | 4 months ago

"associate professor" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

"We are hyper focused. On on value based care and consumerism and healthcare some super excited for a doctor Robinson's perspectives. In addition to to his previous roles he's also an associate professor of medicine at the Thomas Jefferson University Sidney Kimmel Medical College and he's also a practicing physician so It is truly a privilege to have him as not only a health industry leader but also a practicing physician to talk about some of these trends and healthcare with that at Mondo. I WanNa give you a warm welcome. Thanks for joining us being over me. So what is it that got you inspired to do the work that you do that Robinson and had as you said I'm reading my bio a little bit? I had a few different roles and my inspiration has always been consistent. It's I truly want to make a difference. I knew it seems Corny. But you know it's it's one of the drivers I think there's so much opportunity in healthcare to affecting improve people's lives in one of his. Why continue to practice that one on one interaction where you are truly little hospital so literally? Saving someone's life that is inspiring and then even as I think about digital in the opportunity to improve affect people's health across steeled across a large population continues to inspire me. It's it's the the one on one. Interactions the interactions as well as the N. Equals many interactions To me they inspire me in different ways but at the end of the day. We actually truly helping people in that. That's a good reason to get out of bed morning. Totally agree with you and my head and heart are in the same place. I don't think it's Corny. I think it's a great thing to be moved by. And and so I'm curious. Now you know with the work that you're doing there at the cancer center however you guys adding value to the healthcare ecosystem. What's different and better about what you guys are doing is interesting the goals here at MCI designated Comprehensive Cancer Center or nothing less than curing cancer. It's not a ambiguous. Goal is to Jimmy to the provincial tour of cancer. So you know when you when everyone has is is lockstep with that that focus. It's very refreshing right. You know what your goal is my job on the digital side say how do I leverage digital for that same goal right? So what does that look like? And we all have the same goal I bring in digital so you start thinking about those areas like how do I improve outcomes? How do I use things like machine learning and hey I to improve clinical outcomes of those folks that we that we serve? How do I use digital to drive? Cost drive down cost. We can cure cancer cheaper And make it more accessible thinking about robotic process automation. Those kinds of things improving operations. And how do I do all of that? With an even better experience for patients it had delivered digital to skill that improved experience Across the entire population that we serve. So those are those. That's how we how we approach from a digital perspective the opportunity to contribute to the provision cure cancer. I love it and so as as we wrap our heads around this digital theme. How does that translate into? Say The work that you've done in consumerism. And and and you know. How does that translate to the physician level? That's providing care all the way down to the the patients that you guys are taking care of interesting. I like to. It's great great question. I'd like to start with the patients in and go back or go the other way. And actually you mentioned consumer and so there's different ways of defining who we serve honestly even though I've had the title consumer may not be the most comfortable for me but there needs to be some acknowledgement that there are people who are engaging in health and health behaviors and improving their health. They don't see themselves as patients and so we have to figure out. How do we how do we want? How do we engage with them? And then and then what do we call them? So right now the best definition that they have we have the best kind of description that we have is consumer twice until I hear something better than people as a new people so people have said okay. Let's just people which I did but it's a little it's a little loose um so I think I like consumer healthcare to me feels a little bit better than just. Kinda brought people that being said. Now how do you engage with consumers? Well the way everyone else. Every other extreme these consumer digitally right. That's that's the way you engage with them whether it's online or SMS text or or it's mobile APPS and so we're that's how you engage with people it's not complicated conceptually. It's complicated in execution in so anyone disagrees with the idea that you engage with consumers Digitally that's certainly how you skill. Now there's certainly aspects of what we do in healthcare and other industries as well where you need a physical need a physical component to that so now we start talking about the operation talking about the physicians and so forth. So how do you then convert you know? It's almost clicks to bricks. How do you convert those digital interactions into those physical interactions with necessary? And it's not always necessary and you think about things like virtual care and so now he's saying well. How do we optimize our operations so streamline that we can focus on those physical interactions when necessary into a really good job at that and then? How do we bring everyone along? Who's been a traditional healthcare system for decades right? How do we bring those folks along to this digital age? So that's part of that's part of the work that's the work of digital and if you ignore as a digital person as a as a digital innovator ignore the people part of the operations and the clinical piece you will fail Absolutely must focus on those people. Whether it's the frontline staff back the operations and certainly the clinicians physicians nurses pharmacists and so forth that needs to be a high focus. And so you know there's this title of digital in this time of innovation but at the end of the day is it's about people about people and it's about people love it it's a it's a great call out. And and what do you believe makes what you do and what? The Cancer Center does better than what's available today. There are many opportunities to leverage on digital. You think broadly about how do you leverage digital? We've got some really really talented people that are working in the digital realm. And when I when I called JOE FROM FOR MOFFITT IN. Our team includes the entire. It shop Includes Informatics and includes data in here as well as the war to things that people think about digital in terms of you know virtual care and an absence so forth so think about informatics thinking about the opportunity to refine the way that clinicians interact with the electronic medical record. I mean you can have a whole separate broadcasts. I'm a podcast about the electronic medical record the pros and cons and you'll spend more time on the cons by the way and so that's a whole so. Don't just refining right. So you're familiar with his right. I just. We're finding that in Iran finding that interaction and so that you can actually focus on the people Both who are delivering the chairs for the people who are receiving here in receiving those. Those interactions In so there's that piece there's also you know how you leverage data to optimize outcomes whether it's refining your your interaction so you know you have a list of people who potentially could have some kind of intervention. But you're leveraging data big data in this way to say it but it's really this subset of those people who are truly going to benefit can. That's leveraging use use machine learning and in some cases around around that you can do that as well in imaging as well where you actually have a algorithms that are that are looking at your films in supporting the radiologists in optimizing that outcome in you know so. The operations clinical operations. The wins this is interact with the electronic medical record. And then against the way that patients and consumers engage with the system itself whether it's through Piece of portals which I'm not saying by the way so I think I think about the way we engage much more broadly than that you know everyone starts with Dr Google Right. So so what are you doing around that when you're doing an online search what are you doing around our? Seo Sem and all those kinds of concepts as well that entire package right of digital web going from the interactions with a patient and consumers all the way through the clinical operations and operations all the way through to the to the hardcore kind of big data components data. Tighter action is the value that we bring by leveraging digital to improve the ultimately improve outcomes. Yeah I think it's interesting and and then there's the spectrum right Dr Robinson I'm thinking on the one hand folks like yourself that are well versed and understand how to operationalize these these things and then on the other end is folks that don't understand a how to do it. What what advice would you give to other hospitals wanting to take some of this digital up and don't know really where to start? Yeah so it's a great question and there's there actually are levels to that conversation. What are the challenges in? Us Healthcare is you've seen one helsing health system so the answer to your question actually depends on the health system. There are a couple of things I think that are in there though. Is that quite frankly? I can pretty much guarantee that you've probably underinvested in digital. That's that's that's going to be. You know whatever whatever health system I'm talking to you underinvested. And so Just realized that building out digital is going to require an investment. It reminds me of this idea of you. Know we're going to imagine houses and says hey we want to grow our our surgery business we. Let's say we want to grow our joint replacement business And so they say. Hey we're GONNA WE'RE GONNA grow replace. Let's go you know. Maybe let's hire some hire someone or something but they did to build operating rooms in hospitals and or equipment in those kinds of things. We don't need any of that so we just going to hire the docs you. Can't you have to build the infrastructure if you want to grow that business the same is true for digital you actually have to invest in the infrastructure around digital? If you actually want to grow that business you can't just say hey we're digital. How does it work that way? And so again. Almost guaranteed that they underinvested in digital part of the reason is because it's much easier to get money to build a building bonds. You know tons of health is going up for bond rather than the Rachel Crane tons of. It's much easier to do that for buildings to build a digital or it right so that's it so there's reasons fine but quite frankly you've probably already under underinvested until you actually have to have some dedicated resources around..

Dr Robinson Cancer Center associate professor of medicin Thomas Jefferson University Si Comprehensive Cancer Center Mondo Rachel Crane Jimmy MCI Us JOE Iran
"associate professor" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

01:35 min | 7 months ago

"associate professor" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

"An agreement from Santa Anita Park to limit the use of a controversial drug given to many resources that drug is called Lasix it's often given to race horses on race day it gets their weight down they run faster it could also contribute to more catastrophic life ending race horse injuries the horse racing board members quiz their medical director about Lasix isn't not against policy racing to use performance enhancing drugs well that's a bit of a loaded question but yes ninety eight and a half percent of the horses run on Lasix today Lasix was a performance enhancer the board reached an agreement with Santa Anita Park to ban Lasix use on race day for young race horses two years old the director though indicated that it is his intention to phase out Lasix use in the race horse industry entirely at Los Alamos track Craig figure can extend seventy newsradio there is new climate research that points to a link between warming temp Rogers and shortened pregnancies and that could carry health risks for children this study from UCLA using fifty six million birth records across the country funds at birth rates were five percent higher on days that are above ninety degrees associate professor Alan the Recca who's the lead author of the study also says births on those days happen an average of six days before the mother's due date and that he says is concerning there is some evidence that being born even just a few weeks early so that's a few weeks before your due date that those children have a higher risk of having respiratory problems like asthma in childhood the study projects about one in a hundred births in the future will be affected by hot weather but.

Santa Anita Park medical director UCLA associate professor Los Alamos Craig Alan
"associate professor" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:22 min | 1 year ago

"associate professor" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Is an associate professor at the department of history at Columbia University and he joined us in studio to talk about cashmere Monon thanks for joining us thank you India is a secular nation technically but the prime minister mody has been pushing a Hindu nationalist agenda how does that the integration of cashmere which is majority Muslim fit into that historically speaking before this present regime Chris mir was one of the demonstrations of India's secular constitution is a demonstration of the secular nature of India's democracy and it was in such certain ways but it was also a way in which community people were subjugated governed by New Delhi by the state I want to say that the rise of majoritarian politics throughout the world Turkey box on certainly and you know hungry and some might say United States dove tails with the kind of agenda that the BJP has in India and that majoritarian ism in India looks like Hindu majoritarian is somewhere Muslims have been lynched for under the suspicion of eating beef there are violence a lot of violence urban violence of against Muslims who most recently after this election who refused to say Jay street on as a way of kind of a claiming these supremacy of lord around so in this way the majoritarian politics that we see you around the world is very much in control and India as well we mentioned that there were celebrations in some parts of India about Kashmir's integration but we're also seeing protests against the integration can you help us understand those two sides thank you it's very important I mean India is a very large some say the world's largest democracy I would submit however that a lot of times the amount of information that is available about cashmere to Indians is very low and one can imagine if I could make an analogy here that is how many Americans know what is the status of native people on reservations in this country or even how many people know what is happening in Porto Rico and why the people of Puerto Rico are on the streets right now so a typical citizen would have a very a narrow and and perhaps romanticized view of Christian here that they may have gotten for movies or or from their politicians in that sense article three seventy was one of the planks of the B. J. P. as early as late eighties and into the nineties and this part of their political campaign was always to say that if a smear was couldn't could normalized they will be able to as in the Indian state will be able to settle cordon could settle that territory well it's political demand for self recognition our publicized and in that sense I think there I'm sure there are many many people who are very happy that this has happened this is a long held demand this is why B. J. P. was voted into power on the other hand there a conscientious scholars in Indians who recognize that crashed near is under what we make called a severe military occupation there's been I think the word most associated with Chris mir is curfew you know if you're my generation if you were born anytime after nineteen seventy you would know that Chris Mary's have lived their lives under curfew they they have physical checkpoints any Indian troops can enter their house search them and search their possessions commuters can be taken away our our frequently tortured so that is actually the reality and it very well is that many ordinary Indian citizens are just not aware of that and finally what does this do to the relationship between India and Pakistan I think that in the inbox on are and have been you know in great military stress for for much of their existence and have gone to back active war and as you pointed out are nuclear powers I would suggest that you know the the way in which we can say that in the or the in doing state is playing to their majority box on the state box on the service has been largely governed by its military has its own agenda where they've used crush me here as a way to mobilize of right wing politics in their own country there have obviously supplied weapons and terrorists to different parts of cashmere in order to Stoke certain things so there are certainly part of the problem and talks on a still not officially said anything as in they have said that we're formulating a response but I would suggest that we think actually instead of with the thing always thinking about and foregrounding the right the the actions of the states like Indian box than we think about the because many people who have been rendered speechless through this process and what will the Kashmiri people do I think that's the really the key question because the because we demand for self determination is not a new demand has been going on since nineteen thirties it is it's part and parcel of anticolonial movement and because many people have not been heard at any stage of this entire twentieth century and even now in the twenty first century we find them muted and we find their voices silenced and I feel most passionately that that this the voice that we should we should seek we should try to find that voice we should try to enable that boys Indian bugs on are kind of like playing the same playbook they have been playing over and over and over again and you know I can I can certainly provide the box and will say we do not recognize India's right over because we're just media is you know our territory and India will save and Christmas is our territory and so on and so forth and both sets of governments will be very happy to take this belligerence to their vote banks into their supporters and and continue continue to kind of make their politics about that and I think in all of this drama the communities are.

associate professor Columbia University
"associate professor" Discussed on KCBS All News

KCBS All News

01:37 min | 1 year ago

"associate professor" Discussed on KCBS All News

"Associate professor of psychiatry costs so hall. They play a brain circuit double negative role by turning off other cells that tend to dampen the response to emotional information. They kind of let activity in a part of the brain increase and prevent it from being shut down by inhibitory cells. So when a Zaidi signals come into the prefrontal cortex neurons prevent those signals from being dampened to better understand these 'gate-keeping VIP Interneuron, so holidays UCSF colleagues developed an experiment. Using mice in a maze with sections that mice. Would find scary? What they discovered was this turn on when these mice approach scary parts of the maze. But if the researchers prevent that from happening the mice will explore those scary parts of the maze. Teams like they're doing that. Because this information in their brain that normally tells them they're in a scary part of the maze. That's no longer there. If no longer as strong of a signal, we'll be implicated for humans are still unclear so hall says of the day may be coming when scientists will be able to help people with anxiety challenges by honing in on these VIP cells. Maybe if we targeted them, we could turn down their activity and us turned down people things. I do. The research is published in the journal neuron. Jeff Bill KCBS, the Oakland international airport opened its doors this weekend to about seventy guide dogs training to one day assist. Visually impaired owners KCBS Keith Coney tagged along as the pups were put through their paces reason. Good guide dogs means getting them familiar with of a riot environments, whether that might be supermarket or.

Jeff Bill KCBS Associate professor of psychia Oakland international airport Keith Coney Zaidi UCSF one day
"associate professor" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

02:11 min | 1 year ago

"associate professor" Discussed on WJR 760

"Specialist and associate professor in Michigan state university's department of plant soil microbe eel sciences, Kevin happy spring. Thank you find maybe finally get to some spring weather. So I like the ask your every winters different seems like this one was easy early harsh late. But what kind of winter are we coming out of? And then what challenges that presenting for the spring overall? It wasn't too bad. Because like you said took a while to arrive, and then we suffered through what mid January through mid March least, I mean with cold weather, but throughout most of that period, especially in the lower part of the state. I mean, there wasn't consistent snow cover. I mean, you know, I I played golf over the Christmas holiday in new years. I think. Even in. There's no. So the reason that has some impact for for some of the turf is that some of the different snow mold that you might even see on your line, generally choirs, some pretty good snow cover, especially for the grace noble. Tweet us. You don't see in this part of the state, certainly as you get further north and then into the UP concertedly see more of that gray snowmobile type of of disease because typically will say about three months of snow cover which down here. We haven't had anywhere close to that. So what I've looked at some of the terse, so far as you know, we've gotten rid of the snow in the last week or two. I haven't seen the last show. Mold doesn't doesn't mean. The typical areas aren't gonna look bad. You know near the near the street where the snow plow has been piling, the ice and snow and salt in dirt and everything else that typically looks kind of bad coming out. But overall, I would have to say that the the winner probably was was fairly friendly to our turf grass. So Kevin as you like to remind us when we talk fall is really the best time to fertilize and get things ready for the next season. But people love to get out in the spring and do things too. So maybe two answers, what should someone do who did fertilize and kinda get ready in the fall, and what should someone who didn't do? So..

Kevin Michigan state university associate professor three months
"associate professor" Discussed on NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

02:00 min | 1 year ago

"associate professor" Discussed on NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

"The Republican party is the most popular it's been in seven years heading into the November midterms UT Arlington, associate professor political science Allen sec says the numbers confusing again compute because there's another poll which shows that in his mid-term election that the Democrats are leading Republicans by twelve points. Now, he says it's also odd because many of President Trump supporters are not fans of the Republican establishment. Dr success have a theory publicans have been pilloried so much in the past year by supreme court nominations, and whatever there may be a backlash from all of that and sort of sympathy for the Republican party. So it could be a backlash from all of that. Now, Democrats or Republicans battle it out on the issues. There's another group that would be happy just have a seat at the table. Libertarian green party constitution, party independence, or even Republicans and Democrats who are just not happy with the idea that not everybody who is on the ballot is heard when it comes to our debate in Texas. We actually have one of the most difficult processes for a party getting ballot access and this here. In fact, libertarian party has ballot access for the green party in the constitution. Party were not able to meet the requirements Becca Khandan with the group end to party rule. She says it's extremely difficult to get on the ballot having reasonable requirements to get on the ballot. And then having equal treatment. Once you are on the ballot or something that just seems. So common sense is the green party and the libertarian party both end up without access. They meet the state requirements to get there should be included in the debate. Because that means that thousands of Texans had said, yeah, I would like to hear from them. They wanna have another option spec. Kong with. With two party rule still to come on KRLD possible game changer in the treatment for people with severe heart failure that and traffic and weather together on the eighth next forty four..

Republican party Allen sec Becca Khandan associate professor UT President Texas Kong seven years
"associate professor" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

05:02 min | 2 years ago

"associate professor" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"Dr Martin associate professor of sociology, at Rippin college in Wisconsin since. Two thousand twelve he's been studying paranormal investigators also known as ghost hunters in order to better understand who gets involved in this field how they attempt to communicate with. Spirits and document evidence of their, presence in what they ultimately hope, to gain from such an undertaking now based. On participation in twenty per normal investigations. Interviews with nearly fifty, paranormal investigators and observations at five paranormal conferences this research provides for. Him and. Us unprecedented insights into a thriving subculture that persists despite being rejected by both mainstream science and religion the book. That the edited with Dennis Wasco, it is, called, the, supernatural in. Society, culture, and history and Here we are with Dr Mark Eaton Mark welcome to the program looking forward. To this tonight yeah thanks for having me I, really appreciate that how did you how did they professor of sociology get involved in, the paranormal like, this Yeah that's a good question you know, I guess it goes back to childhood interest. In the paranormal you know I wasn't one of these kids like many of the people. That I interviewed for this research that grew up with paranormal experiences. Or abilities or things like that but I was a child of the eighties and so of course I saw all of the. Famous movies of, the eighty busters poltergeists those, sorts of things grew up in the north west, as well and so, stories about Bigfoot lurking in the forest were always on the back of my mind too when I was out hiking so. You know going back to my. Childhood certainly, there's kind of a seed of interest, there, but as a sociologist I'm interested in how people. Make, sense of the world. And how they do. That in groups? Rather than as an individual so watching shows like ghost hunters? For example During a graduate school really piqued my interest in the the how of paranormal investigation you know how it. Is that people, go into these locations and, determine whether or not they believe these places are, haunted and on the, basis of what evidence so it's kind of a an unusual topic for sociologists to study although it's becoming less so with. Denison I both doing this book. Project together But I think it has a lot of sociological interest and a lot of. General interest as well so you became more interested in the why, are they doing this who is doing this than the actual paranormal event yeah Yeah you know I think it's unusual for someone you know to come at. Paranormal from a sociological perspective where you know as the paranormal investigators are are studying the ghost I'm studying the paranormal? Investigators So you know my interest is in the human experience of attempting. To make contact with something that's you know I don't wanna say non-human formerly human or those sorts of things and so, you know it's not that I'm not interested in what paranormal investigators are studying it's an intrinsically interesting process. To, go into, these places and use your voice recorders and whatnot to try to capture evidence but I'm also really fascinated by the the human process that kind of interpretive. Work that happens during investigations Where people determine whether or not they. Think a certain knocking sound was a ghost or. Was it just, the floorboards, creak in, for example, so yeah. That that's the part that really fascinates. Me and I somewhat hold off. The the question of whether or not there's a certain underlying reality to what they're looking at it more fascinated by how people construct reality Mark. With these investigators, primarily doing what they were doing for a number of reasons let me throw out, some possibilities, here and tell me, what you think one would be they actually. Believe they're investigating some, real paranormal activity that would be I think number one their motivation. The other I think they're doing it for fun some people do that for fun another would be that they are want. To meet other people of similar or like interests and they see this as a way to do that What about the possibility that there just skeptics and they wanna really debunk what's happening I, think all of those are definitely part of the mix I, think you know initially particularly for people who got into this in the two thousands, a, lot of. It was driven by this interest that was born of watching ghost hunters ghost adventures those sorts of shows so you you had this influx of people into the subculture that came in kind of preloaded with all of this knowledge..

associate professor of sociolo professor of sociology Dr Mark Eaton Dr Martin Wisconsin Dennis Wasco Denison
"associate professor" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"associate professor" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Certain way and not because I was just trying to get a leg up on Tech Trends I think that I would not. Call them incredibly practical and I would be really dubious of the, idea of them replacing. The technology that I use and rely on a lot but as actual artifacts and things, that are in my body, I love them sure body mind is extreme it's very science fiction, but it's fun and people like Adia the folks who are testing the boundaries. Of, what's possible that, is where the future. Comes from those tiny, implants are pretty cool and then probably will get one but I. Am looking for something a? Bit. More muscular so my name is Yoko I'm an. Associate professor in applied physics At the university in Sweden In my group we do research on artificial missiles or so-called Palmer actuators mostly be focused on soft micro Baltics and activators for medical devices The, more recently we starting to develop a. Textile actuator local textile muscles textile muscles Dr Yeager and his colleagues have created fabric base activate activators activate like sensors sense these move anyway they've created activators out of. A type, of, yarn that they've, coated with a polymer that reacts to electricity past the current through and it contents up or release here so well the. The, poll rectum it's technology that we work with functions best at a small scale that means like thin films or fin fiber thin yards however she can realize that you've seen yarns or thin fibers. Can only exert small forces to to. Use more useful applications for this really to scale up the force, just like normal muscles are built a. Small fire was the same day we can, use palm stools assemblies in parallel to get more Fourche offer small,.

Dr Yeager Yoko Fourche Associate professor Baltics Sweden
"associate professor" Discussed on 790 KABC

790 KABC

04:20 min | 2 years ago

"associate professor" Discussed on 790 KABC

"Five number ninety kabc laura new good great your great excellent we are going to talk to our friend dr judy ho lights clinical psychologists associate professor at the university associate professor judy associate professor professor so welcome as always so what we wanted to talk about narcissism and success yeah so i think there's a lot of pejorative sorts of feelings about narcissism reasonably so because sometimes narcissist unpleasant to be around your jerks they can be they can be especially with their high in exploitation or sort of lack of empathy those two or aggression and those are qualities that had nurses have if they're high in those areas then yeah they're very unpleasant to be around but it it's neat necessarily be a disadvantage right that's right and so i think part of the issue is people throw around the terminology to them and i think a lot of other personality traits know that they are not actually be classically associated with ours it says no actually sometimes have a higher level of emotional social intelligence so that would actually fly in the face of people saying that for example that they are not empathetic right there there's actually some level where they actually can connect with people and so i think that that's one part of it for sure i always think of empathic failure as the liability of narcissism like when it gets very bad emotions don't have meaning because they're sort of disconnected from their own emotions than certainly your emotions don't have meaning and it's hard then to be empathic yeah i think that's right and you know i think another issue that could come up to their maybe selfserving tendencies get in the way of that being able to actually use their social intelligent right right i don't care that bogus yeah but in this one article you sent me or i've got here it says narcissists may be more mentally tough which may help with the grit and things like that lead to success right so in this study they looked at high school students in italy and they were trying to look at the relationship between what they call sub clinical narcissism which they measured with a scale called the dark triad scale was really scary also because it also measured the trade of into them and also antisocial yes but but they say that they're also measuring sub clinical and then what that means maybe some of the more pro social traits of narcissism including things like you know feeling like you have confidence to get the kind of outcomes that you want your natural leader that people gravitate towards you and your special so there's a little bit of entitlement going there but that would relate to mental toughness which is decided that you see a challenge as an opportunity rather than challenge as a way that you're going to fail challenge the way that people might ridicule you you see it as a way that you're going to basically prove to yourself and others that you can better that challenge that's interesting right yeah so this study actually did find a relationship between narcissism and mental toughness and they've found that that was related to the academic achievement of these high school teenagers does the lack of empathy also contribute to achieve moment in the sense that if you don't care about other people's feelings then they can't slow you down gosh that's actually a really good point because i guess if you don't care as much about who you're going to trample on the way to the top right then maybe you get to the top a little easier right whereas we always hear that about twenty people do get dragged down by their partners or best friends if they're not doing as well then maybe you know maybe if you're trying to be a good friend you're not gonna you know for example rub it in their face you got three straight as in a row and they're failing out of a class right or just you know oh i don't deserve this promotion she's done more work than me you know you should handed to her nursing this would never say no absolutely not at least not versus the middle of trying to get a goal more so than preserving their friendships right and i think that's what dr drew is referring to earlier about this possibly dark side of narcissism when you stop carrying or you know it gets in the way of you actually having good pro social relationship or or what they in this particular that we've been talking about they.

associate professor professor dr judy ho
"associate professor" Discussed on Ologies

Ologies

01:40 min | 2 years ago

"associate professor" Discussed on Ologies

"So yeah just holding like an ice cream cone you could i'll check your levels alary sleeve doctor doctor now what is your title what's your official title associate professor and molecular cellular and developmental biology and dermatology i saw that on the yale website and i was like she has so many words and her title can you explain a little bit about what you do yes so i'm a professor at yale so i wear lots of hats i run a lab which is like running a small business and our product is the science we produce and discover and it's mostly in the region ration of skin and hair and then i teach undergraduates introductory cell biology two hundred sixty of them right now two hundred sixty you know all their names beyond though you don't pretend to know okay today civil they expect you to now okay as a side note yeah quick side note i was in class in college once and i tried not to i i would fall asleep sometimes i'm not saying i would fall asleep in your class this was a different subject so i moved to the front row because i knew if i sat in the front row i wouldn't fall asleep and i fell asleep in the front row does that ever happen to professors do they ever see people sleeping in class and they're like i'm going to shoot you with a water gun falling asleep is not as bad as being on facebook oh in the class like if someone's falling asleep i'm like they're just tired or whatever i don't take you know but being on facebook i it's a special thing that i just i'm like i can't deal.

associate professor professor facebook official yale
"associate professor" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

01:36 min | 2 years ago

"associate professor" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"Mousy shoal is an associate professor of history at yale university and the author of the ukrainian night an intimate history of the revolution and if you were young person if you were teenager to starting university that meant that you could go in and around smith's exchange and study at universities elsewhere europe that meant you could learn english or french or german or talian or whatever you wanted to do it meant you would be eligible for internships in brussels it meant that you would be able to travel in europe and go to conferences in without spending months of humiliating yourself and wrestling with the garage crecy to get a visa before the revolution there was like this greenhouse effect in ukraine and we have a lot of active people of young people study abroad and came came back to train and they didn't see perspectives and abilities michaela balabagn was a student in the city of levin in western ukraine vo he'd completed part of his studies in poland along with his friend but on social make young energetic politically engaged and aspirational they were at an age where just about anything can seem within reach from the first days of furor dilution it was a huge amount of of like this feeling of we have the possibility to change we have our generation have possibility to money fast itself and to show the older generation that we want to like new agenda we won't think.

yale university smith brussels europe ukraine levin poland associate professor of history michaela balabagn
"associate professor" Discussed on WDEL 1150AM News Talk Radio

WDEL 1150AM News Talk Radio

02:22 min | 2 years ago

"associate professor" Discussed on WDEL 1150AM News Talk Radio

"First it comes up as associate professor oh i'm not sure in ever kukals myself you'll never go voters out on by well so but if someone didn't know your title how would you expect them to address an email to you it depends who is coming from from students i i really appreciate when these the title however i often get miss or mrs or just high audrey and i i'm a little taken back by that i i audrey yes but it happens i usually respond by signing office after dr bloom and hopefully they'll get the message based on that but from colleagues i like i said first thing bases is fine and you think the academic world is different than the business world when such things um i i believe that in the academic world that's pretty much the standard is on the expectation from students to use our title and also signing my name uh to our anyone other than a student but in a profession not a colleague but a are professional associate i would sign my name audrey blown and then dba after my my name and what about when i do the same yes we've learned it as you said we've worked hard ford earned it and i'm gonna use my credentials right what about familiarity kharbash through of men and women in your classes and do teach them about familiar already in the business world and how to approach that that could cause that's really what we're talking about yeah well we we try to prepare our students to be professionals career readiness and um we stress the fact that that they should they should um respond or contact people in professional ways and not using common names um it's just not professional so they are students take business communication courses and freshen listen courses and they practice that over and over again our hope is that they they won't feel b so um new usage common language professional visit teachable actually complete sentences not.

associate professor dr bloom professional associate audrey ford
"associate professor" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

AM 970 The Answer

03:28 min | 2 years ago

"associate professor" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

"Of the department of orthopedic surgery but mount sinai and whose uh chief of joint replacement surgery the north associate professor of orthopedic surgery authors well operated dahmer over the last thirty years name was able to dardanelles what's the matter of me well all yeah shut out well shaw room dr branch and some germany maria mutola regime show mindy flown farkhat mikaelin yes yeah all the road club a more mindy project but you're dumbbell zambia but also abc picked up one new coveted for the fall susan right this entitled the mayor the saw the promo for that who's creators and riven by an executive produced by germany bronson how 'bout that march them all a beloved blocked rush kuala feel yeah and above the grant helped moselle meal at all wyman god bless her budget has made me some sourdot toast okay were chunky peanut butter and abor cod jam on really the auto nova they're better not the in the world mccann ligament anything often anybody now now won't go with that pretty high analysts but go but go on a little lurking dot dot dot columns were wall or wherever too i am about our own rights trainer muttering the our man spots anyway uh shows likes plan a couple of times 'why not injured myself by falling down typical people's shaath right but men are ruined ruler fell the crashed on the floor with uh step by he had a war in which is a big cash out twice but most late singer by shoulder and uh the benefits are working out all or are the many benefits yes but they're both abbas their only reason i was able to get up go them up robot myself at flo that get up and judd or officials thursday morning steiger or wherever the bank of right about this time as a matter of fact right before this hour the man irl scared so i'm not gonna easily by villanova covered a lot of cleveland kill myself i would have been some way to to wrap it up yes gonnell horrible recovery put in some other way suppose could have been available somewhere to wrap it up to be doing that this morning's very callous we what adam hills probably would add attribute show this morning as a matter of fact that effort technewsworld his cement absorption is final stake in trouble homes to know for sure trip much blood girl admitted of course not like.

dahmer susan executive judd steiger cleveland mount sinai associate professor of orthope germany maria mutola mindy abc mccann abbas villanova adam hills thirty years
"associate professor" Discussed on WAFS Biz 1190

WAFS Biz 1190

03:22 min | 2 years ago

"associate professor" Discussed on WAFS Biz 1190

"Drew but male sinai his for joint replacement surgery associate professor of orthopedic surgery thur's wall is proper law maher over quashed 30 years those are able to diagnose what's the matter with me oh yeah shut out them real doctor brought some some germany remember the television show monday yes yeah the rotund indy project also it'd be picked up one new comedy for the fall season right this entitled the mayor the saw the promo he's cruder and written by an executive produced by german bronx how bout that while portugal the law phil yeah but liberals helped me out at all why go washroom she has made me some soured dough toast okay we're chunky peanut butter jam on the bottom better not the in the world mckay often anybody no i won't go with that pretty high on the list but the one a little lurkingdotcolumns were waller were wherever too i read a room right thoughts anyway she likes playing a couple of times when i injured myself by falling down to people saw right but men are not really fell crashed onto the floor with my head were driven which has a big gash now but mostly venture by shoulder and the benefits are working out are there are many benefits yes because they were opposite only reason i was able to get up colombo by myself floor level to get up and was thursday morning stagger back aware of the banker right it's about this time as a matter of fact right before this hour the man i own scared us shaw i'm not going to easily by coverage kill myself so in some way to to wrap it up yes colonel or some other way suppose it could've been away somewhere to wrap it up be doing at this morning's very callous yeah we probably would add attribute show this morning as a matter of fact that happened the same up slab is final stage trouble halston i thought for sure the.

maher executive waller colombo associate professor of orthope germany portugal shaw 30 years
"associate professor" Discussed on WORT 89.9 FM

WORT 89.9 FM

02:11 min | 2 years ago

"associate professor" Discussed on WORT 89.9 FM

"All akg jacobs mm host arum made again talks easat blew me associate professor in the department of asian middle eastern and turkish studies at stockholm university about what saudi arabia is doing in yemen and why mm uh interests represent by world bank and imf have been uh aggressively trying to do the yemen which is still the wealth of yemen from its people and facing unsuitable resistance uh what what happens in the end it as a consequences of you have virtual proxy wars a brooding yemen's sovereignty in the ability of yemenis to resist this large longterm campaign of of uh basically robbing yemen of its natural resources and its ability to maintain independence from i'd rather red paties global finance a capital regime that unfortunately the rest of the middle east has already been a m a that been facing since the since the interwar period you've been we have to leave it there if a blooming associate professor at stockholm university author of the forthcoming book destroying yemen would chaos in arabia tells us about the world professor thank you thank you and thank you for joining us on the run this.

associate professor stockholm university saudi arabia yemen professor middle east