31 Burst results for "associate editor"

Streaming music services fighting for your ears

Morning Edition

01:47 min | 2 weeks ago

Streaming music services fighting for your ears

"Has never been more important. You see in the new world of streaming If an artist can create that perfect single, their song will be streamed billions and billions of times, making them anywhere from 2 to $3. Welcome back to for my Mariana Trail that was comedian Trevor Noah, making a music streaming joke while hosting last month's Grammy Awards ceremony. This hour. We've been talking about artist compensation in the age of music streaming and in the age of the pandemic, I'm talking with Cody Fitzgerald and Josephine Shetty, both co founders of the Union of musicians and Allied Workers. And both musicians themselves. Josh can the CEO at Band Camp and not still going? Oh Sky associate editor here at KQED for KQED Arts So Trevor Noah joke on a stage like the Grammy shows that there's pop culture level awareness enough to make a joke that you know the audience will get nasty. Do you think this could be an inflection point? Culturally, where organizing efforts can maybe move the needle on artist? Compensation? Is this movement that will gain momentum? You think Radio. I think for so long music and art in general, such an individualistic pursue and then also not to mention artist kind of a lot of the time feel pressure to project this image of financial success, which makes it really hard to transparently talk about the economic realities of music. So I think just the fact that artists are building collective power and just talking about how much they make out in the open and identifying as workers is actually a big cultural shift, But I think we'll make this Conversation. Keep progressing. And Eric

Trevor Noah Mariana Trail Cody Fitzgerald Josephine Shetty Union Of Musicians And Allied Kqed Arts Grammy Awards Band Camp Grammy Josh Eric
Trump to attend GOP's spring donor retreat

The 11th Hour with Brian Williams

04:34 min | Last month

Trump to attend GOP's spring donor retreat

"Trump is scheduled to speak at the cpac conference on sunday while americans go about living their lives. Political reports trump is expected to attend the rnc upcoming spring donor. Retreat in april quote. The rnc's donor. Retreats are a prime stop for future presidential candidates who use the events to establish relationships with wait for it. Major contributors Back with us tonight. Abc veteran washington journalists and associate editor and columnist over a real clear politics and matthew. Dowd he is the founder of country over party. We should point out. He is a texan. Who has a new appreciation for a hot shower. Since the cold dark outage of late and in the past matthew was chief strategist for the bush. Cheney presidential effort Back in oh four Welcome to you both. Ab you right with your usual candor and clarity quote just six weeks. After a deadly insurrection against the us government republicans are past their horror and hopping eagerly back on the trump train. The new twenty twenty one ticket price. They must buy into his big lie. That brings us to the question a. b. if trump is the banner under which they all must run under which they all must try to raise money he lost. How can that be a winning strategy. Whatever he says goes so you saw that. Nothing made it more clear than the house. Gop whip steve scalise going on tv. The sunday after his visit mar-a-lago where apparently they just talked about their families and how chill and relaxed. The president has been in his post presidency period at his resort and he just could not bring himself to say that this was a free and fair election. He said yes. Legitimately biden one when he was pressed by jonathan karl of abc news because elector said that on december fourteenth basically. He said a lot of sing. Swing states just didn't follow their own state laws and a lot of people are very concerned so what you do is instead of spreading the big lie. You never defy trump. You never disavow it and you never spell it you sit and you never discuss. How pernicious and dangerous. It is liz cheney and adam her and others have you just sort of try to circle around it because quote your constituents buy into it. And that's what's gonna keep you in trump's orbit if you want to keep your job in twenty twenty two. Matt voters have a funny way of kind of market testing ideas on their own and figuring out what. And what's gonna fly. How is this gonna fly especially in republican tightly contested suburban races two years from now. Well i think it does well in republican primaries. So i think that's the issue and that's the real problem for the republicans right now. They know that. Donald trump tests eighty eighty five percent popularity among the voters at will participate in republican primaries even in republican primaries in purple states or in suburban districts. That are swing districts. The problem is every time they venture into capturing that republican primary voth it more and more offense the people in the general election so it gets okay in a red state or deep red district to do that but when you start to try to win in suburban areas around houston suburban areas around dallas suburban areas in michigan suburban areas in california. It becomes exceedingly problematic. An i think that's the problem there in though it doesn't seem like they're in any way trying to confront that general election problem that they just keep pushing that often it's somehow they think is going to solve itself. It's almost as if they're going through this primary. They did in two thousand fifteen in twenty sixteen where they thought that donald trump problem would salve itself or he would peter out or nobody would deal within or somebody else would handle it and they didn't have to and then what they ended up having donald trump the republican nominee and then donald trump the republican president and now donald trump the republican president. So i do think it's his party. I don't think there's any question anymore that it's donald. The drill pay party is now the trump party and everything that donald trump does from town to what he cares about to. The conspiracy pushes is the republican party.

Donald Trump RNC Steve Scalise Matthew Jonathan Karl Cpac Liz Cheney Dowd Cheney Us Government ABC Elector Abc News GOP Biden Washington Bush Adam
Associate Editor at Game Informer Magazine, Kyle Hilliard, on The State Of VR Right Now

Techmeme Ride Home

05:12 min | 2 months ago

Associate Editor at Game Informer Magazine, Kyle Hilliard, on The State Of VR Right Now

"What is the gaming industry and by that. I mostly mean developers. What what does the industry think about developing and just the market is it clearly a sliver compared to other things. But do they think like. It's maybe on the cusp of being something. That is interesting. Yeah so. I don't. I don't have numbers obviously but like so to get into my background and just in case your listeners. Don't really know me. I wrote for game informer magazine for eight years as there for a long time until i was we had like right when right when the oculus rift came out like we had an issue like vr issue. Right and we. I remember getting test kits into the office and playing early games and stuff like that and at that time we kind of went in with the mindset of like okay. Well this is like a new. This dobie xbox. They'll be nintendo and they'll be oculus that's kind of how we felt about it like it would just be this other competitive corner of video gaming and now all this time later which is a. We're going to maybe like four or five. Six years later feel like it has found its spot and like you said like beat sabre. Which is the fantastic i played. I almost literally played every day. I love beat sabre Has sold gangbusters There's like i think facebook released a blog that said something like thought they had five other. Vr titles at it sold a million copies which was cool. And so where we're at now is it's interesting because it's not what i thought it would be. Where would be like just as competitive as like the switch. You know what i mean. It would just be another platform that you know hardcore gamers like me would have in their home but it's increasingly kind of become this like weird separate thing that even non gamers are kind of getting into like i've i'm like i've heard of people have met people who aren't really big video gamers but they do have a headset. And they like vr because it does have kind of like what you were talking about earlier. It has practical applications beyond video games. You know you can kind of around the world and see things. I use it to work out like. That's my main exercise purpose lately as i tried to play oculus like at least once a day for thirty minutes played exercise games and beat because they're very movement centered so it's it's closer to like the mobile market. I feel like we're there's a lot of disparate things floating around that are trying to find their niche as opposed to like someone like me. Who's like i have an xbox series s x. I have a playstation five and i got my oculus rift like that's not super common. It's almost treated as like you know gamers like it but it's not like it's not it's more than a video game machine you know. It's like ninety percent of video game machine but like that ten percent is really lifting it up and people are finding that way. Well so this is gets into my sort of disappointment with what i what is out there. Obviously this would have been one of the times where. Vr should have had its breakthrough moment like a lot of things including video conferencing of had The pandemic times now. There are apps on their from companies. That are clearly the eight even says. It's like we'll use this to remote work with your teams and you can all meet in a space and you know whiteboard together and you know. Even you know sketch things and and in a three d. environment especially frano architects and things like that. I can see that but none of it's very good that i've sampled like i would think there'd be more of that. There's also there's also a handful of things that are like we'll watch a movie with your friends and you go into a virtual Sort of movie theater and by the way. All of the like netflix and and prime video they all have apps that essentially you can watch anything you want on a virtual big screen which is very nice for lying down in bed and stuff. But i'm wondering if like they missed a trick like there is nothing that was like a breakthrough during pandemic times for just being virtually with other people. Yeah right when the pandemic started. I remember i think it was fun. Mation was selling tickets to go. Watch a cure with an audience in oculus and i love cura is like one of my favorite movies and i like we are but even i was like i look at that mike. I want to do that like yeah. The resolution on the headset just isn't there like it's basically like shoving a like a switch. Well let me take them. It's better than a switch screen. It's like it's a higher resolution switch green but like it. Just can't look as good as your desktop for work or your four k tv in your living room. It's just it's like you have to accept that limitation in order to participate like i saw this Which i had never seen until today. Maybe because you are emailing me about vr. Google is like oh let's send this guy. vr ads but it was like it was like. Yeah what will like. Let's let's have a workspace. You can have as many monitors as you want and you can have a virtual keyboard. Obviously it'll be but there'll be a virtual keyboard and it's like that's a really interesting idea. But i'm not gonna take that resolution downgrade in visuals. I'm not going to be able to see that. Virtual computer monitor. As well as i can't if i'm just looking at my standard computer monitor and it's not worth that dive and

Nintendo Facebook Netflix Cura Mike Google
In Biden’s White House, surprise visits with staff replace late-night tweets

The Daily Dive

03:35 min | 2 months ago

In Biden’s White House, surprise visits with staff replace late-night tweets

"Us now is anita kumar. White house correspondent and associate editor at politico. Thanks for joining us. Anita thanks for having me. I always like these stories. A little peek into the white house the governing styles behind the scenes president. Joe biden has been in there a couple of weeks now and we're seeing how he's operating in there. We're hearing that. He likes to stroll around the white house in the east wing. He pops into other people's offices he's a very much an extrovert. A people person wants to talk to people face to face the pandemic kind of puts a little crunch on some of that sometimes. But tell us how it's going so far in a kind of in contrast to the way president trump operated in there. Yeah well you're exactly right about that. I mean he has been known his whole life. I think for being an extrovert very outgoing and wants to see people talk to people in and as you mentioned that really hard during corona virus. So he's not getting out of the white house very often. He's not traveling. The country like we might expect during non cova time so what we are. Seeing is him strolling around the white house popping into different offices just to say hello and checking with staff or for particular occasion or particular meeting. We are seeing him doing a good number of some of the meetings he would be doing anyway with outside experts but he those by video instead of you know by phone so he can see those people even if he can't be in the same room with them so we're seeing a lot of that you know you asked about donald trump. I think donald trump also like to talk to people and see people and be seen and so there's a little bit of a similarity beyond that. Their style is completely different about how they get information and talk to people and try to make those decisions. I mean obviously. Joe biden a politician for many many years. He's definitely more of that. Traditional style president trump a businessman. So he kind of has that fast moving pace but even the way their time is structured and access to them is different. Joe biden has a very strict schedule of phone calls that that are scheduled for him. You know people that control access to the oval office and it was a little different for president trump. There was a lot more people that he welcomed in and out of the office. He'll wideness taking much more traditional way to govern but this is sort of how he's done things so you know he will have a set list of calls to make that his staff will set up for him. He will have scheduled meetings. We know that he's doing a national intelligence briefing every day. He's also getting corona virus update every single day those. Are you know from staffers. But how he makes the decision is he'll get You know sort of briefing paper. He likes to read something but he doesn't want it to be hugely long. President obama like to read a lot. He he he'll be all there and he wanted to read sometimes after he read. He didn't wanna talk about it. 'cause he'd already read it he he knew what it said president biden. He likes to read it. You want something concise. And then he wants to talk about it. He wants to talk about it with his aides. And then he wants to talk to these outside experts which could be someone that deals with the policy but it could also be a local official or a state official. So he's having those kinds of calls and meeting with his aides and making decisions that way you know. President trump really didn't like to have those briefing papers. He didn't want to read something. He would sort of famously have his aides debate an issue right in front of him. He wanted them to kind of go out a little bit so the style is very different but something that joe biden has brought from you know he's decades in public life. Before

Joe Biden Anita Kumar White House Donald Trump Politico Anita Oval Office President Biden United States President Obama President Trump
Digital Tools to Measure Blood Sugar & Metabolic Health with Dr Casey Means

Dr. Jockers Functional Nutrition

06:46 min | 6 months ago

Digital Tools to Measure Blood Sugar & Metabolic Health with Dr Casey Means

"Well, hey everybody, welcome back to the dr. Jockers functional nutrition podcast and you guys know that one of my favorite topics to talk about is blood sugar insulin and metabolic health and we had a great interview recently with Dodge van Dyckman. We went in depth on that and this is almost like a follow-up to it because we're going to talk about really the personalized approach to really looking at your blood sugar and how it's responding to the foods that you're consuming and so my guess is dr. Casey means she is the chief medical officer at levels and she is a Stanford trained physician again, chief medical officer and co-founder of the metabolic whole company levels, and she's the associate editor of the international Journal of disease reversal and prevention and he can find more information about her at levels health.com and we're going to talk about what the best food. Are for blood sugar management for metabolic health and how that could be variable depending on how your body is responding to the foods that you consume. We're talking about personalized medicine. So dr. Casey that joining us here. Thank you so much for having me. Dr. Jockers. So happy to be here. Well, yes for sure and I've heard of several of your interviews on other podcasts and you really do a great job of explaining how important blood sugar stability is and you know, this this new technology that we have now continuous blood glucose monitoring. And so what I love to do is start with your story and you know how you went from Stamford and trained in in medicine to now kind of branching out into a functional nutrition Integrative Medicine approach. Yeah. Absolutely. So like you mentioned I trained as a medical doctor conventional medicine. I trained at Stamford did my undergrad and Med medical school there and then I went on to become a head and neck surgeon. So I was deep in the surgical birth. Hold for about five years and in my role as a head and neck surgeon, which is really treating the conditions of the like your nose and throat. So an ENT surgeon something I noticed was sort of hitting me back, you know after about five years, like wow pretty much all of the conditions that I'm treating are inflammatory in nature. They're all related in some way to chronic inflammation. So some of the things you think about are like sinus infection, which is inflammation of the sinuses and chronic ear disease, which is inflammation of the eustachian tube the tube that connects the nose to the ear you get, you know inflammation in that tube and you get past building up in the ear, you've got Hashimoto's thyroiditis, which is inflammation of the thyroid you've got things like vocal cord granulomas which are inflammatory masses of the vocal chords and then lots of head and neck cancer, of course, which we know cancer has very much relationship between inflammation. So it was really interesting to me sort of step back and say wow. This is sort of a very common theme between a lot of the conditions that I'm treating and in some way it didn't make total sense wage. That we would be treating those conditions with surgery because chronic inflammation is fundamentally a issue with how our immune system is responding to perceived or real threats in in the environment in our bodies and thoughts were more were learning about how chronic inflammation is in many ways really rooted in our everyday exposures. So what we eat the toxins were exposed to in our food air and water, you know, how much sleep we get the stress in our lives how much or how little exercise were getting our microbiome all of these things have a direct relationship to chronic inflammation. So I'm treating it with this sort of very reactionary invasive more anatomic approach with surgery, you know, there was some sort of missing missing link there and certainly surgeries are really important in beautiful art but phone no other conditions really rooted in chronic inflammation. It kind of got me thinking there might be a better way to approach us. What could we be doing what sort of really personalized dietary and lifestyle interventions really foundational help to really quell bath. Chronic immune response. Well that threat the body is sensing and potentially keep Patients Out of the operating room. You're not going to prevent all surgeries, but I certainly think there's some low-hanging fruit we can do to help minimize the severity of the disease is and hopefully never have to get have them get that really end of the line where they see me in the or going under the knife, which is a really serious serious thing. So that really got me on this journey of trying to understand the root cause of disease and that led me to functional medicine and so I actually stepped away from the operating room got training with Institute for functional medicine and really started thinking of disease a lot differently. I started seeing things much more as symptoms and diseases often being the branches on a very similar true and that tree that we that that sort of route that that connects a lot of seemingly disparate diseases often comes down to things like inflammation and even deeper Inflammation metabolic dysfunction this was talked about so beautifully on your episode recently with dr. Bed big man who is talking about metabolic dysfunction and insulin resistance, but was so interesting is that you know in our country. It's it's not that about 88% of Americans have met have signs of metabolic dysfunction that was shown in a study a couple of years ago from UNC that 88% of adult Americans have at least one biomarker of metabolic dysfunction and metabolic dysfunction and insulin resistance, which are kind of two sides of the same coin really can directly feed into inflammation. So it's all really created and what's sort of hopeful about this is that those are things that are readily modifiable with smart choices in and how we live and what we expose ourselves to so became really interested in that and and really this system the network biology movement, which is really stepping back and saying, you know, we've we've conventionally looked at diseases in in conventional medicine. As isolated silos, you've got depression. You've got obesity. You've got diabetes. You've got prostate cancer. You've got IBS and these are all things that are different and we treat them separately with totally different with medications a totally different mechanisms. But when you step back and you use sort of more advanced research techniques, like whole genome sequencing and proteomics, how can we actually see? What are the molecular links between diseases and you create a web a network a system and that's really the root of systems and network biology. And when you start doing that you see these connections and I think the future of Iraq and its really treating conditions at that level at the connections between diseases cuz when you do that you can you know, hit a lot more birds with one stone that's sort of a negative metaphor, but you know what, I mean, it's it's it's got instead of playing whack-a-mole. You're really you can have multiple various effects with with some single interventions effect that root cause physiology. So my career really moved

Inflammation Dodge Van Dyckman International Journal Dr. Jockers Stamford Casey Chronic Ear Disease Neck Cancer Stanford Hashimoto Inflammation Metabolic Dysfunc Metabolic Dysfunction Cancer UNC Prostate Cancer Obesity Depression Diabetes
Right To Repair

Gadget Lab Podcast

06:53 min | 6 months ago

Right To Repair

"Hey, everyone. Welcome to the gadget lab I'm lowering good I'm a senior writer at wired and I'm joined remotely by my Co host wired's editor Michael Kouri, Hey Mike. and. We're also joined by wired senior associate editor Julian Takata who's dialing in from new. York Hey Julian. All right. Thanks for joining me today. Today, we're talking about the right to repair. So right to repair something that can be pretty personal to people because a lot of us have stories about trying to get our. Ix or appliances fixed in later in the show, we're going to talk about our own repairability gripes and experiences. But first we're GONNA go to Massachusetts virtually because there's a ballot measure there that could have far reaching consequences. So I'm going to give a quick synopsis of what's going on and then I'll ask Mike and Julian for their takes back in two thousand twelve Massachusetts passed a law that would give car owners and independent repair shops access to mechanical information from your Cards on-board-diagnostics Port, you used to have to go to a dealership for a lot of repairs and now anyone could plug it dangle into the OB, deport and diagnose the problems with your car. Now, this was seen as a big win for the Little Guy Consumers and India repair shops, and it was a landmark law the first of its kind in the United States. But a lot has changed technologically since then cars have basically become computers on wheels. So repair coalitions started pushing a new law that would update the existing law, and now this year that is questioned one on the Massachusetts ballot. It expands the kind of data that consumers and repair shops would have access to to include wireless telematics. So telematics, what is that? We'll telematics. Broadly, it can mean mileage entire pressure and things like that. But it can also encompass a pretty significant amount of data can refer to location speed idling time harsh acceleration or braking. It could mean a lot and as the ballot measures written now it's kind of unclear what it's referring to. So we now have right to repair advocates voting pretty much fever of this update to the law to keep up with the times and make sure that consumers have access to or ownership of the data from their car but opponents to this measure. Particularly, this one group that's got a lot of money from the big automakers is saying. nope. They have a lot of concerns with ballot measure. In this summer they unleashed. We'll just call it a fudd campaign, which we're GONNA talk about. Okay. So I want to get your thoughts and Mike I'm going to go to you first because you're from Massachusetts right. Genetically I'm from Massachusetts yes. I was born in Boston. Okay. So what's your take on this? Well I think it is kind of interesting that. The major opponents here for GM and Toyota, they have been citing safety issues as the reason why third parties should not be able to access the data in their car in in a customer's car so like you took it to an independent repair shop, they wouldn't be able to access this data. You'd have to go to the dealership to access this data. And they're citing these. Weird Safety and security issues like they're saying that this could cause increases in cyber stalking or in cyber attacks like you can. You know roll up next to somebody on the freeway and then turn their car off wirelessly using a hacking method and yes, you can do that but the actual. Chance of that happening is really really slim. Same thing with cyber stalking they say that you know if a third party can wirelessly access your your car's data, bake can find out where you live. They can find out where you work they can see. And they can you know follow you around and follow to your home? Some people have. A code to open the gate to their house or a code open their garage door stored in their cars. They don't have to carry a separate clicker for it and you know the the as the argument goes the hacker able to access that, and then they'd be able to break into your home and. This is why they're telling people not to vote for it and those arguments feel pretty flimsy. Yeah we saw that this summer when ads were released by a group called the Coalition for safe and secure data, and this is a coalition that's funded by automakers that you mentioned and they put out a series of ads. By the way those ads are now listed as private on youtube because they were criticized for the ads that showed a woman being stocked in a garage she approached her car or a man. Wirelessly entering someone's home presumably through the. Garage data. And and this is kind of fun that I was getting out before that these are the concerns that are not technically impossible. But. Many on the repair side of the argument saw these concerns as overblown Mike what's the parallel between what we're seeing with this argument over cars and consumer electronics appliances more broadly. Well, the argument that makes a little bit more sense than the. Cyberattack. Is the same argument that the big tech companies make when they argue against right to repair legislation. They say that we can't let you fix your gadget because you might hurt yourself or you'll make it vulnerable to failure vulnerable to hacks. To. A certain extent that is a little bit true like if you I just want to replace the battery in my iphone well I'll. I'll go to the Internet and I'll buy replacement battery I'll crack open my iphone I'll put the new battery in and then that battery is like some you know weird off brandon explodes and then I have an exploding iphone that's harmful to me it's also bad pr for the company that made the phone same thing with like even something simple like a replacement screen you buy replacement screen maybe that's not an official part in you didn't have it officially installed and it doesn't work exactly right your experiences in that gadget goes down and your customer satisfaction goes down it ends up. Leading to this sort of polluted. market devices, and for replacement parts and companies don't like to see that they like to have control over those things. Also, there is a big business in repairs. So repairing things and doing those repairs yourself, you can charge whatever you want because you're locking everybody else out and it sort of those two things that I think are the the sort of the most interesting parallels with the broader consumer technology industry and the most interesting arguments against rights repair.

Massachusetts Julian Takata Stalking York Editor Wired Senior Associate Michael Kouri Writer Mike What Boston Mike I Mike United States Youtube Toyota India GM
Election Science Stakes: Climate

60-Second Science

04:13 min | 6 months ago

Election Science Stakes: Climate

"This installment of our pre election podcast series I spoke to the Thompson. She's a scientific American associate editor covering issues in sustainability and the environment with an emphasis on climate. I think there's probably a pretty clear difference between the contestants in this election regarding climate science. Yeah. There definitely is president trump has called into question a lot of You know well established climate science. He has denigrated the federal government's own national climate assessments as well as the work put out for years by the Intergovernmental Panel on climate change which are sort of the. The two documents that really bring together and summarize and synthesize all of climate research that's being done whereas former vice president Biden has made it clear on that he understands and respects climate science and that he thinks that climate change is a really existential threat and specifics. So one of the key things that president trump did was last year he put in a request to. Remove the United States from the Paris climate agreement which is the global agreement to for countries to gradually reduce Sarah greenhouse gas emissions. If Biden wins, he has said, he will immediately bring us back into that agreement. The national climate assessment that I needed to earlier that comes out every four years mandated by Congress. There's multiple federal agencies that put that together and the last one that came out came out during the trump administration, and it was very different from the one that came out during the Obama Administration, the trump administration it out very quietly. To minimize attention to it. So now we're at the prosper at the beginning of the process for the next one. But I think it would be pretty clear that Biden administration would reprioritize that report whereas trump administration could be expected to affect what science gets included in it and what conclusions are and how those are communicated and the reason that's such an important document is because. It sort of synthesizes all of this climate information about the changes we have observed and expect in the future across the whole United States and that's really valuable information for state and local governments to have as they try to figure out how to respond to climate threats today, and also plan for them in the future because it's not you know information, you can necessarily get on your own if you're a city government So that's kind of the resource that cities and states can use. So it's really critically important document. What about the scientists themselves? And how they have been either supported or interfered with yeah. Not that's one at various I think from agency to agency. I think in part because of where the trump administration sort of put its energies. So just like NASA, I think have seen probably a little less interference than others versus the Environmental Protection Agency which has been main focus of the trump administration to date and where they have done. Of rollbacks and sort of overruling of agency scientists in terms of rulemaking, and they've also changed some of the rulemaking to. Limit what science can actually be included in some of those regulations and rules processes. I think Noah, the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration has probably been a little bit in the middle. They're still doing a lot of fair traditional climate work. They do a lot of work with satellites there. The main entity does our record keeping on weather and climate, and so they've been continuing that. Have Been. Some appointments to that agency very recently that has scientists and environmental concerned because the people appointed in the past have made statements Showing that they don't accept climate science, and so there's some concern you know and if there's a second trump administration that could undercut some of the science and scientists at Noah.

Donald Trump Biden National Oceanic Atmospheric A Environmental Protection Agenc Obama Administration United States President Trump Associate Editor Vice President Congress Noah Intergovernmental Panel Nasa Paris
The iPhones 12

Gadget Lab Podcast

05:30 min | 6 months ago

The iPhones 12

"Mike, yes Lauren Mike, are you going to upgrade your iphone? Well have an iphone. But it has five gene. Yeah, who cares? Let's see if we can answer that on this week's show. Hi Everyone. Welcome to gadget lab. I'm lauren good. I'm a senior writer at wired and I'm joined remotely by my Co host wired senior editor Michael Cholerae. He who does not have an iphone hello from Pixel land. And we're also joined by wired senior associate editor. Julian Chicago to who has like seventeen different phones on him right now. Hey Julie in below my desk has like six phones on right now so. So today we are talking about yet another apple event this week apple announced a new iphone twelve, actually four of them and a tiny smart speaker, and these are the first iphones with five G. which matters doesn't matter doesn't matter yet. We're GONNA talk about five G. later on in the show what you need to know about it the challenges and rolling it out across the US and whether you'll even be able to connect to five G. With the new IPHONE are calling. We'll night is going to join us later on for that but first, let's talk about the phones themselves. Jillian. Phone has championed edges. Let's get that out of the way. That's probably the most important thing here, right? Okay. But obviously, there's more than that what stood out to you most about the new iphones twelve as someone who takes a lot of photos and tests the cameras on phones a lot. A. Lot of their camera upgrades. We're the most exciting thing for me and and I really like how a lot of those camera upgrades are kind of for the most part. All across the entire lineup from the 699 iphone twelve mini, you're getting the same main camera that they improve the aperture on as the iphone twelve pro. But for the most part that iphone twelve pro, you get these new features like pro raw, which gives you the ability to edit. Raw photos and also get the benefits of apples, computational photography, and that is just someone something that's really exciting for someone who takes a lot of raw photos with my camera just gives you more granular control over photo editing and also the other thing is they're bringing night mode to every single lens that's on this phone. So finally, you can take a Selfie, at night and not have to worry about it being too terrible, looking or grainy. So overall I think the entire suite of camera features on the entire range is pretty exciting and pretty dramatically better than what you had last year on the iphone eleven. And tell us about some of the video improvements to yes. For the improvements, they added the ability to shoot HDR with Dolby Vision, which is you know apparently the only phone that can do this and basically lets you get this program cinematic looking effector or look. You could say with all of your videos at ten bits of it's like super high quality. It just looks really good. With the option to edit the colors and have really good cinematic looking video as well with the iphone twelve pro you there have this improved stabilization system that moves the sensor itself. So basically, in fact, you're getting something that feels and looks much more high quality than ever before, and again, this is somewhere where apple leads compared to every other phone manufacturer except maybe Samsung is pretty close. No one else does the ability to shoot video quality this well, and it's just every year. It just seems to be getting further and further away from other companies even like you. Google. Pixel phones that take really great photos Mike what did you make the event? You know my favorite thing that I saw this week was the mini, the small phone small phones in general are exciting to me. Our colleague Brian Barrett wrote this week that the arrival of the iphone twelve mini is a harbinger of good for the small phone community I think you know fabulous when they came out what was it like eight years ago or so we started seeing these gigantic phones and then. People really liked them and they started them in huge numbers. So phones just kept getting bigger and bigger and bigger. We've all been waiting for phones to get small again, phones have gotten smaller, but they haven't really gotten small enough, and now this year I think phones are starting to get just about small enough to satisfy the people who are looking for small phone I was out last week two weeks ago at A. Socially distanced event and I saw a guy with a Sony experience x to compact, which is like a really tiny. It's even smaller than the iphone mini android phone and I asked him about it. I went over to him six feet away and I said, Hey, what is that and he started going on and on about it and the way that he was talking about it was so passionate and I realize that. Like okay. You know what? There is a huge market. People are really really passionate about smartphones and people are GonNa flip when they see the mini I think coming until November So I, think for people who really want it. They're going to have to resist clicking that buy button for a couple of weeks

Phone Apple Lauren Mike United States Michael Cholerae Senior Editor Julian Chicago Senior Associate Jillian Julie Brian Barrett Google Dolby Vision Writer Samsung Editor
"associate editor" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

05:36 min | 7 months ago

"associate editor" Discussed on WTOP

"And it is by far the biggest development yet in a campaign season that has been unlike any other course. Last night, President Trump announced he and first Lady Melania have tests Good, positive Corona virus. The development came after hours after the news that close aide hope Hicks had tested positive president and first lady reportedly have mild symptoms. But given the viruses, unpredictability surely adds another element of chaos to what's already been a chaotic election year. Joining us now on Skype to talk about it. Anita Kumar, political White House correspondent, an associate editor. Thanks so much for being with us. Anita, can you tell us what the scene is like in the White House and whether or not people are preparing for more positive infections? Yeah, It's just a very odd day where basically, people are trying to figure out if they've been in close contact with The president, First lady or other AIDS you knowwho picks you mentioned has been tested, You know, has that was infected, so they're doing contact tracing and notifying people. People can get go ahead and get tests today, But you're exactly right. There is some sense that people are testing. And coming back negative today, But you know, there's this period where it could not show up for a few more days, so people will have to be tested again. And it's not just at the White House. It's also at the Trump campaign because, as you know, he did a lot of campaigning this week. And there's a mix of White House staff and campaign staff that are with him and past the White House addressed why Mr Trump traveled to a fundraiser in New Jersey despite knowing that hope Hicks had tested positive. Yeah, It's really unclear about what happened Wednesday, and that's the day you're talking about where he tries. He's me Thursday where he traveled. She started feeling sick on Wednesday, and there's some Confusion or there's you know, they haven't shared with us Exactly. Who knew what When, um, at that situation, there are a lot of people saying that the press secretary do but she's pushing back and saying she didn't know at the time when she when she briefed reporters, so we don't have the full time line exactly What happened. There are people saying today why is the president not come out and And spoken. Obviously, he can't appear in public and he self isolated. We haven't even seen him really tweet today much We haven't seen him talk there their AIDS that wish he would go get out there in front of the camera and even talk about what happened. I need a you know, this is an administration that has scoffed at the seriousness of Corona virus and covert 19. Is there a sense that the attitude has shifted now that the president's infected? Well, I don't know. I think it's a little early to say, But there is something to be said today for White House staff are wearing masks and anyone who's been over there recently in recent months knows that they have not been wearing masks. For months now, and when you travel aboard Air Force one, the staff is not wearing masks. So they are doing that today. They are getting tested. I think there's a more serious nature from the staff. You know what that looks like with the president as it goes forward, I think it really just depends on how What he's like, You know, we hear he has mild symptoms. What? We haven't seen him or heard from him today. And if those symptoms get more severe, I think there might be a shift. But if if he you know it's mild, he may not. So I really think it depends on what happens in these coming days. I need a good to talk to you again. Thank you so much. Sure, thank you. Anita Kumar Politico White House correspondent and associate editor. Let's see how Wall Street's doing right before the close. Geoff Clay via the Dow is down 48 points. The S and P 500 index is down a half percent of the Aztecs down 1.8% money news in 10 minutes on W GOP sports at 15 and 45 brought to you by your local Honda dealer. Don't settle for less than 3 45. We've got George Wallace. All right. Shawn Ron Rivera back in the building today at practice after missing a little bit earlier this week due to his treatment, his team getting ready to face the Ravens, and he's feeling how I'm really good at today. The last two days the last three days, actually, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, we're a bit of a bear. Kind of tough, You know, I was able to get in on on Wednesday for a little bit more little bit of tape got in on Thursday and watch portion of practice and they got the wash little bit of tape of that. Today. I have actually felt pretty good, so I was able to be around went through the whole practice with guys and it was good to see him. I thought they had great Temple Great Energy and he continue expects to coach on Sunday says he's feeling pretty good. That's good news. Call hokum. Steven Sims Chase Young out for Sunday. Ryan Anderson, Terry McLaurin, Morgan Moses All questionable embrace love Place on I R Running backs Gnaeus swelling up a bit, says the coach to be a 3 to 4 week injury. Steelers Titans game will now be played October 25th, which is week seven. Steelers Ravens will move from that day to a week later week Number eight, as both teams would have would have had to buy that day. So that's after two more Titans players testing positive. Major league Baseball now 33 straight days that a positive test that's good news and 41 of the last 42 Cubs Marlins. No score right now. In the fifth, they're playing game two of their serious cardinals Padres winner take all Game three later and the N ba Finals tonight. Game number two Lakers up one, Nothing. And How about this stat Over the last 25 post seasons? The Lakers 29 ano when taking a 10 lead? Wow! Yeah. George whilst every TV sports Thanks so much, George. It's 3 47. You've put off taking care of your dental health long enough because of your fear of the dentist at.

president White House President Trump White House correspondent George Wallace Hicks Anita Kumar associate editor Lakers Ravens Lady Melania Skype Anita Kumar Politico Steelers AIDS Anita Shawn Ron Rivera New Jersey Air Force
Trump admits to ‘playing down’ coronavirus threat in taped Woodward interviews

Tony Katz Today

00:51 sec | 7 months ago

Trump admits to ‘playing down’ coronavirus threat in taped Woodward interviews

"President Trump addressing new recordings from Washington Post associate editor Bob Woodward. That seemed to convey that the president knew weeks before the first confirmed US Corona virus death that the virus was dangerous, Airborne and highly contagious. Fox's John Decker president Trump on Hannity, explaining why he told Bob Woodward in a recorded conversation that he knew Corona virus was deadly and worse than the flu. But according tto Woodward intentionally did not level with the American public that said Don't paddock. We don't want to be jumping up and down and going while don't panic, a cheerleader for this country, and I don't want to see panic. The president admitted to Woodward on March 19th that he deliberately minimize the danger, saying I wanted to always play it down. Woodward's new book is based in part on 18. On the record interviews Woodward conducted with the president between December and July

Bob Woodward President Trump Washington Post Associate Editor Corona United States Hannity John Decker FOX
"associate editor" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

KTLK 1130 AM

02:42 min | 7 months ago

"associate editor" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

"Woodward, The Washington Post associate editor, taped interviews of the president for his new book in a February 7th call the president describes the virus is being passed through the air and deadlier than the seasonal flu. So this's deadly stuff. Joe Biden seizing on this during a campaign event in Michigan, he knew how deadly it was. It was much more deadly than the flu. He knew and purposely played it down. Worse, he lied to the American people. White House spokeswoman Kayleigh Mcenany denies that the president has never lied to the American public on covert. The president's been very president was expressing calm and his actions reflect that. And the president himself just talking about this moments ago, saying that he has acted in ways that sought to reduce any potential panic. Over the pandemic at a Senate hearing. Top government scientists say the public should trust the process for the fast track vaccine effort known is Operation Warp Speed. Surgeon General Dr Jerome Adam says he's not saying political influence of the vaccine process from the administration's Corona virus Task force. We have a process in place. That I trust as a doctor as a dad, Adams and National Institute of Health director Dr Francis Collins told the Senate Health Committee. The safety and efficacy of the vaccine won't be compromised. I'm reassured and I hope it will be reassuring to you that there are a number of steps in terms of how vaccines they're going to be evaluated that are going to give that kind of sense of scientific objectivity. AstraZeneca announced the pause in a late stage trial this week after a suspected serious side effect of a participant. Boxes Your helper and on Capitol Hill America is listening to Fox. These four kind Scot Governor Tim Walz today announcing he will convene a special legislative session beginning on Friday. September 11th walls intends to extend the Koven 19 peacetime emergency by 30 days to quote ensure the state can continue to quickly. And effectively respond to the Cova 19 pandemic. It's the fourth special session to occur amid Corona virus. Senate Republicans are calling on walls to put an end to his peace time executive orders, But the Democrat controlled House supports the governor's decision to extend his powers. The special session set to convene Friday at noon, Donald Trump Jr in Duluth this afternoon on the campaign trail for his father ahead of the November election. State, DFL Chair Ken Martin says Donald Trump Jr is visiting Minnesota today in an attempt to distract from his father's epic failure in responding to Corona virus that's infected over 80,000 Minnesotans and left thousands more out of work. State GOP chair Jennifer Kernaghan counters that Martin pushes and promote and blames.

president Joe Biden Senate Donald Trump Jr Scot Governor Tim Walz Dr Jerome Adam AstraZeneca Senate Health Committee Woodward associate editor Dr Francis Collins Kayleigh Mcenany Ken Martin Corona White House Duluth Michigan Capitol Hill America Cova National Institute of Health
Feds clash with Portland protesters again

AM Joy

05:34 min | 9 months ago

Feds clash with Portland protesters again

"Now we all know that Donald trump has a thing for dictators and each time he praises leaders men who he has called. Good friends trump exposed and apparent autocratic envied that foreshadowed what we are seeing happening right now in Portland, Oregon we're on Friday thousands of protesters, including the wall of MOMS and a wall of. Of veterans standing in solidarity with black lives matter we're met by federal agents who fired pepper balls and deployed tear gas to disperse the crowds for two weeks now federal officers wearing military style, camouflage and helmets have been patrolling Portland with batons and tear-gas, driving around in unmarked vehicles, sweeping up and detaining protesters in a way that Oregon's own attorney general says resembles abductions. This ladies and gentlemen is trump's secret police. Federal agents igniting chaos in the city led by a democratic mayor who was also tear-gas by US agents this week. According to trump, he's simply trying to quell unrest. In other words, he is clinging to the image of the law and order president as his approval ratings continued tank borrowing from the playbook of the dictators. He's so admires. will go into all of the city's Eddie of the cities we're ready will put in fifty thousand and sixty thousand people that really know what they're doing. Then they're strong tough, and we could solve these problems so fast. Joining me now is in Applebaum staff writer at the Atlantic and author of twilight of Democracy Renee, Graham columnist and associate editor at the Boston Globe. Sarah Kinzir scholar, authoritarian states, and all of hiding in plain sites and Philip he goes of the center for Policing Equity Thank you guys for joining me and I'm going to start with you. We are living in a world where secret police are detaining protesters without probable. So. If you look out on the nation, you will note across the chasm a lot of steering thing we try to tell you and you really touch on some interesting things in your piece in the Atlantic I loved it and you say that Donald Trump's authoritarianism is a form of politics that reached new heights. And you compare this what we're seeing in the landscape to Russia explain that to me. So. Thanks I think the important thing to understand about what trump is doing is that these are not tactics designed to solve the problem? Why is he sending customs and Border Patrol Coastguard Tsa. Officers into American cities these are people who don't have training and riot control who aren't used to dealing with political protests, and whose main goal seems to be to create more chaos. Of course, this isn't full on dictatorship. Resting the mayor or conducting mass arrests are putting thousands of people in jail for what he is doing is creating pictures. That are designed to show other Americans. How tough he is! So the fact that these men are wearing men and women maybe are wearing camouflage. They look heavily armed. They're wearing. Face Masks this is designed to show and kind of act out dominance. Look were pushing back against the liberal America the. Urban America the chaotic in America that. You're all afraid of and this is how we're going to win the argument. This way of using troops and using photographs of violence is something that we have seen in other authoritarian states. particularly in Russia where. Putin in twenty, thousand fourteen. Used pictures of violence to imply that the democracy movement in Ukraine was really some kind of Nazi fascist uprising, and that he was then putting it. Is, this is a tactic. We've seen US in other parts of the world, and we've already seen the photographs and footage of this be used in campaign. So that really punctuates your Article Philip. I want to turn to you because one thing that concerns me about. This is the experience that black and Brown people have when we encounter police so attorney general bill bar has said that in these new cities that the police officers are going to be clearly identifiable. I don't know that that makes it better. Considering that when black people encounter police there three times more likely to be killed in Chicago there six times more likely to be killed whether you make this. Yeah amp put it exactly right. These are not here. These troops are not here to make anything better. They're set up. In camouflage, which by the way they're not blending into any urban environment with those uniforms. To make the folks who are protesting who had been almost entirely peaceful important up until this point. Make them fear that there's going to be some kind of forceful, physical violent, a reaction to their peaceful expression of their rights and the thing I want to understand is this is over the objection, not only of the mayor of the US Attorney Attorney General the governor of local law enforcement as local law enforcement has been trying for the last seven eight to figure out how dare legitimacy at trust of New York, and this is explicitly not helping

Donald Trump America Atlantic Russia Attorney Oregon Portland Putin Border Patrol Coastguard Tsa Philip Sarah Kinzir Us Attorney Applebaum Chicago President Trump Center For Policing Equity New York
House Speaker Pelosi to unveil coronavirus aid package for workers

The 11th Hour with Brian Williams

10:45 min | 1 year ago

House Speaker Pelosi to unveil coronavirus aid package for workers

"House speaker. Nancy Pelosi is expected to unveil legislation tomorrow aimed at helping workers who may be at financial risk because of the grow virus outbreak. Nbc News reports. The House will likely pass that bill as for the impact. This crisis is having on our daily lives. There are new developments almost hourly the NC Double A. announced March madness will go on at all venues but without fans in the arenas Seattle public schools will close for a minimum of two weeks beginning tomorrow. Tomorrow is also when the containment zone in the New York City. Suburb of new Rochelle. Officially begins officials. Say They hope that will control the spread of the corona virus in what has become the largest cluster of illness in the United States? So far here for our leadoff discussion on a Wednesday night. Anita Kumar White House correspondent and associate editor for Politico Robert Costa National Political reporter for the Washington Post and moderator of Washington. Week on PBS. And we welcome to the broadcast Austin Goolsbee former chairman of the Council of Economic Advisers for President Obama and a professor of economics at the University of Chicago. Welcome to all of you. Anita the president made a number of announcements this evening He did not declare a state of emergency. I do want to remind our viewers. There is a state of emergency that continues to be in effect in America because of the border the southern border. But that's not. As far as the president's gone he also suggested earlier. Today that jared Kushner is is sort of in charge of this and he's studying it more right while the president is expected in the next few days even perhaps next week to declare this emergency of very limited emergency that would basically free up. Forty billion dollars that is sitting there that The government has sitting there for disaster relief so he wants to free up some of that money and and the thinking here is that he wants to go ahead and act quickly He he was on the hill yesterday on Capitol Hill and he didn't hear from Republicans or Democrats Anything that would make him believe that they were going to quickly accept some of his ideas for economic relief and he wanted to bypass them and really just get some funds freed up so he could go ahead and do that Robert. You were reporting this evening about the fact that the president had a bit of a shouting match with his treasury secretary about the measures that the Fed and others have taken. This is his fed chief. Jay Powell who he put into place. Apparently he's very very frustrated with the Fed and things more can be done. He is unhappy with the Federal Reserve Chairman Pal on Monday afternoon while the president was in the Oval Office meeting with top advisers including treasury secretary. Mnuchin he lashed out about pal saying to the Treasury Secretary. You need to try to get him to lower rates if at all possible to try to see if you can have a conversation with him to stimulate the economy. The president knows he's being stymied on Capitol Hill about his payroll tax cut and just a couple of minutes ago house. Democrats formerly released publicly released. Their virus relief. Bill just have been reading it over for the past. Couple of minutes includes paid sick. Leave Food Security It also includes free testing unemployment benefits. You see Speaker Pelosi tonight. A after the president's speech trying to take the lead on the legislative answer to all of this Austin the stock market the Dow was down another fourteen hundred and some odd points. Today we're now off twenty percent from recent highs which puts the Dow into the bear a bear market. The five hundred is not far behind. The president has a what one might say unhealthy preoccupation with both the stock market and interest rates. What do you make of this though? Because the market is responding even after the president's announcement market futures were were lower. What do you make of what has to be done from from the perspective of the government whether it's a stimulus or what? The House is proposing. Well you know I think two things. The first is as we've spoken many times. Vulgar used to tell me over and over and the financial crisis that when crisis hits the only asset you have is your credibility and I think when you see the stock market plunging. The way did today the way it did this evening. It is a judgment about the credibility of the White House that we've had the president of the United States going out and saying people are finding that when they get sick they can still go to work. We only have fourteen cases and pretty soon. That's going to go down to zero when the president himself says that and when people cannot be tested no amount of stimulus is going to be sufficient because the reason that the economy is going into this tailspin because people are afraid and they are withdrawing from the economy and if you gave them a thousand dollar payroll tax cut. They're not going to spend it because the root of the problem when you get into a virus situation is that the greatest economic stimulus comes from slowing the rate of spread of the virus. And we've seen South Korea's succeed at it by having extensive testing and by finding the people who are sick and saying look. Don't go visit your grandma and stay isolated. For fourteen days. They've been able to slow the spread of the virus and their economy is gonNA come rebounding in a rapid basis the longer. We pretend that there aren't cases here and try to blame it on Europe and say. Oh we're going to block cargo boxes from Europe and that's GonNa help us without doing the testing the the more fear is going to be generated in people's minds and the worst the economy's GonNa get Robert this whole issue credibility this. This thing has developed very quickly. I want to just go back to starting really the last week of February the last couple of days of February when the President I started talking about Corona virus compared to what he said tonight. Let's listen together. We're finding very little problem very little pro now. You treat this like a flu. This is the most aggressive and comprehensive effort to confront a foreign virus in modern history. It's going to disappear one day. It's like a miracle it will disappear. We will be suspending all travel from Europe to the United States. For the next thirty days we have thousands or hundreds of thousands of people that get better just by sitting around even going to work. Go to work. If you're sick or not feeling well stay home. Democrats are politicizing the corona virus. This is new hoax. We must put politics aside. Stop the partisanship and unify together. As One Nation Robert this becomes a complicated call to arms for the president because he has been the one saying that the Democrats are politicizing. He and Fox News talking about the media blowing this out of proportion and now the president has got to step up there and do something that is unusual Primetime Oval Office address saying let's come together and take greater action to solve this and there are real world implications for so many the leaders around the country outside of the White House who are dealing with this in an interview. This week with Maryland governor Larry Hogan Republican. He told me that he's deeply concerned about the mixed messages coming out of this administration. He said he had a ninety minute. Meeting with Vice President Pence who said one thing and then he listened to the president who was talking in an entirely different way about the entire crisis. And that's a governor. A sitting governor dealing with cases in his State and when I was on Capitol Hill. There are also expressing concern. Democrats and Republicans about how the president is handling this. There's private concern among some of my top. Gop sources that the president's antennas to attuned to the stock market and his own reelection campaign and Anita in fact the rate cut that the president seemed to be agitating for which occurred last week did not have the desired effect in the market. Nothing the president he's doing is having the desired effect. But at this point you have competing plans the president's plan and then the Republican the Democratic Plan. That's come out who reconciles this. This is not been a White House at a congress. That's managed to come together on many things but at this point is necessary. Who reconciles the fact? That what the president thinks looks like stimulus and success is very different than what Nancy. Pelosi team do right. This is the problem this has been problem on a variety of issues. Obviously we've never been in this place before but on so many policy issues you know the Democrats and sometimes even the Republican Republicans on Capitol Hill can't agree with the White House. And so what happens is they don't do anything. That's not going to be the case this time because everybody believes that something needs to be done. That's why you're seeing the president saying that he's going to act should've unilaterally and then take the you know go ahead with a speech and and call on Congress tact but but you know going back to what Bob said the the president's in this place where he's trying to do two things he's talking about. How this isn't that big of a deal. It's going to go away as you've played but he also has to show that he is doing something tonight. He took a different action showing that he's doing something while he's also trying to downplay parts of it exactly for his reelection and for his popularity. What's going to happen in the future? The trump campaign and some of his allies are very much aware. Now that this is going to probably be the issue that he's going to be judged on in the next few months up until the election Austin during the president's address he said all travel from Europe to the United States will stop not even cargo will go there within correction came out says. Well no cargo is going to go. And then a correction came out to say no. Actually it's just non-americans coming to the United States. I wasn't clear that the virus makes that distinction all that well look this exactly what I mean if the president gets up and says something literally three minutes after he finishes saying it they say no. What he said is not what the policy is. It undermines your credibility the what also undermines the credibility on one hand to say we need a big stimulus and then this afternoon. The secretary of HHS was reached as you know. The president has a plan to cut seven hundred thousand people off of food stamps low income people and they said do you still plan to cut them off of food stamps on April first when those are the very people who are going to be losing their jobs and they say yes they do intend to cut them off of food stamps. So you you've got a we need relief but we're GONNA have a filibuster to hold up paid sick leave for all Americans and I think that I something is going to have to give. They're either going to have to start telling the truth. Doing tests and have a stimulus and an antivirus program or else. They're going to have to just declare. We don't care we all we WANNA do is make. The the problem seems small as possible.

President Trump Democrats United States White House Nancy Pelosi Vice President Europe Anita Kumar White House NBC Robert Costa Seattle New York City FED Anita Chairman
White House impeachment team weighs in on Bolton claims

Fox News Rundown

11:16 min | 1 year ago

White House impeachment team weighs in on Bolton claims

"In the house impeachment inquiry was beginning the White House claimed it wasn't fair and White House attorney said they would not be cooperating with the impeachment process house judiciary chairman Jerry Nadler had said if the president's team wouldn't participate they couldn't claim the process was unfair then things stop house speaker Nancy Pelosi was holding the articles of impeachment saying the house was waiting to hear about the rules of the Senate trial president trump said let's move this along this is Renee a total sham from the beginning everybody knows it I've never seen in the Republican Party so United we got our last about as you know we got a hundred percent of the vote I believe the Senate is equally as well United now the Senate trial has begun discussions over what is fair still loom Republicans say an offer to let the president's team participating committee presentations of evidence came too late Democrats and the White House is blocking documents in preventing key witnesses from testifying Monday the president tweeted that the house never even asked former national security adviser John Bolton to testify but they didn't they didn't issue a subpoena like they did the Boltons aids trials government government filed a lawsuit to force the question should I listen to the president stay quiet or complied with the subpoena the judge dismissed the suit though when the house withdrew the request and moved forward with formal articles of impeachment so the question has been answered Bolton has since said he would testify in the Senate trial if the peanut Democrats do want to call more witnesses before the Senate Republicans say they should have done that during the house inquiry now though Senate minority leader Chuck Schumer notes there's new information Mister Bolton's book is further evidence that a large number of people for a quote in the loop on this scheme and now they are all covering up part of Bolton's book many script leaked over the weekend after it had been sent to the National Security Council for classified information vetting he says the president quote wanted to continue freezing security assistance to Ukraine until officials there helped with investigations into Democrats including the bidens I'm sorry about the timing AT standard is an associate editor and columnist at real clear politics because everyone was assuming we're speeding toward a conclusion here of the trial at the end of this week without witnesses but in terms of how long it is that the manuscript has been at the administration whether GM but the National Security Council or both and we know or dare and also distributed to a wider circle of top political people as has been the case with books like this in the past was it always the case that Bolton sort of you know hovered over this defense from the president's team and threaten to weaken it yes it was always the case that we knew he had information the investigation and the impeachment in the house had not yet revealed and it was likely to run counter to what the president's lawyers for saying schools in the tourney said that this clearly is a corruption of the NSC review process and Democrats say you know this surely should serve more as a catalyst to to actually hear from witnesses specifically Bolton when you look at sort of the the broad strokes in the big picture of what everyone saying regardless of any motivation does its way things doesn't change anything well it is a first hand hand the cal and in a way that contradicts the the defense that began over the weekend of of the of the president where lawyers came out on Saturday and said there is no evidence anywhere that this was a a quid pro quo on and that the president intended it to be that withholding of security eight so I think the senators on the Republican side are angry not because they think the John Bolton was squarely in the release of his timing and you know perhaps it's connected to his creed overbooked fails but that the White House might have known since December thirtieth that this is an incredibly damaging development and would poke holes in their defense and would make the argument for witnesses had this information been known earlier I I actually saw some defense from some Republican senators of John Bolton many of them are very close to him they believe his truth teller and that he wouldn't be lying in this book do you foresee a court fight I mean I know the court site really only happens if four Republican senators say yes to witnesses so we have to get there first we think that's gonna happen if John Bolton isn't just going to go on sixty minutes or something I mean I I just don't know just on anyways right he's decided in the eleventh hour that his reputation could be tarnished by the fact that he was holding out but now they're rushing the book to publication and body wants to be a patriot and he didn't wanna look redeem he's clearly conflicted so I don't know what exactly his line of thinking as but he has made it clear to us all along he intends to tell us something that we don't yet know and so if he foresees a court battle does he go into an open media setting I know that nothing can stop the house from trying to subpoena him and he could say yes to a subpoena I don't know but the Senate trial if that's gonna get gummed up this building just sit down in interview that that's I think a big alone looming question here now that he has that publication date since Fulton's many scriptures leak Republican senators who previously expressed interest in possibly hearing from witnesses have said this does strengthen the argument Utah senator Mitt Romney said he thinks it is increasingly likely that other Republicans will join those of them who think they should hear from John Bolton Maine senator Susan Collins said the reporting on Fulton strengthens the case for witnesses it would take a least for Republicans joining Democrats in order for witnesses to be called so wise and Berg is former deputy independent counsel in the whitewater investigation it authorizes the calling of witnesses I would have to believe that Bolton would be one of them the real question is what happens after that do the president's lawyers make a motion in the trial to exclude the testimony under executive privilege and if they do what happened to that one I think most of us are curious about the reach of executive privilege and a lot of articles have been written over the weekend like trying to expound on what seems like untested waters to a certain degree we we don't really know how far executive privilege will will apply do we certainly not in the context of impeachment I don't believe there's any precedent certainly not in the federal appellate precedent gusting executive privilege in the context of an impeachment inquiry or an impeachment trial I should say so we're really operating without without a guide book I will say that if you look at history and particularly the accounting period and the and the first few administrations and congresses after the founding period there is some historical support for the notion that it might not executive privilege might not apply at all in the context of an impeachment trial the first is the very first time a president withheld information didn't called executive privilege then but the very first time I believe that a president withheld information from Congress was when I was in a Washington with held certain papers related to the negotiations of the Jay treaty which was very unpopular and he was asked for old papers and he gave the great majority of them but he did not give over certain papers that he felt were too sensitive and he said at the time this would be different if if we were talking about an impeachment inquiry so I think there is certainly a credible argument that executive privilege either would not apply or would be the standards would be much more difficult for successfully invoking executive privilege in the context of an impeachment inquiry or trial school in your legal mind how does not proceed does it depend on if you have a cooperating witness first is not of just how does the justice department pursue a case against somebody who says you know I'm I'm going to ignore your your invocation of executive privilege and I'm going to go ahead and testify or does it work in the reverse if you say to Congress no I'm going to resist your subpoena who's sort of the authority that that will make that determination ambassador Bolton has already said that if subpoenaed he will testify so I think how it would proceed would be the president's lawyers in the impeachment trial if that happened the boat Mississippi that need to testify will make a motion to the she just this thing the president invokes executive privilege and we we do not agree that this man to justice robbers can do one of two things he can make that determination himself number one do even apply a secular privilege here number two if I'm going to apply it how do we waive the interests of the president versus the interest of the Senate and conducting an impeachment trial now this is David keep justice Roberts says I'm gonna let you invoke executive privilege that would be the easiest for the the majority I think in the Senate because they would have to overturn him by majority vote to overrule but let's say the rules you know what executive privilege simply doesn't apply here it's not very strong here and by the way we do I think the president's already waived whatever in is an interesting situation because we can certainly be overruled but I think we have to think about what you're gonna look like at the two cases in the United States has ruled that Fulton have testified even in the face of an invocation of executive privilege by the president but we're gonna overrule the Chief Justice is what you're saying hold truth the reverse occurs in other words if somebody is resistant unlike Bolton to appearing maybe Samick Mulvaney or a secretary Pompeii or somebody like that and Congress you know the senators say you know excuse me you can't ignore our subpoena is due to the senators then take this to court or petition justice Roberts in much the same way that you you save what happens if the White House felt they were trying to get something through well that would certainly let's say the the the Senate subpoenas and Mulvaney to go into court he could he could make his argument first in front of the net at sitting as a court either thing could happen I don't think it would be bold enough to reassert this the notion of absolute immunity again because it is it is the

White House Attorney Jerry Nadler President Trump Nancy Pelosi Chairman
#PayUpHollywood Attempting To Change Pay And Working Conditions For Entertainment Industry Assistants

The Frame

06:44 min | 1 year ago

#PayUpHollywood Attempting To Change Pay And Working Conditions For Entertainment Industry Assistants

"Assistance in the entertainment industry are overworked underpaid and and often have to run personal errands for their bosses even after they leave for the day. That's according to a new survey of more than fifteen hundred assistance. It was released this this week by the grassroots movement called pay up Hollywood. The campaign started as a twitter Hashtag back in October and has been gaining momentum since then Katie kilkenny is an associate editor at the Hollywood reporter where she covers labor and she explains how the Hashtag grew out of an episode of script notes. A podcast asked about screenwriting. A assistant wrote in saying you know I think one of the big issues. That's going to be coming forward in the next few decades in Hollywood is that we're gonna I have to talk about the low pay. That assistance are facing in how that is related to rising cost of living in Los Angeles and from near the hosts which cacus Craig Mason. Who are both really powerful writers in Hollywood? Read that note and ask for more people to talk about their stories of being an assistant in Los Angeles they just got an overwhelming matic. Email and a writer named Alber who is on the board at the Writers Guild of America started Hashtag called Hashtag Champ. Hollywood so a couple of days before Thanksgiving script notes facilitated a pay up Hollywood town hall where assistance had a chance to talk about some of the issues. And here's what one woman who didn't provide. Her name had to say about burnout. We almost have like three jobs at once. Like not only. Are we working our day. The job for forty to sixty hours a week and not making enough and then therefore doing work on the side like babysitting driving etc but we also have the work of our own careers. I and I think that is what leads that burnout. Because we're not only expected to have this day job that puts all these things in place for us to move forward and then on top of that we're expected to have like an hour to write a day or or to fund their own short films and make them on the weekends like that is just like impossible. I think impossible's inaccurate word word for what she's describing. What some of the other issues that came up around the Hashtag and around the town hall so I think a big one is the question of access? Hollywood has been talking talking a lot about its diversity issues wanting to get more folks into the pipeline of diverse backgrounds. But what we're looking at. Here's the situation where you have to to be able to afford to be an assistant in the first place to get that first leg up in the industry and so Paige Hollywood has just released a survey of one thousand thousand five hundred fifty one assistance and they found that seventy percent of the people who were surveyed were white and that fifty two percent were receiving financial -sential aid from family and friends to make ends meet as they were assistance in Hollywood. So I think we're seeing that this industry in order to diversify does have to become more accessible or economically manically accessible to folks who aren't coming in with with that aid so that to me was notable as well as the fact that a lot of assistance were also talking thing about this sort of demeaning conditions that were expected of them. Hollywood has pay your dues culture and I think a lot of folks remember at its in difficult conditions when they or assistance and so sort of expect. There is a lot to go through that as well. But in the survey it showed that one hundred and four respondents had an object thrown at them in the workplace. So I think that we're looking at conditions assistance or not only being pretty badly paid but also they are facing conditions that are pretty rough. We're talking with Katie kilkenny at the Hollywood reporter about pay up. Hollywood there are other things that really jumped out to me. One is that almost ninety three percent of those. The people surveyed said they work more than forty hours a week and fifteen percent said they were working more than sixty hours a week and hero's something that was really troubling. Almost almost a quarter said that they had reported an increase in substance abuse. So it sounds like the job is really taking a terrible terrible toll on the people who are in this line of work completely. I mean I think these numbers sort of show something that assistance have been talking to each other about for a long time and so I think for a lot of this is not a surprise but this survey really shines a light on some of these issues and the fact that things need to change and it sounds like some show runners are actually saying this is unsustainable and maybe even immoral absolutely so I talked to a few folks. We'd been vocal on twitter with their support and basically found out talking to them that they were advocating for higher wages on projects that they're currently developing and these are Adam conifer who Folks might know true. TV's Adam Ruins everything. David H Steinberg. who was a CO show runner? Netflix is no good nick. And the writer producer producer Creator Ayelet Waldman who was an executive producer on Netflix. Unbelievable Waldman in particular told me that she was trying to get her assistance twenty dollars an hour plus benefits and hover was saying that he was trying to just various aspects of the job to make it more. Tenable you said in your story Lori that you had reached out to the major studios and talent agencies for comment and let's just say they weren't flooding the phone lines calling back. have any of them. Had anything anything to say. One Agency is doing something and they didn't provide comment for the story. But you know I heard via sources that for which is the talent agency that represents spoke John August who helped movement as well as Liz Alpert who coined. The HASHTAG has conducted in anonymous pace survey of their assistance. And and I will also be receiving and looking at the results of the pay up Hollywood survey and I imagine that in weeks to come others will speak up more but for now they our remaining mum and even if the hours are horrible. The working conditions aren't great. A lot of people want these jobs right because it's so hard hard to get into the business and this is one possible path for people who want to become creative people in Hollywood definitely. They're extremely competitive jobs and often a line that is used with assistance to speak up about work. Conditions is that you know there were thousands. That will take place but it's gotten to the point where the wages are the same as they were twenty years ago in some cases That's what we're hearing from. These stories while the cost of living in Los Angeles has skyrocketed. And so these assistance missiles argument is that the situation is untenable at the slain. Katie Kilkenny is an associate editor at the Hollywood reporter. Katie thanks so much for coming on the show as much for having me

Hollywood Katie Kilkenny Paige Hollywood Los Angeles Reporter Writer Twitter Associate Editor Writers Guild Of America Unbelievable Waldman Netflix Craig Mason John August Alber Lori David H Steinberg. Adam Liz Alpert Executive Producer
"associate editor" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

03:28 min | 1 year ago

"associate editor" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"No matter who the candidate is i think that we are going to have a period area of wealth distribution and the pie is going to be redistributed in some way <hes> corporations. The profit share that they're taking is as high as it's ever been. <hes> labor labor is as low as it's been in the postwar period so it is time for some rejigging. There are couple bright spots on the horizon. If i may go on for just one moment though <hes> ah put in a shameless plug my next book don't be evil actually talks about the shift from <hes> <hes> to a digital economy and at both the challenges that that brings but also the opportunities we're. We're all creating data every day right. We're online. We're communicating. We're on our facebook feeds <hes> if we could own the value of some of that data that's it's an interesting opportunity for the for the future if we could be trained. <hes> and many companies are actually trying to institute their own programs to move from manufacturing and sort of industrial economy jobs to digital jobs. The u._s. is actually very well poised to do well in that sector but we've got to have a public private partnership around all these things and so that's one of the things i'm exploring flooring now. I'm glad you added that because i was. I was gonna say i was my publicist with would kill me if i love your show without plugging my book. What i was gonna say is the ideas are there right but you must have political will isn't yet there and i keep coming back to that because ultimately decisions have to be made decisions. Visions do have to be made but all right. I'm gonna i'm going to be a little bit of a contrarian again. I totally agree that. Our politics is dysfunctional but i really wanna call on the business community immunity to come together at this point too. I mean we have we have so many great business. Leaders in this country and folks need to jump in. I mean there are a a lot of calm individual companies. I could name ten off top of my head right now doing doing fabulous things. I'd like to see the business roundtable for example which is the one of the business <hes> biggest business. Lobbying groups groups. Come together and go to the government say all right. We want to get behind <hes> a new deal style retraining program for the twentieth century workforce. What can we do. Let's let's sit down and talk about this. You can't just take profits offshore. <hes> have capital leave and not work with a government that <hes> is rather beleaguered so so i do think it's a it's a it's a double edged thing and don't be afraid of the names you might get called on twitter <hes> but if indeed the business leadership wants to step forward here. We've got got a minute left to go rhino and speaking of the tech industry and your book. I just wanted to ask you. I i think you've written that you in terms of the immediate future and impossible recession. You're also keeping your eye on the billions of dollars of cash that these tech companies are sitting on and what they might do with it. Why is it important indicator well. It's very interesting because in the last ten in years wealth has flowed really away from the largest financial institutions and into the tech sector now in in the last couple of years tech has been punished by the trade war but these companies companies are still sitting on record amounts of cash. I'm going to be very interested. If there's a downturn they gonna come in and buy back a lot of their stock or are they going to invest. They really going to help. Bolster the economy that would be a big opportunity for them to score a few political points will run off route har- global business columnist and associate editor at the financial times author of makers and takers how wall wall street destroyed main street and the forthcoming don't be evil. How big tech betrayed its founding principles and all of us when that comes out. Come on back to on point. Okay sure we're well. Thanks for having me thank you. I magnin talk regarding. This is on point..

facebook associate editor
"associate editor" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

04:11 min | 1 year ago

"associate editor" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"Welcome into Friday. President Trump is running for reelection as an outsider candidate, but it's not he challenge for someone who holds the world's most powerful office. That's the take from Nile Stanage, Whitehouse columnist for the hill Nile, how do you see it? Opinion polls. Looks like our number of democratic bits are head to head. Patients really getting the extent to which can still wrong. I'm tired establishment figure. Clearly believed. Earlier this week was very much portraying himself that way in the United States, which is. Usual to proclaim himself cider in. I guess it depends of your definition of outsider two two and a half years into Washington versus some folks who've been there decades. Right. But. How will he position do you think? Position. Bye. Schmidt. I think he believes. Remains. To get them. Property development. He felt they need. Because he was from. So there's an element that is sincere here. But I also think the portrayal of himself. Cider is something that he sees potential dividend from a strategy standpoint. I guess he has to maintain as one person said and your story, the war with the establishment. Trump to be seen, as making nice Washington star Washington per se. Irrespective of their specific ideological. Favor ciders relevant creatures off the establishment. But secondly. Specifically he clearly. Cider as painted themselves. Painted themselves the voice. In his inaugural speech in January twenty seven we're speaking with Nile, Stanage, associate editor and White House columnist for the hill. His piece is called Trump run as an outsider, you said to skeptics point various pieces of evidence that the swamp that he rails against has remained undrained under Mr. Trump explain how. I mean if you look at something like name, which is limited signature policies. Slash the corporate tax rate significant not something that in itself. Working people check into massive corporations. I think so say someone. The EPA. Scandals or controversies. Other issues like for the Trump hotel here in Washington DC, chose drawings consistently. People are staying there are doing so in order to curry favor with the president. Yeah. It was setting your story to that the, the president has a feel more so than others for the cultural moors of blue collar, America. Does he do that? As a as you referenced, you know, billionaire, New York, real estate developer. Great question. The inherent. Because many people as. Tursun bay. Tuesday's before politics. Tower.

President Trump Schmidt Trump Nile Stanage hill Nile Washington president United States Nile Tursun bay White House EPA New York Stanage associate editor America
"associate editor" Discussed on The Poetry Magazine Podcast

The Poetry Magazine Podcast

02:28 min | 2 years ago

"associate editor" Discussed on The Poetry Magazine Podcast

"Lindsay garbage associate editor on the poetry magazine podcast. We discuss a poem or two in the current issue. Randall Horton's most recent books are hook a memoir and pitch dark anarchy originally from Birmingham, Alabama he now resides in east Harlem, and as a member of the experimental performance group heroes are gang leaders, the poem two eight nine one to eight property of the state is part of Horton's next manuscript which addresses, mass incarceration and the criminal Justice system. Hopefully, this sort of asked the question a may once asked a question about like, what do we what is our vision of Justice, really, look like the people who hold the keys have a responsibility to right? So was that responsibility Horton s the reader to examine specifically what's being advocated for when people enter the prison industrial comp. Plex is trying to wrestle with the difficult. This sort of unbelievable in the unimaginable in that. Which is a in cost ration- would be the ways in which we allow the sort of things that go on inside to be normalized as it, and that's part of the punishment to while. The palm draws on experiences in Horton's past the series isn't auto biographical focused was not really about me other than to eight nine once eight was must state prison number in in the Maryland correctional system Horton has to consider in a general sense. When metaphor is used in poetry. And why what this poem tries to get to his leg when it says, he slaves fucking risk many slaves. Fucking risk. Yeah. So it's tragic, you know, sometimes that's what just needs to be said, here's Randall Horton, reading two eight nine one to eight property of the state, or this malice thing never to be confused with Justice. Nothing symbolic. Okay. Dark dark cages cage hunted in hunter of both in the literal. Make believe in. What is do not exist ally? Nothing cryptic here. Okay. Rape. Is rape. Pray Mus pray. No minute in the future safe from quiet insertions of shink in masking tape. Okay. Nothing here infinite only time is constant to the merciful and mercilus. There are no allegories to hide behind. He slit his wrist Meany slid as fucking wrist. Okay..

Randall Horton poetry magazine Rape associate editor Harlem Lindsay Birmingham Alabama Plex Meany Maryland
"associate editor" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

AM 970 The Answer

12:21 min | 2 years ago

"associate editor" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

"Rothman is an associate editor of commentary, but he is the author of unjust, social Justice and the unmaking of American. That's why after Monterey no one. I are open but unjustice first book, and I think done one hundred tweets about unjust, Noah Rochman, welcome. Good morning to you. Thank you so much. Old. I you know, you can't pay for that kind of kind of endorsement and deep insight into the book. I really appreciate you could try and pay me. I mean, I would be okay now, I actually I was on vacation, and I was reading unjust. And I just kept quoting it because it is a it's just a fantastic exploration of the identity and left and the right. And so I stopped Margie Rosh. I was at the national religious broadcasters. Margie is the president of which published it then I stopped. The owner. President Xi of Salem said unjust are sleeper unjust as the best book. I've read in a long time on Justice. Gotta get more advertising. More traction. How's the book doing well? Really? Well. Nobody really knew about it did very well. And you know, we got intention from places that you didn't think you would like MSNBC where I'm a contributor, obviously. But a lot of people in the network wanted to talk about it Bill Maher and win around the country and talked about it. You know, we was expected to be a quick quick of a book, and it had some longevity to it. So that more than I could have ever Margie said, it's got legs. And that means we wanna grow him. I love it. When you go out. You're one of the two people that go into missionary work at MSNBC along with me. And you do morning Joe, which I can't do because I'm on the radio. But I'm always love looking up and seeing you there and debating Eddie, let me get to the book unjust. I want to read from page ninety two perhaps the best description of the identity activists class ethos is collected antipathy to fortune and the fortunate gut that's not a very lofty eat those perhaps, but it is not without philosophical idiological, precedence Rousseau. I would argue a variety of philosophers and theoreticians throughout history dedicated their careers to polishing envy and class. Consciousness until they shine. With a bogus academic luster five check marks two lines. That's my highest in my own little weird. Side notes that paragraph is everything though. Thank you very much. Yes. So there isn't Roca philosophical foundations social Justice that has historical origins. Dating back to the mid nineteenth century, a religious concept, but most academics would consider social Justice role in modern social Justice advocates really have no use for roles. They're much more attracted to a school of philosophical thought. That regard luck and fortune with great hostility. And there is a substantial donation of academic work there to in the basics of sound nation efforts to level societies over the course of history when you start regarding luck and fortune with the sort of disdain in how silly and you get to the effort to level societies which usually manifest downward social level opposed to creating positive opportunities for people who deserve them as individuals. And then you start people not as people, but it's collective classes and tribes avatars roots. And that's. When you do some really terrible things to people need to humanize, and that is ongoing every I gotta warn, you know, we have steel at run Pittsburgh. Right. So you just said Rawls they're trying to think you mispronounced rails. And so we we got full down. We'd say professor roles. We're talking about social Justice while you're blindly put into a state without knowing you create the rules for the state, and then you're put into it. And it's it's a Justice driven theory. It's interesting but on page, forty four you, right? The United States is not a broken society in which the Justice system has become an instrument of indicative unrepresentative government, any assertion to the contrary is a fairytale invented by activists looking to justify their radical program as a moral imperative we know that to be true Noah, but the pushback against you on this particular point, I think has been extreme because it threatens the entire reason for being for the identity and left. Yeah. Make this it's overly academic. It's really really not very much fun exploration of that. I think is pretty silly. And for the most part, but it did go into sort of the academic literature about extrajudicial parallel tracks for Justice, which is what social Justice advocate. They think that the Justice system constructed in America. Unjust because it cannot adjudicate claims to their satisfaction define them to narrowly impose conditions on people that are traumatic heading to confront your accuser court thing, like the constitution or just too much for the social Justice advocate. There are situations where you would need these extrajudicial flora, mostly post conflict societies or post, a revolutionary society and the United States is no such society. It's just not. But that is the conceit that social Justice advocates believe they believe that the of the that arise forever prejudice, racial prejudice. Gender-discrimination? What have you are ongoing indefinite permanent such that you can't have the kind of Justice that you seek in a courtroom, individualize, objective Justice, it must we must more subjective and much more collective and like you said, it's a compete. It's tribunal, Liz. I mean, it is a a threat to the rule of law and this rule of law show. And I spent a lot of time telling people why Mukasey tissue listed why we wanted to be. That way. But it is also a fun book and unjust by you know, the lunch rule Noah. The lunch told me by Frank lunch, and any radio interview, you've got to repeat the term the title of the book unjust at least seven times. And so we've said unjust five times. Now, the by saying just just twice more actually once more than unjust will meet the lunch rule, and the wants role is if you want someone to remember the title of a book, you've got to say it seven times in a radio interview four or five times in television, interviews, fine radio interview. They showed the book, and they can see it. But went on a radio interview that got a here unjust. Here's the fun part. You also take on the alright, and I'm glad you do the all right is a funhouse mirror reflection. I've identity and movements on the left from the darkest corner of the rights online haunts to the Ivy covered halls of academia language that the humanizes political adversaries to picking them as one dimensional creatures of singularly malevolent intent is rampant. It is inevitable that that kind of incitement will yield violence, so a pox on both their houses is in unjust. And it's long overdue. No rodman. Very much reflections of one another because they believe the same thing. They have that this movement has adopted and idea of itself as being a victim classes being oppressed by ill defined unseen forces. That are nevertheless that they must appeal to strong hands to restore that which is do. And that's the tracks of Justice in the system are fundamentally arrayed against them that Eliezer rate against them in a way that requires a sort of evil along revolutionary line, the nurse philosophical background says what they believe is hostile towards democratic for hostile towards the Representative governments that we have developed in this country, the leaves which morning, Eric Socratic sort of sort of belief structure, and and the extent to which these the they speak the same language that use different vocabulary was such that couldn't really overlook it. I mean. I'm glad you did a lot of. Both as a lot of people including me to beginning. Didn't quite know. What? All right meant Ben Shapiro being part of the right because I thought he was edgy and Kirch leaker when they're both friends of mine. But I said because all right and Ben come down on me like a ton of bricks. And so I got I quick education. Not all right. I was thinking. Okay. Edgier more combative conservative. No, it's actually much more nefarious than that. And I wanna go make sure they read from page to five because this is the underlying fundamental truth of unjust come talking with its author. Noah Rothman, those who engaged in violence in two thousand sixteen in two thousand seventeen by the way, that would be on the left and the right we're born in the most fortunate period in the safest and most stable country mankind's ever known they were born into stability and relative prosperity, regardless of their personal circumstances, unless they have migrated from for most of never known organized state-supported political tear, but they have never lies romanticized political violence and to some extent welcomed at now, I read that income. Boda Noah where the commuter ruse forty five years after the fact that fifty years after the fact have left behind decimated country where ideology murdered everyone over forty or fifty everyone wore glasses, everyone who had a college degree in this spasm of Stoep in violence that the all right, and the identity and left seemed to glamorize. Yeah. It's still perverse. Hear them talk about this sort of stuff like it's romantic political violence, and you can just that up to just, you know, being bored and comfortable and an educated perhaps. But what's most is heartening that these fringe movements, and the are French aren't being just just just denounced by the center in this country by the responsible relevant both parties there rather they're being welcomed, or at least Hala rated, and it's stream leading to see these kind of movements that are again, inviting violence, welcoming violence and sometimes practicing in the streets at least talking about it. As though it's a useful political tool in the tool shed, they should be summarily dismissed, but these parties don't seem to have any tools to do that sort of thing. So in the last chapter with me through this book, and you think that this is a problem dressing. I do provide the mechanisms that I hope both parties will appeal to in order to marginalized and stigmatized. Ideas. Maybe not the people who believe in them that certainly their idea. I think someone who's been doing that has been SAS, and I really applaud him on it the bell curve of ideology. America does have a farthest one percent left, and right, and they are outside of the mainstream, and they have to be now I pushed Hillary Clinton when she was on last year. How many white supremacist do you think they are she with less than two hundred thousand? All right. We just did some Matt how many social Justice warriors are genuinely. Sort of crazed and violence oriented in your opinion. Noah rothman. I don't think I could quantify it. But it certainly around that number. It's very small very small, and is is that they're very attractive too much larger much more influential and we can monetize their Craig. I I've seen the antifa in Portland video one hundred times longer watch them because I don't need to see mindless violence on the left or the right period. I think people should not post that stuff because it gives them a sense of satisfaction and accomplishment when they haven't actually satisfied or -ccomplish anything. No last question unjust, social Justice in the unmaking of America. Big first book. What's next? I'm actually working on a second pitch right now, which I very rudimentary idea. But it is about essentially the morality of the marketplace. Now, the marketplaces the most moral the most moral institution that has ever been created for interesting. The kind of problems that Democrats and liberals believe needs to be addressed the prominent inequality of poverty, the environment and the marketplace of ideas, stigmatizing ideas that are intolerable desire over every alternative. They've created. These problems has failed everything. Well, that sounds good. But spend more time promoting on Josh social Justice in the unmaking of America. Yeah. We're going to sell sell sell and come back on here. And just talk it going on MSNBC keep debating, Eddie. You gotta go out in the country on a tour because it's a great conversation. But as a great book, congratulations on it. No Rodman, and everyone I sent it out again on Twitter. All you have to do is remember unjust and go to Amazon and find no Rodman. Thank you know, America to. Hold up. My relief factor dot.

Noah Rothman MSNBC Boda Noah America Margie Rosh United States rodman Noah Rochman Eddie Bill Maher Monterey President Xi Pittsburgh president Ben Shapiro associate editor Salem Rousseau Joe
"associate editor" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

12:29 min | 2 years ago

"associate editor" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Associate editor at the Washington Post and author of separate the story of plus the Ferguson and America's journey from slavery. Segregation, Steve welcome to. Thanks, bob. Glad to be here. The term separate but equal never actually appeared in the decision. But the case and your book hinge on that idea because in Louisiana as would be the case throughout the south as Jim crow evolved, railroads were permitted to divide the races in separate cars. And this is the reaction in part to reconstruction. And the three reconstruction amendments that expand equal rights provide citizenship for blacks ensure equal protection voting rights. There's a resistance to that among whites in the south who've lost political power lost economic power separate, but equal does not appear in decision as you. You pointed out it does appear in the descent, but it becomes the phrase that the supreme court uses in nineteen fifty four in the Brown decision. And that's how we regard the shorthand today to the particulars of the case. The plaintiff Homer Plessey wasn't some random victim of segregation. Like, Rosa Parks, nearly a century later. He was handpicked for the role and the circumstances were engineered for an arrest. Well, they were trying to create the Plessey team down in New Orleans, which is where the case comes from it isn't unusual city every shade of the spectrum under the sun is there and the group that brings it as a group of mixed race French-Speaking often Creoles that means native born frustrated after more than a century of trying to get their rights. Most of them have never been enslaved. Their parents were enslaved their grandparents were enslaved, and they feel that their best argument is to throw some confusion at the court in part. Plus is. Fair skinned enough to pass for white or to cause that confusion. And so they want to be able to argue that the laws that enforceable. It doesn't define white. It doesn't define mixed race. And so therefore, how can you possibly enforce this law when many people riding the trains in Louisiana are of indeterminate race the case. Was the culmination of decades of activism legislation. The first of those cases is in eighteen forty one in Massachusetts when a slightly built black New York abolitionist named David Ruggles. Decides to bring assault charge against the conductor who tries to separate him at a Massachusetts railroad he loses, but he establishes a very important principle, which is that we can go into court to pursue grievances. Eighteen ninety two they know they're probably going to lose. And yet this is a group of fighters, and they're not going to sit by and take it without bringing in their case. Well, there's no need to withhold the ending of this story that decision was catastrophic for blacks in American society as a whole an utter repudiation of civil rights and an assault on the basic humanity of African Americans and opening the door to other statutes other states an acting separate. Nation laws to separate waiting rooms separate bathrooms separate water, fountains. All of this was intimidated by the only the center in the case, John Marshall Harlan of Kentucky southerner from a slaveholding family. And he says this is what's going to happen. He doesn't predict those specific conditions. But he does talk about separate juries or separate courthouses. And he says this day will one day be regarded as shameful as dread, Scott. That's the ruling before the civil war that blacks free or not could not be citizens. Now, this was the nineteenth century newspapers were wholly aligned and allied with political parties, the Whigs the know nothings, the Democrats, the Republicans the by the way, the Democrats and Republicans kind of flip flop from how we know them today the legality of slavery the path toward the terms of reconstruction. They were all litigated by a highly partisan press. No, absolutely. That's why you have newspapers remaining today that are called the Springfield Republican or the Arkansas democrat where they began as alliances with political parties, and nobody thought that was very unusual reporting in the early part of the century and through probably eighteen eighty or ninety was almost non-existent. It was frustrating for me as a researcher to be reading these newspaper accounts. And they have a lot of opinions and hot air. But they don't have a lot of facts a prefect society wasn't fake news. It was pre- news faction. No facts. It is shocking. How vital appreciative how nakedly racist? The democratic press was particularly in the south well white superiority as opposed to white supremacy, which is also a part of this century is rampant than they reflected that in their newspaper articles in their letters in their conversation. White supremacy does come out of the loss of economic and political power after the civil war which gives rise to the fear and anger that creates the klu Klux Klan in eighteen sixty seven in Tennessee in that it spreads to the other in southern states and violence underpins this era from the eighteen seventies all the way through the mid twentieth century where lynching becomes a way to settle issues that the whites feel that they've lost the political power in the economic power and the press reflects that to read the book because it focuses on. On contemporaneous coverage. You would think that race was like the number one trending story for sixty years. But after all of this foment, you know to say, the very least by the time the ruling came in on Plessey, the press was kind of a wall. The coverage of the decision that would have such brutal ramifications for the site. It was barely even mentioned was it just race fatigue. Well, they're talking about the white press. Remember, you use the term mainstream before the white press saw this as an expected decision winter Jay the lawyer for Plessey showed up from western New York in Washington to give the oral argument, the Washington Post, my newspaper covered it with a column called capital chat in which they said that Jay who had written a novel called a fool's errand about reconstruction south was another fool's errand by trying to litigate this case that everybody knew was going to end with the supreme court ruling in favor of separation. They were right. So in terms of the way, the press operates, what's the news here where there's not a lot of news. So we're not going to give it great attention. The press on the other hand in the Richmond planet says that after this ruling evil days are indeed upon us Albion jai, the lawyer and judge and novelist and newspaper columnist was one of the hero. Does of your story. Another was the author of the sole dissenting opinion on Plessey Justice, John Marshall, Harlan known as the great dissenter. Here's one line from his dissent. Our constitution is color blind. And neither knows nor tolerates classes among citizens in respect of civil rights. All citizens are equal before the law. The humblest is the peer of the most powerful Marshall was from Kentucky former slave owner. A former opponent of the reconstruction laws, and he at the time deemed to punitive to the south. But obviously transformed how well it's a remarkable transformation of very hopeful one because it shows that somebody can hold despicable views and then abandoned him, and he does so forthrightly. I don't have any doubt about the genuineness of his transformation. He was a pro slavery candidate for congress at the age of twenty five. Five and eighteen fifty nine he comes from a slaveholding family. But he does raise a union regiment in eighteen sixty one because he believes that the union needs to be preserved both north and south. But he states that he's not going to fight a war against slavery. By the eighteen sixty eight period, Theus, changes mine, and partly it's politically driven. He has no home. You can't believe that. He he should belong to the Democratic Party, which is filled with ex angry confederates who've lost the war and had tried to accomplish by the ballot box with they couldn't accomplish by the war. And so he joins the Republican party that anti-slavery party, and he turns his eyes toward Washington because as a man who wants to make his Mark in the world and ambitious man. It's the only way that he can see that. He's going to have position that's going to give him some influence. Any fortunately is nominated to the coordinating seventy seven, but Steve wanna take note of that phrase in his dissent, equal before the law. Neither Harlan nor any of the advocates black or white who devoted their lives to equal rights are ever heard in your book, espousing, what was called social equality, the ideas that blacks and whites. It's would ever mingle. Well, even Harland in his dissent says that the white racists superior to the black race and will be for all time as long as it continues to respect the idea that everyone is equal before the law. That's an odd way to go after a quality. I think but it reflects the the attitudes of the time and in his arguments, he has quite inventive argument. Which is that your race races your property, and if you could pass for white and white is a better economic position to be black. How can you be prevented from trying to exploit that reputation and robbery and be denied it without due process? Now, if you think about that, it's a terrible argument because it means if they win that there could be a car a railroad car with white and mixed race passengers but still a separate car for those people who can't pass for white. So I tried to wrestle with this. Why would they make that argument and the answer I think is pretty odd. Obvious. He wants to win. And he sees these supreme court justices men of privilege and class who regard property rights as paramount. And so he's giving them a property right argument. I mentioned that the press in institution operated quite differently. And the eighteen fifties than it does today and a lot of the adequacy was basic crusading. It was constant coverage beating the same drum over and over and over sometimes for decades as a modern journalist did that make you feel at all queasy, or did you kind of long for the days when a news organization would put all of its reputation behind an ideal. I think I saw it just didn't its own context is being different. I mean, you have newspaper in Massachusetts, the liberator, which is the arm of the abolition movement of the Massachusetts anti slavery society every week. It's hammering on the issues that matter to that organization. It's a storehouse of information about the times, it's not objective reporting. But I can handle that I wouldn't want to necessarily work in that environment. But if I were living in the eighteen thirties and forties. Maybe I would have who knows. What do the media tend to miss now when we talk about plus Ferguson? They often say that the supreme court has created the doctrine of separate but equal and made it the law of the land. Well, I would argue that it didn't create the doctrine it's been a foot in the country for sixty years supreme court is endorsing it. But more importantly what we do. And we say the supreme court created is we're kind of giving the rest of the country a pass. This is the shame of the north the shame of the south the shame of all of us. It's not proper delay. It only at the feet of the supreme court. Steve. Thank you very much. Well, thanks, bud. Steve Luxembourg is an associate editor at the Washington.

supreme court John Marshall Harlan Massachusetts Washington Louisiana Homer Plessey Washington Post Steve Ferguson Associate editor John Marshall New York Kentucky Rosa Parks bob New Orleans
"associate editor" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

06:28 min | 2 years ago

"associate editor" Discussed on 600 WREC

"Memphis morning news. We're getting it done on a soggy Friday, high back into the sixties. We have forty eight right now. Excuse me, fifty eight degrees, or as my brother says, there is no excuse for you. Tim fifty degrees. Some fog little bit of light rain. Megan Nichols joins us seven forty five. She's associate editor of the Memphis business journal, and we'll have a chat with her about what's happening around town coming up in about thirty minutes. But right now in less than thirty seconds. We'll be joined by the esteemed host of the Andrew Clarke senior show heard right here. Live on Saturdays at noon. Tackling national and local headlines, it's our friend. Andrew Clarke senior good morning, sir. It's great to have you back on the program with some warmer weather, and it's nice to be dawn out for change. What's going on Andrew? He's going to be a good show. You guys are doing. Well, like you always do and tomorrow. We gotta talk about city council. The charter school issue. The governor the governor was out of university of Memphis, and he spoke to us spoke to the state we want to find out what I what listeners think about that in all that that entail, Andrew del. Now, the governor promised I think doubling the amount of money to be put toward charter schools. Is that the number the am I recalling that correctly? You are you are in B to. But the question is what you're going to get the money. And you know, this is the beginning of of his first term everybody is on his on his side. And you can't get the money. It sets free Texas. It just opens up the door to other other things. But I honestly wish you well. I hope he can get it done. What did you think about Tammy Sawyer? Tossing her hat in the ring yesterday to try to be the next Memphis mayor. She certainly has the right mysterious started out as a community activists allow voice a lot of demonstrations to where credit she has form community bonds, and she. Following it? Now, she's on the county commission. I just don't see her as being the mayor. But she's certainly welcome to try. I don't think it'll be. Oh, I did. You're absolutely right. She's welcome to try. But I I mean, I kinda I'm with you. And if anything I'm just hesitant right now. Just because and look, and I know she's been a community activists, and she was very vocal in the the statue take down and was seen a lot by the TV cameras, but only in elected office as a Shelby county Commissioner for a handful of months, it almost makes me wonder if she's doing this to kind of test the political waters in really gained some experience to try to make another run here. Maybe in a few years after getting a little more experience on the commission, or I don't think there's any question about it to me is too soon. But you know, what we say? Let's do this do that Brighton. She has the experience in this attack on her. She's outgoing she she's got a strong following. And as I said before I wish you well. I don't see it happening. No. I I don't see her beating strictly for her. Andrew Clarke senior joining us here on Memphis morning news. I, you know, I just not an expert on local politics. I try to kind of keep an ear to what's going on. But when it comes to analysis, I leave that to the experts, and I know you have seen and you've talked to a lot of people Andrew. Could this simply be something as simple as a basically a dry run for twenty twenty three? It's like what have I got to lose to run this time? Let me just see what my base is right now before I've even got much experience. I think you've assessed that quite properly one intellectualize it. It'd be very she cannot win. She's an unknown quantity in terms of can she govern? And she gets policies change. Can't you do this? Can't you do that? She doesn't have that base. But again, I wish you well. But I don't see any. I don't see anybody being Strickland right now. He's he's strong. Andrew what else are you looking at discussing tomorrow on the program and we've got charter schools, and you're talking about the the mayor's race is. Well, what what else do you see being a big topic tomorrow during your to our broadcast? I like the fact that the governor wants wants criminal reform much like what the president is done. To to govern at least early in his campaign. He pushed that so I won't see these concrete things come to to to reality. But I really am. I'm definitely gonna talk about. A second chance like Harrington head because governor said there's something he believes him. All right, Andrew. Hey, thank you so much for joining us on Memphis morning news, the program, the Andrew Clarke senior show tomorrow at noon, and sometimes if you're lucky enough, and you pay close enough attention. You may hear his voice during the Ben Ferguson show from time to time as well. So thank you for waking up with us this morning and giving us a few minutes of your time. And we look forward to you provide us some great live talk radio tomorrow starting at noon. Absolutely. Have a good day. Thank you. All right. There's our pal Andrew. And so it charter charter schools. I I'll be interested in I'll tune in tomorrow just to hear the discussion about that. Because that does present itself as a complex issue in regards to who's pushing back because you find that the public school systems are pushing back against charter schools, the teachers unions. I've seen in headlines have provided some pushback as well saying that the public school system can't afford to have money shifted from its school system to charter schools. So to hear Andrew's taken to hear what the people are saying is going to be fascinating tomorrow, and that all starts at noon right here on six hundred E C ninety two point one FM coming up. Megan Nichols says the associate editor at Memphis business journal. She'll join us at seven forty five and she'll have several stories to talk about. And oftentimes she'll have a story a few days before most of the mainstream catches up to it. So get ahead of the curve for their pal Meghan right here. Coming up in about twenty three minutes. It is.

Andrew Andrew Clarke Memphis Memphis business journal Megan Nichols university of Memphis associate editor Andrew del Tim Shelby county Tammy Sawyer Ben Ferguson Texas Meghan Brighton Strickland E C Harrington
"associate editor" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

06:28 min | 2 years ago

"associate editor" Discussed on 600 WREC

"Associate editor of the Memphis business journal, our friend Megan Nichols. Megan. Thanks for joining us. How are you? A hope you are thawing out like the rest of us doing well. Good morning guys. Yeah. It's great to have you back on the program. Okay. Big announcement from Electrolux that seems to be making all the headlines what's going on with Electrolux? Yeah. So this is certainly the big headline. Yesterday was news that the Electrolux Memphis plan is going to be closing in twenty twenty so at its peak plant employed more than a thousand people currently has about five hundred and thirty employees locally, but the company is apparently consolidating its cooking products appliances business to Springfield, Tennessee. And it's going to be reinvesting in that plant Electrolux has previously stated how about ten percent of its North America revenue came from a Sears, essentially, so Sears bankruptcy has certainly had a negative impact. But Electrolux received a significant amount of incentives for its Memphis facility. So still lots of questions that need to be answered. But there were apparently not clawback provision for those incentives. So currently the state in Shelby county remain on the hook for a lot of that original investment to get them here. Now, meghan. I know what a clawback is. But for those that may not know in our audience. What does it clawback when it comes to a pilot? So essentially, it's if they were to leave before the pilot wants to expire, there'd be some provision where the incentives, and they might have to pay back where they then send it to be called off. So you kind of it's a safety net for our investment. But that was not in that contract. No, we're going to have to wait and see on this one. Oh, I wonder if that was a cut and paste wonder about that Meghan Nichols associated or the Memphis business journal joining us this morning. Other big company news FedEx retirement age. I changed their. Yes. So there's two kind of things that came from the board of directors this week with FedEx, I other notable news was Dave bronze Accu the president CEO. Fedex just was elected to the company's board of directors. So that decision is effective immediately. But the board also announced changes to the company's corporate government guidelines so previously. There was a mandatory retirement age for seventy five years old now that age requirement only applies to nonmanagement directors. Fred Smith is currently seventy four years old. So that's the adjustment in that rule. It'd be yeah. It'd be kind of weird to boot the founder of the company. Yeah. Meghan Clark tower getting a new tenant. Yeah. So little headquarter relocation news true. Temper sports is getting ready to move its headquarters to Clark tower. So true temper, which is one of the leading manufacturers of golf shafts is currently headquartered out and turnament drive in Southwind, but they're going to be moving to Clark tower in east Memphis, the company said they wanted to be in the heart of the city, rather than the suburbs. And that's kind of a larger plan to grow their local employees account by fifteen to twenty percent in the next couple of years. They wanted to space it would help attract some new talent. So that's supposed to be built out this spring, and they'll be moving in shortly after that. So I guess a warning into be careful for folks over at the Lenny's and over at the vitamin Shoppe and Home Depot if they start testing drivers on top Clark tower could be a problem across right? Four five six seven and eight you're hitting it off a Clark tower. Megan Nichols, the associated or Memphis business journal checking in with us this morning, Pyros one of my favorite pizza places in town. They've they branch out to not just hot food but cold to. Yeah. So little food update. The owners behind Pyros who also own Levy coffee and creamery recently opened their second coffee and ice cream shops. That's located over in the mixed-use Highland road development right by the university of Memphis. You might remember we talked about this a while ago and plans first came out, but they had some slight delays. But they are now officially open, and we have some photos of their new space on our website and check out very good as a subscriber to the Memphis journal. Now, you've got some big things coming up this week for those that have not subscribed or or getting ready to check that out. What have you got coming up? So we have a cover story this week called it. Welcome to Motown. It looks at how mayor Strickland plans to capitalize on the city's momentum. And we also have our. Annual special report this week on education called top honors. You can find that at Memphis business journal dot com. Terrific follow her at 'em BJ Nichols for the top stories of the week in fact throughout the week. You can you can get a heads up on what's going on around town. Megan. Thank you for joining us on. Memphis morning news. Have a great weekend. Do you have a Super Bowl pick, by the way? Oh, gotta go with the patriots. I I think you had a certain kickers jersey on earlier this week. I did you gotta stay with your fellow university of Memphis alumni. Yeah. Absolutely. All right. Then patriots. It is have a good weekend. Megan thanks for joining us. Thank all, right. That and get 'em BJ Nichols. You can follow her on Twitter, by the way. Congratulations. I know. Memphis, ninety one F C has has acquired Marc Burch who is a Major League Soccer veteran player played with Tim Howard. It's Colorado Rapids and also Minnesota United among other teams. He is going to be the team's first captain when they kick off. Can you believe it? You can actually now say they will kick off the regular season. The first game in gosh, what thirty eight thirty nine years next month. They do have some preseason games coming up and they'll play university of Memphis next weekend. But congratulations to Memphis, not one AFC for finding their captain. Also, Memphis, express kicks off in kosh, Sherry, can you believe football in Memphis kicks. Off in about nine days. Memphis express will be in town at the liberty ball kicking off. They jump right into that alliance of American football season. That's that's crazy crazy in a good way. It's nice that we've we've got something going on around town but Super Bowl coming up on CBS on Sunday. In the meantime, tiger hoops tomorrow. Eleven o'clock tip off ten o'clock pre-game right on six hundred W R, E C and ninety two point one FM as warmer. Temperatures are here who I it has been a long long week. We were at twenty one twenty two degrees yesterday morning. But now now we're in the upper forties. And by the time we get into early next week. High temperatures will be near seventy. I don't know about sinus sufferers. I don't know how you.

Memphis Memphis business journal Megan Nichols Electrolux university of Memphis Electrolux Memphis Memphis journal Clark tower Meghan Clark tower Meghan Nichols FedEx meghan patriots Shelby county Associate editor Sears North America Springfield Pyros
"associate editor" Discussed on MSNBC Morning Joe

MSNBC Morning Joe

04:38 min | 2 years ago

"associate editor" Discussed on MSNBC Morning Joe

"Certainly they'd be impeachable offenses because even though they were committed before the president became president. They were committed in in the service of fraudulently obtaining, the office ten thousand protesters on the streets. Harrison lockdown a police crackdown. A thousand arrests shot the start of a revolution. She as a result. If we went ahead and held the votes tomorrow. The deal would be Richard significant. Wow. Talk of presidential impeachment in America, Paris in flames and Brexit deal ripping Europe to pieces as Richard Haass frames? It a bad day in politics for what we used to call the west welcome to morning Joe on this Tuesday. December eleventh Joe is off today, but with Willie and may we have MSNBC contributor, Mike barnicle, associate editor of commentary magazine and MSNBC contributor, Noah Rothman, Republican strategist and MSNBC political analysts Susan Dell purse yo president of the council on foreign relations and author of the book a world in disarray. And boy does it seem to be Richard Haass Pulitzer prize winning columnist and associate editor for the Washington Post and MSNBC political analyst Eugene Robinson is with us as well. And richard. Let's go right. There are all these crises if you could speak to them are they one offs or are. They worldwide populism still burning. I wish they were one offs meek. But at the risk is starting people's day on Downer before they've had their second Cup of coffee. This is now part of the new normal. You've got populism of the left. We're seeing that in France real concerns about inequality making ends meet. You've got politics the right against immigration over cultural anxiety, and then against a backdrop as I said what we used to call the west no consensus and not a lot of will on how to organize the world. She had this all up the domestic challenges against authority, a lack of international cooperation I'd ever thought when I wrote a book, but with the word, disarray, and the title, I would be an optimist, and guess what things have turned out worse than we thought. Really? Predicting quite a is there a way out for Macron? And may looking forward look in the long run. There's way out. There's nothing about this. That's inevitable. Wasn't inevitable. We'd get to where we are. It's not enough things are bad. But we yesterday. We didn't see the way out we saw retreat or capitulation in France. That's not going to be enough for those with the yellow vests. There's no way to clearly pay for it. Rigs there's zero consensus on what the next step ought to be no matter what's decided you've got a truly divided country. And a big part of it is also on us. The United States is the principal architect of the world order for the last three quarters of a century. We would the principal supporter. And now you've got the United States rather than supporting order and the world is we've known it. We've now become the principal. Disruptor. There's no one to take our place. So they'll China is very happy to eat our lunch. This is a bad combination. It's tumultuous and we're going to dig much deeper into what's going on in Europe coming up at now to what's happening here at home, some top Republicans are dismissing the allegations that Donald Trump directed. His former fixer Michael Cohen to make illegal hush money payments to two women during the two thousand sixteen campaign when asked if he had any concerns Senator Orrin Hatch told CNN and the democ. Kratz will do anything to hurt this president? When he was told the allegations came from the southern district of New York hatch said, okay, but I don't care all I can say is he's doing a good job as president hatch was asked whether he was concerned about the allegations. And he said, no because I don't think he was involved in crimes, but even then, you know, you can make anything a crime under the car all my he's turning into Trump. Honestly, these people are turning into Trump. If you want want to you can blow it way out of proportion. You can do a lot of things Louisiana Senator John Kennedy told NBC news, let me say this about Mr. Cohen Jesus loves him. But everyone else thinks he's an idiot. I think most Americans think he's asleep. Void Griff daughter. I can't imagine. Basing any kind of prosecution on the word of Mr. Cohen, Senate Judiciary chairman Chuck Grassley, also dismissed the allegations telling CNN they based on what a liar..

president Senator Orrin Hatch Mr. Cohen Jesus Richard MSNBC principal Donald Trump United States Joe Downer Europe France Richard Haass Richard Haass Pulitzer Senator John Kennedy associate editor Harrison Kratz CNN
Outraged by Woodward book, Trump comments on libel laws

Afternoon News with Tom Glasgow and Elisa Jaffe

03:19 min | 2 years ago

Outraged by Woodward book, Trump comments on libel laws

"Certainly plenty of buzz surrounding the upcoming release of Bob Woodward's book that offers an inside look at the Trump White House. In fact, it generated a recent conversation between Woodward and the president name sources, I've been naming the people are just say, you know, people have said I'd say two days following happened. Everyone including yourself. Quoted with the book fear Trump in the White House do out on the eleventh and excerpts already made public. The president is suggesting that libel laws be changed political reporter John Wagner wrote about this for his publication, the Washington Post, and he joins us on the KOMO Newsline. John, we appreciate your time very much. Thanks for having me before we get to this specific issue of libel laws. I wanna talk about someone who obviously is a major influence on your newsroom, and that's Bob Woodward as associate editor at the post, can you give people. An idea exactly what goes into his books. This is not the first one. He's written about a White House in terms of sourcing. Putting it all together before it is made available to the public. You're right. It's certainly not the first one he has written about presidents dating back to Richard Nixon and pretty much everyone in between now up until Donald Trump. The method generally uses is called deep background. He will talk to sources within and around the administration under condition that he can use their material. But most often they are not named. So that gets people to open up a little bit more, his interviews or can taped. So there is a record of everything that is said and from that that really becomes the source material for the book, I just wanted to provide that background because in one of those recorded conversations, we just heard a portion of the president actually praised Mr. Woodward. And of course, that tone has changed since yesterday in those excerpts came out in regards to libel laws. What exactly is the president saying? Tweet this. He said the same article or. Totally make up stories and quoting him here. Now for a picture of a person that is literally the exact opposite of the fact get away with it without your cost. Then he goes on to say, why Washington politicians libel laws? It's an interesting question because otherwise they're actually crafted at the state level, and he doesn't seem to be. You're interested in changing what happens in state legislature? So quickly. This course of action he's actually recommending so on a on a practical front. This is seems to be much more wish than reality. I think that's right. Very similar back in. Michael Wolff, fire and fury came out that also the unflattering picture of the White House, John Wagner. Good enough to join us political reporter with the

Bob Woodward Trump White House John Wagner President Trump Washington Post Donald Trump Komo Tommy John Washington Shannon O'donnell Reporter Mariners Seattle Baseball Mike Leake Earl Thomas Richard Nixon Denver Michael Wolff
"associate editor" Discussed on The NBA Show

The NBA Show

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"associate editor" Discussed on The NBA Show

"Hello and welcome to the ringer nba show my name is danny show i'm an associate editor at the ringer dot com joining me here in the los angeles studio is a man whose voice is way less digitized in real life staff writer jonathan sharks it's funny ko see left like a day i came he had to get out of here real quick we can't be in the same room i don't think it's a sliding door situation yeah as you can probably tell this is not draft class are fearless host kevin o'connor is somewhere out there in chicago nba draft combine probably lost in mobile seven ten wingspan sponsored by hitting the streets i think that's his thing nonetheless this is going to be a really cool episode later in the program we will have a special interview by hall of fame center shaquille o'neal and indiana pacers all star victor ola depot but first since there are two thirds of the nba draft class podcast here we want free force if you count producer is yeah isaac of course we wanted to talk a little bit about the draft we had some time to digest the lottery results and we have some thoughts on the top three i think the one thing that most fans listening are wondering right now is what do we need to know about luke donshik i think a lot of people have kind of read the scouting reports get the gist of who he is a player you know he's six eight to twenty to thirty to twenty eight yeah best passer in the draft but charts you've been doing a pretty deep dive on him recently you you have a piece going up on friday about look don rich in the running up of his final four appearance in the early which is also friday yep so yeah what's turned up in your research what are they called nfl draft twitter i've been eating tape recently grinding tape it's actually been really fun so luca place for real madrid one of the top teams in europe they're playing the early final foreign friday they use them lively different roles they just want their best of five series against panathinaikos where he was been guard by the nas anadarko and it's fun to watch us place or so many rand.

associate editor kevin o'connor producer europe nba los angeles staff writer jonathan sharks chicago shaquille o'neal indiana victor ola don rich nfl rand
"associate editor" Discussed on MSNBC Morning Joe

MSNBC Morning Joe

02:28 min | 3 years ago

"associate editor" Discussed on MSNBC Morning Joe

"Right i had nothing on that i know associate editor for the washington post david ignatius who really does regret being here thank you thank you and pulitzer prize winning historian jon meacham there we go he can explain the fish seed and give us some boring perspective on everything oh okay so just how chaotic was yesterday john talk john you know no no no no no i wanna i wanna practice discipline to try to keep meco awake on it go john tyler john tyler once very important about just fell asleep okay let me give you the list and then you can give us the perspective i president trump fires his secretary of state on twitter then that's just stop right there for a moment and pause then he fires one of rex tillerson's top staffers who called the white house story into question after that we learned that one of the president's closest aides who reportedly is under investigation for serious financial crimes was escorted off the white house grounds but he quickly landed a new gig with the president's reelection campaign halfway house and the news we just reported moments ago isn't going to give the white house much of a lift this morning a democrat is now the apparent winner of that special election in pennsylvania where republicans have held power for fifteen years he's been up all night following western pennsylvania special congressional election and steve what a shock i mean this is a district republicans won by thirty six points in two thousand ten one by twenty eight points in two thousand twelve unopposed fourteen and sixteen this is about as deep red as it gets donald trump won by twenty points just eighteen months ago but you have some pretty surprising news yeah i mean look we are declaring connor lamb the democrat the apparent winner here in the eighteenth district of pennsylvania we can get into that wording in just a second exactly why it's put that way but basically what you're sitting at looking here looking at here is a six hundred and forty one vote margin currently four lamb.

pennsylvania steve white house david ignatius washington connor lamb donald trump republicans associate editor financial crimes president rex tillerson twitter john tyler jon meacham pulitzer prize eighteen months fifteen years
"associate editor" Discussed on 790 KABC

790 KABC

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"associate editor" Discussed on 790 KABC

"Five two twotiered near moments we're going to bring our friend now stanage it here associate editor of the hill the congressman japie lawmaker uh he's named paul go sargodha served who's taking the position that undocumented immigrants at the state of the union should be arrested that's debts conciliatory this striking conciliaory tone for unity of this union ah eight i'm not so sure in that country together tone we wanted to go out with again the number here is eight hundred two two two five two two two she lawrence watt i'm dr grew this midday live and he is nial stanage now up to the program good to be here while we're quite well appreciate you joining us so where shall we start shall we start with the state of the union or should we start with a memo well i think we should start with the state of the union from them to do that still at tonight is a big night for president trump and we can expect that he will be congratula leading himself as he typically does on on all of his accomplishments this year and with the economy uh doing pretty well that's a pretty big accomplishment that of many americans are enjoying but what else will he be taught tides that or will he bring up anything that is an early early parl odd lord's question of say how will this conciliatory tone be straw was you're gonna do to bring partisanship closer to its could not do it in the closer delivered well i guess one of the things that that you can look for some topic on which there might be some kind of a potential for bipartisan agreement one of the more likely scenarios in that respect is infrastructure spending i mean there isn't really an ideological divide over the need to how the rules that can be potholed and bridges to collapse so that could be one of possibility you mentioned in your introduction uh both of you the immigration question that's a much more difficult needle to thread but as lawrence at he'd be spending a lot of.

associate editor congressman paul lawrence watt president
"associate editor" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

02:36 min | 3 years ago

"associate editor" Discussed on The Takeaway

"That combined with travel costs getting to the is specialized centres will likely add to the final price of the therapy that's something patient advocates are also concerned about the four hundred and seventy five thousand dollar price tag for this therapy is probably not going to be the bottom line cost of getting treated emily moen associate editor for biomedicine at mit technology review thanks emily thank you they take away is supported by staples offering technology solutions for businesses from laptops and tablets to smartphones and including tech services like set up repair and tech security more at staples and staples dot com staples it's pro time you are listening to the take away from wnyc an pri public radio international in collaboration with wgbf h radio in boston whether it's dental care or medical services access is about a lot more than having insurance it can also be about poverty or age or even geography according to the robert wood johnson foundations county health rankings in 2016 nearly one out of five rural counties has experienced worsening premature death rates over the past decade maggie yellow elwani is a government affairs in policy vice president at the national rural health association and she says rural america is experiencing a health crisis would i wanna point out israeli there is an onslaught of chronic problems that is really becoming overwhelming enroll america we have an escalation of chronic disease chronic poverty you know we declared a war on poverty fifty years ago um and those poorest counties in the country were that warren poverty was declared are still fifty years later the poorest counties in the country we have chronic workforce shortages and now we have a whirl hospital closure crisis to maggie it's been known for a long time that in many many different health indicators people just don't fear as well in rural areas is in the cities and there are a lot of reasons behind that do you have evidence that lack of access to hospitals is is driving a worsening trend lately oh there's absolutely many many different studies on that are showing the widening gap of worse health outcomes are growing in rural america the centers for disease control and.

boston vice president america emily moen associate editor mit technology robert wood johnson foundation warren fifty years seventy five thousand dollar
"associate editor" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

WLS-AM 890

01:37 min | 3 years ago

"associate editor" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

"Of symbolically saying i've had it but it doesn't really change things unless the congress suddenly tries to make a new rondo and i just don't see it in the carts yeah i'm we're going to talk a little bit later on about tax reform which is obviously the the intense in almost sole focus of republicans at this point to try and get something done racing with just a handful of days left in legislative calendar to get something done before the end of the year it's hard to imagine that they could set that aside in and do something on this anytime anytime soon sl tom in the thing is there watching their back you know a lot of people a lot of members are facing um deadlines mid december four for primaries for challengers to to register as candidates to run again that money or are they going to be really worrying about you know the iran deal and dhaka before christmas i highly doubt it all right we gotta leave it there ab started associate editor for regular politics thanks for joining me thank you with a quick break when we get back we will have kaitlan he'd be burns our national political reporter on the scene to talk about what the democrats are doing and also some of these political races that have bubbled up to the surface 2018 is underway folks stick around we'll be right back after these words blowers kossov health insurance only the beginning sabotage he would care to see uniform california critical fire stations and winds the news bottom of every hour as an embarrassment this month still he.

congress christmas associate editor reporter health insurance california iran dhaka
"associate editor" Discussed on KBNP AM 1410

KBNP AM 1410

02:43 min | 3 years ago

"associate editor" Discussed on KBNP AM 1410

"Planning in analyzing over the show at ccri you ski columnist an associate editor of rizala magazine he's also way off on former fox business network producer we judge andrew napolitano great to have you back yet how are you today uh are we lost that crease cuba we should get back your learn very quickly um anyway what we have gone before us is sort of a meeting of the head scratcher says oh what is wrong with this guy i mean kim jong on you know commenting on the set on the sanity of anybody thing about it young on commenting on the sanity of anybody is a bit like michael moore uh lecturing others on their obesity no you can't be the embodiment of the very thing you criticising and still be taken seriously and it what we have assisting in the opening an analyzing i understand we do have back was ed you ski columnist an associate editor of the result a magazine again he's also former fox business network producer with judge andrew napolitano ed good to have you back how i felt only the wider great having a listen phnom we referenced trump threatening north korea only if north korea were to attack us or our allies and now kim jong on is reacting to that warning is if it were tantamount to a unilateral threat with no foundation or is this just another example of functional illiteracy but merely in another language your take i might europe during hour about michael horii in order kony quick do miami copy were come on i think we're talked bigger on the menu light went on you're very good joe you know we talk about or all carpet on trump is doing it articulating that your structurally come on harel going to happen it more career tied blunted new oppor we became ability would grow the political will dumping about it it the by usually talking with them that prompted nuclear during the cold war in repairing except return to for sale secondly period really really heartening well they're saying that by doing this he's only making things worse instead of calming things down uh that would presume that the a policies that we've applied in the past where it concerns north korea have ever demonstrated any efficacy it's as if like you know are ongoing some foreign policy or at least.

michael horii europe fox foreign policy cold war harel joe miami kony associate editor north korea trump michael moore kim jong cuba andrew napolitano producer rizala magazine
"associate editor" Discussed on Bill O'Reilly's Free Podcast

Bill O'Reilly's Free Podcast

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"associate editor" Discussed on Bill O'Reilly's Free Podcast

"I don't wanna bring in peter hassen associate editor of the daily caller who has researched some of these far left pressure groups of first of all my comments leading up to you peter that i make any mistakes no okay so let's now give the folks some information some factual information on the farleft how many groups would you say are threatening sponsors and politicians right now loop failed say at least a dozen in ah is spear headed by a in the two groups you name on color change on it in a ed matters released as part of broader stretch routed yom elapsed to kind of around the people and just fled the plug uh by going after these corporations telling them we're going to tarnish your brand were going to do our job we're going to portray all of you guys you know bashes if you continue to support uh whether it's you or whether it's sean hannity aura were even if it's setting up rnc iii basically threatening visa yet or trading them with economic influence right so media matters might tell the folks about because that's the most powerful one telephoto about them gets so day um are of very very very well funded activist group the left whose entire purpose is to silence conservative voices um and so at the moment through one of the group says currently doing everything they can to get sean hannity taken off air um ended they do this by uh by smearing hoststate do this by up.

associate editor sean hannity peter hassen