3 Burst results for "assistant professor of neurology"

"assistant professor neurology" Discussed on GSMC Health and Wellness Podcast

GSMC Health and Wellness Podcast

03:43 min | 11 months ago

"assistant professor neurology" Discussed on GSMC Health and Wellness Podcast

"Talk to your doctor now that also makes me think about folks who are transitioning especially folks who are transitioning from male to female. So, there was a recent study in the Netherlands that found in the male to female transgender population about twenty six percent of patients who transitioned adopted migraine characteristics, and that's about the same as the general population. Right now that's the most complete data set that we have according to Dr Barbara Ny at the headache clinic had Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Center in Lebanon New Hampshire and she's also an assistant professor neurology at the guy so school of medicine so I wanted to bring up that study because you know when you're on more estrogen. That be what your body is naturally producing or that which your body is being treated with, either to help you transition or to ease other types of transitions like those into pause it could impact your body and a variety of ways so estrogen can sometimes make headaches better sometimes make headaches. Or make headaches arise when there were none before. It's those that are associated with hormones. We know that hormones do play a role in Migraines, but we're still looking into exactly want they do exactly how and why? They caused them and Dr Nine points out that patients on hormone therapy are often also suppressing some other hormones, and they're keeping more consistent levels instead of having peaks and valleys as folks who menstruate or who were going through menopause typically do. But we need more data to tell us what's going on with these specific types of patients so that we can best help them out and predict their specific migraine symptoms and on sets researchers like Dr Ni- would like to do some more research overall, and they've also said that they are not saying that hormones are a primary cause of headache in transgender individuals, but rather that it's more likely it's your underlying genetics like with. With my family history with my mom, having migraines and me having it and we're going to have to see a little bit more as this body of research builds the years, so if you're looking for a dissertation project, and you are in the lgbt community specifically, this is something that you could study to help out an under served population and do some good in the healthcare industry in helping individuals who were undergoing transition. Have better outcomes when it comes to the transition process by perhaps preventing or even eliminating these headaches. If you'd like to read more about this particular article. You can go to the American headache society and checkout migraine in transgender patients as the name of the article. We're going to go and a quick break and when we come back, we're going to talk about those tension. Headaches stay tuned. The GMC live unhappiness podcast takes you on a journey of exploration. We'll discuss. Try true methods.

Headaches Migraines Dr Barbara Ny Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Ce Dr Nine Netherlands Dr Ni Lebanon New Hampshire
"assistant professor neurology" Discussed on People's Pharmacy

People's Pharmacy

03:41 min | 2 years ago

"assistant professor neurology" Discussed on People's Pharmacy

"Forties, complex, chronic illnesses are benign things. The appropriate use of things like diet, exercise, sleep, stress, brain training. Targeted herbs, a so-called neuro Ceuta calls. All of these things are things that are benign and used in the right way at the right time for the right person can be very, very helpful in the right combination. So all of these things have been coming. One of the other things we've learned from the first five years of Recode is been that we can look at other diseases. So we're starting to work with people who have other neuro degenerative diseases as well and seeing similar patterns. Now it's not a course, it's not identical to Alzheimer's, but with modifications we see similar sorts of stories, Dr British and we love the idea of patient researcher partnerships. How can patients who are interested connect with a researcher who will be helpful? It's a great question. And at the moment, these. Are just beginning. And so the easy thing is to talk to researchers who are interested in your area, whatever it is that you have or are interested or have as a family trade or as a family risk. The other thing you go to the website Dr Bredesen's dot com. And and let us know that you're interested in this sort of thing back to Dan van Essen. Thank you so much for talking with us on the people spermicide today. Thank you so much, Joe and Terry, appreciate it. You've been listening to Dr Dale Bredesen's author of the end of Alzheimer's, the first program to prevent and reverse cognitive decline. We spoke with him by Skype. We spoke earlier with Dr Robert Moi assistant professor neurology at Harvard Medical School, and you'll find some interesting links to information from both of our guests at our website. People sperm see dot com. Lindsey, Google produced today show our ski is the engineer, Dave Graydon at its. Interviews that people's pharmacy is produced at the studios of North Carolina. Public radio w. UNC the people's pharmacy theme music is by BJ Liederman. The people's pharmacy is brought to you in part by brain gauge developed by neuro scientists at the university of North Carolina to track brain hill available for home research and clinical applications online at gauge your brain dot com to buy a CD of today's show or any other people's pharmacy broadcast. You can call eight hundred seven three two, two, three, three, four today show is one thousand one hundred thirty two. That number again eight hundred seven three to twenty three thirty four online at people's pharmacy dot com. And when you visit that site, you can share your thoughts about today's show at people's pharmacy dot com. You can also sign up for our free online newsletter. We're subscribed to the free tied cast of the show. When you sign up for the newsletter, you'll get our. Free guide to favor, home remedies in Durham, North Carolina. I'm Joe Graydon. I'm Terry grading. Thank you for listening. Please join us again. Next. We hope you enjoyed this podcast. If so, please consider taking a minute to write a review on items and thanks for listening to the people's pharmacy.

researcher Dr Dale Bredesen Joe Graydon North Carolina Alzheimer Dr Robert Moi UNC Dan van Essen Dr British engineer Dave Graydon Durham Skype Harvard Medical School BJ Liederman Google assistant professor Lindsey Terry five years
"assistant professor neurology" Discussed on People's Pharmacy

People's Pharmacy

06:05 min | 2 years ago

"assistant professor neurology" Discussed on People's Pharmacy

"Times more effective than penicillin. So it's a pretty potent little protein. But the really interesting thing about it is how it does that and the way it does it is it foams employed and traps the bugs. So literally encapsulates and permanently sequester them into these amyloid deposits, which we call plucks amyloid plaques, which you find in huge abundance in Alzheimer's disease. Patient's doctor. Quite kind of bugs. Are there in the brain? Yeah. So that's obviously a question. And the sort of a knee-jerk interpretation of finding is that Alzheimer's disease must be some sort of fiction. That's not as outrageous as it sounds. This being a a small group of people saying that for many years, and indeed, if you'd talk to people before the discovery of I buy, most of the idea researches would have said it isn't fiction, and fact Ellis Alzheimer's. The first guy to suggest it. But the thing is it's a little bit more complicated than that because there's no single pathogen that crops up in every day case. So it seems that it's not so much a classical in fiction as possibly a combination of microbial organisms causing this problem. So of about eight months ago, we started what we've called the brain micro. AM project. So we've been looking in Brian's to see what's there. We do with the process called Jeep in genomic sequencing, which basically involves looking at deny and looking for non human sequences and the findings were both very surprising and very exciting. We found over two hundred twenty bacteria that seemed to be living regularly in normal people. That's extrordinary. I think that if you had asked most patients and perhaps most health professionals twenty years ago, are there bugs in our brains. Microbes bacteria, viruses, fungi stuff like us, the micro ecology of the brain look like, I think people would have given you a blank stare. So you know the brain is sterile there. There's nothing growing in there just as we used to think the lung with sterile. In fact, except for our digestive tracts, the colon, we thought, you know, the body is pre devoid of stuff pathogens, but you're saying you found two hundred and twenty different bacteria in the brain indeed. And the whole concept of the stereo buddy is kind of studying to to fight away. There's a microbiome of the blood in every Mila blood is about a thousand microbes. And as far as the Bryans consent, people knew for quite a while that there was a various populations in if for instance, viruses, the number of ours is particularly hoop. He's viruses. That pretty much one hundred percent of people have hippie. Six. A lot of people have hippies one. They usually acquire them before the age of two their lifelong. So the him as it's known has been known about for quite a while and this probably a dozen or so it tends out this more than a dozen, but that's been known for quite some time. Plus this took place. Melissa, of course, the little amoeba would so that system I did the being one in every five people. It's normal host is the cat, but it's found its way into us. And so you know, there's Ivor billion people on the planet, but that thing living in neighboring. So it's not exactly strictly sterile, but I don't think it was appreciated just how many different microorganisms. So there seems to be living in a bright and they're not just sitting there doing their own thing, the interacting, and you can do an analysis that looks. Those sort of interactions. And what it tells us is that sometimes they co up right sometimes they compete. They really an active microbiome and not just passive resistance. You're listening to Dr Moy assistant professor in urology at Harvard Medical School. He's also assistant professor neurology at Massachusetts General Hospital neurology research, Terry, it's unbelievable. I mean, I'm just amazed that we have so many different bacteria and viruses in our brains more than two hundred different types of bacteria from healthy people. And there's just been a study published several weeks ago suggesting that herpes six and herpes seven viruses may be implicated in Alzheimer's disease. Well, the levels of those viruses were twice as high in the brains of people with Alzheimer disease as they are in healthy individuals. So. So it doesn't say it's causing affect, but it certainly looks suspicious end. It looks as if people who have evidence of those infections may have a faster decline. So it may be interacting in some way to cause problems in the brain. Well, after the break, we're gonna find out what those microbes are doing in our brains. Is it possible to have a beta amyloid and those tau tangles, but not dementia? What makes brains of Alzheimer's disease patients so different from others? Is it possible to correct the microbiome balance in that brain? Could we get rid of the bad actors boost the beneficial ones? Learn how this research could help in preventing or reversing dementia. You're

Alzheimer's disease Alzheimer disease assistant professor Ellis Alzheimer penicillin Brian Harvard Medical School Massachusetts General Hospital Ivor Melissa Dr Moy Terry one hundred percent eight months twenty years