7 Burst results for "assistant professor of finance"

"assistant professor finance" Discussed on Knowledge@Wharton

Knowledge@Wharton

03:17 min | Last month

"assistant professor finance" Discussed on Knowledge@Wharton

"Persist the timing of when the price might change. that's something that's not easy to predict One kind of practical when the tension that might arise as as the price of an individual share gets hired In my it's harder for people to especially small time retail investors to purchase many shares. So that might be something that starts to eventually limited the price increase I wouldn't be surprised if we see drops. Seems head us there. A way to guard against this kind of a pattern so coming full circle here If you are worried that you know the price of game stop is going to drop Shorting it would be one way to to profit if that were to happen. Now that's risky given What's going on with the price and the momentum and a significant amount of short interest. But it's something that if a company is able to to Essentially have sufficient capitals maintain the necessary margin and not have to close those positions company. Basically can be a rather than investor could be patient enough shorting i games could potentially be profitable and really you have to have to look at at different companies. That could potentially be a candidate to be shorted at this point when you think about some of the dynamics play we mentioned game stop. We mentioned you know that there had been worries about tesla going back a little while i mentioned. Amc entertainment which is apparently in the cycle right now and there certainly concerns around the the movie theater industry at this point. Yes so look into short stocks. I think when you're looking what's going on with the prices the fundamentals of the company. There's a couple of reasons why you might think a price would fall so personally. I'm more inclined to value based investing and thinking about you. Know what is this company. What kind of economic activity or are they gonna be able to generate going forward. And if i was pessimistic about a company's fundamentals then i might be more inclined to short them now when what we're seeing right now likely has more of a psychological components insurance with behavior prices. And it's a lot harder to know how and when that is going to pan out In the long run Psychology is not something that add value to company. So i would say it's harder to time and make a good bet when there's a psychological elements involved like what what is more likely the case at game stop now something like amc which is now getting more attention may be bigger. Psychological component is going to advise there. Maybe not but Fundamentals for the movie theater industry are probably gonna face a bit of a challenge given the current public health crisis. So it's psychology as you say psychology rather than kind of a cyclical nature where we see in a variety of different areas. Yes exactly yeah sasha. Thanks very much for your time greatly. Appreciate your insight. Thanks great chatting with you. Thank you sasha and dark day assistant professor finance here at the wharton school to keep engaged with wharton business daily and other wharton school shows visit business radio dot morton dot upenn dot edu..

sasha Amc entertainment wharton school dark day one way One upenn of reasons tesla wharton morton
"assistant professor finance" Discussed on Knowledge@Wharton

Knowledge@Wharton

02:49 min | 2 months ago

"assistant professor finance" Discussed on Knowledge@Wharton

"One of the campaign promises made by president elect joe biden dealt with student loan debt which is around one point six trillion dollars right now. And there's an idea out there about erasing all student debt but a new paper from researchers at the school in the university of chicago say that racing massive amounts of that type of debt may be a mistake because it might end up being a windfall for families on the upper end of the economic landscape and hurt those on the lower end the researchers behind that paper join us right now sedan katherine who is assistant professor of finance here at the wharton school. And constantine ellis. Who's assistant professor finance at the university of chicago. Great to have you both with his. Thanks very much for your time today. Thanks for having us thank you. So constantina gets. I'll start with you. Lay out this case for. Not cancelling all student debt. Well i don. I don't want to lay out a case because we're not partisans. Here rack obamacare search researchers. But what i can tell you is what we find in the paper and What we find in the paper is that directly forgiving. Or cancelling Student loans is a highly regressive policy basically motion benefits will end up accruing to upper income individuals and the reason for that is very very simple. people who go to college tend to earn more and people who have gone to college for more years like doctors Mba's and Lawyers tend to earn more than those who four year degree or two year. Associate's degree So we also find that. There's another policy that is More progressive in that more of the benefits accrue to the middle class and that's expanding income driven or payment plans that link payments to income. So so van. How much of this one point six trillion dollars in student loan debt. Right now do we believe is being held by upper income families and maybe how much more being held by middle or lower income families at this point. Yes so it depends on how you look at it. So people traditionally just to the dining and one of innovation of peta is to say look like the balance. It's it's a little bit more complicated. Because the best anti fog yvonne after twenty years in and so people who are in the lower part of the solutions they might pen may than the balance before it's forgiven on so to some extent present value of our debt is much lower. Well then why is the banner Seem to indicate whereas like people into poverty citizen the and so that is like.

president elect joe biden university of chicago constantine ellis constantina wharton school katherine Mba peta yvonne
"assistant professor finance" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

06:47 min | 1 year ago

"assistant professor finance" Discussed on WTVN

"Dr John tar water to the live line doctor. I hope today find Joel. Yes. It does. Thank you very much. Joel super a really interesting perspective you have on what's going on on the south border. I don't think most people would think, hey assistant, professor of finance to talk about immigration illegals, southern border wall, all that stuff. But knowing that you have lived in that area. Where exactly did you live when you were down there? My wife and I lived in McGowan Edinburgh. Just right there. Where people are crossing. I gotcha. That's largely Hispanic community. Yes. Is it is about one hundred fifty thousand. Okay. So when when you talk about having perspective having lived down there just kind of paint that picture the people that live right at the border is this a huge problem is not a huge problem. The people that they're seeing are they largely just trying to escape a bad situation south of the border. Are they coming here for work? Just kind of walk me through that. Well, in twenty fourteen the mission loudest mood, hops, working with a nonprofit, we moved from Guatemala where we'd seen a lot of poverty and violence firsthand. And then in twenty fourteen when the crisis really seemed to escalate we begin to see numbers of the time around two hundred fifty refugees process released per day. But those can we thought at that time. Oh my goodness. This is the incredible numbers. And as a result of have we had volunteers from all over the United States coming down the hill that those numbers now pale in comparison to the top of numbers that we see today, and you call them refugees. So my senses, you've you these people that are just trying to get away from bad situation get themselves to a better place. Right. I think in prior days, the situation was more of illegal crossings involving Mexican migrants seeking work. The opportunities situation is really far more complex now involving many children and families fleeing drug wars and massive islands. D get a sense that the people that are stealing into the country. Are they using their family as kind of shield like they bring children knowing that, you know, most civilized nations will have some pity maybe more pity on them if they are bringing their children with them. Do I believe that there's a degree that the people are being strategic in how they're broaching the border? But at the same time with the children are the ones that are most vulnerable in those communities for drug wars and violence breaking out, and we hear an awful lot to it's not just people from Mexico, but from people deeper into central and South America, but that was your experience as well. It was even when lived in Guatemala or spoke Honduras Mudgal travel to various countries in Atlanta. And you'd see a common thing in those areas. And so now we are seeing just bass communities from countries making their way up to the US southern border. Dr John tar water our guest assistant, professor of finance cedar Ville university. So so kind of play that out in your mind. And again, my senses, sympathy empathy of traits that you embody on a daily basis. How do you balance that how do you balance with your heart knowing that you need to take care of people at a base level, get them, hopefully to a better place, and then maybe more self sustaining versus what you hear out of the government. I mean, you hear our government taking a very hard line wanting to build a wall wanting to keep people out maybe opening for job visas, but really not much more than that. How do you balance that kind of being? A citizen and a patriot versus being someone who's sympathetic to these people's basic needs. Joel. We believe that we have a responsibility to those who are the weakest among us wanted to clear that we should be hospitable and compassionate to those in this situation. But his parents, and as citizens we recognize that we have responsibility, protect and care for those in our community and in our country. Our fears that we have to be careful in this responsibility that our desire to protect there's not manifest itself in non-christian ways. Such as racism, I found is that the bible doesn't what's flesh out for us? How to balance these issues simultaneously respect for human life and border security? But it does help us to give more weight to the being compassionate and merciful to those that are found among us. You know, I don't wanna get involved into the politics of what people should do. But for us when we were living in area, we were saying Aidid already crossed the border and now that they're here. What can we do to to assist them? I guess that's where we were. Yeah. And as far as I guess a lot of people get concerned about the money involved in, you know, having a teaching finance in. I share that. I'm very concerned, you know, a living in a country that literally deals with debt in the trillions. The tens of trillions that. When you hear stories about people getting into this country and then going right on the systens. I get concerned about that. Because it's unsustainable. So in your mind, in your financial mind is there a way to balance that is there a way to handle that that's good for the people that need some refuge. But also for the people who are here and are contributing in, you know, a charitable ways and through taxation that's responsible to them as well. That's what an excellent question. I don't know that I have an answer from financial standpoint suspect part of the the pace you can be handled on a tax bases as we courage people to give their tax incentives. That's going to increase the amount of funds in that area for financial standpoint. I think it may be better that we are able to assist countries like wanna mall and Honduras. L Salvador handle the problem later, so that we don't have to encounter do signal on as well burdens on this side, and in both ways, and honestly, it's cheaper to handle issues over there, you have people doing healthcare in the United States Healthcare's vastly more expensive here than it is in Guatemala in at the same time. They can have good care Inc. Quantum all we can take care of an issue there. It's going to be financially more feasible. Brilliant. Doctor. I appreciate the time in the perspective much, Dr John tar water assistant, professor finance, cedar. Ville university on NewsRadio six ten WTVN seven twenty. Here's traffic.

Dr John tar Guatemala Joel professor of finance United States McGowan Edinburgh South America Mexico Ville university cedar Ville university Honduras Mudgal care Inc WTVN L Salvador professor Honduras United States Healthcare Aidid Atlanta
"assistant professor finance" Discussed on Knowledge@Wharton

Knowledge@Wharton

04:10 min | 3 years ago

"assistant professor finance" Discussed on Knowledge@Wharton

"Have as much of a threat as in say. The restaurant industry where McDonalds and Burger King have limited market Power because of potential competition. You know, investors have become more concerned about a possible government regulation with alphabet Europe and anti-trust authorities. There have been more aggressive than US anti-trust authorities at questioning, some of the things that go on and nobody knows how that's all going to play out is a call. David is a call for more regulation. Maybe the thing to really watch out for right now. Well, I mean it's hard to say what the actual share is because you have to define what the market is, but let's say that Google controls, you know, ninety percent of searches out there. That means they have a tremendous amount of thorn in the marketplace. We haven't talked about, you know, regulation and and breakup in what twenty five thirty years since the old AT and T days where it was actually quite a big thing where we govern was talking about quite a bit. And so it's been quite for a long time. But yet some point there might be a turn in administration. I contest what it would take, where they look at these tech players, they look at the profitability of their generating. They look at the small players struggling to compete, and then maybe one day they do an AT and T style break-up. I think that the probability of this embedded into the market prices actually is actually quite quite low. I think the bigger issue that we're facing less around regulation than what is the true market size for these companies. Because at some point, every company hits growth wall at some point, the growth taps out and people are still trying to figure that out. I mean, Google and Facebook and Amazon are these guys. Ten percent of their potential market or they'd ninety percent of their potential market? And so that's why you are looking quite closely at the results each and every quarter to try and tease out where they are in this growth process. So although regulation and privacy issues are very important, I don't think those are as large as a concern as again, just what the total market size is. Because when you hit that growth wall, all of a sudden those multiples really start coming down and all of a sudden you start matching for cash flow. The valuation is completely different than when you sort of are growing at an unlimited pace and people think the market could be ten, twenty fifty times the size you currently are. And we've seen that with some of the older companies that have been on the market for for quite a long time where their stock prices languish. So there are companies out there that are in the tech sector that hit that wall. And the question just is, when will these other companies hit that wall as well, J your thoughts? You know, I, I don't think that breakup of some of the big companies are very, like. I agree with David net, but where there is more of a concern of regulation, as for instance, with Google search results where there are some bias sees recently, they instead of directing their search to other sites. They answer some of the questions directly, you know, give their own airplane arrival times and things like that and are therefore disadvantage ING competitor's that are providing travel agency, advice, for instance, and that that's where I think the potential for regulation that might affect the profit stream is a more realistic possibility. Great. Having you both on the show today. Thank you very much, David. Thank you all the best. You both taker. David Wessel adjunct. Professor financier at the warden school J redder eminent scholar and finance at the university of Florida, former assistant professor finance here at the warden school for more insight from knowledge at Warton, please visit knowledge dot Morton, dot U Penn dot EDU.

Google David AT US McDonalds David Wessel Europe Burger King David net warden school J warden school assistant professor Professor Warton Facebook university of Florida Amazon
"assistant professor finance" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:55 min | 4 years ago

"assistant professor finance" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Is spent and he from the country said to have looked at und accounting performance of the we're tried off the phone unfair tougher to been eighteen and saw enough the found the actually see drops and performance off these phones after the transitioning from a founded to you know the the air but the ass if you drops between ten and twenty percent off profitability ouch tend to twenty percent that's a steep price for loyalty is now but wait a minute antoinette shore look at affirms profitability what if just what if loyalty costs you in profitability but if you're shares trade publicly you makeup forte and share price you know what if the wall street loves the story the family for our there was when i studied by offenses compares going vontaze who hasn't he looked at the condition events in the us so he looks and qs and what happens man in the us of public keeps waited family hence over the reigns to the area and he fine spent there was a drop in the stop ties by rounds and ten to fifteen percent okay so i went and collected those data and when i found was so what in my opinion was grinder shocking that's francisco perez gonzales i'm an assistant professor finance that stafford great school business the data covered three hundred and thirty five family firms in the us that had a management transition one hundred and twenty two of them just over third brought in another family member _a_c_l and the rest when with outside management and as you heard the market did not like the family success but perez.

us francisco perez gonzales antoinette assistant professor stafford great school twenty percent fifteen percent
"assistant professor finance" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:37 min | 4 years ago

"assistant professor finance" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Takes over so one thing i can tell you is fed and his from the country seppi had looked at und accounting to fall minnesota we're tried off the phone unfair tougher to been eighteen and saw enough to found the actually see drops and performance off these phones after the transitioning from the condo to you know that the air but the ass he see drops between ten and twenty percent off profitability ouch tend to twenty percent that's a steep race for loyalty is not but wait a minute and i'm not sure look at affirms profitability what if just what if loyalty costs you in profitability but if you're shares trade publicly you make up for an share price you know what if wall street loves the story the family for when i studied and by offenses cooper's going vontaze who hasn't he looked and he's condition events in the us so he looks and qs what happens ran in the us complicates waited family hence over the reigns to the a half and he fine spent harrison dropping the stop prize around ten to fifteen percent okay so i went and collected those data and when i found was so what in my opinion was grinder shocking that's francisco perez gonzales i'm an assistant professor finance said stafford great school business the data.

minnesota us harrison francisco perez gonzales cooper assistant professor stafford great school twenty percent fifteen percent
"assistant professor finance" Discussed on WNYC

WNYC

02:03 min | 4 years ago

"assistant professor finance" Discussed on WNYC

"In the the see usa ego public the company keeps waited but family and the fact hence that over from the reigns day one to the from a the half from that our that august and he was finds born that and his father there puts was the five dropping drops the stop a budweiser prize in this mouth around and ten when to the fifteen one our percent old he was indoctrinated into okay the quarterback so i one use in and the culture collective bulls agree state in concert and in the when weight i found of was it so what in my opinion was grinder shocking that's francisco perez gonzales i'm an assistant professor finance that stafford great school business the data covered three hundred and thirty five family firms in the us that had a management transition one hundred and twenty two of them just over third brought in another family member _a_c_l and the rest when with outside management and as you heard the market did not like the family success but perez gonzalez one to answer a harder more important question why do family see ios do worse well rooting around in the data he found an answer the on the performance of tommy's heels list basically explained tables family ceos that did not attend you forget about the most selected coaches in the us if you're in into top thirty kaun h you do fine if you're in the top fifty college again you defined or a top hundred punished is fine it's they had a forty three percent of the key just my sompel where people who attended caller just outside the top a hundred eighty nine coached and you ice despite having substantial well so this people dead one could save maybe did not have the ability or what can not have the effort because they might be able but i'm not encouraged to to make huge effort this where the was the would driving or driving the out the the to performance of the time he see you so if you throw out the family firms who hand off to see the position to a family member who went to a non selective school.

francisco perez gonzales perez gonzalez tommy us assistant professor stafford great school forty three percent