20 Episode results for "art museum"

Smithsonian American Art Museum: An Interview With Stephanie Stebich

Stuff You Missed in History Class

41:33 min | 2 years ago

Smithsonian American Art Museum: An Interview With Stephanie Stebich

"This episode is brought to you by GS k. Each year. There are thousands of deaths from vaccine preventable. Diseases in the US. A GS K we develop and manufacture vaccines to help protect people against diseases like flu meningitis and shingles. And by exploring innovative technologies, we're working to develop new vaccines against diseases previously beyond our reach because the more diseases. We prevent the more lives. We can save. Welcome to stuff you missed in history. Class a production of I heart radio. How stuff works? Hello and welcome to the podcast. I'm Holly fry, and I'm Tracy b Wilson I am super duper excited. Because I was recently fortunate enough to visit the Smithsonian American art museum and sit down with the director Stephanie St. bitch for a chance in this interview is focused on anyone specific thing, we talk about Stephanie's work and some of the museum's exhibit. But also just what museums offer the world, and how they fit into history Fefining has a passion for work and for sharing art with the public. That's completely infectious. And what she really cares about is how people engage with the museum. So when she first down with Holly for the interview, she asked Kali question right out of the gate. Find out what Holly thought of time at the museum this morning. Yeah. She's a little basing somebody cried in front of some art. We're going to pick up this interview with my answer. And then we'll start off. My interview is Stephanie which quickly opens up into the history of the building that houses the Smithsonian American art museum. So it's been a mazing. I. Mentioned to you before we came in that I had my little tearful moment with the Louis sculpture because I'm a great admirer of her in her life story is very inspiring. So that in and of itself was my great thing because we're here before it opens into lake have private time with a piece of art lake that is. Beyond special to me. But I want to hear about from. You though, is there are some things that you showed me that we walked around together doing and some things that I walked around on my own experiencing which I last about in a bit. But before we get to any of that. I want to ask you how you landed here. Like, how does one become the lead of a place like this? Well, I would tell you Holly. I have the greatest job a possible. It is a job where everyday I'm working with really talented, creative people, and I'm not just talking about my phenomenal staff, but artists who come here. People who have a passion. And collect people who want to write about what we present art, critics and thinkers and also people who've never been here before as well as people who love this place, deeply and have their five favorite objects favorite places in the museum. So how do you grow up and become a? Zim director. Well, I would tell you the Smithsonian is in many ways, the Harvard of of art museums because we are this big family of museums. We're the largest research and museum complex in the world. We are these official national museums of different subject matters. So in my case, it's American art as well as I run the Renwick gallery, which is the national museum of craft. And then you go through the national museum of African art and the Cooper Hewitt and on and on all these specialties. I I grew up in museums. I felt at home in museums. I studied art history and they're different pathways. I could have taught I could worked at an auction house or a gallery could written. But when you work in a museum, you get to touch that many more lives. You get to constantly learn it's a graduate seminar with every special exhibition. We do when we make really tough decisions about which works of art. We're going to accept or with limited dollars purchase. We are making an important statement about time and place, and I like to say in museums. We're in the forever business. Oh, that's beautiful. So there's a there's a sacred duty. And I would tell you I often tell my staff the museums are team sport. Yes. I have the good luck of being the director. But it's really nobody can do. This work alone is just it's just too many facets to have any single person. Even even our curator's who who think up these wonderful projects, it it depends on so many arms and legs to get something done here. I love it. And I mean just in our short time walking around with some of your staff that's abundantly clear that just everyone here. One is incredibly smart, incredibly engaged. Like, I tell you even like just the people that are walking through doing maintenance stuff. Nobody is like just clocking in doing their job. They all seem to really Holly, museums are generally happy place. Right. It's just grateful. Come with some leisure time. They come with their friends. They come with their family. They come on special occasions. They come to share things are deeply meaningful to them. They come for fun. They come for surprise. Hopefully, they leave remembering something that. They saw that that that. I I like to think that the gift artists give us when we encounter the work and really spent time with work is that artists changed the way we see the world. Yeah. One one object when our work at a time. So the building we are in as well, you gave me a quick version earlier, you took us into the secret room, which is off of what appears to initially be a very standard sort of courtroom. And then there's a secret room, which has some really cool insights into the buildings history. Will you talk about this building's history? And how it how it's evolved over the years. To where it is. Now. Sure, it's a spectacular building. It spans two city blocks a seventh to ninth street and is boundaries by effigy streets. And so we have entrances on both sides, and that's secret room. You'll find on the F street entrance. As you perhaps hang up your code or leave your bag. You'll see there's a little chamber in the back where we have left uncovered the the structure of the building because this was built as the patent office for the United States. The third federal building built after the White House and the capitol and you have to magin miss must be a very important building. It's where American entrepreneurship and creativity is at home, and it's a pretty good choice to locate the national museum of American art. So the building originally housed shelves rows and rows of shelves of patent models. President Andrew Jackson signed legislation about around patent law which mandated that as an inventor you had to bring forward a model of your of your invention. Plus drawings and explain how this was made. And that future inventors could come and look and say, oh, actually what I have is an improvement is a very Asian on an existing patent. Again. You have to be your patent has to be reviewed even today. I'm recently. I heard Holly you might find fascinating the ten million US patent was issued recently ten million is astonishing to think about all of the engineer witty that the preceding numbers all contained in many cases. Yes, it's just as a great deal about the never ending quest to make new things and fill gaps that we need and sort of beautiful. Indeed. And this historic building. Also went through some. Transformations. It was built to be fireproof. So that meant originally stay away from wooden beams and work with iron tresses, and such and built in the Greek revival style it during the civil war housed a hospital. Walt Whitman would come here and read to injured soldiers and in its incarnation as the patent office, the very important Clara Barton worked here. We would know her for two important reasons. Of course, she was the founder of the American Red Cross and in today's important conversation about gender equality. She was the first government employees who is given equal pay for equal work Clara Barton here at the pet novice, and it also housed earlier it rations and collections of this Massoni in and thankfully in nineteen sixty eight. After a significant restoration was the official home for the Smithsonian American art museum. And our sister museum the national portrait gallery, and it's so beautiful walking around. I spied something very cool which has been retained despite updates and things being renovated. There is a tiny piece of graffiti the guys kept a now, it's almost its own little secret artwork exhibit. We talk about that a little bit. Yes. I think museums have wonderful objects that we caretake, and hopefully we displayed in intriguing and beautiful ways provocative way. Sometimes. And yet, let's not forget the house in which we sit whether it's a contemporary building. And they're wonderful star architects rebuilding. Great museums. These days, but many museums are located in historic buildings repurpose. And so if we can bring a little bit of the magic out if we can remind people that that these. Great facilities had important roles. Not only we were a civil war hospital. But we were the home for Abraham Lincoln's second inaugural ball because it was one of the largest spaces in Washington DC for such an event. Yeah. I do we have any insight into who the mystery C H F that I initially. I wish I could tell you. I wish I could tell you that it was Walt Whitman himself. No, not the case. However, Walt Whitman there are echoes of Walt Whitman around the city. So I invite you to go to the DuPont circle train a metro exit and etched in the entry and exit tunnel is the Walt Whitman poem about his days reading to civil war injured. Yeah. Yeah. I love it. So for listeners it's a tiny little piece of like a a window frame. Yes. It just has the initial C H F carved in it in the misstated, August eighth eighteen sixty four and you guys have put this beautiful just a little glass over it. And it it is sort of funny because when you look at it straight on it almost looks like you'd just mounted a picture on the wall. But then when you see it from the side, you realize it's just protecting something that's part of this building's history. I'm so glad you found it Holly. We. Want people to look closely at works of art. And then also explore a little bit of the building. So when you're in the great hall, which was where Lincoln's inauguration was and if you look at the floor, it feels different than in the rest of the building not on marble floors. You're not even on wood gallery floors, you're on beautiful tiled floors, and because that is a completely different style. There was a fire on eighteen seventy seven in this building. And so a new architectural style was added to our Greek revival building something called Neo renaissance. And so a very different grandeur was was added to the building give it a bit of an update, I hope everyone who visits the Smithsonian American. Art museum seeks out that little bit a preserved graffiti that we talked about it just feels so unique and special in it tethers the building to its past coming up Stephanie will share two stories about places in the building. She thinks they're extra special and that visitors should make sure to visit. But first, we will take a quick sponsor. Break. 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You mentioned that this was at one point the US patent office. And you still have on display some unique pieces that are you know, old patents and their models. When you talk about some of those or some of your fate one or two of your favorites. Perhaps. Sure, holly. I I always invite visitors to explore this really large building of the three different floors and then make a beeline for two very special places. One is called the loose foundation center for American art, which is where we're located right now. And there are a couple of sort of mezzanine levels of shelves and open storage as we like to call it there three thousand works of art on view across all media, and then tucked in another corner that unites spied on walked over a little bit is the lender. Conservation center, the first visible conservation center in in a museum. So the patent models. We thought would be important to still show and we have an under. Standing with the patent office that a couple of delightful. I would say both failed models and things we still enjoy today like a butter churn. Or I think you spied a sewing machine I did. So these wonderful models are tagged with a wonderful calligraphy on indicating their number a little bit of their history. We have reproductions of some of the drawings talk about process and use. And we also have a timeline of of the of the usage of the of the museum. So it's in bay Twenty-one when you're up on the mezzanine level of the loose some center, it's there are so many wonderful little nooks and crannies all over this building. But so I'm glad that you directed people where to go they wanna see that. Because I finally tricky to find it if you don't know the billing terribly well, one of the things I really wanted to talk to you about is an exhibit that you guys just opened which is called artists respond in its American art in the Vietnam war. One that's a really impactful exhibit to walk through. It is not an easy exhibit to walk through a lot of those pieces are not what we would call like pretty art. They are moving and visceral and very frightening in some ways in arresting. Will you talk about just that exhibit? Why it is important why you wanted to have it here at the Smithsonian and also just you know, your thoughts on it. And how the whole thing came together. Thank you, Holly. I'm so glad you have invited me to spend a moment on this exhibition. So this is a project that's been five years in the making really take that long to identify works to hone your your theories and your messages to right catalogue entries and essays the end to ship everything here. And and also raise the funds to to make it all happen. This is an exhibition that is a window into a moment. A moment of the American experience the Vietnam war by any definition was one of the most contested moments in American life, it touched our political life our military experience. Our social understanding and artists were among those who were grappling with this war that for many people arrived in your living room. It was sort of a first televised war, and so you would be sitting down to dinner with your family. And there would be the on your screen the notices of how many people were killed or injured, and that is reflected in a fabulous piece by Edward keen halts that we have on display this exhibition looks at a unique time period. Nineteen sixty five to seventy five this key moments. The escalation of the war as well. And it is fundamentally an anti-war exhibition. I think it is it is not. Designed to be anti-american. And I don't see the artists making that statement. They may question the American government. They may question the the ideals that are not being upheld in this moment there is. A moment where this conflict would forever change American art why? Because if you're making pop art or abstract expressionist art in the preceding decades, that's not the language where you can talk about loss that you can talk about the body that you can talk about ideals or American identity or atrocities or places far far far away. It's really interesting because I feel like one growing up in a military family where my dad was in the Vietnam war and never wanted to talk about it. It's really enlightening again, I was tiny at that point. So it wasn't as though I have my own memories of it. But it is enlightening even for me who I feel like, you know, I study history, and I read up in these things and have personal connection. But even so it really captures what was going on socially in a way that I think we don't often see, you know, it's an education in and of itself about. What what it felt like to be an American during the late sixties and early seventies. That I think is incredibly important. I wonder what the reception has been in the short time, it's been open. It's only been open like a week and a half, right? Yes. Yes. I think people have understood that this is an important topic. It's really the first and survive largest most comprehensive view of this moment in time. It is both feels very contemporary and the artists were making work in response to that moment. And again, the exhibition has works only from that decade much. Of course, we offer some interpretation spaces and talk about the Maya Lin's Vietnam war memorial because we are of course, here in Washington DC, and it is something that many ways brought the country back together again after the shattering experience of the war, the exhibition also feels very historic in terms of moments that speak to the democratic convention. Also, a tough Mel. Moment in Chicago. It's an exhibition that invites a lot more voices into the story than we were used to both at the time. And even sometimes today, so many more works by women artists by people of color are included. I think people will be surprised how many works by veterans are in the exhibition, and they to grapple with their dual identity as an artist. And as a veteran, it's also showed that confronted with different media. So they'll be an environment that will be graphic posters. They'll be some photo journalist images. There'll be big bold paintings. There are photographs of performances included. And I would tell you a lot of these artists weren't necessarily making the art for the art world, they weren't necessarily expecting the works to be displayed. And a lot of dealers really didn't wanna show this work. And it was work that in many ways was not always fully formed was still impressive. So you'll find people, you know, like, Judy Chicago. And Chris Burton and you'll find people you may no less like Jesse Trevino and Kim Jones both vats or somebody as impactful as regards thea so incredible mix yet, the the breadth of artwork in that exhibit. I as I was walking through I kept going wait is there's more down here. Like, it's huge. It is a big show and believe it or not we had we we did a pretty good job of editing. Not not everything you wanna borrow is available, and yet people also very generous in their loans, and you have to track down who owns something because it may change hands during that time. I would also say that art critics have picked up that this is an exhibition that is worth writing about and hopefully encouraging people to visit. So we had early previews in the Washington Post. On Wall Street Journal and a complimentary review in the Washington Post calling it a must see exhibition, and I hope it is an exhibition you see with other people and that you can both respond to the works of art. And also to your memories or your understanding of that of that moment again conveyed through this. I have to keep reminding people Holly it's fundamentally in art exhibition much as we are pausing and trying to remember what exactly happened in that year of nineteen sixty nine and what changed again in nineteen seventy one. I mean, we we offer timelines and other moments of context for our business. But it's really the art that we want you to encounter, and you guys have a unique little setup where people can kind of process where they're at in terms of like what they've experienced in. How they're thinking about it. We talk a little bit about that. Because it's fascinating. Yes. I more and more. We ask ourselves. How do our? Visitors get ready to see next vision. And how do we give them a space for for pause? So I have asked the curator's to plan for each exhibition to have a video a brief moment where you can stand. You don't necessarily just sit we're not making blackbox spaces. But some kind of moment where we can talk about the artist or the time period, or what was going on historically just preparing visitors and letting every visitor come in sort of at a at a same same level of information that that we're offering and then in in you, go through the exhibition, and the rooms are thematically laid out their numbers. So we do think that there is a a story to be told as you move from room one two to five or so and then at the end, comfortable seating a pencil catalogues books. A timeline images a revisiting the artworks. In a chronological sense. Instead of in the Matic sense updating the story a little bit reminding you what has happened since. And then asking you which works of art spoke to you, which works about will you not forget, which works were familiar to you or artists that you, you know, in one context, but did not ever think that they would be making art that would speak to the Vietnam war experience. Yeah. It's a an amazing thing. I kind of wish every museum exhibit habit. More and more. I think we we wanna know more about how our visitors come into the museum. What is their frame of reference? What is your frame of knowledge? And how do we give them a quiet space for for interpretation for for sorting through before you again jump into another gallery? A different time moment a different material. We want people to to rest there is. Is to. I want to shift gears a little bit because I you mentioned earlier to me before we started your favorite piece here. And I would love for you to talk about that a little bit. I'll Holly I I have a favorite piece of the day at the at the museum here, we have forty four thousand works of art. And I'm constantly learning. Something new I have the pleasure of meeting artists and then seeing the work maybe through their eyes, or when we purchase something that becomes a new favorite. So remind me what did I tell you was my favorite thing that Helen Keller own but his not my object. I'm happy to tell you about a work in the Smithsonian's collection. Gotcha again, as I mentioned the American art museum. We hold forty four thousand works of art interest. But your Doria so lovely NBA wanna miss this Smithsonian Institution, which is supported by your tax dollars as well as private contributions holds a hundred and fifty five million objects. Imagine that now let's let's imagine that most of those are maybe bugs in the natural history museum. But among those incredible objects that tell us about ourselves our time about about what we're thinking and feeling is an object that I'm very interested in which is Helen Keller's watch K so pause for second. And imagine what you would think it would look like, it's not a wristwatch. It's a pocket watch. Okay. Was it made for her? No, actually, it was a gift who would have a watch that would be useful to L them Keller. If I told you it was a diplomat. If I told you it was a pocket watch. If I told you it was a watch that you could feel the time on so that there was an internal mechanism that were time would be represented on the outside. So that diplomat would be diplomatic. In ending a meeting or being on time someplace, and this was a gift to Helen Keller that she treasured and makes us think a differently about timekeeping and how somebody who overcame so much would find use in something that other people would could also own would have routinely. I love that. It's just such a fascinating little, I don't know. Is it a piece of trivia to? It's just wonderful limit. Can I tell you why I'm interested in the house, and so I- another hat or two or three at the Smithsonian aside from running the American art museum and the Renwick gallery are pan institutional or Smithsonian wide initiatives and one of them is the American women's history initiative. I'm the co-chair of this, and we are spending the next five years to pull the threads together of all. The stories of American women through science through history through natural history through art through politics, every which way that remarkable women and also everyday women have contributed to the American experience to American history. So there are two cornerstone anchoring exhibitions one opens Quincy Bentley on March twenty eighth here in the old patent office building. My sister museum the national portrait gallery is doing a votes for women exhibition obviously you'd towards the anniversary of suffrage which did not give all women the right to vote. You have to remember in in the south during the Jim crow period. Black when we're not in franchised. They would also have the book end to that opening exhibition in the coming years is an exhibition called girlhood it's complicated, which talks about growing into your own identity as a woman so the phases. Of myth making in reality of American girlhood. And so the Helen Keller story is part of that exhibition which will travel nationally. That's wonderful, maybe half a dozen museums. That'll be fantastic coming up. Stephanie is gonna talk a little bit about how even the frames that art is displayed in are an important part of an object story, but first we're gonna pause and have a word from one of the sponsors that keeps this show going. -nology truth. Brought to you by Geico. Truth. You will certainly send any text about your supervisor to your supervisor. What's Janet's fangs? Did she lose a bet? With a weed whacker? Oh, Sint, wait. No, no, no truth. It's so easy to switch and save on car insurance at geiko dot com. Janet, I think my phone was hacked or something. Go fifteen minutes could save you fifteen percent or more. I know that you are obviously keenly interested in history. There was also another little bit of trivia that you told me as we were walking around talking about conservation picture frames. You talk about that a little bit. Sure. One of the special places here at the museum is the lender. Conservation center that I may have mentioned earlier, and when you are up in that space what you encounter are floor to ceiling window panes. It is basically a glass box, and we have five conservation labs that are visible to to anyone who who comes up there. So are conservatives are working diligently away in a framing studio in an object's laboratory in the time based media space in the painting a lab, and we try to reveal a little bit about the magic of of of how we present works of art, how artists create things and so in the framing studio, you'll see different styles of frames. We'll explain how they're crafted a close to the window. You'll see a little sampler of papers. So there's a go. Gold leaf their silver leaf there's cop relief things like that. And more and more. We want to try to encourage our visitors to understand that there's something very special to historic frame that perhaps the artist was very intentional about the frame that they wanted. Maybe they even created the frame or maybe it was important for a collector to have frames that really showcased and showcase the artwork and gilding was often for the distinctive purpose of making the artwork glow with limited domestic lighting, it would reflect the lighting and the painting better. So in the future, we will be adjusting are labels and pointing out to our visitors when it's an original frame so much both don't that. I think maybe start or maybe even stop a conversation. Did you see that Richmond frame? Yeah. Yeah. I mean, I think about there are a couple of art pieces. I have bought. Fairly recently in New Orleans where the frames were made out of refuse from the hurricane. And to me like that's exactly kind of the same thing. It's just historically oriented in a hundred years. Someone will have that tag on. And they'll be like, oh, it will add weight and depth to their understanding of of that piece of artists are taking it in. So yes, an end framing Ali is ever-evolving museums will take frames off and say, you know, what that frame is speaks more to the collector and their desire to have one type of frame versus what was really a more typical for this kind of of an object a museums. Go to great lengths to restore in some cases, recreate frames to again honor honor the work of art love, it you, obviously. Because of your position. I I don't wanna get too headier. Make you feel weird. But obviously, you're the steward of a place that is maintaining and bolstering. History and how it's told. So I wonder is it too weird for you to think about in a hundred years when someone looks back on your director ship. What would you like them to remember? Well, I appreciate that. You understand that these jobs are temporary that we're all stewards of that. It's I'm doing my very best to make sure that I advocate for visitors that that what we have to share is meaningful to the people who come through our doors, and I'm happy to report that museum visitation is that an all time high last year. We welcome some two million visitors and this past year three million visitors as a huge uptick, of course, it's a special exhibition. It's a things that capture people's imagination that they wanna see and we're delighted when when that happens. And of course, we keep asking ourselves who are we not speaking to? Who who needs different works of art to feel welcome at the museum and be represented here. And I think mostly my impact will be not which works of art. I had the good luck of bringing into the collection. And encouraging our courageous to be bold and inviting people to be generous to help us purchase things. Hopefully, my legacy will be some special exhibitions that will be groundbreaking like our artists respond American art in the Vietnam war nineteen sixty five to nineteen seventy five project or burning man exhibition at the Renwick, gallery, ten sure the exhibitions are bigger and bolder. I I wanna make sure that I'm educating the next generation of scholars and in our in our fellowship program, which is going to be fifty years old next year oldest largest and premier program in American Arden and visual culture that we caretake. These objects in the lender conservation center. And that mostly Holly people feel at home that this is there a museum that the Smithsonian American. Art museum is deeply meaningful for people throughout their lives. I feel like your legacy is going to be that you opened the doors wider. Well, that's certainly my charge because we are free. It is an amazing thing to offer all of this for free. We are open every single day of the year. I didn't do Christmas didn't another. And so an in this building that'll patent office. We have later hours were open till seven o'clock at night, the only Smithsonian was such late hours. And it gives us a different vibe in a different energy. And I'm happy to report we are also among the favorite of the Smithsonian museums in the sense that after the national zoo, we have the highest repeat visitation fifty three percent our visitors come again. And we're not on the National Mall. So yet, we're we're destination. I love it. I it speaks to the amazing work that you've been doing. I cannot. Thank you enough for having us today like this has been creamy. Well, holly. I I tell you this is a place for the people of curious minds. This is a place for fun as well. We want you to get get your hands dirty as well too. When we've got great family day programs. Let me tell you about one of my favorite programs. If you if you don't mind, we do something that I've never seen it any other museum because believe it or not we collect video games. We see video games as art in terms of the composition in terms of the narrative in terms of the of the elements that go into it. And they're often have a story component to them. So every year for some ten years or so now, we've been doing something called Sam, arcade. You know in arcade is the museum the fabulous co. Oh, God courtyard and other spaces in the museum are filled with all kinds of games and video games. They are free. We invite people to be polite and only use them for some fifteen minutes or so and people are very good about that. And let me tell you. There are motorcycles parked outside the museum. There are a vans parked outside of the museum. There are people pouring out of the metro station young and old English as their first language as their second or third language. We feature new kinds of games games that use historic elements and have a sense of chance that relate to to biblical stories a piece about Walden pond where you travel through the house and look at historic objects. How you go into the woods and have to chop down a tree to make the log cabin amazing kind of fantasy games you play. By yourself or with others and best of all you wander through the rest of the museum as your has your going on. It's a two day event. We've over ten thousand people come and it invites us to think about doing the next or video games exhibition about the museum and to send around the country. All right. We'll be here for that. Again. The American experience will get tired of seeing me and American. Giving her sure I love it again. Thank you so much what a delight for me. My pleasure comeback. I feel so spoilt. I like to say tell everyone, and I mean that not in the tell everyone to come. But tell everyone that you want to come with them here. Again, back to the social experience museums. I feel like it is kind of impossible to not want to run to the Visayan American art museum after hearing Stephanie Stevie talk about it if you'd like to run to the museum, and you want to check out the exhibit that we mentioned in the show artists respond American art in the Vietnam war in nineteen sixty five to nineteen seventy five that exhibit is open now, and it will run until August eighteenth. We are also going to be sure to include a link to their website with information about that exhibit in our show notes super big thanks once again to Stephanie for being on the show. I have a quick little bit of listener mail, if you'd like cool, I'm on a roll where I really am enjoying our males from from educators. So this is from our listener, Jessica who writes, I highly in Tracy, I am a fulltime special Ed teacher in a part time history buff. I started listening to your podcast a few months ago, and I'm constantly. Gently amazed by the amount of content stuff you missed in history. Classes covered my goal is to be able to give you guys an idea for a show some day. But every time I come up with one I find that you've covered it already. So then I quickly find it in the archives, and listen Barisha Slee recently. I was reading the book brave Harriet by Marissa moss with my students this introduce them to Harriet Quimby who was the first woman to fly across the English channel not surprisingly after a quick search of the archives. I found that Harriet was mentioned in a previous podcast back in two thousand twelve. So I quickly downloaded the show and shared it with my students, and they were so excited to learn more about this American aviator. Thank you so much for all that you do to keep stories like these relevant and interest younger generations of history. Levers, thank you so much. Jessica again, I have to say thank you for being an educator because we need those, and it is a a noble in Denver. I certainly feel if you'd like to write to us you can do so at history podcast at house works dot com or you can come and visit us anywhere on social media where we are missed in his. History. We're also at missed in history dot com as our website and all of the shows that have ever existed can be found right there. You would like to subscribe to the show you can do that on the iheartradio app at apple podcasts or wherever you listen to podcasts. Stuffy missed in history. Classes a production of I heart radio. How stuff works for more podcasts for my heart radio. Visit the iheartradio app apple podcasts or wherever you listen to your favorite shows. Well, what was hard? 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Smithsonian American art museu Holly Art museum Stephanie United States Walt Whitman director national museum of African art Helen Keller Holly it Renwick gallery official Abraham Lincoln Visayan American art museum Washington national museum of craft Conservation center
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25:57 min | 6 months ago

Special Report: Jennifer Trainer on Museum Town (2019)

"Hold you ears folks show people pay good money to see this movie when they go out to a theater they walked. Cold sodas popcorn in no masters in the projection booth. Everyone for ten podcasting is boring You remember when you first heard about the idea for good way. I'm thinking like everybody else. What is contemporary art. And then when i saw a little bit of it i saw all by god. What is that stuff. people are. Adams are not ready for this. North adams massachusetts once bustling and prosperous. Its main street. Now is virtually empty. Also tom came with this great idea. This create idea was totally unethical. What this town was an art museum of modern art museum. What's that. I feel that it is based on the fundamental message. Put on the table. Was that art museum. For eighteen century idea nineteenth century box. They had to confront the limitations of the box. Oh my god no way there was some trepidation because my my stuff was you know had pictures of drug paraphernalia and lots of other elements that were less than totally savory so if the state of massachusetts were put in say thirty five million dollars of taxpayers money. Is this the kind that you would propose. Non view and i said well yes. This is exactly the kind of work with show. I see this as say sanctuary of sorts. But it's also says migration So this is where they all come together and ness dead communicates. It's sort of a metaphor for that says people. This is just as place of imagination in dreamy special episode of the projection booth. I'm your host. Mike white on this episode. I'm talking with jennifer trainer director of the two thousand nineteen documentary museum town. The nice look at a town that was brought back to life through the power of art. Different checkout museum town movie dot com so you can see where the film is playing near you or if you can rent it through your local art house. Let's keep the to live enjoy. Tell me the jennifer trainer story. I like to think of myself as a renaissance woman for a long time kenya scattered woman. I graduated from tufts university in well. All my peers went on to business school and law school and medical school. I hopped on a sailboat. I love to sail. And i delivered or small sailboats. Remain to the british virgin island and then after about six months. I decided i i need to move to new york and get a real job. And i became an editorial assistant at simon and schuster and it was right after the three mile island nuclear disaster. And we were just inundated with anti-nuclear proposals. I was twenty three. And i wrote a military my boss and i said i thought what was needed was a book which fairly gave both sides instead of the diatribe one way or the other because i i thought i was anti-nuclear but i didn't really know the facts she said that's a really great idea and she told me she was firing me because i was really busy assistant and that i really should be writing and i should do this book and i well twenty years old and i. I've written a few newspaper articles for the you know my local newspaper and high school that was in. She said oh finding expert so the poor guy. dr michio kaku was a distinguished nuclear physicists. At city college working on the superstring theory and he had submitted a very anti-nuclear. But i took him out to lunch and he thought he was having lunch. With an editor. Simon and schuster and not a flunky who just got fired so. I told him that we were rejecting his book but did he want to do with me and fortunately he said yes. That was the beginning of my writing career. We ended up writing books together. One on nuclear power and one on one by my best seller by far is called beyond einstein and it was scientists quest for the the unified field theory which was like you know the holy grail of physics for the twentieth century. Some heavy stuff. It wasn't really heavy. Because i knew nothing about science. I was one of those kids who didn't go pass over grade science and so i would question everything he you know he'd say they think the universe beginning eleven dimensions. I say okay. How many are there now for what. What's the fourth one. I know linked with in-depth so i made the books really readable. And he made them legitimate. And that was the beginning of my writing. And i think the film is just a continuation of my writing. You know thirty years later. Were you able to support yourself through your writing. Some years i did. I was able to support myself through hot sauce. It it does all come together at some point. But when i was delivering the hinkley as to the virgin islands which is like you know being asked to drive a maserati on the amalfi coast. Hinckley's just beautiful sailboat. When we'd land in these islands and virgin gorda tortola you'll send dyke you know they're always hot sauces and they would be like the rotary. There'd be women sitting checkered tablecloth on a card table. You know pushing what used to be run bottles and now we're filled with these wonderful concoctions of chili peppers vinegar. So i totally fell in love with hot sauces and when i moved to new york those are still the days where you could put bottles in your bag. I came home at a lot of hot sauces. And i had about fifty in my pantry and every time somebody came over to dinner i couldn't get him out of my pantry because the labels were so hilarious like i'm on fire ready to die and there's another hot sauce called last rights which showed a chili pepper in a coffin. They were just outrageous and wonderful. So i wrote a book about hot sauces and then i did this poster of my pantry. It ended up selling over one hundred thousand copies on. Good morning. america and blah blah blah. And so i. For a few years. There i was able to make a living on my books and my posters and things my like go from nuclear power to hot sauce. Just go explode into explosion jennifer. How does the museum into your life. I moved to the berkshires in the mid eighties. And i was a freelance writer. I was working on my. I've written nineteen books now. But then i was working on my third book. And writer's life is very isolated. And so i would go to any anybody be so. I got wind of a cocktail party at the williams college museum of art which was a small college art museum and the director. Was there tom krenz. And we started talking and he told me about this outrageous idea. He had to turn you know. The vast derelict factory complex into the world's largest museum of contemporary art and contemporary art then was about as popular campbell wrestling. I mean it was really it was out. There and tom is a very tall man and talking to him was like walking into a wind. Tunnel it just. Like and i was really taken with it so i called the times and i got i got eric. Asthma was on the metro desk and he is my son and so he he He didn't give me a byline. But he commissioned me to write the first story about massimo. Okay so. I did. And i called it. A derelict. factory complex and what was so ironic is really annoyed. I didn't get a byline. And i probably got paid like fifty bucks or something but years later. The mayor of north adams skill annoyed that the new york times to call his a derelict. Mill town so i of course. I never told him that he didn't know that. I wrote that story until the movie came out. How would you define contemporary art. Because i think there's a little vagary around that term for some of the listeners are is really after world war two you know modern takes you up to up through world war. Two and contemporary art is you know what's what's made today what's made yesterday. And really since the nineteen fifties. And that's a really good question. People do struggle with that all the time so you write about this but then you up working there as right. I was really taken with a project. And when i when i actually saw the factory i just fell in love with it. It was. It's magnificent if it was like cnn. Had three still does have three courtyards. Two rivers moats. It was twenty eight buildings on thirteen acres and it had started before the civil war is a textile mill that they printed patterns on fabric and they they actually printed uniform colors for northern soldiers during the civil war and it's it's snowy rural new england and so in the winter they would have to get these bolts of fabric through all twenty eight buildings without going outside so all twenty buildings in a snap did and they're all their cata want this to each other because they weren't design they were just what's practical and one of the courtyards only exist because the bleach house over over the centuries just disintegrated and created a courtyard and so it was fantastic place and and so sad because it had been the heartbeat of the city. It was a small city in massachusetts. Twelve thousand people and four thousand people worked at the factory spray electric and they. They pulled the plug on the. You know the factory close down right right around. The time that i moved there and in those days every single person you met in north adams had connection. They'd worked there. The parents at worked their grandparents would work there. The factory they had a a company orchestra They had a company newsletter. They had company center. It was really the heartbeat of this little city and it was so sad that it was just such a beautiful place a little bit. Like miss sam's wedding cake minutes crumbling and in total disrepair. Tom krantz is indicating. This idea williams college and the massachusetts governor at the time. Michael dukakis was intrigued by it and released money to conduct a feasibility study. And it would be a year that a team would analyze whether this was a harebrained idea or not so. I heard that it had gotten that first step so applied for job. I got hired and we weren't even museum. We you know we. We didn't own the buildings. We didn't have any art. We didn't have any visitors. We didn't have a constituency. It wasn't like a college alumni base. Not at all that we're going to. We were the executive planning group. And so i thought being hired to be the head of pr because you know pitch them. That i knew how to write. And when i got my business card three days later it's that i was the director of development and public relations. I had no clue development net and it took me like three days to screw up my courage to go ask you know with sign was in charge of future future construction but no i was. I was in charge of raising the money. And then i stayed for twenty eight years. Where does the film come in. Where does the museum town documentary. Actually start for you. I started working at mass smoke in nineteen eighty eight. It took mass moca eleven years to open in nineteen ninety nine. It was a to the moon to be sure. And i knew that i had witnessed something rare. It could have gone either way. And i like to think that i would appreciate the journey if it had gone either way. Because you know it's sort of like the show west wing it where it's a lot of smart but ordinary people trying to do extraordinary things and i started thinking about. How did yankee stadium get started. And how did the get started. And you know the detroit museum of art. How did that. How did ford motor company. Get started you know all these things were just an idea in. Somebody's had and it was super hard to do. And i says littered with all the times where ideas never make it. And so i knew that i had this story and i had witnessed this and i'd i'd i'd been part of it. There are a lot of great stories. Funny stories. I mean if you've seen the film the story about david byrne talking heads. You can't make that up. And so as one of my roles as developed director i would lead trip for donors and for the last twenty years. I've been leading donor trips to sundance the film festival with rachel ten off who's an independent curator and and producer and around two thousand ten. The museum was eleven years old. After watching like five documentaries backed back. I just turned to her and i said i need to make the story of mass moca. She slapped her hand under the table. And she said if you do. I'll produce it and it took us another ten years until we did it. The one thing. I would say that i say to women in particular but i really say to anybody is that i was in my fifties when i started this film and i think i'm fairly brave and i think i have. You know. risk aversion factor. That's pretty low but you know trying something you've never done and the the looks i would get people would say what else have you made. Say well as my first film and they complete disdain. And i just kept feeling myself and thinking you know steven spielberg has his first. Every single person has their first of everything. You had your first podcast and this is really an important lesson to remember more about the people that you then got to help you out with this because your crew. I mean i'm very familiar with pola. Rapaport stuff I'd like to know more about kirsten. Johnson i mean these are some really talented folks who surrounding yourself with rachel and i started watching all these documentaries that we like and we would take notes and then we both really liked kristen. Johnson's works she's a noted cinematographer and director in her own right and she. She's done camera person and a lot of films and so we just reached out to her and you know we got lucky and with pola. We actually started with a different editor. And i i knew nothing about. I mean you know the night before. We were filming. I was like trying download like these online. How to be a director. Kate and it was just ridiculous but the editor wasn't right and i didn't realize when i began the film and i certainly know now films are made in the editing room and i consulted with film storyteller in australia and i said i was having problems with the editor that i thought that they were very good but they just you know you you spend twelve hours in this tiny room with your editor and you gotta you gotta you on the same page. And she said ask her if she loves your characters. 'cause i loved my characters and i asked her and she said i like some of them. We knew then that we needed to get another editor and nothing against her. The the i was very very talented. Just wasn't the right kind of mix that's when we found polo. We got so lucky. Because she and i were joined at the hip for about a year and she was just a great editor. Her husband will gang was also on cinematographers and film. He did he did the sort of really beautiful sweeping aerial near the end. There's installation by michael oatman which is basically a A motor home. That looks like it's crashed landed on the on the bridge and he pulls up from it and it shows you how great puller was see you know we had all this footage from eighteen months and then she said we just need a few beauty shots. Just you know this is a visual film is about a museum. We've got a lot of great shots about art but you just need a few stunning just like you know. Just luscious and i was like. Oh my god we were at the end filming at the end of our budget. And he came for two days and he was so precise he had my assistant. Take pictures of what i thought. I wanted him to shoot at different times of day. And and record the time of day and and what direction he was facing so he'd know where the sun was he's so precise he's great and and the opening and closing shots of the film are his and they really they just make it sore and kk johnson was also kirsten's. She was so generous. Who's on my first few shoots. And she knew that. I was first time if she knew us service and she just gave me such great pointers. That just you know will stand with my my whole life she was. She's very magnanimous personality. And i would say. Also john stewart. Who is a music supervisor has been having. The the band boko has been having music festivals mass moca since two thousand and ten. So i've known john for ten years and he's a very empathetic it talented lovely guy and i knew it didn't wanna make a rock doc. But i knew that i wanted a lot of music and i think there's like sixty two music cues in the film and i knew that i wanted the music to be representative of what mass moca is. So you know it's all over places lucious big thief with talking heads it's Ruthie foster. I just asked him to have coffee and asked him if he would be the supervisor and he fortunately said yes wants is completed. What happens with the documentary because this year all bets are off. It premiered at south by south west in march of two thousand and nineteen and then it had a great festival. Run aspen and woodstock and also all over the place for like seven months and then we started to try to sell it and the pandemic hit. We're actually really lucky. We found a great distributor kino marquee and it was released on friday. And what's really neat about. It is that it's being released in virtual cinema so you can go on keno marquees website or you can go on our website. You didn't have movie dot com or you can go to the brooklyn academy of music's website the institute of contemporary art boston's website. And you can buy a ticket and it gives you the link to watch it in your home for five days and forty percent of the twelve dollar ticket. Price goes to the nonprofit that is is carrying virtually. So you can support your favorite nonprofit while also watching the film and what are you doing now. Are you still sing. O o keeps you busy. I left mass moca. Four years ago to become director of different museum is called hancock shaker village. It's the seven hundred fifty acre site with twenty historic buildings dating back to seventeen eighty three. The shakers settled this community in the late. Seventeen hundreds and and so it's a. It's a living history museum but it's also a place where we see the world through a contemporary lens with shakur values and ethos so for example. Myelin did an installation of Who's atomic river watershed. Let two years ago. That reflected their strong sense of community in they. They established a gristmill on this river. They ground the corn for their neighbors. They were very commuter oriented. It's a pretty cool place. And i i've been director there for four years and you know they. They believed that work was a form of worship. You know they had a phrase hands to work and hearts to god's so they didn't just make a chair. They made a chair to perfection. And that's why you know shaker design is sort of a a revered american aesthetic. Really are you looking for other film projects. I'm percolating on it. It was really fun. It was really hard but it was really fun. I always just follow my path of what intrigues me. Like people used to say you know having you go from unified field theory too hot sauce. Or how can you go from nuclear power to a contemporary art museum. And i i really. I liked to do what i find interesting. I have confidence. We'll all we've together someday. We'll thank you so much for your time anyway. Thank you so much for interviewing me Dishonest out of ood s. When the burn sleep pleased with still be right where you left again as a and this job to pieces news f. You were shopping through every piece say l. Sent me. Say i love you.

massachusetts art museum of modern art museu jennifer schuster dr michio kaku north adams williams college museum of art tom krenz british virgin island Mike white North adams tom miss sam Tom krantz tufts university new york amalfi coast
Saturday, December 21st, 2019

Gemini Today

03:39 min | 1 year ago

Saturday, December 21st, 2019

"Good Morning Gemini. Today's Saturday December. Twenty first two thousand nineteen the son son in such a terrace. Sex Tyler Moon in libra. You are intelligent. Your life should be full of those who can mentally keep up with you. Otherwise you'll always feel restless. This is Gemini Today. Apar- cast original Horoscope today is supported by better. Help online counseling. A lot of times people portray their happiest self to others. Whether it's at work or on social media we often make it appear that we have everything figured out but a lot of times we don't. It's not always easy to ask. Ask for help and find counseling. So if you're feeling down but don't know where or how to ask for help better help. Is there for you. Better help offers is licensed counselors who specialize in a variety of issues including depression and anxiety as well as grief stress complicated relationships. And so many others. If you've been putting off counseling because you don't have the time better help makes it convenient by allowing you to connect privately with your counselor through text ext chat phone and video calls. Get help at your own pace on your own time and at an affordable rate horoscope today listeners. We'll get ten percents off their first month with Discount Code horoscope today. That's better help dot com slash horoscope. Today why not get help. Better help dot com slash horoscope. Today Let's begin your day when the Sun sex tells. The moon energy flows easily. Everyone seems to be embracing racing. The holiday spirit. And you may be the ringleader but as your ruling planet. Mercury and Sagittarius Squares Neptune in Pisces. All this good cheer ear could easily overwhelm you enjoy yourself but know when it's time to take a break now take a moment to reflect on your relationships with your ruling planet. Mercury in cemeteries activating partnership in your chart. You you may find yourself bored by anyone who is less than your intellectual equal. If you're partnered planet date that allows the two of you to share ideas and get lost. Austin conversation in art museum is an obvious choice but see if you can think of something more unique. If you're single looks will take take a back seat to cleverness and mental agility. Intelligence and good conversation aphrodisiacs. Seek them out. Contemplate your path to personal growth rather than cramming your social calendar full of activities events and obligations. Start to carve out free time. Even if it's only thirty minutes of reading or quick massage it's a way to give your nervous system. A moment to collect and relax Gemini today will be back tomorrow to learn more about your horoscope interscope visitcalifornia psychics and connect today horoscope. Today is a podcast original.

Austin Apar depression art museum thirty minutes
Savage Love Episode 706

Savage Lovecast

50:59 min | 1 year ago

Savage Love Episode 706

"You're listening to the micro version of the savage love cast. Www DOT savage love casts dot Com. We were out for a walk with my husband's dogs this weekend. Well actually one of them belongs to my husband. The other belongs to the husband's boyfriend. It's complicated. Where complicated dogs aren't they like to go for walks pseudo gay men? We were made for each other anyway. We left the house before it got dark and by the time we were coming home. It was dark and we had two options. Stay on the street AKA along way home or head through the park okay. The shortcut we took the shortcut park near our house is kind and the Torius volunteer park is in what was once. Seattle's wealthiest neighborhood. The street nicknamed millionaire's row at ends in the park. There's a lovely little art museum. Saddle Asian Art Museum. A famous culture of big marble synchtree thing called black hole sun. But it's the museum or that one particular hole that made volunteer park notorious. It's zombies the Dick zombies digs. Zombies are like regular zombies in some ways your classic movies Ambi- you're shuffling zombies the kind of zombies. You can get away from if you just keep moving but Dick zombies. Don't WanNA eat your brains. They WanNA get your day. Ix Extolling Dick zombies or guys who have sex and parks after dark are the reason. Seattle parks are closed at night. All of them twenty five years ago. The city shot all the parks down after ten PM in order to keep the Dick zombies out of one park and it didn't work for half the year. It gets dark in Seattle after four PM closing the parks after ten PM. Yeah no the Dick. Zombies are still there waiting behind trees in the dark hungry for day eggs. I've ever been tempted do knowing the Dick zombies or there it says something about the triumph of the human spirit or maybe the irresistibility of deck or both but I was surprised when a dig. Zombie stepped out from behind a tree in the dark. The other night I almost had a heart attack. Scared me to death. Then we saw another and another and I don't know why I thought the dig. Zombies would be at home but I did so. My Guard was down which is why. Let out a little scream when the first dick. Zombie shuffled out from behind a tree in the near Pitch Blackness heedless to say for a Dick Zombie a screen. Kinda kills Mood Dick. Zombies prefer to conduct their Dick Zombie business and silence. They don't want to draw attention to themselves. Just Day eggs. I was equal parts comforted and alarmed. It was similar to the comfort. I felt when the Cherry tree in our front yard exploded into bloom. Hey life goes on but the alarm I feel when someone who isn't wearing a facemask squeezes past me in the supermarket dude. What the fuck are you doing? I wanted to shout. Hey you guys. This isn't okay. Walk the same time pausing to recognize my privilege toilet paper. Canned soups decks were stocked up and I understand. There's only so long people. Human beings can go without contact or sex. And Hey maybe if a particular dig. Zombie was practicing social distancing and living alone and working from home and having all their groceries delivered. It would be safe for that particular Dick Zombie to meet up with another Dick Zombie. Who's doing all those same things but failing that Ja- this is not okay. It's not safe. You can't maintain a safe social distance. You can't stay six feet away from someone while you're eating their deck. That's sad. I think we all recognize that. This can't go on forever. We're going to have to figure out sex in our new reality. We haven't figured it out yet but for now. Dick zombies and I say this is fan and it mirer. Don't eat the Dick's maybe stand six ten feet away from each other and Jack those dicks off all right coming up on today. Show in the micro addition to the savage love Cast Diana from Studio. Friction joins us to talk about creating Kim communities and on the Magnum addition of the savage webcast that you can subscribe to at savage love cast dot com twice as much show more gas no ads Joel in. Nadi joins us to talk about her new book. The monster under the bed about introversion depression sex bromance everything all that coming up on. Today's show is episode is brought to you by Helix. Sleep the best mattress for your individualized comfort right now. My listeners get up to two hundred dollars. Off All mattress orders at Helix sleep dot com slash savage. This episode of the savage love cast is sponsored by. Omg Yes a website where you explore the latest science about women's sexual pleasure. Through fun honest videos get more understanding more pleasure and more tools for an even happier relationship. Get a discount on newly released season two at. Omg Yes dot com slash savage. That's omg yes dot com slash savage this episode of the cast is brought to you by pill club the birth control subscription. That's delivered right to your door. Get a special care package with your first delivery. Go to the pill club dot com slash savage. Hi Dan I'm calling with a quarantine teen sex story the other day my boyfriend and I were both rock climbers and in our state. We're allowed to recreate outside. And there's a climbing area of very close to our houses that nobody ever claims that accept us and so we headed out there and to do some climbing and it got too hot to climb and so he started kissing me. And taking off my. He took off my climbing harness and took off my clothes and then he puts climbing harness back on so and then he proceeds to suspend me And then he went down on me and then we had sex like that and it was pretty fun and wild and really beautiful out in nature and This climbing areas pretty special to us because we recently put up a new climate there and named it quarantine in honor of the term that I believe you coined and the fact that we are now quarantines so thanks for the inspiration. Thank you so much for sharing. And I don't mean to be pedantic during a pandemic but if you were suspended didn't technically go up on you we're looking for your quarantine sex stories to start the show every week literally with a bang if you have a good quarantine sex story give us a call two six three two two zero six four and share it and we may open next week show with yours Dan. I must a straight woman in my mid thirties. Living in a big city on the east coast A few months ago I ended a two and a half year relationship during the time I was in that relationship. I was introduced to a guy who recently moved to my city as a worker contact. met him in person. A number of times always enough professional unfriendly context. I thought he was cute. And we seem to have a lot in common But since I wasn't available I didn't think more of it since I break up. I've been thinking about him a lot more. We've been in touch more often in the past couple of months in a friendly way and we even went out to dinner. Together was a nice restaurant on a Friday night. But it's so had more of a friend not state by to it. I'm interested in seeing their potential for romantic relationship to come out of this. I know that he's looking for serious relationship for himself and I also know that since he moved to my city he hasn't been active with dating only going out with two women. I think he's a bit shy. Just not a fan of dating apps so the fact that he never asked me out could either be that he's not interested and only sees me as a friend or he might be interested in me but it's just not the type to make a move. I'm not sure I'd love advice on two things I. How do I come out in a way? That doesn't put him on the spot. It's an awkward if he's not interested and doesn't affect our friendship honestly. I'll be totally fine. If he isn't interested and I'm happy to just be friends and I WANNA make sure he knows that the second thing is that during this time of quarantining I obviously don't know when I will be able to see him in person again. So is this the right time to let him know that I'm interested in potentially dating which I guess would mean going on virtual dates or should I be patient and wait for the social things to be behind us? And in the meantime continue just chatting with friends. You wonder why he never asked you out but you already sort of lie. You never asked you out if indeed he's interested in you in that way or potentially interested in you in that way when you first got to know each other you're involved only a couple of months ago to break up with your acts. And maybe he didn't WanNa feel like he was swooping in and now we're all in quarantine and everything's Kinda called off on hold. You should definitely ask him out the awkwardness that. You're worried about the rejection. The potential rejection. There's always a potential acceptance but the potential rejection. You're worried about yeah. You just have to brace yourself that you have to lean into your knowledge. The awkwardness telling. You've always been attracted to him. You kept it friendly professional because he was a work contact and you were involved somebody else but now that you're not you're interested in knowing whether or not he might be interested in getting to know you that way getting to know you romantically going out to dinner next time when going out to dinner is a thing and making it a date and see what he says. Worst case scenario he says No. I'm so sorry I don't think be that way you've missed read my signals. You apologize to him for having misread him. And then you say I hope. This doesn't negatively impact. Our friendship's going to be a little bit awkward at first but we will burn through the awkwardness and keep this friendship because the friendship that of course initially led to me feeling attractive and so I obviously value that friendship and I promise I won't be trying in the future to upgrade friendship to romance. If the answer's no but the answer might be yes. And why not? Now if you hang back now because we're in quarantine you want to wait till this over. It could be Berry fucking long time before this is over and during that very fucking long time until this end somebody else might be just about to ask him out somebody. He may be less interested in. But by the time you get around to ask him out he could be involved with and then unable to give you the US. You're hoping to get ask him out. Go on virtual dates now when they begin to lift. The central distancing restrictions may be then you can go on some actual dates but at the very least. You'll both have something to look forward to. You deserve a comfortable mattress. You WanNa sleep right particularly now and if you're lucky enough to be having sex right now you really want to have the best possible mattress to get sex dun-rite now imagine having the perfect mattress view delivered to your home safely with no contact. That mattress is a helix mattress. And it's what Terry night's sleep on every night and sometimes we do other stuff on it. To helixsleep has a quiz takes just two minutes to complete and matches your body type and sleep references to the perfect mattress for you if you like a mattress. That's really soft or firm sleep on your side or your back or your stomach if you sleep really hot. You're one of those people who heats up at night with Helix. There's a specific mattress for each and every bodies unique taste body type and heat. Index Helix was awarded the number one best overall mattress of twenty nineteen by G. Q. And Wired magazine and you just have to order one to know why Helix also designs their mattresses with sex in mind of their mattresses are hybrids meaning. They have both foam and springs in them. Unlike many other companies and having springs in your mattress rather than just foam keeps you from sinking in too much and gives you the perfect level of bounds and leverage. You need to get it on that mattress. They're high quality springs are incredibly quiet and won't SAG even during your most athletic non sleeping activities. He looks mattresses. Also have strong edge support thanks to their reinforced coil parameter to keep things stable. He never have to worry about rolling off the bed. No matter what you're doing on it tearing. I ordered ourselves. The midnight locks helix mattress. Because we wanted something that felt firm and when we do sleep we move around a little at night. And that's what worked for us. He looks mattress has a mattress. That will work for you. However it is your moving around at night go to helixsleep dot com slash savage. Take their two minute sleep quiz. And they'll match you to customize mattress that will give you the best sleep of your life. They have a ten year warranty. And you get to try it out there matches you get to try it out for one hundred nights risk-free they'll even pick it up for you if you don't love it but they're not going to need to do that because you are going to love it. He is offering up to two hundred dollars off for our listeners. At helixsleep dot com slash savage. Get yourself great. New Mattress support the show go to helixsleep dot com slash savage up to two hundred dollars off. Hey Dan and a longtime listener person caller from Italy and Turkey for your sold in a thing with my boyfriend. Twenty nine for almost two years are sex and communication are great. Always talk about sex lives and how he'll enjoy in this really nothing. We can't discuss except for one thing. We both love email me. Being on the receiving end and a couple of months ago we started jokingly to talk about me penetrating his ass in never really said no and even started talking about it. Always jokingly minds you. I've always responded than definitely not against an as a matter of fact if done it before but then would need him to me and I will take what what teach me partly because that really me on and because I honestly am not sure what to do with finger. I commend SAS so one night we had smoked cod and we were talking and I proceeded to put up Pinger ask. You didn't stop me but he also didn't say anything so me being a little secure. It's a finger out and we continued as if nothing happened. We didn't talk about it afterwards. And I've talked about this things we're not in quarantine together so my question is how do. I approach asking him but he liked it or not I feel maybe it's a shame there's no need to be in. Maybe a little bit embarrassed. Also since we won't be together for God knows how long because they leaving in the extender of dependent egg and he's in another state should I may be weights and we we get together and ultimately what do you do. Inside immense has a like make Bingo a multi than reaches prostate. Helped me then and stay safe. What do I do inside a man's ass well having been inside a few men's butts in my time there are nerve endings? All around the so. It can be very pleasurable to have those nerve endings stroke to stimulate. You don't even have to penetrate someone to provide them with a little bit of anal pleasure. You ran a Luby's finger back and forth or around in circles on the outside of someone's feels pretty good if you go inside well a dude has a prostate gland if you are in front of him and you slip your middle finger up his ass. Make the come toward me gesture. That's basically where the prostate gland is as he becomes more aroused you can feel it harden and rise before he had jackie relates to really. WanNa know where the prostate is? If you want to have a little experimental session with some dude that you're penetrating digitally. Just get your fingers in him. Get One or two fingers in a very looped up with his consent. You do need to ask. You should ask someone before you stick a finger in there but once you're in with his consent what's your fingers are up there just very gently stroke your fingers. And that come toward me gesture. While he masturbated and his prostate gland will identify itself to you it will stand up and salute and then you will know roughly where it is and how to pleasure. It's just a very gentle kind of stroking pleasure you're not trying to slap the prostate around. There's also huge. Psychological component to being penetrated for many men men are supposed to be the penetrate tours not the penetrate tease most and by men get past that and enjoy penetration. But for a LOTTA STRAIGHT GUYS. The shame of it. The inversion of roles and expectations is part of the turn on the transgression is part of the Turnham. So I don't think I need to get him to a place where he's completely over his shame. You just need to get into a place where the shame is contained and corralled in such a way that it is serving eurotic connection. But you gotta be able to talk about it. You don't have to eradicate the change just to be able to talk about it because you can talk about. Like part of what turns them on if he can articulate? It is the wrongness of the delicious wrong. This up and it's not just people who are into having their butts played with you. Get to enjoy that delicious wrongness field as we've said like most kinks at bottom or about some sort of power exchange some sort of power play but a lot of them I think concurrently twin route is really this idea of how wrong this is. How wrong how naughty. How transgressive but you got to get him to talk about it and you have a great opener. Remember that time honey. I put my finger in your but we never talked about it. Can we talk about it? I enjoyed it. Did you enjoyed. I might like to do it again. We've joked about pegging. Lot of people will raise a sexual interest it's a little nod transgressive by framing it as something. They're just joking about so that if their partner is offended or not into it or judgmental that Kazaa. I was just kidding. Obviously he's not just kidding. Obviously this is something he would like to do. You're GonNa have to do what you did already proven that you can do which is used your words. You're very articulate. There's nothing your shaming about your tone your line of questioning. You just need to take all of those things that you me and those questions you asked me and put them to him and ask them of him and when it comes to anal penetration baby steps. You'RE NOT GONNA go from one. Very wet. Fingers slipped into a about to slamming in an autumn on the strap on Dildo in ten minutes. You're really going to have to ramp it up. I would suggest you know when you guys can get back together that keep playing with your fingers maybe enjoy a little bit are ing and then get him a butt plug but plugs are great intermediate sex toys particularly for straight guys who may be wrestling with. Shame the transgressive -ness of it all because it doesn't look like a Dickin- you can get it into your ass and then leave it there and he can go back to doing all of the straight guy things during sex. You know eating your pussy getting his Dick socked fucking you while the buffalo just sits there in his ass lurking in wait ready for that moment that he comes while he's doing the straight guy thing and fucking girlfriend's pussy and the minute he comes. His anal sneakers begin to contract the prostate harder rises and this contraction of the ails. Victors which is part of what helps slam all the Jackie out. His body is going to move. That bud plug gently back and forth across. His prostate can be mind blowing but to get there. You'RE GONNA have to have a conversation with him about it. You say the sex is great. I believe you you say the communications. Great Okay I believe you up to a point but if you can't talk about his but particularly after you have digitally penetrated after all these jokes about pegging. Communication is incomplete. So use your words and this is a great time to get on the phone and use your words because what else do we have to do? Omg DOT COM. Is a website devoted to sexual pleasure? In Partnership With Indiana University and Kinsey Institute researchers they asked tens of thousands of women. What was the one discovery you've made? That really made your pleasure matter. And they found the patterns in those discoveries the physical techniques psychological techniques the ways of guiding partners and they still all those discoveries down put him on a website. Omg Yes dot. Com discoveries are brought to life videos and a mation data visualizations and a whole lexicon of what feels good. And what works. Omg US really is a binge with benefits. Most entertainment like shows in watching videos online doesn't really be better off than before you watched it. Most online education feels like work but OMG is something binge -able omg yes itself a pleasure that you want to keep watching and watching but it's nutritious. It's good for you. It's good your life and your mind and your relationships a study out of IU. School of Medicine found that one month after watching G PEOPLE HAD MORE WORDS. What they find pleasurable more confidence guiding their partner's pleasure experiences that felt physically noon. More relationship closeness outside the bedroom and more body. Positively this shelter in place. Time the perfect opportunity to learn and explore your or your partner's pleasure. Sia SAMPLE DOT com slash savage and listeners of the love cast also get a discount at omg gas dot com slash savage Dan. This is a long time. Rada and longtime listener and must say that it strangely you your podcast was what got me through hospice seeing my mother actually so anyway. I M sheltering in place with my partner of thirty five years and we've raised a couple of kids and we have. We have a great relationship. We've always had very high libido and since the kids have boo off on their own empty nesters and all that we really gotten our kink on and thanks to you. I've been open to all the things that I'm interested in. It's shocking actually that I am. What do they say he as fuck anyway Having a marvelous time just before the pandemic broke in the sheltered home place was ordered. We moved from a small apartment with paper thin walls in to a standalone home with backyard. And Nice solid walls and even a guestroom. So we've got plenty of places to play in plenty of time and space and privacy to do so so this is actually both a chicken from Corentin love tales. It's also a question so it turns out that the I'm switch but my husband's a dumb and we're having a great time. The question becomes when I am fully bound an awesome gagged. How can I communicate things such as a safety woods to my partner? I looked online. They said using corn or some Sexual Bell. I think bell. We'd get lost in the in the ruckus actually and I believe a haunt just is. It's just tone deaf to what's happening in the room. You're very welcome. I'm very sorry about the passing of your mother. My heart goes out to you almost empathy. this is an easy one to solve. You know if you've been with somebody for thirty five years probably pretty good at reading each other's moods and each other's body language advice about a safe gesture or something that you can do if you're bound and gagged presumes you're with someone that doesn't know you well and you're with someone that you don't know but you trust them enough to make you helpless is that and the advice. Typically I mean a horn would be ridiculous. A little teeny something like a ball. You squeeze it makes a honking sound. Who wants to tie up Harpo Marx eight-year-old pop culture reference for the kids? Not Sexy. Not Fun instead. What people typically do is some sort of grunt pattern a real quick means. I'm saved forwarding or you. Give the subs something to hold in their hand. Maybe the restrain. They're tied up at the hub the use of their hands or fingers and palms or free and if the sub has a ball in their hand than they hold onto it if they drop the ball. That's safe wording seems to me that unless you're the kind of kinks Albania. Samsung who likes to struggle likes to look unhappy likes to perform. No no no please. Don't please stop that. You wouldn't necessarily need the ball or the cronk prompt or gestures shaking one leg or shaking one arm. But if you do that's the kind of play you and your husband for thirty five years together are getting into and I think that's so wonderful and what a great example to other callers particularly callers couples. Were parents you have small children in the home. You're stressed out. Your sex life is a little road. There's a lot of maintenance sacks and not a lot of passion hang in there it could come roaring back most people you meet in organized swinging for example our parents with grown children who are just getting into it and obviously this caller thirty-five years together to grow children and Kinky as fuck as the kids say so if you'd like to struggle if you like to look like you're miserable while your husband's da-ming you get a ball agree on a grunt pattern or adjust your. That's your safe word. Thank you for calling and really happy to hear from a couple of Ben. Together as long as you. Youtube have still exploring doing things really killing. It's a good problem to have your problem. Most of the couples we hear from our having not so great problems to have always refreshing to hear from a couple. That's happened the opposite problem. The good problem. You need to renew your birth control. Prescription WanNa switch up your birth control. Maybe try birth control for the first time if you know what you want or even if you don't know where to start pill club has your back. Pill Club is a birth control subscription that is delivered straight to your door. Most prescriptions are free. With insurance or Medicaid. It can be as low as three ninety. Nine per month without shipping is always free indiscreet and pill clubs schedules deliveries. So you always have your next dose. On Hand. Before you need it so skip. The office visit skipped the line at the pharmacy and join the club. And Right now. Our listeners go to the pill club dot com slash savage. Get a new way to get birth control and special care packages with every delivery. That's the pill club dot com slash savage to get your first birth control care package. Remember the pill. Club dot com slash savage. Hey Dan I am a straight male college student. My early twenties and I have a question about starting a relationship with particular person. I have a close friend That I have seen actual traction. We supposed to talk a lot about the fact that we're track to each other. We even made out a couple of times parties after having a couple of drinks There's one particular problem and that's that she is very religious and not interested in having sex until she's married now. I want to preface by saying that. She's in no way of prudish or second. Negative person come to other people We have a lot of mutual friends who are openly polly and openly. Lgbtq openly kinky and been judge mental them and she even very frequently jokes with our friends about the people they've fucked and people she'd like to Faulk so there's no real sexual negatively I've seen from her and I've asked her about it. Her answers always been that she believes the Bible calls her. You know not to have sex before marriage. But she doesn't think it applies to anyone else. Who doesn't believe in it? The problem here is that I am interested in having sex regularly had sex in my previous relationships and I don't know how ethical it is to go into this relationship with the hope that eventually she will be willing to have sex before marriage. I wouldn't be comfortable being in this relationship for more than probably six or nine months without eventually having sex. And because of her general sex positivity for people outside of her south. I don't think it's unreasonable to assume that she could become comfortable with that possibility. In fact we have a very close mutual friend who was raised conservative Muslim and didn't drink or smoke or have sex until she got a boyfriend. Who did all those things and now she does all those things too so i. I'm just on the bench. Is it ethical to go to try and start a relationship with this person who I feel really straughn emotional and physical connection to with the knowledge that if after three months or six months or nine months? She's still not willing to have sex before marriage. I don't feel comfortable saying that relationship any longer. You're an adult. You certain things that you want out of a relationship certain expectations. That seem perfectly reasonable to me that you might place on a romantic partner. She's an adult if you inform her about what your expectations would be. What your needs would be from a romantic partner. And she chooses to get involved with you then. She's an adult. She gets to make her own choices. You don't WanNa put her in a position where she's become so emotionally involved or attached to you that she winds up doing something that she at that point doesn't WanNa do but it's the only way to keep you in her. Life is to concede that in. Fuck you in violation of whatever it was that she read in her Bible. That was written in lemon juice for her just by God and she had hold you. Can't I don't know what it is that she's reading that allows for her to smile on pilot amorous relationships and Oliver sex positive sexually active friends but tells her she can't but whatever that's her on personal interpretation of Sky Daddy's orders for her but she is an adult and if she chooses to get involved with you. Maybe that's a step. She's taking toward letting that go. Also when people say they're saving it for marriage define it. Some people mean all of it to know kissing on the Doug remember the dodgers kind of like the doctors no kissing no hand holding just sitting next to each other. They're saving all of it. Some people have a much narrower definition of what it is that they are saving what it is some people who are saving it at oral sex. They engage in mutual masturbation in the intercourse. All they're saving is vaginal. Penetration is saving that husband their wedding night because in their own personal copy of the Bible with the page written and lemon juice just for them by God and secret that they held up to a candle. Vats what they're supposed to be doing. That's what God told them to do. So you might want a little bit more clarity from her about what she means by it when she saving it you might be more comfortable that relationship with Pi is great. And you love it. But all these other kinds of sex are just as rewarding and I think the broader definition of Saxe more all encompassing. It is the better of a sex life you're gonNA have and maybe could have that kind of a sex life with and even in the absence of Pi Intercourse. But you're right. There is an ethical issue. Here you don't want to backer into a position where she feels obligated where she ends up having sex with you to keep you sexually didn't WanNa have but if after six or nine months. She agreed to have sex with you and that is the only reason that she's doing it. Because you guys are Gonna. Continue to talk about this. At that point you can choose not to have sex with her however it is you two are defining sucks. Hi Dan. I'm a twenty one year old bisexual female currently living in the Midwest. But I'll be moving to a smallish town in New England once I graduate which will be in the next couple of months. I'm really excited once. We're done socially distancing to begin to find build my sex positive kinky community. I've played up it with rope in the past and there's so much more I want to explore but I have a few questions first and foremost. I'm looking for your advice on how to go about this in the safest way possible. The Guy who first introduced me to replicate so incredible. Just truly the best guy but I know that people can be shitty and I'm wary of being taken advantage of especially as a young female who's very new to the scene. I've been put in uncomfortable situations before I would ask friends to accompany Media Club servants. But I don't have friends are interested in or really comfortable with Kink. They're great but it's just not their thing. Oh and and how do you find these events? I met the guy on an APP. But they haven't been so lucky since. I know that life is a thing but I've been overwhelmed trying to navigate those message boards before and it's hard to tell what's legitimate joining me by phone to help tackle this question. Diana founding member and manager of studio friction a rope centric community space in Denver Colorado. Hey Diana how are you? I'm Dan how are you really good before we get to the specifics of the callers question because I think it's instructive? Can you tell us how studio friction came to be you created? You helped found. I think the kind of community that the caller is looking for. How did you do that? Yeah so stadia. Fiction was kind of born out of a need Denver wrote bite was created seven years ago and we were initially at the Denver. Think swearing and we just totally outgrew the space And so me and three of my friend or to my friends decided like let's dive in and see what we can make We wanted to make a community space. That kind of fits the pressure off of like going to a dungeon can be Kinda scary and had events that were less like a pressured and more like let's get to know each other welcome to the community sort of people talk about munches which are sort of informal coffee Klatches for. Kingston's where you get together at a time where there's no play. It's not play party. It's more getting to know each other and informational and you know to help people to make their first contact with the king community. It almost sounds like you've mixed that you know. Denver sanctuary kind of play space with the Munch and integrated them at studio friction. Yeah we definitely have A. We have an event on every other Sunday or we were having an event every other Sunday. I'm called Sunday dinner where we would get together and basically just throw potluck for everybody to come and meet and talk and you could practice your if you wanted to. But you didn't have to and it was. It is my favorite events that whole host. And now during social distancing we're GONNA try and do it virtually And have an instructor teach cooking and then we can just hang out and chat so we'll see how that goes so. Here's the callers she's graduating. She's had a really great. I kink experience with someone And she wants to get out there and create her own community seems to me that if kink is really important to her in this kind of play really important to her that she might WanNa prioritize moving to a place like Denver where the community is established where she doesn't have to create it from scratch. Absolutely I think it's a it's a privilege that We have here in Denver that we have such a great community and so many wonderful volunteers that help make it happen and I also understand like living in a small town where maybe that's just not an option and that's how you make friends in the king seen she's Kinky said a great first experience none of her friends she would either would feel comfortable going with her to kink event or she would feel comfortable going with them. That can make you feel self conscious if you feel like a Vanilla frontier chaperoning you. You WanNa be somebody who's going to be some kind of kinky baseline but the way to to to to find those people is to get into the kinks. It's sort of. She doesn't feel comfortable entering the king seen because she's got no friends there. But the friends that you need to be comfortable with. Kingston are in the king seen and she's just gonNa have to push past that that block and push yourself outside of their comfort zone momentarily to make those friends in there for then feel more comfortable in the king spaces absolutely and I think a really important thing to remember is like everybody in the community. Was that person at some point in time. That was terrified to get out that was scared to go to their first event. That maybe didn't have friends that they could go if And they we all had to push through that barrier and just kind of finally get our toes. Let's you know I really think that that's true. And sometimes there's this fear for the the you know the person hasn't been to the events yet. Who is the Newbie that the interest might take in them when they go to that I can cabannes just sexual predatory and what they don't know because they haven't experienced it yet but will once they enter a you know a a safe and responsible and Karen King Community is a lot of what they're going to get his empathy? That I was in your shoes wants. Nobody's born into the king seen. I was new nervous like you. What can I do to help? Set you at ease and then you'll also meet people. Perhaps that you WANNA play with play with you. But YOU'RE GONNA meet a lot of people who want to help you get comfortable and make those contacts and and be your friend. The people have it in their heads. To the first time you go into kinks seen you know people are to sneer at you if you don't know what doing if you've never been if you don't have the right gear and it's really the opposite reaction. It's the you know in some ways. I'm going to go up now. It's the same fear. A lot of people have to go to the gym for the first time that the people who go to the gym all the time are going to judge them and it's not true if people all the time might look at you because you're using the equipment wrong in their worried for you and they don't know how to say something same thing on the king seen if you go in there and you know what you're doing people are gonNA worry for you but people aren't unhappy to see you hundred percent. Nobody is unhappy to see anyone. And especially. If you're doing something incorrectly. And the Kingston Link. Somebody who's going to step in and say like. Hey let's talk about how he can get a little safer and things like that I think some some really good examples of I events are those munches Especially for people under thirty five T and G events or the next generation events or really great to kind of make you feel more comfortable with a group of people that are around your same age Also classes are fantastic spots. Go to classes. Even if you're maybe not interested in learning that topic if you just show up people are gonNA start noticing you and they're gonNA start reaching out and they're gonNA start wanting to know who you are last question one of the things that she raises. She had a great first experience. She knows though that there are be people out there and you know it's not just keep people have to worry about shitty people taking advantage of them but if you kings really you know your sexual interests center around moments of complete helplessness. You get your little more concerned about winding up with somebody who's Shitty or taking advantage or a monster. That is something that people can find in the king not that. There's no shitty people in the kinks scene but an organized king seen people who reveal themselves to be shitty tend to be shown the door at some point exiled anyway yes and that's one of the functions of an organized kings one of the things we want from an organized king scenes that kind of accountability. Absolutely so you still have to use your bullshit detectors just because somebody's at the monster at the party doesn't mean they're a great person but if there are regular and they've been going to the month or the party for a long time and you meet other people. They played with who've vouch for them that all contributes to the likelihood that this is a safe person to play with the assurances that the this person is going to be safe to play with. You can find the Organiz kings. Yeah and I like to tell people all the time like signed people that like to do what you do. And if you like to receive things or you're the bottom for things find other bottom to talk to about that or if you're a top five other top to talk to about that because the best people that are going to be the most knowledgeable about good partners are gonna be people that have done those things up. Founding MEMBER MANAGERS TO FRICTION RIPS INTER-COMMUNITY SPACE IN DENVER. Thank you so much jumping on phone. Thank you for having me Dan. Hi Dan I'm calling for some advice on my relationship with one of my partners I've been married to my husband for ten years and we have had an open relationship for the last three. My issue is with my boyfriend. Who been seeing for about a year and a half now until recently. I didn't care to know much about his other romantic relationships. I knew he was seeing at least one. Other person on a regular basis. This other woman is also married but her husband does not know that she had seen him. What concerns me about? This is not the basic behavior knowing about. The first woman was not a big problem for me and I didn't feel it was my business anyway. I recently though he and I have opened up a little bit more about the other people that we are both saying. I learned that he was seeing a few more women that were all married all cheating on their spouses. What I'm concerned about is whether the fact that he's dating married women exclusively three to four of whom are having affairs speaks his moral fiber and frankly whether he's the type of person. I want to be spending my time with and my overreaching here or does this pattern. Say something about him that I should be worried about. Its honestly turned me off of him. But is that unfair? You know sometimes. People are really trapped in marriages that they can't get out of. Maybe they have kids who have special needs. There's economic interdependence is not always. The wife is economically dependent on the husbands and wives husbands economically dependent on the wife. And sometimes there's a lot that's really wonderful about the merit these to our best friends. It's just kind of sex or the sex never worked and that married persons as I like to say doing what they need to do to stay married and stay sane and they are cheating because they tried to have the conversation about or their partner so insecure that they're not able to have that conversation of partner said no even though the partners and interested in fucking them their partner won't give them permission if anybody else and so they cheat sometimes cheating is the least worst option sometimes being cheated on his actually in the best interest of the person who is being cheated on whether they are capable of recognizing it or not their spouse gets out therapy find somebody in stable who isn't a threat they get these needs met they come home. They're happier and more content in their relationship. They don't have to live a sexless life even if they're in a success marriage. I could see that being the case with one of your boyfriend's other girlfriends but all of your boyfriend's other girlfriends he's got four women four women he sees regularly who are married and cheating it becomes less and less likely the more married cheating women he adds to his stable becomes less and less likely that they're all doing what they need to do to stay married in stay sane and it looks more like your boyfriend has a thing for married women who are cheating. He's obviously got a collection of married women. Who are cheating. You're the exception E. Need to talk to your boyfriend about this many of my responses. They're getting in the end. You need to talk to the person that you're talking about the fucking that you're doing or not doing fucking that. They're doing with other fuckers. Need to talk to your boyfriend about this. If you're uncomfortable being with someone who out married women who are cheating on their husbands without good reason and you know four sounds like probably at least two of them are unlikely to have good reason. Is that something you're comfortable obviously? It's not that's why you call your not comfortable with it. If he fetish is. Is this kind of sex sex with married? Women were someone is being betrayed. That's part of the erotic Fazon for your boyfriend at. That's something that he's seeking out and you aren't comfortable with that. That's the libido killer for you well then you may need to end things with your boyfriend all right before I get your response calls. Let's read some of your tweets. Vivere dirt tweets almost every time I type social distancing. I accidentally hit F. instead of D. and man social financing really makes your mind wander other efforts substitution. That can make the mind wander. We'RE GONNA go meet with the regional distributor to serve with distinction the welcome distraction. There's been a faster since in the forest. I could go on. But the look on Nancy's face tells me I shouldn't J. Rachelle tweets. Hey at fake Dan savage when you say you need a better word for vaginal secretions. Allow me to suggest. Gruel girl drool the name has its own sub reddit and everything all right. Well we've girl Drool Gruel G. R. O. L. has its own sub breaded. Who Am I to argue with that? But you're Neil. Gypsum has a hominem problem gruel. Gru E. L. Two syllables defined by. Miriam Webster the only dictionary with a decent drag name as a thin porridge. Gruel entered the English language in the fourteenth century according to Miriam Webster. It's never used as a complement. No one wants to be served gruel. So I'm just going to reject this one on behalf of the ladies out there out of hand celebrated be damned and finally delicious spear tweets. It's been seven weeks since I listened to the savage love cast because my anxiety has been through the roof during the pandemic but I just listened episode seven. Oh five and I feel like I'm coming home ugly tears. Thank you. Dan Savage and Nancy. You are welcome Alicia and it's great to have you back all right. If you want me to read your tweet of an upcoming episode of the Savage Webcast please be sure to use the Hashtag savage love cast and now your response calls Dan. I'm calling response to episode seven. Oh five where? The woman called to say that her and her significant other would break up and get back together frequently. I'm a therapist and I do. Therapy with couples and my rule for couples is that they are not allowed to say they are breaking up with each other unless they're actually breaking up with each other. It's a common thing and it's very toxic relationship only time. You should be telling somebody that you're breaking up with them is if you actually breaking up if you're very frustrated with them than tell them that you're frustrated overwhelmed angry anxious but no more breaking up getting back together he dan. This is a response to the episode 705 about the translator on the Scooter. I live in. Dc and I recently found out about the existence of a trans woman. Here who identifies as a sissy princess she's known for scooting around DC and harassing men for money? She then posts screen shots of Havana on social media bragging about off the money she gets from men saying that she's a thin dom. I'm assuming that she's involving these men. I'M CONSENTING LOUIS. In her financial domination kink much as she had with this woman she also claims on her social media that she uses this money she gets from men to pay tribute to other fem domes because she believes in female supremacy. When I heard the call I immediately thought that this has to be the same woman and I wanted to call in to give this woman a little bit more context around her experience and let her know that this lady on the scooter is an asshole only to women but also to men a Dan. I just heard you say that there was no Spur Badger no secretions and I was immediately. Came to my head pussy juice and then. I couldn't get beyond that but I went to. The store found a few more made an oil the flange better pussy liquor pussy nectars juice devise gene. I on like an Pootie Tang Pussy Fountain and I can't even say some of these. Okay thanks for this show. It's always fun that Gary in these times and we're going to leave it there. Two six three zero two two zero six four is the number here at the savage. Love Kosta question or comment with the show. Give us a buzz two. Oh six three Oh two. Two zero six four fatter than calling. You can use the voice memo APP on your phone record your question or comment and then email to us at voice. Mail at savage love cast dirty Little Film Festival Hump This. GonNa be streaming online may nine through June twelfth hosted by me. We got permission from the filmmakers to show their films online and we'll have the fifteenth annual festival up and ready to view from the comfort of living room bedroom. Wherever you liked to watch I'll be there to introduce the show and then take you straight to all the great dirty movies in this year's Tommy go to Huntsville best dot com to watch the trailer. Checkout the lineup. And choose the date and time that works for you including additional shows for hub fans in. Follow me on twitter at fake. Dan Savage follow. Joe Ellen Nadi on twitter at Joel. Naughty and OT savage love cast produced every week by Nancy her Tunisian and me and the tech savvy rescued him. Nancy back next week. Moore installment savage loved cast. 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Governor John Hickenlooper: 2020 Presidential Candidate Interview on the Arts

ArtsVote 2020 Podcast Series with Ben Folds

30:33 min | 2 years ago

Governor John Hickenlooper: 2020 Presidential Candidate Interview on the Arts

"Hi i'm ben folds today. On twenty twenty podcast series on arts and politics senator mark baggage pitch and i talked presidential candidate governor john hickenlooper of colorado governor hickenlooper is a passionate advocate for the arts and he shares his own personal musical talents. We we also learn why is mayor of denver and governor of colorado invested heavily in the arts at the state and local levels. Governor hickenlooper also tells us how as president and he would show his national public leadership in the arts to support both public and private giving to the arts and arts education. We are here with governor. Hickenlooper ben folds who <hes> is here on the campaign trail. I'm actually calling in from alaska and moderating this. Oh we're very excited. Decide to have you here and what mike to do. Just maybe throw out a basic question and that is where you see the role of arts and not only as a presidential candidate but oh you personally. How has it impacted you or your family or or your role that you've added governor and mayor. There's a a framing that arts and cultural affairs plays in how we approach our economy our civil nature of democracy so many of the major issues and you know i come from the pro arts side of things one of the things when i got elected mayor in two thousand and three mayor of denver was we decided we were going to be a destination for young entrepreneurs and then we sat down scratched our heads and said well who are those those entrepreneurs. I'd had you attract them and richard. Florida had just ridden the rise of the creative class and his argument he came out and visited us was that most most of the really talent entrepreneurs tech innovators were kind of social outcasts in high school and they generally hung around with musicians and the artists and the other people that were on the social periphery of the popular group of people in in any high school and so his whole pitch was attract artists to your community and you will get the entrepreneurs and the tech innovators so we did that in denver for now we provided these little incentives and recognition so denver now has more live music venues in austin or nashville. We have a thousand thousand miles of bike trail which is not really music but is a form of music and we celebrate visual arts and theatrical arts everywhere we could and now uh-huh expanded that when i became governor in two thousand ten we expanded out to a statewide effort and for the last years where the number one economy in the country and i would argue that a big part of that is we have been a destination for young entrepreneurial and it's not just tech innovators. It's all kinds of young entrepreneurs. They wanna that'd be where there's a culture of creativity seem to me. Everyone really may maybe they're exceptions. I haven't met them but most people are interested and like and respond to art of all kinds of really. I'd i'd say after you've got the roof over your head and clean water and you know everyone's everyone's healthy the next thing you turn your mind to what am i interested in and that seems to be art a lotta times so it does make us into that that was effective. Do you know anyone one like in your in your business a name but is there a type that you would consider not pro arts like in what does that mean because everyone i know oh loves something music or some kind of art as a human being well. There's a title for those people that are called curmudgeon. Yeah i think the battle is really. There are an awful lot of people that love our self interest in art when i first opened my first restaurant was a large group called the wine coop brewing company. It's still in business in lower downtown denver and it was a big empty warehouse and we didn't want to paint murals because people would get tired of them <hes> but we wanted to have we want something. Ending vivid on the walls and people would talk about and remember so we actually hired one of the local art gallery owners to come work for us one quarter time and and to be our curator so he went to all the galleries and we had rotating art on our walls that allowed us to i don't know to really engage our restaurant strong customers on a regular basis and one of the local writers referred to me as hickenlooper comma nearsighted and long limb which which which is really a polite way of calling someone a geek thick glasses at the time but anyway owns perhaps the only restaurant in america with its own art curator and it really did add value and it said a statement to all of our customers that we thought that supporting the arts was an important part of what made our restaurant special title can. I say it sounds theme. Is that art when applied smartly anyway is good for business. It's a it's a it's an economic economic driver is what you're saying. It's good for business but it also creates a word what i call love of place and i think that's at the heart sort of almost all economic development is people when they care about a place they'll invest and they'll put themselves into that investment and and topa feely a- is that word word that is love of place and the arts has so much to do with with how people feel about place so whether it's art hanging restaurants restaurants based on all that we did with the restaurants i got invited to be on the board of the denver art museum which most people have to give twenty five grand a year or something. I did not do that but i it did create. An organization called culture house spelled h. a. u._s. culture house to encourage young professionals to join the art museum like many cities as art museum was aging the average of membership. The average age was going every year. Now dramatically turned that around and recognize that having oh really good art museum or hopefully many art museums creates that level of place and it allows other economic activity and growth to kind of create get get creative side by side as as you ascend to the title of president. How do you balance them because you're now representing as as president you're representing everybody in so many tastes and i find that as much as art is unifying it also can represent our differences because because people are like this is my art in my tribe and the other say the same art against each other in some cases. How is president. Can you effectively use the arts to work for us the way that we know that they can well. I think the key there is that the arts generally if properly applied brings people together and it blurs the lines between one tribe and and the other and you know we have a wonderful this amazing outdoor facility is a natural amphitheatre up in the foothills called red rocks holds about ten thousand people people and it's owned by the city of denver and when i got elected mayor in two thousand and three and i loved it i went out there as mayor and they told me that they were going to do that. You're going to get to thirty three concerts at red rocks. I said thirty three. Why aren't you doing more said well. If we had more concerts the average attendance would go down. People wouldn't get the same experience. I said what about starbucks they opened another coffee house across the street and the customer count double goes goes up dramatically at the one that was already open not to mention the new one so we argued about it but the mirror denver's a strong mayor form of government so that next year we we did forty two concerts in the next year we fifty now. They're doing one hundred fifty concerts and the average attendance is always going up. I've played three of those. Did you relate it's so cool. I mean it is isn't it the most beautiful place before my favorite places in the world to play one of my favorite bands is the brothers down from from concord north carolina from my area area and david's come out and i've got to know them now. I always go out and have dinner with them and they i mean they could they could get the same amount of money <hes> by paying two shows they actually get more money from paying two shows at fiddler's green closer to the city right not quite twice but seventy percent more capacity than they would playing three shows at red rocks and yet they still play red rocks just because a religious experience you made me think about it you talk about the business economic model and you get the connection between the two and you add arts. You create opportunity business. Here's an issue that <hes> as president you'd have to deal with can and that is what happens with funding the national endowment for arts for example established in the nineteen sixty five. It's funding today about one hundred fifty fifty five million dollars. Give or take and if you kept up to inflation you'd end up with <hes> about three hundred fifty million today but of course it's non on and the national arts just small pieces of the puzzle of the arts community is funding. I know ben's talked about an idea of how maybe the president it might look at this and also to give his idea because i think it's a great idea. Tell me your thoughts on that and then maybe you can pitch out the idea that talk the candidates about and and your thought on that them right. I mean what what what i think we'd like to see is a simple index of one dollar per head one one dollar per capita that everyone knows that one dollar of their tax money goes to goes to the arts. I think any as like at forty thirty seven cents per person now. It's about forty seven cents. If you did it today you'd end up about three hundred and forty million her take and that is basically keeping. Thanks for inflation your thoughts. You know i think i would happily support that as long as you set your your ground rules so you're not trying to use government to create the most provocative art but the goal would be to create art that brought people together and i know there are many in our party <hes> as democrats who feel that that's that's a limitation of free speech and the government shouldn't be involved in those kinds of limitations but i think this country is plenty divided right. I'm running for president because i think we're in a crisis of division right. I think trump is fueling that and probably worse probably probably more divided now than any time since civil war and i think art would be a tool that i would want to use to bring people together and david brothers are great example. They liberals or conservatives and republicans are there democrats who cares right. They are good people and they create amazing music but i think that if we're going to actually expand federal funding for the arts which i think is is a great idea. It should be in in that purpose of bringing the country back together again and we've all seen those examples where the art that gets funded actually divides us in ways that you know that aren't constructive yeah. I mean my understanding of it. Is that at this point and this is where anyone who knows a lot about the n._e._a. I would love anyone in the room to kick in on this point but for instance one of the great things that i see is a musician is the revitalization of rural areas areas little towns especially in the mid west and west where you've got an old theater that has now gotten any attention and if you look at it not all the money came i'm from the n._b._a. They came in and established that there was the need to refurbish an old theater where any art that you wanted could go in and it was was a good eight dollars of private investment to the one dollar of federal investment and i think that's a great start towards what you're talking about because that's not investing in rob robert mapplethorpe who is the the the photographer that that really upset a lot of people with that one artists except upset. A lot of people yeah that was that that was a dramatic moment but i don't think that that represents what the n._e._a. Is and i think most people ought to understand that the n._e._a. Is more of a of a road is if you had a mall that everyone would like to go to but the government needs to come in and build a road roads that we can get to the mall land. Enjoy the private the private businesses it exists there and maybe some of it is is really educating the public that the n._e._a. doesn't walk around saying this art is better than this and this are better than this and investing in it with the amount of money we put into it we over the course of this this podcast. The federal government will have paid for the n._e._a. Twenty minutes of investment if we were investing equally across the entire year so it's the rest of the year runs out the whole clock no more money goes in the and i'm i'm worried that people's misunderstanding of it that it's that some sort would've commie organization that that that <hes> centers on deciding what artists best and what is not that would be a good thing if that can happen well i think the national trust for historic preservation which in one thousand nine hundred seven i won the award of honor from the national trust for restoring historic buildings in a number you know an ah a dozen downtown's across the midwest and trying to create this what you're describing the ed- does creating community really and we did that a little bit in colorado we would provide key funding kind of called anchor funding for small towns with main streets to restore one of their historic buildings as a kind of crown on jul and inspire other capital investments so the n._e._a. was going to go and say all right. We're gonna use this money for investing in the infrastructure that promotes else yards. I think you'd get rid of half of your opposition. Maybe all of your opposition right right well. Maybe it's a good discussion to have. I mean i think there. There are so few of us who really understand what the n._b._a. Does from a symbolic point of view a citizen looks and sees that so little money is is invested in arts arts is so important towards our economy and well being that there's a disconnect between <hes> those things and to me. It's really really important for the next generations for <hes> for us to invest even even symbolically investing in the arts would seem to be good for morale absolutely and you would appreciate this ben that one of the things we've worked on in colorado over the last few years. Isaac slade just stepped down. He was our first chair. I co chairs and now west scholz. Who's the lead singer for the luminaires. It's taken over. We have a thing called take note colorado and take note his predicated upon the notion that colorado will be the first state in america. Were any kid who wants to learn to play music. No matter of there were there geography the or their financial circumstances but any wants to learn to play music. We'll have an instrument and a teacher and it's been amazing. All musicians have done benefits one republican the luminaires in years and the fray and faneuil rate lift in the night sweats. All these bands want to be part of this because it's actually building their fan base is to a certain extent but it also gives them a connects them with their fans in a really powerful way. Every study shows that study music when they're in elementary school or middle school they do better in math. They do better in languages. They are more successful students. They do better socially one. After another these checkpoints we we've been able able to get so much done in colorado with take colorado by incentivizing private businesses to get on board and help provide the funding so we raise these benefits weren't one or another of our bands will do a big concert. We'll get five thousand people raise a million bucks but then we get five exit four x that four million dollars over over the course of the year from donations that are really allows us to provide teachers and one of the great things that some of those teachers musicians who haven't made it yet so they need aside gig right they need they need to have steady income and twenty five bucks an hour or thirty five bucks. An hour for for teaching kids how to play music is not the battle turnip. Let me take a lead off of that. If i can govern that is education is a big deal you spending as your governorship as mayor. One of the issues is his <hes> stem education versus steam and differences one simple thing and you know there's i see by your smile. It's a simple thing adding art science science technology engineering arts and mathematics and you kinda let into as president gave us kind of from thoughts around that of what how how you would address or deal with that expand arts and part of that <hes> string of education especially k. through twelve and how that would impact them so so the the types of activity that goes on in young people's brains is they're growing their synapses or connecting brains are developing the activity when when they're creating music or working art is very similar to the the kind of activity when they're trying to figure out numerical puzzles or basic math and language problems right when they're when they're problem solving and i think there's almost incontrovertible evidence that there's connections between how a brain matures and the kinds of activities you put that brain in front of and that could be a a visual arts that could be performing arts that could be musical arts. I mean go down the whole the whole list and the more we can figure out how to get more creative work more a into the steam the more successful our math programs are engineering programs. Are science silence programs the more successful they'll be literally. I don't know any. I don't know a single scientist who disagrees with that not one. I'm talking about. We've got several paul nobel prize winners for various physics type or chemistry type awards and they are the first ones to say that the arts are a a crucial part of their of of getting more successful scientists. One of the themes that here you hitting on is a place between the private sector and the government and when it when it comes to both education now because some of this program you're talking about does involve people privately investing in which is my opinion is one of the great things about our country. I mean i've done a lot of touring and other countries and i like to hear how their arts work and while i think there are a lot of honorable honorable other ways to do it. I kind of think that it is a great thing that we have been forced to combine the two. How do you balance that you you know yourself. If education is irrefutable better with the arts what is the role of our government and our president says this is a next step for you. What is the role to lead and balance that between if it was all private money then i think we all know it wouldn't all go to the right places says because it just doesn't work that way but if it's all government than than that presents its own problems to how how do you see a balancing leasings well. I i think that i i think our education system is pretty messed up and i think there's a fair argument to be made that are high schools have evolved loved to reflect how society has changed how the needs of our education system changing steams a good example of this. I mean mostly what are high schools now are doing doing is teaching kids how to memorize and regurgitate what they memorized and they're in a funny way. Our high schools are filters for the elite universities well when you squint your eyes is in recognize that that two thirds of our kids are never going to get a four year degree and we pulled back so much of the vocational training and the skills based training thing for them music and the arts becomes part of a way to keep kids engaged twenty percent of our kids never finished high school and they know that that's a makes their life trajectory possibly difficult and they still don't finish high school. Another twenty percent finished high school. Never take another class the rest of their lives. That's forty percent are so turned off by what we're teaching high school well if we had more music and the arts if we had more things that people bill with their hands if we train in kids how to how to work collaboratively how to problem solve things like probability that most high school kids never get exposed to the kids would be more interested in coming to school and and music and the arts would be a class a perfect example of that kind of engagement tool that allows kids to hopefully begin a lifetime of learning because the automation an artificial intelligence that workplace displacement. That's going to happen here whether we like it or not. In the next ten or twelve years it's going to require that. Kids of all ages are going to have to continue learning all their lives and it's not just the arts. The arts become a very powerful powerful foundation to allow someone to learn for their entire lives. See i get a different story in in every city that i play. I have what we call a little little masterclass which is fans wanna show up early i bring public school music teacher in and <hes> and we have a little town hall almost about what goes on there and i've learned a lot because from place to place. I find surprising differences. Some places are one poor lady with a hatchback from nineteen seventy seventy five like a pacer some she's driving broken instruments to ten schools and just trying to keep up other places have incredible public school with a good smattering of music and arts from early on. It's not consistent consistent. It has been in in colorado. Well <hes> take no colorado part of what we partnered with a organization out of new jersey called little kids rock and there are a nonprofit but that promotes music everywhere and they have been great at trying to make sure that when we provide musical instruments to school system school districts that they don't disappear they don't get broken that they they're there for each successive year to continue using and i think that's a big part of spending dollars wisely but i think also the the ability of our business communities to recognize the need and take care of it has been underestimated and to a certain extent we we haven't done a good enough job proving to our commercial businesses. Hey this is a serious issue and our funding for education. I mean we all know that in elementary school middle school a longer school day and a longer school year will dramatically balance out everyone's achievement in other words kids from low income communities will do as well as kids from upper middle class communities and yet somehow we haven't been able to fill in those gaps and business business would help and and i mean i don't know maybe just a musician but maybe some leadership from the top from from the top of our our government the federal government to say actually it is important and we're going to invest more than just twenty minutes of our year towards something. That's important <hes>. Maybe that has a role as well. It's hard to convince someone that something's important. If you refuse to build a road to it and it's funny and i hate doing this because you you know i'm i'm a child of the sixties so i i came in and believe that the adults were doing was ruining this country and i went to the first earth day and i'm marched on washington and i i did all that stuff and you know we wanted to change the educational system. If you go back to the what an elementary school day looked like in the nineteen eighteen sixties and i know it wasn't perfect everywhere. I get that but we had physical fitness all across this country. We had music almost every public school not all of them but almost almost every public school in america had music and visual arts art class as available to all students that'd be you'd go twice a week or three times a week to classroom music as a class you sing a chorale you talk about the arts and how important is in bikes in the sixties. It was all encompassing interesting pistons to in one thousand nine hundred eighty six. If you gave money to charitable organization you could write it off then changed and then it got not even more restrictive under the trump administration's new rule and one of ideas being kicked around wide not make charitable contributions above the lime unit. Anyone who contributes can inhabit as a deduction instead of just the super wealthy people who itemize but just across the board you want to contribute you get the right that off now we we know there's economic stat but i'm just curious on the concept of that idea to get more people engaged because when this happened in eighty two to eighty six contributions nations have almost fourteen percent when the lodge change kind of drop by five percent and so from eighty to ninety six said you could deduct rather than you could actually they. I call it love the line you know you contribute you get the right it off but it may be seven eighty six tax law tax law change back then big modification and then it pushed down and you had to itemize it and now if you itemize that's where it falls you don't itemized. You're not in the equation anymore. You don't get any benefit right. I i have to look at that. I mean i wanna go see exactly where that money went and what the social benefit was. Not all charities are are born equal and we wanna make sure that these are things that are you know nonpartisan and really aren't like like i think music and art that help all kids now. You got a little more more information so you know it's something to think about and something that we hear about yards community as an important part of helping push people to get more now. I have a fun question so so. Let's assume you have nothing to worry about in life. You don't have to worry about going to war. Who's the artist or someone that you would like to be like could be music could be painting the authors of the anything in the arts work. What would be that person think about that for a second. Tell me what you thought. What would be their boy. That's so i mean that's a pretty wide open landscape one of the great benefits about being a mayor and governor as you get to hang out with musicians like then and so so you know i mean i've gotten to play on the stage with with old crow and with bob weir the songwriter and singer for the grateful dead you know i'm not sure pick one artist out over another. One of the broadway musical hamilton road show came to denver last year and i was lucky enough to go the i went to college in connecticut called wesleyan university that has a big world music program big arts program and lin manuel miranda the creator one of the creators of hamilton and his partners partner tommy kale who was the director both went to westland and so i got to meet tommy kale when he came to denver and part of hamilton was they go to ten or twelve schools each roadshow and challenge those kids ask them a bunch of reading about the colonial characters the you know the founding of the country and who the people war and then challenge them to create a song or a performance that was about somebody other than alexander hamilton but somebody else from those times times and then they have a competition so they provided tickets in colorado. The theory was i think twenty six hundred people and they got two hundred sixty people from each of these he's ten high schools and then they had a competition where everyone did their performances of these historic characters and then they got the actual actors from hamilton to come out and sit on the stage and they took questions from all over the auditorium and then twenty six hundred kids from all these different high schools s- quieted down saddened their seats. The actors went back and got into costumes and the kids got to see a free performance in hamilton and to me watching the interface between education and and and really high are just wonderful art broadway musicals. You can't call it high art. I call that one is pretty high art but to see that there was more to it the just a business business than taking money and and show people show but there was a real connection with students and education and a real interface there was i felt really really inspiring so i guess i would hold that up. If we're going to post an artist or an art form that would be the hamilton folks. Yeah i agree. I think we'll see you in the next campbellton revival. Well let me say this. I know <hes> the american for the arts action. I really appreciate you taking the time behind his podcast. That's not often that we hear about the arts talked about in the presidential campaigns but this is a chance for people who care about the arts but also care about this country the direction it's going in hearing from people who are running like yourself <hes> so thank you for taking the time and being here <hes> today for this great opportunity on on the podcast and have fun on the campaign trail. I wanted to talk to you. Thank you for listening. Be sure to subscribe today to the arts. Vote twenty twenty podcast series with pinfolds on anchor or any of your favorite podcast apps. Please go to arts action. Fund dot org slash podcast for more info that's arts action fund dot org slash podcast. You'll get more ridiculous.

president colorado governor hickenlooper denver denver america federal government colorado alaska david brothers art museum good art museum hamilton denver art museum starbucks mike alexander hamilton senator rob robert mapplethorpe north carolina
Listen: Inside A Reopened Smithsonian Museum

WAMU: Local News

03:39 min | Last month

Listen: Inside A Reopened Smithsonian Museum

"Several big smithsonian museums and the national zoo are gradually reopening to the public this weekend. And next weekend we're chronicling reopening in the region and to get a sense of reopening day. Wmu's margaret barthel. Visited the american art museum and the national portrait gallery. Myla jones is outside the museum building waiting for the doors to open. She's visiting dc from chattanooga tennessee. And she's thrilled. Her visit coincided with the reopening. I really personally like are and i really want to come here. And i thought it'd be really cool to come back on the first day and just be back from all the covert precautions and everything also waiting on the grindstone. Steps are monica would and her two young children alma and clara. The family has been stationed at joint base anacostia balling since last fall. She says the art museum is an exciting new way for her kids to get to know their new home. And we've been homeschooling this year so hope we came from japan. So seeing more of the american art and portraiture and stuff that we've seen in books that we haven't been able to see in real life the anticipation increases as the clock. Ticks closer to eleven thirty a. m. when the doors will open a steady stream of people walk in get their free ticket scanned and then disperse into the galleries. Brenda castro is visiting from costa rica. She loves going to museums to find a sense of place. It's something that i do every visit. Athey go to a museum. Because he's the heart healthy and the coulter another visitor nebula tomato yanni from indonesia and has been studying in boston. She's especially excited to see the portraits of barack and michelle obama. Since i'm not from the us. This is how i want to know. More about the The us how the government works and so on. Because i'm a student as well. It's the one way that easier funner and more is just different way to learn. Inspiration and relaxation. Were on the agenda for manassas resident. Who guna joe goo also good to kind of disconnect and unwind from work. So i like to walk through the galleries. This some classical music taking the art taking the history and just kind of get some peace and quiet and call me was taking the american art museums chicano graphics exhibit which features protest movement art from the nineteen sixties. Through to the present. He said the art made him think about what cadillac and connect social movements across the decades. The pandemic the movement for racial justice climate change all those relevant and complex themes thread through the american art museums. Current exhibits says director. Stephanie see bush. I like to believe that that people come to museums to have a moment of reflection. So what i find really powerful about artists are they help us understand the world around us. Hopefully ourselves and better stavish spoke by phone because she couldn't be at the reopening day back in the museum. Brenda castro is about an hour into her visit and she already has a collection of photographs of her favorite pieces of art on her phone. I take one beater of lucy. Stone is a portrait. It's beautiful because i didn't realize that big turkish say so much and now that the doors are open. More people will be listening for wmu. I'm margaret barthel.

margaret barthel american art museum Myla jones Brenda castro national zoo Athey Wmu national portrait gallery chattanooga joe goo clara tennessee monica michelle obama movement for racial justice rica japan costa manassas indonesia
One year into the pandemic, how will downtown Seattle thrive again?

KUOW Newsroom

06:35 min | 3 months ago

One year into the pandemic, how will downtown Seattle thrive again?

"It's been nearly a year. Since thousands of office workers and others who regularly went into seattle's downtown core obeyed the stay home orders now. More vaccines are on the horizon. As well as the promise of more life returning to what used to be the downtown heart of seattle's economic life. But what will that look like. And what needs to be reimagined to bring people back. John schools here to try to answer that question. He's president of the downtown seattle association. John thanks for chatting with us. Thanks for him so john. If you cast your mind back. I remember talking with you soon after the pandemic started. And you were describing looking out of your window and seeing hardly anybody on the street where what. He's seeing right now today. Well we have more activity than that there. There are some office. Workers are back that are back of course essential workers. There are things that are open today that we're not open a month ago. Museums like the seattle art museum and wing luke The pike place market has been just a great bright spot through all of this. They've never closed. They've had to adjust plenty. So that's a note of activity and usually it's a lot of tourists there. It's mostly locals that are coming from other neighborhoods in seattle downtown. So there's activity downtown. But we sure want more genders more activity but still i mean. The pandemic did take a major toll on downtown businesses. Can you give us a nutshell. Just what happened over the last year. Yes we all know. Downtowns are all about bringing people together and in a pandemic to stay apart for good reason so this pandemic has had a disproportionate impact on urban areas in our country and downtown seattle. Certainly and so. We've had one hundred sixty small businesses that have permanently closer restaurants and retailers office. Occupancy has been below twenty percent over the last couple of months of folks who are showing up at least a few days in their office during the week. Hotel occupancy is still hovering at twenty percent or below in some weeks and our major venues arts culture performance live music venues have have been shuttered for the most part throughout this period so this has been devastating economically to our downtown into downtown's across the country because when you're all about bringing people together a pandemic has significant impact on on how you function and that's what we've seen john. We are still dealing with this pandemic. we haven't turned a corner quite yet but it does seem that most adults who want a vaccine will be able to get one in the next few months. What could that mean for. The future of downtown really is a game changer and we. We have such a clear line of sight on the pace of vaccinations and win. A majority of adults in our community are going to be vaccinated because of the recent approval of the johnson and johnson vaccine. So it's going to allow office workers to return at some level here Early in the summer late spring. We're talking to employers and companies that are that are making those plans now and it's going allow for leisure travel to resume at higher levels throughout our country in seattle can compete really well for the domestic leisure travel business which we believe is going to be sort of the first type travel to return likely before business travel and likely before international travel. People are dying to get out. We want him to come to seattle so office. Workers in leisure travelers and the seattle. That maybe hasn't been downtown in the last year. We want to invite them back. There's plenty of that is open today and more to come. So that's where we're focused. Some folks are speculating. That this pandemic has forever changed. The nature of work and that many employees may simply work from home indefinitely which could mean way fewer people shopping and dining downtown. Are you worried about that potential shift. I do believe the office and work does get recalibrated but the office isn't going away by any means but it mean that some folks might work from home owners days a week. That's generally what the research in surveys. Both in our own community around the country are saying so. The office in the downtown still has an important role to play. When it comes to work and collaboration in shaping a company an organization's culture i do think it gets a re recalibrated doubt. So recalibrate it. If you've got fewer workers around who else possibly could be drawn down to the core to to kind of make up for the for the flow of energy that used to be there. We'll we're investing still record levels in in housing in downtown so more than seven thousand. Units of housing are currently under construction. Were connecting our city to downtown in ways that are going to help people to take a train from northgate in just a few months. That comes every couple of minutes right into downtown. So there's there's new ways to get downtown. We're significantly in housing. And then we're investing in generational infrastructure projects like the waterfront park and a great new arena seattle center. So there's going to be new things to see inexperienced downtown that weren't here prior to this pandemic and there's going to be lots of new businesses that come in into spaces that were vacated by businesses that had to close through this pandemic so this plenty to look forward to new investments new experiences that we're not here prior to this pandemic and we want to celebrate those in addition to everybody that made it through this pandemic and that's able to reopen. Is there a scenario where you might see that. The downtown doesn't recover. And what would that look like. And what would that mean. There's a lot at risk here. And i don't think we can take anything for granted and every great city has a great downtown. I haven't been to a great city without a thriving core in as a as a city here in seattle in a community. We we've made a big bet on a healthy thriving downtown. We've passed many levies to invest in families and education universal pre-k low income housing and a great park system that is betting on a healthy economically. Vital downtown so we have a lot at stake on what happens on these three square miles of land for the entire city and really the entire region. So we've got to get this writing. We can take nothing for granted. John schools is the head of the downtown seattle association. John thank you for your time today. thanks so much.

seattle seattle association seattle art museum John john johnson northgate waterfront park seattle center John schools
#28 - Libra Full Moon + URGENT MESSAGE

Bridging Realities: An Accessible Astrology Podcast

15:02 min | 1 year ago

#28 - Libra Full Moon + URGENT MESSAGE

"Hello everyone to genius here. Coming from the hillsides of England where the Gods and goddesses are good. The Earth Is Lush. Nature is grand animals and plants are grand. They don't give a shit about what is true or not. They know that the biggest greatest truth of all is is nature is the gods and goddesses above that there will be spring followed by summer fall and winter so I wanted to share some thoughts with you here on this full moon and libra in fact. Hopefully I'll be able to show you the moon in this video. The Sun is setting right behind me here. On this hill. The Sun in Aries and aries. We have to think about as singular singular energy so to speak libra. When we'll come to the full moon on this side is about myself in the other. It's about both so one of the things that happened. Many many many many moons ago in ancient Egypt was that there was this fella. A Pharaoh called Akhenaten K. Handsome Bloke. Lots and lots of amazing statues about him are of him in. Egypt Art Museum in Cairo and all over Egypt which I've had the great privilege to visit and decided to take the sun and make the culture and the consciousness only worship. The Sun called RAW K. So he went from the whole consciousness of Egypt's being polytheistic culture. Saying we're GONNA worship every God and goddess so we're going to worship Ross the son. We're going to worship Horace. We're going to worship ISIS CYRUS. Etcetera etcetera is a polytheistic culture. When you are in Egypt you see that really clearly see that. There were many gods and goddesses. I could not and as handsome as he was decided. I just WANNA worship the one we are going to only now worship one God not two or more labor the one areas and that consciousness of worshiping just one God changed the perspective of humans from then until now in a very serious way I mean he like burned artwork and got rid of all kinds of shit and he's like no we will not all these gods. It's just raw. The Sun Aka the son of God which got translated into Christian mythology and other mythologies as. Well if you do the math and you actually not the math. But you do the research. And then look at astronomy and a archaeology and then he start to realize about philosophy and religion it-it-it-it but it also comes from him taking polytheistic to monotheistic. I digress so everybody started looking up to the one to give us the answers so whether it was the one God the one teacher. The one governor the one politician the one person who could tell us what to do and who to be the one God so to speak. Consciousness took on its own understanding its own behavior it's beliefs and so we started to function as a society like that for a long long long time. This is we're talking thousands of years and so where we are today especially with this. Aries Sun. Lieber full moon situation. We'RE IN IS THE DIVISION. Some are calling it the light and the dark some are saying this is the war between light and dark And in some ways I really get that I really resonate with the fear. The scary parts of what's happening in consciousness and also the light that's happening and consciousness the meditations and the people coming together to to serve humanity in this really incredible way. But it's both right. It's both it's light and dark it's The sun and the moon and so we are moving my hopes as an Aquarius from a polytheism worshiping. One God back. Excuse me monotheism back to a policy as more we. We are worshipping multiple gods and guess who those Gods and goddesses are you and me. We are the gods and goddesses who are arising awakening right now and it's up to each of us to use our voice. This is not the time to act Coy. And be shy. This is the time to use our voices. We are coming into the Golden Age. Actually we're going to have to go through some pretty rough bumpy mother fucking shit but on the other side of this. I believe after lots of research thoughts and meditation that we are heading into the Golden Age where your God and goddess like nature becomes as enviable and worships as anyone else right because we all hold light the Sun and dark the moon? Okay we are both all the time and if we are moving into this polytheism energy of Aquarius which is what we're moving into. That's what the whole becomes is each individual unique authentic voice. Leo makes up the whole now so I just went through my sort of dark night of the soul during this journey of Corona cove and I went down some conspiracy theory videos and other things the news. Which is its own conspiracy theory of information who to believe what to believe. I'm so grateful for people using their voices. I'm so grateful for putting people putting their neck on the line. I've seen a lot of the videos that I watched. Come down off the internet and be censored and it's funny because I think a lot of times people are afraid to get on the internet because of being censored but right now this is the time to put our voices up and if it's censored maybe that's just what the world needs to be aware of the world needs to see but if we each collectively use our voice right now we are embodying. The new Golden Age the age of Aquarius the age of policy is going back to a polytheistic consciousness which says that birds trees the grass. The flowers the rivers the sky the clouds every element of life is worship. Even the evil dark malign because inside of everyone is good and bad you know I have a lot of people who have been saying. Don't go dark. Don't go dark stay positive. Stay positive and it's like yeah. Okay now if I'm just sitting around being evil in the line and dark constantly. Someone's going to need to snap me out of that and definitely encouraged me to find the light. I really really feel that and I really really get that. But if I'm mostly an a place of optimism and just want to show you this water in a place where I'm leading people because I am my own God and goddess who has a valuable voice and I find myself in a dark moment afraid and scared. That's okay because it is kind of a scary time. I mean when you're a nature it's like blissed out and amazing and beautiful because nature's just like gets it but when you really think about and when you watch the news we watch these conspiracy videos or whatever it's like Oh by God right. But it's all valuable content and it's up to me as the individual to discern what is true and was false into use my voice accordingly. I am in awe. How people are finally using the Internet. Now more it's beautiful. I'm an author of how people are sharing their food that they're cooking on the Internet to watch. That is so cool. I'm an odd. That people are showing exercises some sound some random video the other day where Somebody was just showing an exercise. You know to help release trauma. I don't even know who it was but I've been using that exercise in a collective trauma. I don't know who that person was but I have found that information incredibly helpful. We each have a moment to use our voice and there are parts of that that are scary and there are parts of that that are exciting. Because it's always both. We are living in a dark time and a lifetime because it's always both being realistic about the astrology of Twenty twenty being realistic. So I don't WanNa be fearmongering or whatever but I want to be realistic. Twenty twenty will continue to be mind-blowing ship. I think that right when you think that it's as crazy as it could get is GonNa get crazier specifically the astrology of September. We'LL REALLY AUGUST SEPTEMBER OCTOBER. And then a lot of ways. I can't really as an astrologer even see too far past those that time into November December. So well but I can say that that's going to be a crescendo. Or a What's the word the final Hurrah? I don't know if that's the right word either. But it's like the orchestra comes to a crescendo. At that moment so to speak and I think I mean I could be wrong but ash logically. It does and so being realistic about that. It's so important that right now we really get what this time is actually about from the gods the perspective of the Gods and goddesses above that. It's really about moving into both right. It's the individual which is aries right son and then libra. The libra full moon high. It's just a great example of ideology of right now and how? That's really impacting everything. And it's doing both right. It's doing myself as an individual and we as a collective consciousness both and that our words are here to serve the world and others and also to serve ourselves. It's both and so I just. I don't know it's just so beautiful it is it's like salvation is nature every fucking time and you know. I had to get out of the house. I had to go take a run and a walk big time today because I was just like feeling really anxious and I wasn't really getting the support from anybody that I felt. I needed because dark and a little bit bummed out and it was this that saved me today. You know just nature that beautiful son you know if anything is consistent. It's that and so I encourage all of you right now to use your voice if you get censored taken down. Maybe that's what needs to happen right now. Use Your Voice. Speak your truth. It's up to us to discern what is real and what is not that is the age of Aquarius every individual making up the whole. We are no longer going to worship one. God One politician one c o one organization one belief system one religion so necessary. Everything has its place. The big cosmic energy of everything. We are part of an infant system of planets and stars as we move into Aquarius. We'll see that more and more. Our actions here have an energetic vibration that reached so far and so wide. So that even if you say something right now people don't like it or gets censored whoever did see that the chances of that having a energetic in vibrational frequency is possible? And so say it. Put Your love and your words and your light out into the world. See how it reverberates into infinity. I hope this is helpful. I hope you all have a blessed full moon. I was not able to catch on camera but I'll try to take pictures and put them up in the feed so so much love for all of you.

libra Egypt Twenty twenty Egypt Art Museum England Ross Lieber Coy Corona cove Leo Cairo
Writer and Artist Chanel Miller on Surviving, Identity, and Activism

At Liberty

36:32 min | 2 months ago

Writer and Artist Chanel Miller on Surviving, Identity, and Activism

"From the issue this is at liberty. I'm kendall ceasefire the producer of this podcast and your host for this episode. A listeners know before we get started this conversation was recorded prior to the shooting in atlanta. Georgia the killed eight people and targeted asian americans. So while we talk about asian american discrimination. This conversation does not address the recent tragedy this week were rounding out our women's history month series with writer and artist. Chanel miller chanel jumped into the spotlight back in two thousand fifteen. I threw a pseudonym. Emily dough known in the context of the crime committed against her a sexual assault that took place on stanford university's campus perpetrated by then student brock turner. The victim impact statement. She wrote and delivered at the trial went. Viral deceiving over eleven million views buzzfeed. Chanels words helped set off the metoo movement but her name was nowhere to be found in two thousand nineteen schnell stepped out from under anonymity and into authoring her own story. She published the new york. Times bestselling memoir. No my name. She is now known as leading voice for survivors of sexual violence and as an emerging artist currently debut in work in. San francisco's asian. Art museum behind every social issue are survivors often of discrimination of atrocity and once everyone had an experience that has made them ill nameless and faceless but chanel knows that an our own power we can be both powerful for ourselves and those around us. She joins us today to share more about her own journey. Chanel welcome to elodie. Hello kendall thank you so much for having me. It's so so good to have you. So as i mentioned in the introduction you first rose to prominence under a name that was not your own in court. Documents were known as emily dough. And like i said your victim. Impact statement went viral and buzzfeed published it. And so so. So many people connected with the words that you had written about your very specific circumstance in many ways you acted as a symbol to all of us before we knew you as chanel miller renew you as representing millions of survivors. What did that feel like to you to know that. These people were connecting with your words but didn't know you as a person it was extremely revelatory because preceding. The eruption of the statement was the loneliest year of my twenty something years on earth and so two overnight have that loneliness juxtaposed by global support was really surreal and actually took a long time for me to absorb. I almost think of it as like a water tower of love and support like water or something and then every day. I can drink maybe two cups of it but i couldn't consume it all at once. But that's okay. Because the letters i received from people sustained me over the years. It took to write the book. I think it's important to note that overnight. It's not like. I refrained myself in realized that i was a creative person and triumphant survivor. I still wasn't even close to an ending where i felt at peace in my life in that it would still take a lot of encouragement to get me to a place where i felt more grounded in my self confident enough to put a face to my name so i think not only was the original expression support important. It was the ongoing showing of support. In the fact that when i did emerge people were still there for me even though over four years had passed in the story was no longer quote unquote relevant in the news cycle. I was still relevant. I still ally here and people showed up in that. That has been really important for me. I think other survivors to see. Did you have any concerns that after so much time had passed. You would still have that kind of same support. Was that something that went through your head and it was an idea introduced to me by some of the reporters who had inquired about having interviews early on applying that pressure her to come forward and saying you need to do this before. The news cycle ages out. I knew that. I couldn't. I knew that internally. I wasn't ready in. That won't be good for anyone unless i feel okay with what's happening in so really. The past. two years has been practice in listening to myself and really following that internal compass to guide me when to make these decisions because then no one else's decision to make while. I'm really glad that you listen to yourself. And not those sharkey porter. that's not. That's not good behalf of my former profession. i apologize so in twenty. Nineteen you publish. No my name the title. I think says it all suddenly everyone really does know your name now and we just this month spoke with delaware state. Senator sarah mcbride and we were talking about a different topic. We were talking about appropriate. Id documents for trends and nonbinary folks and the power that name's carey and i want us cher is something that she said with a you and get your reaction so she said names and pronouns are the first way we affirm a person's humanity what are oftentimes the first steps of everyone from bullies to governments that seek to oppress its to remove people's names and i guess i wondered if that resonated with you the power our names hold what were your considerations about introducing yourself by name and what did stepping into your name. Feel like to you. Yeah i think for a long time. My name was all i felt like i had it. The only thing legally that i was allowed to keep everything else was pretty much up for grabs so i was allowed to be interrogated. I could be asked about my way in my personal relationships past relationships relationship to alcohol naked in the hospital where put up on screen so everything was being taken but the one thing i was allowed to keep with a six letters of my first name and so that felt extremely sacred to me. My name was used in the courtroom. And i sort of had to trust that people wouldn't walk out with it but i really didn't like the feeling sometimes of hearing people like my salen saying my name. I had this instinct. Tomo scrape it out of his mouth and hold it in you know. Keep it close to me. So i was aware too that it's a gift you know to give you. My name is a signal that i trust you in that. I'm giving you my story that i am willing to share something that's been very intimate and personal to me so i needed to protect it and it took me a long time to be proud of what i had done. I think it takes a long time to assign like pride doesn't really seem to exist much in the realm of assault. But i think it totally belongs there like so much of what you go through so excruciatingly hard in just getting through. It is an unbelievable feat. No matter how you come out on the other side so after a while. I learned to see that what i had done was admirable end. Even if it looked like tears everywhere or looked like a quavering voice it was still powerful. And so i was ready to surface in deliver my name. It's interesting that you use the term pride and say that survivors should be proud of themselves. Because i think oftentimes the word associated with assault is actually shame which is very much the opposite. You frequently said that. I don't think most survivors want to live in hiding. We do because silence means safety. At what point did your shift from being a safety precaution to maybe a form of silencing and now that you're not silent anymore do you still feel this way. Do you still feel that your silence was also your safety thing you said. In the beginning it was a protection in the end. It was more inhibiting in actually was denying a lot of who i had become and i think in coming forward. I'm not only coming forward to tell you that. I have been assaulted. I'm coming forward to have the public acknowledged who i am in how far we've come. I think again. That piece is really essential. That's not just sad story but it's a celebration to just recognize the fact that i'm still here in that. Even though so much damage had been done in changed in irreversible ways. Some of those changes are positive in that the public has taught me how valuable i am and i know not to ever tolerate any kind of abuse verbal or physical moving forward. I before was never that opinionated. Now i will speak exactly. What's on my mind if it is for what is right. I want to be able to acknowledge how wonderful it is to be able to grow into yourself and your voice which has been possible. Only because of the constant support at the aclu were always working with social issues and typically representing clients who've experienced marginalization discrimination in the advocacy space. We have to acknowledge that obviously speaking and writing about the ways in which someone has been victimized or abused is often deeply traumatic. How have you protected yourself in this experience of okay. Now you are speaking up now. You are stepping into your story in a very very public way. How have you protected in this experience of sharing. I think it's important to know that survivors. You can always draw lines if i in court. I thought the rule was give give give like. I will give you anything. You ask of me in order to get this case resolved when i set back out into the real world. I realized that we're allowed to have boundaries if i'm in an interview and i made to feel uncomfortable. Have every right to exit the interview or to assert my needs and expect that other people will meet them. Your boundaries aren't meant to be crossed again and again in order to extract are stories. And i think it's society's job to create more nursing environment in order to properly received these stories not for us to be gutting ourselves in order to be heard absolutely so you're also an artist in addition to being a writer. The really exciting thing about when you join social media publicly to share your book with us you also began to share your art with all of us. And then the head of the asian art museum in san francisco sire work on social media and invited you to create work for a wall in the museum is exposed to the street by windows and i read somewhere that it's a half block of the city which is a pretty big space. So what was it like to be given that kind of space. And how did you decide to use it. What was the process like for you in talking about. I my drawings. I think when i do interviews i feel a need to come office semi coherent and but together. But there's still so much that i don't know so much that i'm processing. I'm growing up and so my diary comex our way of continuing to do that and again you know. I'm always out here advising people to be gentle to themselves. And i acknowledge that that takes so much patients in practice and then it's something i need to remind myself time and time again so all create these diary comics to sort of slowdown. Pay attention to what. I'm thinking feeling really examined that and then i also think drawing is powerful because for me it exists as a counterweight in allows me to work harder or at least worked in subjects that can be more turbulent like i can read a lot about sexual violence knowing that the end of the day i can wind down by drawing family of seagulls to go down as long as i keep those in balance than i can continue to do the work that i do with the museum. It's an example of something that i would have never thought to ask for myself for seventy five feet of wall space but that someone else presented to me to show me the space. I deserve to take up in the world. And i think i do have a level of confidence that i'm constantly nourishing but i also need the space to grow into. I think it's a really beautiful thing. We can do especially for survivors to continue their stories right in when she brought me in for the project. She said i could do whatever i wanted. It didn't have to be like. Hey can you be the glowing voice. That has come out of this case. She just said here's your wall. Go home and draw. Come back with some drawings and we'll talk it through and i think another valuable thing to know. Is that if you look at the peace. The lines are actually quite simple and in the beginning i had started with really intricate drawings. I thought i want to show everyone. How good i am at drawing. You know. this is my only opportunity but overtime. I thought i'm done proving things to people like. I just wanna do things because i enjoy them in look at things because i love them not because i feel a need to always be showing you that i'm worth something. So the simplicity of the drawings. They're these sort of sweet. Looking characters is a testament to the fact that i let go of trying to earn worth from external sources in really. Just show what. I want to show and that does seem like a message that you are also conveying to your audience. Both in that piece of work itself but also as you mentioned explained all of the instagram posts. Your often using creatures as you mentioned like drying different animals and metaphors also to deliver these really powerful messages about healing about dealing with uncertainty and also about activism in. And you did say they start in your diary but do you. I come up with what you wanna say. And then you come up with the art to share or illustrated or is it vice versa. So what i think is that we put so much emphasis on like capital t. traumatic events. Those are the big painful headline worthy things. When i'm much more interested in how trauma sort of trickles into our lives and how it lives in us. Every day through are behavioral patterns in the way we observe things in the way we carry ourselves. and so i like paying attention to what might be considered mundane. We're all going through so much all the time. And we feel like we can only justify feeling low. If we've had some significant concrete bad thing happened when really just like making it through every day is its own challenge you know. We're living with so many experiences in our pass that we may not have processed but that's music really interesting so i start with small moments in look for the deeper layers in those moments. That seems really reflective of what i've seen and also my next question actually is about your art and how you use it to share the experience of being asian in america the pandemic obviously has brought us many unwanted things and one of the worst things it's brought is a surge of anti asian hate crimes and i know that you've addressed this in your art both indirectly calling out the violence talking about things like the model minority myth but also to your point sharing these more quotidian experiences that you've had with your family namely your grandfather. I find your approach to be both informative but also very familiar. And i wonder if sharing experiences about your grandfather is very intentional and the kinds of things that you share about your relationship or your identity and how you think about that in your kind of bigger. Yeah absolutely so yeah. That comic was about a time. I shopping with my gong my grandfather every where getting closed buying groceries. He always has this chinese instrumental music blaring out of his phone in his pocket. And i've come to think of it as his sound jag and we were in the store in this white woman just turned us in. She said i hate that music and he immediately apologized in with sort of fumbling to turn it off and that hurt me because he was so quick to absorb her shaming in her dismissal and her rudeness and i was so angry. I stepped away from the situation for a little bit. then i walked b-actor later in just said another way you could have said that. It's just politely. Asked him to turn it off. And she didn't say anything because she knew and i really don't have to insult her is just have to mir her behavior back to herself in. That's often all it requires right so that was so significant to me. Because i think racism can be so subtle end so masks in again so embedded in everyday life in that exchange is not going to be a full story. It's not going to be published anywhere. It's not going to be a hate crime. You know it's it's just something that passes so quickly. But i wanted to document it in preserve it in sort of highlight just how boldly she insulted his music and also almost like how she dimmed his spirit a bit like this is not your space to be expressing yourself in. I don't wanna hear in these. Instances accumulate over time especially for asian americans. I think it's always just enough. That we say o k. I can live with this. You know we're like oh can not gonna start a fight but over time it so painful. It's painful for is it's painful to see happening to our family members who may be. Don't have the english to stand up for themselves in. So i think we're way past that point of tolerance and with all activism. I think it starts with these little seeds of personal stories. That live very close to our hearts in then. We go often find the language in the greater oppressive structural patterns In the repetition of instances like this but it first starts with paying attention to what we've experienced in taking that seriously. Yeah i think it's been really powerful to see other. Asian americans speak up about the issue and really important because i think we often think about racism as a black white issue. When it's very much bigger than that. I also have heard you speak about on your podcast with your sister. Which is very good by the way and in other interviews that you're taking chinese lessons in the pandemic which is a great way to spend time and i was wondering how those were going. Yes so i had heard was video chatting with my grandfather. I had heard a voice in his apartment. And i asked. Who's there in this youtube video of someone. Speaking english phrases like look at the size of her ring and he would repeat them. And i thought it was so sweet that he was learning continuing to learn on his own and i thought why have i serve given up you know. I wanted to challenge myself to at least meet him more halfway and said he chinese again. They started doing my classes. I also news. Since i wouldn't be seeing him in person for a while. It was essential that i be able to communicate better verbally or to be able to write him letters. I think in person. We communicate a lot through food. He cooks me huge table. Fools of food i sit there consume it all in. That's flub. that's how love is exchanged. And i knew i wouldn't be able to do that for an indefinite amount of time so just like again leaning more into my chinese identity. It's something that. I resisted for a long time and i think many people do because we were so eager. When you're young to assimilate into repress anything that made us different Now i think we are demanding that we be a part of the mainstream. Obviously we've talked about you using your art to vocalise the mundane to express in call out important action for asian americans but you've also used it to be an ally to other people and i think that has actually been. I've consumed all of this art. As i was living throughout the pandemic but then also going back and reflecting on it and i specifically had remembered this one post in which you like in your experience when you are quiet and other people supported you in lifted up your voice and story to what we need to do for ahmad arbery brianna taylor for george floyd and so many other people and it really struck me that you know by you tapping into your own experience in your own pain. You could more presently feel what they were going through. Even though it's a vastly different experience that made me wonder what is the value of our own. Unique pain have an activism. What value do you think. Your own unique pain has in your own activism if you look at a story right now. I'm held someone who has a strong voice. But if you look at my trial the only reason any riddick all is because i had two witnesses. The two swedes testify on my behalf. And on my side in. That's how the verdict was secured. Two months after the verdict was the sentencing. Which is when. I read a victim impact statement. And when i after i read that nothing happened like i had no influence in in the court system. I meant nothing and it was only when the statement was released that millions of people poured in suddenly. I was given a platform. I was taken seriously but that you have to realize that voice was not given to me within the system. It was given to me by the public. And i think about brianna taylor. In the fact that her family was fighting for her death to be acknowledged for months before other people were aware of it and began strengthening their case. But i cannot. We cannot live in a world where it takes us sending flares up in the sky and smoke signals waiting for it to catch on somewhere and having millions on our side to may be heard in the criminal justice system. That is absolutely ridiculous in disturbing that we cannot rely on the system alone to hold people accountable. And that we can be so easily erased. If someone doesn't notice that were missing rate or that. Something has happened in so that terrifies me so i think there's the initial trauma that happens. The second trauma is the lack of acknowledgement. That something has happened in that to me is so pervasive in terrifying it is being actively suffocated having your existence denied. It is screaming in not having anyone here you. That is a nightmare in itself and that is the one that we actually have control over changing more quickly right. It's something that we can attend to immediately end so that's all us to do the listening. Yes we also need to do the preventing but listening can be done today. Most people i think who experienced this kind of abuse or marginalization discrimination. They don't have people marching in the streets for them. I think that's actually the rare case that we see that gets our attention. You talk a lot about the concept of imagination in one post you wrote. I have to stretch my imagination and things. Give them names and explanations so that they become scary when i create i am no longer held captive in an uncontrollable environment. Since i am the one who is now dictating a story. And i wonder if someone just mentioned being someone that was deeply mistreated by the justice system. Both in the courtroom and also in the sentence that your perpetrator received. Can you imagine a better system. If you've got to use the full embodiment of your imagination. Do you have ideas of how could be even better things that we may or may not have thought of all. I was very lucky. That the first detective. I spoke to who came in. Met me at the hospital to get my first statement. His demeanor was receptive. It gave me space to speak. He wasn't pressing in that was essential. Because how the story is. Extracted is extremely important in what i said in that hospital that morning would be used again and again in the courtroom so had he come in and been dismissive judgmental. I might have caved in on myself. Not been able to speak if the experience had been negative. I might have said on the spot. I don't wanna press charges in. My story would have ended their in. So i think everyone needs to be more chain to be trauma informed to be able to properly take care of these stories to understand that if a survivor appears to be flat or not. Crying doesn't mean she's not emotional. She could be suspended in a frozen state in a state of self preservation. But it doesn't mean she's apathetic. Everyone needs to understand that the one thing we have to restore the survivor is a sensitive agency to give her options to know how to move forward. And so i think a lot in the criminal justice system. I raised the question like who is allowed to be human on that same morning. I was expected to tell a cohesive story. I was expected to act with calmness in clarity. That's always demanded of the victims. So i encourage all of us to continue to look at these cases in think about who is allowed to be afraid who is allowed to make mistakes. Who's allowed to overreact to act impulsively without thinking things through forgiven who's allowed to feel fear into constantly having to prove that they are worthy to society in who doesn't have to lift a finger because they are automatically assumed to be worthy. I think it's so hard as a young person when you beginning this fight or entering activism. Because i think you'll be told a lot that some things are not possible or not realistic. And i came up against a lot. When i was in these conversations with stanford university and on one hand i came away from these conversations feeling naive. What did you expect that they will listen to you like this senior person coming against his huge institution but again. I thought it's not that naive to expect safety. It's a right. And i'm not some young person throwing a tantrum expecting too much having too many needs and someone who is seeing what is happening in what they need to address intend to quickly because over time it will infect them in bringing them down and that they should be grateful that i am alerting them to this in. I guess the one thing i adjusted is how much time change takes like i do understand now that things do take time. They don't happen overnight. And i'm willing to accept that piece but i'm not giving up my idea of noah's what's happening on campus. Like what's happening is in normal in the fact that we treat it like it's a natural effect of going to parties means that our culture is sick and that we need to like you said. Imagine being taken care of if you see someone who's ruin normal. That's not unreasonable to expect so i think imagination is necessary in that it will. It's not like the word imagination. Sounds floaty but it will become reality and think it cans on floaty and soft to people who want to build little something like that. Something is so powerful. But i think as a tool for social change. It's actually probably the most important thing is to have an active imagination. Because we don't imagine a solution then we can't create the solution s diverse start with for us and what we can believe in dream into existence. It's very clear that you are just getting started. This is the first of many things that we will see from you that we will read from you. Where do you hope your career as an artist and writer leads next. I hope i just continue to try things that the public will witness me. Failing at certain mediums experimenting with different mediums. I think it would be a huge disservice to myself. If i become too precious about what i put into the world's next so i just hope you always thinking about what you want to say i in an secondly you think about how you wanna say when you think about what i wanna communicate to the world and then that might make itself known in a children's book or film or whatever i will always continue learning and i think at the end of the day everything always comes back to cherishing your inner voice which can so easily be trampled and race in stricken and i feel like it is my duty to build little shelters around other people's faces and give them the tools to build those shelters themselves had is honestly beautiful. I love that Chanel thank you so so much for joining us and everyone. If you'd like to hear more from chanel you can also check out the podcast. She hosted her sister. Tiffany called childhood. It's a very lovely way to spend time in the pandemic think-i kendall. I really enjoyed speaking with you today. Thanks so much for listening if you enjoyed this episode. Please subscribe to at liberty. Wherever you get your podcasts and rate and review the show we really appreciate the feedback until next week. Stay strong everyone.

Chanel miller chanel Emily dough brock turner Hello kendall emily dough chanel miller sharkey porter Senator sarah mcbride schnell stanford university kendall Tomo Art museum Chanel chanel asian art museum cher carey
Another Covid shutdown delays museum show, but doesn't stop this Seattle artist

KUOW Newsroom

04:06 min | 7 months ago

Another Covid shutdown delays museum show, but doesn't stop this Seattle artist

"This is komo. W i'm camel kim barbara earl. Thomas has been a seattle artist and arts leader for more than forty years. She studied with jacob lawrence at the university of washington and helped create the northwest african american museum. Her first solo show at seattle. Art museum was scheduled to open this week. But governor inslee is new. Social restrictions closed all museums. So thomas will have to wait for her moment to shine k. u. o. w.'s arts and culture reporter. Marcy silman got a chance to see some of her new art and has the story eight. Colorful paper cut. Portrait's of african americans hang on the walls of a long corridor. It leads into barbara earl. Thomas new show. These are images of her friends and family members. Not george floyd. It's not gonna tailor. Their stories must be told they should be but my thing is. This is what you get when the life gets to go on in one portrait. Young boy looks off into the distance. He's holding large sign. That says grace in the original paper cut. The boy was holding a gun. A commentary on gun violence. But thomas decided she wanted to send a message about the possible. You know you want to de-fund police but what does that actually mean. If defunding the police means i wanna have a more sensitized police force plus i wanna take some of that money and have mental health reinstalled. That's what you do want. So if i don't want them to show what do i want. I want one stuck on a grace for thomas. Grace involves taking time to consider the impact of what you say or do. She's learned that lesson over many decades as the first person in her family to go to college as one of very few black students. At the time she was enrolled in the university of washington's art school then in nineteen seventy nine as the only black administrator at the seattle arts commission. I actually had a very hard time. They're just trying to figure out how to be a professional in how to do a job. And if i did could i be rewarded for that by getting you know a better position or being whatever so i struggled a lot and i really did feel at a certain point where there are certain jobs at that place that only white people could do by the early two thousands thomas had moved on. She was founding director of seattle's northwest african american museum helping to shepherd from an idea into an institution ultimately. She left administration to focus on her own art. Most recently it's involved hand cut ties vic. That's the insulation material. You normally see on buildings at construction sites. Her new show at seattle art museum features will look like florida's ceiling white tivat columns. She's placed lights inside them. So they glow like giant paper lanterns. They're inspired in part by an essay. About how the introduction of electric light in japan changed the way people they're perceived everything including skin tone. He talks about how light and dark work together and the mystery that's created by adding both those things it really isn't about race or anything that would stuck out for me and age seventy two year old. Thomas remembers the civil rights. Struggles of the nineteen sixties and. She has some advice for people who feel overwhelmed by twenty twenties challenges. You will cook this. You'll be a different person and maybe you won't find whatever that thing that you lost just the way it was but you'll find something else and you don't know what it is if you don't get up and keep holding marcy suman. Klw news barbara. Earl thomas is solo show at seattle. Art museum is called the geography of innocence. It ll open when new social gathering restrictions are lifted until then though you can see some images at k. u. o. w. dot org.

kim barbara northwest african american mus governor inslee Marcy silman thomas seattle barbara earl george floyd university of washington jacob lawrence Thomas komo seattle arts commission Art museum forty years earl northwest african american mus seattle art museum seventy two year florida
Inbox Investigation

The Good News Podcast

06:22 min | 2 years ago

Inbox Investigation

"The. Hi, I'm calling your host for the good news podcasts. And I'm Neil. The other host. The good news podcast is your source for good news, fun stories auditory, delight and sonic. Joy. We're bringing you all of this goodness from beautiful downtown Chicago today, we're opening up. Our good news podcast in-box sharing three pieces of good news. That were sent in by listeners, we love getting emails from listeners. We always appreciate it. So keep them coming. I Ryan sent us an Email literally months ago calling. I know months months league got a bit behind on the inbox. We love getting emails were not always great about responding to them. So this one slipped under our radar. But Ryan wanted to let us know that mammoths might be making a comeback. Sure. Sure. They're big. I like the animals Louis take you to the Siberian plains, cold, windy sparsely-populated. But we found out thirty six million thirty six million people live in Siberia, Google that we had to glad we're glad we did there. It's so huge though that it still one of the least densely populated parts of the entire world. It doesn't sound fun to live there. No, it doesn't. But the takeaway is that in an attempt to avert some of the worst parts of climate change. There are scientists in Siberia who are trying to bring back the woolly mammoth that sounds great. I'd love to see willy, ma'am. I would travel to go see L willy mammoth and person. Yeah. Absolutely. All right. You have another Email the two hundred to chair. Sure, so Jenny send us an Email in response to an episode titled Neil straw, where we were talking about plastic us, and how certain cities are banning the use of plastic straws. And I had suggested, oh, it'd be great to have a reusable stri and Jenny sent just that. So there's a straw. That's called final straw. It's not cheap. It's twenty five dollars. That's a lot. But it is a reasonable shot. And it sounds like they've done some some thinking through at least what I was concerned about the clicking. Oh, sure from metal straw against your teeth. Yeah. So they have silicone on both tips of the straw. So it's not going to click around on the glass or on your teeth. Oh, that's nice on both on the other thing is it comes in a small container. One of the things you were worried about with. Cleaning. There's a. Sing Jill a distinct grossed out face, and we talk about it. But apparently this straw comes with a drying rack and in a squeegee. So you can squeeze out some of those Germany's the phrase squeegees out is a nightmare to me. Well, so anyway, I wanted to share it listeners there is actually a thing out there that you if you feel like you need a straw. But. Yeah. Wanna help the environment, and you got twenty five dollars to burn. That's great. Yeah. Finally, just recently a listener named Liz from Wichita sent some great news about the Wichita art museum, which I imagine dolled Wham. I dunno nail a better be. Listen them in Email. I've I feel like I've been to w cities, and it's just awesome to go to an art museum called the Wham. They really take advantage of that w. So the Wichita art museum will have free Saturdays beautiful, and they will have free Saturdays for ever. Wow. I love anything forever. I know either love it or it makes me really uncomfortable. The Wichita art museum has received a gift of a million dollars from local Wichita n-, which Tani which Itani Tony and Colby sand. Lian who is a real estate developer in the area who just has a philanthropic bent and wanted to make sure that everyone could go to the art museum. So million dollars can buy Saturday's forever. It is an annual grant. So every. Wow. Yeah. Okay. That's the different that's a whole 'nother level of giving another level of giving. So that's wonderful news. And Liz wanted to make sure that we knew it's just it's which it doesn't mean that it's only farms gapes in the Newseum live. I never assumed that I would I appreciate that. You sent at the Wichita art museum has a great Dale JR. Installation. To Hooghly the glass, the glass Arnett the glass blower, and it's called the Persian see form ceiling Google, maybe we can toss it up on her Instagram. It is a beautiful piece of glass and looks magical so worth going with the William just for that. I love that. I'll go go for it on a Saturday, though. I'm not trying to pay. I'm not drown of. Okay. So what? Excellent news from the world of science innovation and art keep those emails coming. Make sure you're going to the new address. Hello at the good news, podcasts dot FM. Thanks for listening. Do you have good news incredible? Or maybe wanna tell us a joke idea. Excellent Email us at Hello at the good news, podcasts dot FM or leaves a voicemail at seven seven three two one seven zero one five six you can also tweet us at the good news pot and follow us on Instagram too. And if you love the good news podcasts think about supporting us on our patriot page must were music is by putting bear.

Wichita art museum Neil straw Instagram Google Liz Chicago Siberia Wichita Ryan Jenny willy glass Arnett Louis Jill Dale JR Germany Lian Tani
MBMBaM 455: Fear Sponging Material

My Brother, My Brother And Me

53:04 min | 2 years ago

MBMBaM 455: Fear Sponging Material

"The McElroy brothers are not experts and their advice should never be followed. Travis insists, he's a sex part. But if there's a degree on his wall, I haven't seen it. Also, this show isn't for kids, which I mentioned only so the babies out, there will know how cool they are for listening. What's up you? Call. The not too. But not. Hello, everybody. Welcome. My brother. My brother mean advice show from the modern era. Oldest brother Justin Maccarone? I'm your middle, brother. Travis mcroy, I'm Griffin McElroy and. Got me good this year. Shot are you'll pay by dark tip of that. Just got me. Oh. Tip of that. Got me. Good that taxman gotten. Right. Oh, they come if. And they just nipped me right in the Duff with these taxes this time. I I tell you the bad experience. I had. Yeah. Is the tax man came with? No. That said, hey, I never thought to ask. I was I was just right Nemechek. And I was like I never thought to ask who gets this. And he was like the president. And I was like, wait a minute. Yeah. I don't like that fella. Yeah. I don't even wanna do this anymore. I don't wanna do this. Here's here's how how'd that play out? He was like, well, what do you wanna do it? I was like could he build a dam like because I feel like I know the walls so hot right now. And everybody's wild for it. Like what about a damn instead of real powerful damn like America used to build in my days powerful, Dan up. Damn I did a thing this year. For taxes a little life AC that they don't tell you at accounting school. But rather than give my money just every time I made a purchase I chopped off like a quarter of it. And just sent that to the government. So they got like a quarter of my Capri sun and like new pair tennis shoes. And that way, they're they're still getting a corner of every a quarter of everything I own, okay. So the in the fiction of your. Little little confection in the fiction of your confection. Yes. The IRS opens a super slobby envelope at it's got a quarter of a big back on it and a picture of your face smiling and a pair, I would presume you as security number. Yeah. Or they wouldn't know what to bucket to put it in. There's a post it note that says four podcasts on it. They know what to income source was there like four bug cast. We wish. Tell you about the the light. Heck, I've got no money. How can this one's good for your wallet is high about that cigarette? Boat back in two thousand seventeen and then they got me with that cigarette. Boat tax in two thousand eighteen. In two thousand eighteen I bought a second cigarette boat and the tax it didn't double. It's like now it's like a fraction of the I zoom. I just keep buying cigarette. Boats. Eventually you'll have votes it'll be a profit generator my dad's gonna make me smoke all my buds. Revenue stream because the taxes are going to be nothing on these puppies. And then you can open up like a water taxi business, or like, you know, one of those things are like, hey, do you wanna go out and look at the water that's farther out away from the land because that's different water. Yeah. I've seen people do that beaches and stuff where it's like I could stand on the dirt and see the water or I could go out like a hundred yards onto the water and see better water stage cigarette boat fights in the in the, you know, in lake Travis or whatever and get people all around for that. There's a lake named after. Yes. Sell tickets to the cigarette boat fight this is money money money money. But then again, then they frigging kid it to build another damn next year. Dammit, there's no winning Griffin. You could sell those owed. Don't even sell the votes, quote, unquote, loan them to a stunt spectacular men when they explode insurance money not tax it lost guys. The guy. I was about to talk about how cigarette boat is a pretty bad name for that. Because it sounds like something wild like towns like a Wild Thing. That replaces the term rum runner is the is the former slang term for these smugglers used to love him, but get this the real name of this. According to Wikipedia, Jeff Bezos. According to a convenient. It's called a go fast boat. No, okay. Hold a go fast boat. Yeah. Show hyphen fast. But okay. Well, let me check the on. My God that go fast boat tax rate is so much lower. I've been taking I've been getting really blinked on this one. Okay. I really gotta talk to people. Can I tell you? This is true. When I was a kid, and I I heard the term cigarette boat that was during a time where I'm not mistaken. I think there are like camel bucks or something that you got like little I thought that a cigarette boat was about the earned from smoking a lot of cigarettes. I once redeemed points from a similar system to buy a mountain dew Brandon pager, hell, yes. The dealer of some sort. Yes. That's right. What does he deal? Extreme excellence in sports. I don't know. Always ready for a land party. I think I think that's it was some questions and Eason eastwards age he's got to be on. Call question is what Griffin requested an I live to serve my brother here. We're recording this on sibling day. So I have to deal with Griffin bids everyday from me sibling day, you guys are my world. Did you did you sign it? And it was it was a, contented sigh. It was like sweet I work at a contemporary art museum and people keep asking me what kind of art. Do you have was that mean wish I respond with besides paintings sculptures? What kind of art? Are there is this art from in Austin, Texas? Boy, I mean, you've come to the right place. Yes. Obviously. Thing myself is something of a amateur volunteer dosen't. You haven't gone pro yet. Well, I'm sort of a dose sent to the world. Now, working at any not not sort of tied to anyone establishment just sort of wondering the streets in telling people about good are that I saw once when they ask what kind of art do you have they're talking about one of the main buckets of art and debts shapes paintings. Yes is one folks paintings, which is folks statues and hanging statues, those are so fun. You get one of those hanging statues with all his shapes and dangle bits on it. That's really cool. Let's especially the hanging Sach is with the light. And it's like, well, that's a dirty word when you look at it that way. Oh, dear when you'll get it this way, I love those. And then there's just there's a bucket called stuff. And this is one where that's like if it's a an old vase that somebody painted usually a horse on or. Or a beheading then that's just kind of stuff. That's just the flotsam and jetsam of the tell you my least favorite bucket of more is the bucket of might be a chair. But isn't don't sell gosh. Those get me every time that might be what they're calling when they're like what kind of art. Do you have to say? Like, none of it looks like chairs, don't worry. Don't worry one thing that is an easy out for us because you work at a contemporary art museum. When people ask how are you have on the new shoot, the new releases didn't do much? Yeah. We of that old garbage. Just hottest new sounds used to have a water lilies from Monet. But we threw that enough booking garbage can and here's one I made with puke. Transpeople shirt he made it two weeks ago. It's the new Sheely outta here nine days. So while alas throw it right on top of Claude Monet's Bush did old ass. Here's a dream catcher. We made from the shredded up water lilies. It's hot shit. It's the port is. It's new. Boy, that's all the things we know about art, ladies and gentlemen, trained think who was the nasty mess. One the one who made the net. Jackson Pollock made the nasty MRs. Yes. Heaven now fully exhausted. The things to say about art similar thing. You have in me when I worked at best buy and people would call and say, what kind of TV do you have like tell me about your TV? And I don't know if you'll notice Salata TV's. Yeah. I and I think here's all you have to say if someone says what kind of artsy have say art, I think you'll like amend say, wink, because he's calling and they won't see this is such a wild unanswerable question. I think you have to judo it back onto them and say what kind of art. Are you looking for? Well, what I have to do to get you into some of this. Art today. I go to art museums. I visit Houston, and they have so many art museums. Everytime. We go we'll hit up a coupla wonderful. If you were to ask me three feet from the front fuck in door. Hey griffin. What are you excited to see in there? I'll be like. And I would I would run away because I'd feel challenged in that moment because I don't know art, I want I just want to see it. And then sometimes you'll see a painting that you saw sauna TV show once and that's cool. And that's I think no matter what you tell these people. They're not fucking coming asking this question. No one gets to the door of an art museum peaks in is like what the fuck is. All this. It was going on in here. No, one drives there to like look in the door to see like what kind of good art. You have. I mean, just just regular art. It doesn't do anything. I like our that. Does something you know, how hose? And hose Cosi the s a big pendulum that knocked shit over and just learn about rotation earth. I love it. Ever labs. Everlasting gobs opera, machine burps, farts with all kinds of beautiful colors all over the guards over three three. There's a whole fuck and room in there that you can lick the VR and it tastes like shit. No one has ever. Let me lick are. I went to this. Art museum wants where they let you put on these. Like futuristic looking vests, and they gave you a little fake gun, and you could run around and shoot each other's vests. And you would get points. If you did a good enough job. And then asks you could go out to the concession stand. And you could have a pizza. That's the best museum. I've ever been to my life Billy Bob's wonderland accuser. I think yes are not sure where the accuser modern busy of moving laser tag designed by Guggenheim or whatever is. You can only like poetry the has clues to a treasure. That art I only like paintings painted on top of another painting that you could only see with an x Ray. And it leads you to something songs that are meant to put a dragon to sleep. That is a song. Says something I want to call museum now, it'd be like, hey, I'm really excited to come a museum, very Stokes. If you're you've got a Matisse, I think is one of them anyway. Oh, yeah. Do you have any of those paintings? Where is follow? You. No matter where you are. Because fuck that. I'm very scared. Do you have any paintings that I might be afraid to be trapped in by a witch that I've crossed because if so no thank you. Do you paintings where you have to kinda cross your eyes to see him and their three D? 'cause I love I'm wild for that shan't. And no one's got. My mal used to have them at a concession stand. All these guys in fidgets fetters. Here's the who sent him by Michelle Smith. Thank you. It's an anonymous. Yahoo answers user name. Oh my God. Usually look around the page for inspiration for what to call. These anonymous users and right now, I'm looking at a Yahoo finance just like video that's in the sidebar. And here's the headline into I wanna munch much junior running on Dunkin coffee giant debut signature sneaker. So these are shoes say Dunkin donuts on them. I this is very strange. This'll be like if you're reading much squad. And there was just a Yahoo embedded in the middle of it. I'm freaking out. Okay. Anyway, this anonymous user who doesn't deserve a name asks all I want in life is to be able to cruise on my motorcycle with my dog. How can I do that? I know sidecars are an option, but besides that my dog is eighty pounds of Doberman slash pit bull update deem. Oh, can you link me some carriers that would be good for that? And I guess there's a well. Wait. There is no deal. There are no I'm looking at all three answers. And once from Marian wants from Bill from baby Buber when thous-. Thousand one which is a very sort of redundant name to have on. Yahoo. Of course. You are. I love you use sometimes drop these Yahoos Griffin. It's like here's my question. And I know what the answer is. But I don't want that answer. It sounds to me like the question asker would like the dog to be driving. With this Askar riding in the back of it. See Abe, and then I still would prefer if my dog was it. My eighty pound of Doberman slash pitbull was going to be up there driving. I would want to be in the sidecar. It's not an option travel got a very narrow tunnel that we're planning on going. Oh, right. Right. Right. Right. Right. So that's just out of the question. I need to get my dog on this bike. He is see Vinci's more about like the grips. You would have special like Sunday could slip their paws into g. It's a that's a big old dog eighty pounds of feels like so a baby Bjorn a traditional baby not gonna go ahead and get you there. Now, let me tell you about I wanna baby Bjorn. I can put Travis in is. I was thinking about this the other day. I my my daughter's about thirty pounds about three feet tall. And I'm six feet tall and about like two hundred pounds. We'll round up. So I did the math. And I think that means that I made like twelve foot tall sixteen hundred pound person to carry me around. I think if I'm doing that math correctly. I just want a giant to carry around. Oh, feel so good. This. What if I'll just keep putting these these haters up? Yeah. Please. What if the bike is the dog? Okay. Go elaborate. You ever heard of this hybrid technology. That's going on these days now Griffin. The do you mean the hybrid cars that run on both gasoline and electric now man bio cyber melting? Do you know about the shit Jesse? Hear your mother should. Cohen graffman. Tell me about are you talking about like a robot dog bike? Yeah. And I think I think they're real good and everybody has robot dog bikes. Oh. Oh, no once crusher my front door, Chris running over me over and over died. I got killed by the thing. I liked about the future. So that's my new book near. I found a thing. I really liked about the future. But they ended up driving over me and bite him. It's like. Oh, it's running over me. Amp binding every time. It goes worst parts of both of owner cycle dog. I should explain if you haven't seen the series black mirror every episode ends with so in Guinea and run over by a cyborg dog bike that is kind of the gag of that of that times. It's more kind of emits more sense than others. Yeah. Metaphorical cyborg dog bike. I give particularly Wadey insult hurled at that person. In line dog bike. The one where the two women for powerful relationship and the cyber environment. I thought was amazing and touching heartwarming until the they got their own too big dog bikes. And that was a weird I was feeling uplifted and then black. That's how Blackmore gets here. Because if you are always. But it's always the twist. Yeah. So all right. How big shirt red shirt doesn't shirt? No. Like you wear shirt. But also the dog faces a shirt, maybe big pantsuits dog also fits in a training shirt. He won't need that all the time. Right. This is what big dog shirts are made. This is what big dogs is. Yeah. Shirts you wear with your dog. That's what big dogs the water big Johnson shirts. That's when you can stuff your hug up. Oh problem. No fear is the one where you hide your fear in the. Stay quiet in there. Anyone? No, I'll take the fair. I'm sure I'll take the. It's made of this fear. Sponge? Weeks the fear away wicks it let me with your fear jerem, Kennewick, your I'm getting wet as fuck in this Serb. But I am not afraid. Thank you read a question. I recently decided to patrol this. Yes. A nerd. A recently decided to patronize local concert hall and a whim arriving only a few months before the concert started, no minutes. What is wrong with you months? Yeah. But it's only once. Who's playing well, two months? Now, we got a simple plan. Okay. I guess I'll stay for that. I decided to patronize my local concert hall Wim arriving only a few minutes before the concert started as I was approaching the box office to purchase a ticket. A woman intercepted me. And all but insisted I use a spare ticket. She had one of her family. Members must not to make before I consider the consequences of doing so graciously accepted, and she sat me among our members in the second row the state for very intimate to our concert because of the proximity. The sage I'm worried these were rather expensive tickets. Should I try to compensator somehow? She also invited me to her church to start going. There are needed by her ticket to something. Now that's from a ticket tag along in Texas. I don't even think how could you not tell us what the concert was. I thought that's like was going to be the whole thing. I'm so disappointed. Yeah. Is the Hayler? I the church thing. Probably not. I think you're okay. I think you're okay. That's a big decision for person making. I do not think you can be bought in into it by a second row tickets for James Taylor concert after all that James Taylor concert. You got plenty of church, and you just from that right there. I promise do you need to buy her a ticket. Here's the thing at the moment that ticket entered your possession. One second before that exchange happened that ticket's value was zero because it was not going to be used right? Like if I have a gum ball. And I was gonna throw it on the ground is hard as I possibly can as a joke. And then I saw Travis and I was like you went Gumbel. It's no longer the twenty five cents. I spent for the dump all its valueless because I decided it had no value. I was gonna throw it on the ground. Does that make sense? Yes. But I also think Griffin this person welcomed you into their family probably heard some James Taylor branded popcorn with you. Fire and rain and butter and salt, and that was probably we could probably do better. I know, but I do there's no time. And so they shared that experience with you. And now, even I think what you what you're feeling question asker is a bond, and you wanna break that with money, and I get that you feel like you owe them something maybe just handed twenty. And walkaway feel like you went to a concert going to a concert without knowing what concert you're going to see is the single wildest act. I have ever heard of any human doing that would be a Kintu mailing one hundred dollars to Amazon and saying and whatever surprise me. I'm I'm I'm and make me I'll video myself opening it, you can watch my reaction. It's it's insane. You deserve the worst that life has to offer you, but. I will say a museum without knowing. If they have laser tag like come with exactly I will say this. You went there to open yourself up to the adventure of life. One of the many wonderful adventures this world has in store for us. And it seems like the door has been open to a story where maybe you find a family that has always wanted to childlike yourself. Yes. And you find renewal and the blood of Jesus Christ or something, and it's like your story. The you started with this like random thing and close the door on it. I think you need to repay these people by becoming a part of their family like a surrogate of their family be there. Thanksgiving Easter, whatever whatever they like. Yeah. You're going to repay them somehow until one of them. Yeah. They'll become a moment when they take it for something. And then you can get the hell out of dodge. Shoot. I really would love to go see kings of Leon. Oh, cool. I got your ticket for that. But I fuck goes to three Christmases together. Jeanie? I'm free. Hey britney. We all hate Dylan. What's the whole time? Hey, Kevin your haircut. I didn't like that sweater. You knitted me for Christmas. The quick Yahoo. Yeah. I think so Griff. Okay. So here's one from Judah, I've import level nine thousand. Yeah. Judah get you from Yadransky user, they're anonymous to I'm gonna call them Bertha asks did cavemen go to school. Okay. Me and go to school not in the traditional sense. I think probably not in the school school is we know school. I think school pie didn't get invented. Until more recently. I'm thinking, but came in have a school's like system where they can share Abe school. I rock desks. You would assume some serve hunting apprenticeship, right? But that would be I feel like cumbersome because you have one dude is like great at hunting. And all the kids would want to train with him. Yeah. So he would need to maybe educate them on mass, which I feel like is all we're talking about right here is how here's how you beat a velociraptor. Yeah. And they tan about a dinosaur bones. Yeah. They would use pens out of dinosaur bones with aiding baby like books that are big leaves. All stuck together. Books would be big leaves, and they wouldn't have ipads. They would have rocks rocks. That can be funny. Big flat Iraq's bevy like, this is my tablet, but it's just like a stone tablet. This is I'm writing this down for the caveman. The Geico cavemen. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. So you're. Shut up school clubs. Okay. Okay. Yeah. Drama club. But it's an actual club. Okay. I don't know that says drama on it. Okay, and club. But it's a club that his glee on it. All right. I don't always say though. Yeah. I I had this perfect joke Griffin. It was the swim team. But they do it in a tar pit. Yes. Oh at lunch. They just get a big site. Lebron's sewers ribs. Okay. So okay. Listen tips their car over when the caveman invented the wheel did everyone else. Just immediately agree. Like, yeah. That's better or take some time. And be like is this better? Is this is it? Good fire. I mean, it's warm as bright there is nothing funny about cavemen. And like it makes me wonder why they decided to do a whole situation comedy about it, you may say drama club. But it's a club. Right. That was more amusing that was more Reader's Digest like a real toilet. Thinker. Wasn't a real gut. Buster that I expect from a mad magazine. So yeah, I'm sorry for this one guys. I would I would like to take a moment I've been led on the internet. And I know that we need to do the money's on. Thing. But I like to take a moment to talk about the TV series caveman. And the things that I've learned about it on the Wikipedia page, and I know what you're thinking a sitcom that is about the guy cocaine. Preflight in two thousand seven it doesn't seem all that funny. But. Listen to this description. From this office caveman have prominent brow ridges and more body hair than homeless, but beyond superficial differences in appearance. They actually are not that much different from modern humans in terms of behavior. Physical abilities male cavemen are very hairy have thick long beards. And where the hair shoulder length, a cave woman that appeared on the show also prominent brow ridge, and comparatively more body hair than a modern human female now some caveman attempted to pass as homo sapiens. This is about the series some caveman attempted to pass his homo sapiens by shaving their body hair. Other cavemen called them shavers. The central humor of the show is that caveman characters are not brutish primates, but fully integrated into white collar jobs. The central caveman characters are modern city dwellers, they must they must endure racial epithets such as Magar a pun based on chrome cro-magnon, all my fuck. This is funny. Dim. I'm laughing already. And that's before I get to the last line of the synopsis, according to producer, Joe Lawson show is originally going to set. Newport, News due to its proximity to the water, then the setting chain, Atlanta, Georgia and finally San Diego, California, the thirteen episodes of the series were made the final six did not deem it air on traditional television. And you can do a little math. That means that cavemen got seven episodes, which is again one more episode. Episode then our TV show. But good news is all the episodes. Aired in Australia. I always said they should've done a show about the talking stack of dollar bills because that's fun kissed that one's funny, and they could have called it the money's zone. Yeah. Yeah. The geckos pretty good transition flux dishes. Talk about squarespace. Now. You've got a great idea somewhere inside you. I believe that all people are formed by their life experience to put something anything into the world that only they can create are you talking now right now. Yes, Travis even you right now that flame wise buried within you, and there is a way to unlock it friends. I am Justin McElroy, and I'm ready to unlock the power within you by harnessing, the creative energy of squarespace. Are you talking about me about you Travis? This is direct conduit from your heart your mind into the computer, turn your dreams and your imaginations into emotions that could be seen on any. A computer screen like not just codes. Why lawnmower man just like in lawnmower, man? And these are the these aren't just on screens phones to their designed for mobile from the ground up. They're gonna help you design a website to showcase your work, promote your business announced an upcoming event or special project like a reboot of cavemen. They've got a beautiful, customizable, templates to create about world-class designers. I don't know why that to be, customizable, though, they're created by world class designers. Asian fuck with them. Maybe they put a lot of work into use them like they are, and there's ecommerce functionality too. So make your dream stand out. Make it stand out stand out with a beautiful website from squarespace head over to squarespace dot com slash my brother for free trial. When you're ready to launch us, the offer code, my brother, save ten percent off your first purchase of a website or a domain. Squarespace plug your brain and heart into a computer and let your dreams become a website him. That's really nice that is that is that a poem that because it's been to sell something. There's a purpose. Perfect. Justin. Speaking of domains could I have a lillies Vega girl dot com back now. Or where we add on that? I'll tell you what traffic you get into supernatural season. Fifteen. I'll give you the euro. Okay. There we go. I want to tell you about stitch fix. I have had like one hundred percent hit rate with stitch fix for the last couple of months, stitch, fix you. Go in you, tell them what your style is you they even show you like some different options and say do you like this? What about this would is this something you would wear you also can tell them like what you'd be willing to pay for pair of shoes or shirt where you would wear the clothes? And then they send you a box of I would say super high quality amazingly tailored to your style clothing. And not just like shirts and pants. I've also gotten you know, shoes I've gone hats. I've gotten really cool stuff from them jackets. I got his jacket in my last one that has just instantly become a favorite because you work with the personal stylist. Who gets you know, you and what you want. Get started today at stitch fix dot com slash my brother, and you'll get an extra twenty five percent off when you keep all items and your box, but stitch fix dot com slash my brother stitch fixed com slash my brother. Hi, it's Allie cook it one of the cast members of mission to six new addition to the next network, we're blown away by the welcome. We received from mex- listeners telling us you've discovered the show binging it hard supporting us during the drive and just being read humans all around vision is improvised obsessively sound design scifi comedy epic a group of investors. Explore the end of space. I played Dr that foot tall Omni sexual security officer with for scales. Chest talent in a series of flaps and shoots that are for. You'll figure it out. We lighted joint arc grew aboard the aging sentient starship of Jerry Jade as we traveled six quadrant meeting, all sorts of weird aliens. Played by brilliant. Guests comedians that mission deke's Z Y accident. Cool. Another quest Yona. Here we go. Another question. Coming at jump. Did did he did he? Interrupt to myself this time because I thought that was more polite. Yeah. Did you do Louis little I wanna months? Above. I've got some drainage, and I want to much spa in. It's messing my voice. Quick update. Don't do the Dunkin shoes I did that Duncan shoes. Quick update before we get in welcome to the family fresh in co launching a cannabis focused menu. It's a special four twenty emp CBD views menu that launches exclusive freshen coop on April ninth you fucked up. We'll be in restaurants from April twelfth three thirty of fresh and co executive Craig respectfully curated the menu in collaboration with jeepneys shift Miguel. Trinidad and just say you're plugged into where the scene is at got the half-baked shrimp salad, which has cakes hit mixed. Green CBS read in winter. There's. CBD infused ginger cashew Ailey on that good. There's a blazed beat sandwich. Again. This is CB folks is and hip would mega may ropes out of. None of this. These sandwiches will not get you. Wish to God. These companies would stop making sandwiches pertain. They're gonna get you. I I see I wanna talk very quickly about toppers pizza, which just added pretzel bites to its value menu. I've never been to a top speed. And I don't know anyone who has. But I feel like I've learned a lot about toppers pizza. Namely that the person they talked to namely, the president doesn't give shit about these. Toppers pizzas continue its commitment to great pizza, and quality offerings all at an enforceable price. Thanks to the launch of its newest value item. Pretzel bites Bill on the belief that better doesn't have to cost more in the words of founder and president of topper speeds, Scott get-rich, the brand rolled out picking or more get rich, Scott, get rich. Fake person's name is name, Scott. Get resident Scott is a CEO. The five ninety nine value menu. Let's customers choose any two of the following baked MAC and cheese gooey monkey brand half pound orders of boneless wings and single orders of topper sticks. Plus, any medium two topping pizza, folks, if you wanna put weed into food Vassar out, right? I asked where you're gonna put weed in. I know what it is. And I do enjoy it. But hearing the phrase gooey monkey bread as like, yeah. Do you want is I it's up setting it's viscerally upsetting. So these toppers pretzel bites her snack ready morsels fried to perfection and dusted with C. So in case, you're curious cost customers. This is the weird. One of the weirder lines customers can pick from any dipping sauce with Nacho cheese. The brands favorite. That's exactly what it says with not cheese the brand. Five ninety nine value item. Includes twelve pretzel bites and so they come to Scott, get rich, and they say, Scott, Scott, give me a quote, Scott. We need a quote this press releases going hot gimme a quote for the pretzel bites press release. Fru most thirty years we've been relentlessly committed to doing Pete's better says, Scott Garrick, that means our fans shouldn't compromise on quality and pursuit of affordability. Our ever expanding value of new reflects that. Scott, Scott, how do you begin with? We are relentlessly committed to doing better and your next is. And folks we've strayed from the path. I have nothing to do with pizza bread. Should not be based in an alkaline bath it goes against my beliefs skydivers in the VP of marketing for toppers pizza. The white Scott. Hey, it's me. Nice scott. And that quote was terrible. Here are going to get people horny for pretzels. Not again, you've twisted. Dreams. We were tirelessly to make sure our pizza lovers. Enjoy a variety of complementary options that we develop after closely attending to the data. What? What data we work tirelessly to make sure pizza lovers? Enjoy variety of complimentary options that we develop after closely attending to the data. What the living fuck? Talking about man, I'm hungry for pretzel bites. Good place. Well, we make good pizza and look at data d want some of these every time you order toppers pizza as you open the box. Someone rises up from behind your couch like tone, my me, just observing the data. I'm minding the data. I myself is something of an appetizer suddenly gay. So it looks like you're having a sausage mushroom might I suggest the fried pretzel bites. They are dusted with salt never form, my favorite, dusty, my favorite dipping is Tanaka cheese. Of course, it's the restaurants favorite doesn't matter. What you like we've attended the data. It's all of your favorites. Anyway, I will now read a question I was working the ticket counter by university theater when Amanda per this is very performing arts century opposite. Isn't it? It's very arts arts heavy not just performing arts. First question about our. It's about the arts. I was working to take my university theater when Amanda purchase the counter and said stone cold, I'm just going to bust in walked into the feeder unchallenged. How could I stopped him? That's from steamrolled at the singer Oma, my friend. I don't think you could have did say very clearly he was going to. Aided his intention and he completed his objective. It's not a crime. If you warn them does. He's is true. What isn't cry? What are you gonna get tried for in this and I hate to revert to shoplifting cool Griffin? But like it's not it's not shoplifting. This one. You can't shoplift a beautiful performance from David Hyde Pierce at the Broadway. Like, you can't you can't David hype Pierce isn't gonna be like, hey, give me my performance pack that I did in show. Right. It's impossible to imagine that. We have gone this far in the history of the arts and have not come up with a countermeasure for. I'm just gonna bus. No one's ever thought of this like Broadway. Hamilton tickets are real tough to get off got a solution. I'm just gonna bus ago. And if what if I sit and someone seat because everybody tell them sit somewhere else. Yeah. I busted in or I'll just get up and move to the next MTC and just keep doing that. Until I get to stay in a seat the whole time Yarrow stand in the back. I busted in you've got nothing on him. No way to track. I'm off the grid. I'm a self made man. And if you're watching this show, you'll learn that those are good Hamilton the aisle. I'm the Hamilton of this theater. If you think about it, really what the phantom of the opera, sit and see. Or would he lurk in the back as I am doing? Yeah. Look at me now. Trying to catch me. But I can't because I'm so slippery. Just like Rummy tumbles cat rumbling families. Appleton here. Here's what you can do to someone who nounce they're just gonna bust in. You could say I'd prefer. Could try that. Something my daughter is taking to say, I'm just gonna bus and you say, no, no, that's a strong. They'll do it. Anyway. Response that happens when you look at nap. Well, and she says no, and I have irrefutable. Once. They get in there. You can't stop the show to get the performance burglar. You can't do you? Call the cops and his this. Hi, this is the cops. What's your emergency? Well, they busted in. Yeah. What do you want us to do? It sounds like they're already in this happened. Once when I was at CSC and a person walked in like, I think it was like ten minutes into the start of act one and like made I contact with the person at the front and just like nodded as if like I've been you know, and the person in front went and immediately record. But the person the guy who walked in just kept walking down the aisle to backstage. And then just like stood in the backstage looking around then turn back and left. Yeah. Was great to work at the marquee cinemas. Right. Yes. Were you given any protocol for I'm just gonna bust it? No. And you know, what there's something I would've noticed. Yeah. I'm just going to bus in don't know, I'm going anyway, I want to see the show, and I don't want to pay for it. I'm gonna bust in. Now, you know. Fucked up I've been sitting here trying to think of something to say, and I just now realized that everything I've been trying to think up is good ways to bust in and. Because I was just thinking about saying out loud, you dress up in all black, and you put on a headset and you carry around a three ring binder, and you just walk into it, really quick. And you can give them like hold on hold on finger. If they start to talk to you because they don't know you might be stage manager stage managing and you need to be up there. I don't I feel like if you sneak in you'll be arrested. I think that is sneak in I don't want anybody sneaking in I wanna push against his nation's inability to stop people are just gonna bust in performing art. I think if you if you rolled up to let's go back to Hamilton. If you're all the two matinee of Hamilton dressed. I can't afford it. Traff. Dressed as Hamilton. You're going to bust in and you're going to say I'm going to bust in in like a Hamilton accent. And like at that point. Everyone's like, this is part of it. This kicks ass. Even before you get into the feeder, yours is yours to southeast still. I feel like to maintain the bussed in because that's so important Bustan makes Justin good is you dress up like Alexander Hamilton. And then you bust in charge the stage grab the real Hamilton. And you to spin around real fast. Okay. Don't do that. But no. Brian. And then you say arrest who. Okay. Okay. As we something only the real Hamilton that kind of thing you got a bone up before you go. President where you fourteen fuck. Now got it in the one. And then they take a jail you say I wanna bus down. Why haven't we thought about something been bam? I'm a prison warden. These dang guys. Keep slip it on dang through. Do you guys know how how just like existential fucked? It is that we have now spit. I dunno six minutes talking about other fun ways to do the cry and other cool places to do it. Yeah. 'cause the answer for the question that we received as Cal trips, and I wanted to make some jokes before we landed on the obvious answer this thing, I think about like how much stuff we all kind of just do because we know we're not supposed to do it. Like, you know, I I have a running joke with Theresa every time like a check comes for a meal in like kind of quietly say like so. But then I think like people then like just leave your table, and you could just get up and leave like shouldn't you shouldn't listen, you should not do that. And don't do it. But there are things that we don't do because everybody just does that they're like the wrong thing to do. And one of those is I'm just going to bust in. So feels like the thing that do to stop that is I don't know better education in schools. Maybe. I don't know. Just just every time you turn in a ticket to any event to ticket change your take a moment. Look at them in the eyes and share a moment where the both of you just appreciate the long moral arc of the universe. Yes. How about a Yahoo and say, I'm not going the Buston. Yeah. Going thank you. I'm going to Santorin Adrian calcium in. It's from Yahoo answers your Johnson. Who does ask how to build a Koi pond for cheap? I love these big guys. Griffin Griffin said I love these big guys. Okay. They're so fucking big every time I see a Koi and do with alarming frequency every time. I see Koi. Forget like. Wow, zirs. You guys are so big I feel so at peace looking at you in there. But I do I've got three dollars. And I want to I want it to be like, you're in a fancy Bank when you walk by my yes, my house or inside my house. I preferably would be inside in my lobby where the oh, well, not the I was just gonna say plug up, your bathtub. No, no, no. Because then it's only for the shippers who go in there to use the bathroom. I want everybody I want where my shoes live where I kick off my my my boots at the end of a hard day the factory I want there to be coy there instead, but I like three dollars. My problem is with Kobe. Yeah, they're always pretending to be shy. Now. I don't think so I checked travel don't think they're being coy. Yeah. I don't I don't actually think. So on that. Here's one thing. You could try take all your Koidu the local swimming pool in. Yeah, they're fine. They live for this shit. That's the thing. You don't know about Coit. They're nasty, and you can't kill them people really like it when we get things wrong about fish care. So I just want announced it you can't fill your coined the local swimming pool. And then you say, hey, nobody fucking swim in this. This is my Koi pond. I just busted it all my fishing here. And you get new shit about it. And they'll give me the sad is they're fine. These things are nasty and they live for chlorine. And they love it. How much kiddie pools? Could you get kiddy pool for like ten bucks? You could. I thought about that was the first thing I was about to say. And then I thought well that probably wouldn't work because you probably need to dig a hole for it. And it's like, okay. So you dig a hole for your Koi pond? And then you put the kiddy pool in and then maybe put grass over it to kinda high. Oh, no. It's a good idea. No, you could down some plastic bags to line. Oh, no. That's a good idea. Wait, wait, wait shit. That's it trav-. I want them in my house, right and a kiddie pool buried in the ground. That's not great. But but clear garbage bags that I fill with water and stuff one individual Koi end before tying it up. And then I could just leave it in the living room like a beanbag chair that no one can ever sit on earth consequences dire. Oh god. So everything ruined. Coy every poise fucking fine. Don't worry about the Koi. They're nasty. They live for it. Oh god. Terrible mess, the terrible mess. But then, but it would be bad ass though. Look cool Bank. Yeah. That's for me. That's the one for me. Folks, that's gonna do it for this week on my brother, my brother, and me, we hope you've enjoyed yourself as much as we have. It's always a treat getting spend some time with you. If you have four spare bucks this week. We would ask a humbly that you go to your local comp store and buy a war of the realms journey into mystery number one. I know it sounds like great eight nerd ship. But we wrote it, and it's not it's pretty good. If you already comics rotary funny are daddy wrote it with us when we worked together. Actually, he did the bulk of the work or taking the crowd. Oh, more taking the credit. That's the macaroni family crest. It's round there. Look it up. I'll it's a cat of stealing a cake from another cat. We also just like a shit ton of two or dates coming up for two thousand nineteen they went on sale last week. So hopefully, they're either not sold out or you got your chance at those tickets. But if you're not sold out, go to mcoy dot family, click on tours, there's a whole bunch all over the place. And if you're sitting there thinking, well, you're not coming to wear. I am there's lots of places where people are and we can't go to all of them. But maybe if these tickets, so really, well, we'll go to other places next year. Who knows who knows we're so wild unpredictable. I wanna thank John. Roger can long winters theme song. It's departure off the album putting the days to bed which is a fantastic album. And I say fun tastic and thanks to maximum pun for having us on the network maximum, fun dot org website, you want to go to if you want to check out all kinds of great shows like JV club with Janet Varney and stop podcasting yourself, and who shot and just all of them and maximum fun dot org. Anything else? There's a lot of merge if you go to macrumors dot com or adding new stuff every month, and seemingly all the time. So if you haven't checked in a while check it out here's finding out who was sitting by Adrian calisthenics Adrian, it's Yahoo answers user cool birds who asks does anyone else ever accidentally call lotion yogurt and vice versa? Just. I'm Griffin McElroy is my brother. My brother main dad scramble EPs. Maximum fund dot org, comedy and culture, artists owned listener supported hi, I'm Joe Firestone. Moreno Detrick game show, which is a podcast where we play games submitted by listeners, regardless of quality or content with in-studio goose and callers from all over the world could win a coastal magnet scribe now to make sure you get our next episode. What's an example of a game Manolas? Okay. Mom or medication? How you play that you have to guess if something's poking on name for medication first time listener if you want to listen to episode highlights and also know how to participate follow Dr game show on Facebook Instagram Twitter love to hear from us really fun for the whole family will be every other Wednesday starting March thirteenth, and we're coming to max fun. Orla mine.

Griffin Griffin Yahoo Travis mcroy Scott president Alexander Hamilton Art museum Griffin McElroy Hamilton Texas lake Travis tennis founder and president McElroy America Justin Maccarone Jeff Bezos Johnson
Philadelphia Museum of Art Miscellany

5 Minutes in Church History

04:59 min | 2 years ago

Philadelphia Museum of Art Miscellany

"The. Welcome to five minutes in churches during hosted by Dr Steven Nichols, where we take a little break from the presence to go exploring the past travel back in time. As we look the people of aunts and even the places for the shape the story of Christianity. This is our story, our family history. Let's get started. Welcome back to another episode of five minutes in church history. This is our third and final episode talking about the collection and the Philadelphia museum of art. I've entitled this a miscellaneous. We'll be looking at a variety of painting the first painting we're going to consider as a painting by the Italian painter Mataya Preti his life spanned the seventeenth century. He was born in sixteen thirteen and died in sixteen ninety nine. This particular painting by pretty is from sixteen fifty six titled it Saint John the Baptist rebuking Herot. In this painting, he employed many of the baroque strategies. It's a large scale. It is a very large impressive painting. And he also used lighting and shading to tell a story in the center of the painting is John the Baptist and his face is very much illuminated an off to the far corner of the painting sitting on his throne as Herod a shadow crawls across his face. He has. His chin resting on his arm, and he looks absolutely board as if he is about to yawn pretty has him entirely apathetic here stands in front of him, the prophet and John the Baptist arms raised in his bony fingers pointed as he is calling Herod for his sin, and Herod is entirely apathetic to this prophet. Also in this museum is one of many paintings that Rembrandt did of the studies of Christ and the so-called head of Christ paintings by Rembrandt Rembrandt as you know from Amsterdam and he lived in near the Jewish quarter and he would often use his Jewish neighbors as models as he depicted many scenes from bible times. And this particular scene used one of those models for Rembrandt's head of Christ. There's another painting in the art museum. That's absolutely chilling, and it recalls one. Of the most chilling episodes in the gospels, the massacre of the innocence this painting is by Francesca to Rosa. Many artists tried to depict this painting. This one is stunning. It is a very large painting and then it you see these women as they're trying to protect their children from the Roman soldiers. And there they are with their swords drawn and their massive muscles, and they have sheer hatred in anger etched into their faces. As this scene from the gospels is depicted and Francesca de Rosas massacre of the innocence moving on in the museum, we come to one of Van Gogh's sunflowers. We don't often think of Van Gogh as a figure in churches Chery. But in fact, his father was a pastor and Van Gogh himself studied divinity and theology, and he. Was pursuing and considering the pasture before he became, of course, an artist. In fact, it was during the years of his life when he was twenty five to twenty seven, that he was a Protestant missionary and southern Belgium. He was there serving among a very small and very poor mining village. Now, Van Gogh scholars will tell us that these years were his formative period, and while he was busy as a missionary, he also spent a great deal of time sketching as he would sketch the faces of these workers. And as he would sketch the folks and the common objects that he would see in this village while also and the Philadelphia art museum or a number of paintings by Edward Hicks. He was a Pennsylvania born artist. He was born into an Anglican family, but became a Quaker is probably most famous series is his peaceable kingdom where he'd paint the lion and the lamb next to each other. He also liked to paint an. Animals from Noah's ark. So in the Philadelphia art museum, you can find many paintings of Pennsylvania's native son, the artist, Edward Hicks. Well, there it is Philadelphia miscellany and you know, I didn't even mention a set of converse trainer footprints outside the front entrance at the top of the steps belonging to a fictional boxer from a nineteen seventy six film. I'm Steve Nichols and thanks for listening, five minutes in churches. For more information or to listen to past episodes, please visit five minutes, Trish history dot com.

Philadelphia art museum Belgium Rembrandt Rembrandt Van Gogh Edward Hicks art museum Mataya Preti Francesca de Rosas John the Baptist Dr Steven Nichols Herod Philadelphia Steve Nichols Noah Chery Rosa Trish John Amsterdam five minutes
When is it OK to sell an art museums paintings?

Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

09:00 min | 8 months ago

When is it OK to sell an art museums paintings?

"This marketplace podcast is supported by Deloitte private offering business insight and strategies tailored to the needs of privately held companies to help them navigate today's uncertainty and build resilience online at Deloitte dot com slash us. Slash Cova. IMF as host of the marketplace podcast, this is uncomfortable. Halloween is coming up and what better way to celebrate than with stories about financial decisions that still haunt you. Like say that time, your mom caught you over drafting your bank account on adult websites and I suddenly realized that one of these things is Mr Skin Dot com and thirty dollars a month and. Then new episode of this is uncomfortable drops Thursday. You can listen wherever you get your podcasts. When is it okay to sell paintings out of an art museum? I'm David Brancaccio Monday the Dow falls six, hundred, fifty points, Tuesday two, hundred, twenty, two points, and as we speak that stock market and sometimes that general mood indicator is down five percent weeks so far in early trading here the dow is down five hundred seventeen points. One Point, seven percent the S&P is down in a similar range. The Nasdaq is down two percent. Susan. Schmidt is head of US equities at Aviva investors good morning to you. Good Morning. It's not really quarterly corporate profits. Is it? No earnings by and large have actually been. Okay. All right. So what is it? Then I mean it's got something to do with corona virus spread and hospitalizations. foreshores big things increase in the number of virus infections knows stimulus before the election, and then importantly that upcoming election where we don't have a clear outcome. Right, it's not just who wins or who loses it's do we know in a timely fashion who wins who loses? Exactly. It's heat uncertainty that is an underlying theme people need. You remember when you don't know something markets tend to get nervous and it leads to more volatility were definitely seen that this week. Susan. Schmidt at Aviva Investors Chicago office head of US equities. Thank you so much. Thank you. Checking back in with markets Banzer up bringing down interest rates with the ten year Treasury yield down at zero point seven, six percent this morning I know it was already super-low. We're now into the second day of facebook's temporary ban on running new political ads. There were hiccups day one, some political advertisers say they're having trouble with ads approved before the election blackout period marketplace's Kristen Schwab has some specifics. Advertisers in campaigns had until midnight Pacific Time on Monday to submit new ADS and receive at least one impression meaning they had to have shown up on someone screen by deadline to qualify the here is to limit misinformation before election. Day. Bought changed yesterday. Well advertisers are complaining that adds that met the requirements were taken down even though they had been running for weeks or had once run and were on pots facebook's product manager tweeted that the company is investigating the error. and. Not everyone agrees this was even the right move to start with. EAC critics say this is too little too late when it comes to misinformation on social media and they also note that this doesn't give political groups a chance to respond to attacks from opponents or even share valuable information last minute changes to polling sites plus this year we have an election season not just election day and lots of people already voted before the ad band started. And let's face. But what about other social media companies? Will twitter hasn't been running political ads altogether for about a year now and recently turned off some features that help tweets go viral faster like prompting users to avoid re tweeting a news article if they haven't read it and all these guidelines won't stop after Election Day facebook and Google are blocking political advertising after the polls close. Chris Thank you. This marketplace podcast is supported by we work as a business. You know today takes new ways of working. It takes new measures toward health and safety flexible terms for where when and how you work spaces designed with your purpose. In mind it takes innovation of a we work office to take your business where you want it to be visit we dot com slash future to learn more. The Auction House Sotheby's is moving ahead with plans tonight to auction off two of three paintings from the collection of the Baltimore Museum of Art Clifford, Stills Nineteen Fifty, seven G and Bryce Martins three are on the block a separate private sale of Andy Warhol's the Last Supper is also planned. Museum sell works out of their collection de Accession is the term to buy new art. But with the Baltimore Museum wants to do here caused an uproar because some of the money raised is not to buy new art but for other important operational expenses including giving raises to museum guards art critic Blake Gopnik contributes to the New York Times and is author of a new comprehensive biography of Andy Warhol. Got Nick argues the guards very much need a raise and he supports the museums diversity initiatives, but he says at a time, the numbers show the affluent are getting richer during pandemic. He thinks the museum should raise it sixty five million dollars Bhai soliciting new donations not by liquidating paintings blake welcome. Always a pleasure David. This spring. When most of us were focused on pandemic lockdowns in Association of Museum directors decides that maybe it's also okay for museums to sell art works and use that money for more operational things. Museums have been in really hard place. They've been losing attendance like crazy, which means that if you charge for attendance, you're losing money like crazy. So the. Association, of art, museum directors decided to open things up a little bit so that in this emergency if you're desperately needed cash And you were museum. You could sell a few works, just the tide you over to for real emergency purposes. But that's not what happened at the Baltimore Museum of art they don't charge for admission and they haven't been hurt financially in a really big way by the pandemic they decided to use this opening to sell some work to achieve all sorts of normal kind of operating goals. We'll normal operating goes they talk about fostering the cause of diversity and inclusion in their collection but you're saying they want to sell some of this art for other things. Well, they to sell about fifty five million dollars worth of art in order to fund better salaries for the museum guards, for instance, and they want to stop charging for special exhibitions that more kinds of people can come to the museum and that's Great. No one is objecting to that. The thing is that's what you usually fundraise for right. That's you go out begging and you say give some money. So we can achieve these useful goals. You don't sell your most important works of art because you're not really museum if you don't have great works of art on the wall. Everyone who needs to see the thing gets to see it because it's on the wall of a museum. It doesn't just pass from one rich private collection to another one at auction. No this is gotten pretty intense at the Baltimore Museum, of art in particular, they're reporting that some big donors now thinking of changing their mind because they don't like this notion of selling off part of the collection. Yeah to former board chairs have said that the fifty million dollars that they claim that they that they were going to give to the museum they're they're not gonNA give anymore selling off major works of art that the museum has in its collection won't please future donors a whole lot especially donors of art I mean it's hard to imagine someone giving their price because so thinking, yeah, I'm giving it to museum, but maybe in ten years when they don't like Picasso so much anymore or when they want to fund. More energy efficient light bulbs going to sell the Picasso, and it won't be a descends my gift anymore this could really open a Pandora's box for that museum in for any museum that sells works of art to fund normal operating expenses. Blake, Gopnik author of the biography of Andy Warhol. Thank you very much. Pleasure. And the chair of the Art Museum Directors Association said This Week the Baltimore Art Museum. was violating its guidelines. I'm David Brancaccio marketplace morning report. From APM American public media. I'm Justin, Ho with marketplace, the economy is changing so fast it's hard to keep up to our latest podcast is here to help called the marketplace minute give just sixty seconds and we'll bring you the latest on what's happening in the economy three times a day market updates business news in hell the numbers affect your personal economy will tell you what you need to know and why it matters just ask your smart speaker to play the marketplace minute or find it wherever you get your podcasts.

Baltimore Museum David Brancaccio Baltimore Museum of art Andy Warhol facebook Art Museum Directors Associati Blake Gopnik Baltimore Museum of Art Cliffo US Susan Association of Museum Schmidt Deloitte Deloitte dot Baltimore Art Museum. Mr Skin Dot
Warriors: Artemisia of Caria

Encyclopedia Womannica

07:39 min | 1 year ago

Warriors: Artemisia of Caria

"Hello for wonder media network. I'm Jenny Kaplan and this is encyclopedia. Britannica happy February. A new month means a brand ran new theme this time talking about warriors women from throughout history and around the world who stood up to fight for what they believed for some that meant literally taking up arms for others that marching writing or speaking up for the cars are story. Today starts way back in Ancient Greece in the fifth century BC. We're talking about a queen and Genius military strategist whose advice was sought out by the Persian emperors. Here's our CC's meet Artemisia of Caria Arte. Museum was the daughter of the King of Halacha. NASICE her mother's identity is unknown other than the fact that she was from after her father's death Artemisia assumed the throne of carrier which is located. In what's now Turkey carrier was the province of the Persian empire at the time because of her gender Artemisia technically served as regent for her young son. During this period zirk sees he's the powerful Emperor of Persia was attempting to conquer Greece. His father had suffered an embarrassing defeat at the battle of marathon and Zirk sees was determined to carry hurry out his father's quest for revenge to do so Zirk had brought together. What's believed to be the largest military force assembled up to that point in history Artemisia troops were part of that force led by the Queen herself as Queen? She wasn't required or expected to join the war so she must have actively chosen to to do so. Most of what we know about. Artemisia comes from the famous Greek historian. Herodotus he was quite a fan when describing the Persian military military herodotus wrote Artemisia. I pass over all the other officers because there's no need for me to mention them except for Artemisia because I find it particularly remarkable that a woman should have taken part in the expedition against Greece. She took over the tyranny after her husband's death and and although she had a grown-up son and not have to join the expedition. Her manly courage impelled her to do so. Hers was the second most famous squadron in the entire Navy after the one from side. None of circuses allies gave him better advice than her Artemisia fought in the battle of Artemis e in late for eighty BC there. She proved herself to be quite the tactician to avoid unnecessary conflict before her forces were ready and in the correct positions. She instructed her ships to switch between the Greek and the Persian flags on her orders. The the battle of Art Museum was considered a tie but the Greeks fled allowing the Persians to recruit Artemis. Performance was so impressive that the Greeks put a bounty on on her head. As the Naval Battle of Art Museum was being fought the battle of thermopylae was playing out on land. The Persians won a major the victory at the land battle and went on to burn the city of Athens in some ways. Destroy the city accomplished what Zirk see set out to do but but the Greeks had fled Athens before the Persian troops arrived and the war was far from over the Greek forces were instead preparing to change the tide of the war in a naval battle. They lured the Persians into conflict off the coast of Greece. Circuses called on all of his advisors. Here's to decide whether or not the Persian should move their forces to meet the Greeks where they'd station near the Strait of Salamis. According to Herodotus every single will member of the council wanted to go for it except for Artemisia was impressed that she dared to oppose the majority opinion. He had already been impressed by her performance. In the battle of Artemisia and this honest guidance lifted her even higher in his esteem. Still all circuses decided to follow the rest of his advisors. He wanted a decisive absolute victory against the Greeks. Unfortunately things didn't go his way. Despite the fact that Artemisia had advised against joining the fray she didn't hesitate to follow orders to do so as the Persians attacked. The Greeks acted like they were retreating. The move forced the fight into the Strait of Salamis. The narrow street was very difficult to maneuver in the Persians large ships and significantly easier for the Greeks more nimble vessels the Persians. majorly ager lost the battle. Circuses was afraid that the lawsuit prompt the Greek forces to go on the offensive and strategically trap his troops in Greece Greece. One commander offered to stay behind with three hundred thousand troops to allow himself to retreat before agreeing agreeing to the plan. Circuses again sought the advice of his military leaders including Artemisia according to Herodotus when Artemisia arrived to give advice ice surfaces excused everyone else to hear her thoughts this time she sided with the proposed plan. She said that whether remaining troops won won or lost it wouldn't be too much sweat off sees back Zirk sees followed her advice and left Greece. Artemisia was charged with taking his children to safety in Ephesus access which is in modern day. Turkey the commander who stayed behind was killed. The following year and another Greek victory after delivering Zirk sees children. Artemisia disappeared from the historical record. Despite the fact that her side Lost Artemisia proved herself to be an extraordinary strategist. She earned herself the position of prized adviser at a time when it was almost unheard of for a woman to be in such a role this week of encyclopedia. CLA -PEDIA will MANTECA is brought to you by Athletic Greens. No matter what it is. You're fighting for it's essential for all kinds of warriors to be nutritionally ready for for action. That's why I'm a big Fan of Athletic Greens. I don't want to have to take a million different things to get attritional balance I need the athletic. Greens ultimate daily. All in one health drink has seventy five vitamins. Minerals and whole food source ingredients making it easier to get comprehensive nutrition without the need for multiple pills powders or potions athletic Greens also includes prebiotics. probiotics digested enzymes adapted superfoods and more. It's like a one stop shop to help support your body's nutritional needs across five critical areas of health including energy immunity gut health hormonal and neural support and healthy aging. Prepare to be your best warrior. Self go to athletic. Greens dot Com Slash Encyclopedia to get twenty free. Travel Packs valued at seventy nine dollars with your first purchase. That's athletic Greens screens dot com slash encyclopedia tune in tomorrow for the story of another warrior. Special thanks to lose Kaplan my favorite sister and co-creator Talk to you tomorrow.

Artemisia Greece zirk Athletic Greens Jenny Kaplan Naval Battle of Art Museum Turkey Herodotus Caria Arte Strait of Salamis Athens Persia Art Museum commander Ephesus co-creator MANTECA seventy nine dollars
Quiet, Subdued, and Possibly Illicit

Dear Hank & John

37:17 min | 1 year ago

Quiet, Subdued, and Possibly Illicit

"Dear john is supported by wicks dot com with which you can create your own professional website insight to tell your story exactly the way you want just go to wicks dot com slash hank and john to get ten percent off whenever you're ready to go premium. That's w w i x dot com slash h. A. n. k. a. n. D. j. o. h. n. Thanks for all the spelling john you're welcome. I'm a great speller. I don't like to brag <music>. The listener supported w n._y._c. studios hello and welcome onto dear hank and john or as i prefer dear john and hank. We are here on a rooftop deck in madison wisconsin. We're actually at the madison contemporary art museum which has excellent shows. If you happen to be in or near madison wisconsin we're on the right now but we're not going to let that stop us for making a a quiet and somewhat subdued and and possibly illicit version of dear anchor john at some point. We think a security regard is going to come up here and kick us off the roof but in the meantime we're going to start out here on the roof with a sculpture garden john yeah. How do you kill bill elephant with an elephant. How do you kill a blue elephant. I know all of these. I have a child two of them in fact with a blue elephant gun yeah how how do you kill red elephant. You have to choke it till it's blue and then you shoot it with a blue elephant gun. How do you kill a green elephant if to embarrass it until it's red choke until it's blue and then shoot it with the blue elephant gun and how do you kill a yellow. I don't know there are no yellow elephants you idiot. It's good good how elephants heightened cherry trees. How do elephants heightened cherry trees. They have to paint their testicles read. What's the loudest noise in the jungle. What is the loudest noise uncle monkey taken up by jerry. This is definitely appropriate conversation. H how do you convert art museum yeah. How do you know that there's an elephant in your refrigerator can't fill footprints in the the butter footprints in the butter. That's one of my favorite jokes. They'd just they can't get enough of it. They say they can barely get out the word footprints in the butter before they start laughing. Oh there's a truck that's coming by. I don't know if y'all can hear that. It explained to both the truck and plane. We're being attacked from above and below not to mention the nearby crickets. It's a soundscape. It's what they call in the radio business the soundscape. I don't know if you can hear the wind but there's also a very present wind just wafting. Thus gentle wind cricket nearby as well. This is the opposite of your usual episode of deer hanke john what we're really trying to get you to do. It's just calmed down. The world is loud and a little terrifying but there are still crickets. There's still wind on the face and there are still apparently apparently abandoned public spaces where you can just sit and see no one. This is a really good art museum and i'm kind of bummed out that there are more people here right now one. It seems like the time it's time for this people pe- please come to the madison contemporary art museum. It's great john. This first question comes from kyle who asked steer hanson john. I'm studying chemistry at university and i love it especially. When i got to talk about my research with others my parents both work in marketing and have accepted that much of what i'm studying goes clear <music> over their heads but nonetheless they're generally interested in what i do when i told them about a new project. I'm working on every time they ask without fail. Are you safe yeah aw there are many systems in play in my lab to keep me safe. All i work with my nasty little friends but i worry that the words flesh-eating bacteria override my parents interest in my work. Um yeah i mean they certainly override my interest in your work kyle. I was all on board with an answer where i was gonna say. Kyle parents love you and they just want kyle l. Get the hell out of that lab. Kyle actually came to see us in madison so nice nice to see you last night kyle. I hope that you had a good time. Is there another way to communicate the gravity and excitement of my research on flesh-eating bacteria that cause my parents worry well. You got to create a euphemism for flesh-eating bacteria just like skin lunching bacteria that was going to say something. That's adequately technical. Your parents won't also won't understand what like the technical name chronic fishy. Oh oh gabrielle so that's worse you does sound bad is chronic fascia so thing if it is it is similar you know about a thing called the credit fascia versus the words ring a bell in my head but i don't know exactly what they mean. You know yeah. I've done a lot. A lot of googling over the years had set one day yeah. I i know there. There aren't a lot of disease process. He's i haven't researched at at least a little kyle. The answer to your question is that you've gotta talk about your work in a way that's adequately vague <hes> so when i ask hank to explain concepts to me in the sciences which i genuinely have a third or fourth grade level understanding yeah of but also an interest in but also an interest in it's the same way i feel about skateboarding very interested in it not a lot of talent for it yeah i i i usually ask cactus to simplify more and then if i need him to simplify less that makes me feel good so i would start with being being like so listen mom and dad. There are believe it or not things that are alive that are too small to see and just go from there or kyle. Maybe you can convince your parents that you don't have flesh and be like no. I'm immune. No don't worry about it. Dad i am as it happens in artificial intelligence yeah when you sign up to work in this lab they replace all your flesh. I took out all my parts. This next question comes from elliot who writes dear john and hank. I live in a small small house with six other college students. We love each other a lot and i'm very grateful to this found family that we built together. Oh that's great elliott. However one of my housemates really wants to get a crock pot an idea that i hate. I have no idea why can't stand the thought of having a crock pot in one of our cabinets. How do i tell my housemate that they cannot under or any circumstances purchase a crock pot. I think that you may be confused about what a crock pot is. It's not just like the shoes. Just pop for. Those crocs shoes the sandals so yeah. It's not just for cooking crocs. No cooking lots of different things that i'm concerned about elliott is that you might think that a crock pot is some sort of like a very small nuclear weapon or a drug thing your math you know it's not it's not a crock. Pot is just a way of just an i'd him for cooking food. Is it better if you call it a slow cooker because they started doing that and they were like. I don't think people like the word crock pot. I think people are upset by the word crock pot. The crock taught people yeah and they are then people are like i know what's up. We should call it. A slow cooker which to me is like i also hate this because i want food pretty much immediately. The moment i start to cook get will the great thing about a slow cooker. Though is you just like. Put it in the slow cooker. You go to work you. Come back and it's all whatever who can think that far ahead astound me. Oh i can think that far. I i love to plan out what i'm going to eat in a day. It's one of the highlights of my day man all right. So where are you going to do. Elliot is you're going to get your house may take in the crock pot because you're being you're the weird one here. Don't ruin your amazing found family over a crock pot like i can't i literally can't think of a worse reason yeah. You seem to really into your found family. I look at your support them feel as much further from the mike than me. I feel the opposite percents. Let's just have some quiet time. Real quick listened to the sounds. You know what i i was thinking about. I was thinking about how this place must have been amazing. In full of birdsong before people ruined it. I was thinking about how the cricket was listening to us and it. It's like okay. I will also be quiet. I got the message guys have quiet time. I like it i've been i've been working so the heart all morning. Thank you for five minutes off. Alec says franken john. I finished the first draft of the first novel. I've ever written about a month ago congratulations in this novel. I'm this novel and i'm this novel a god. This person is inside of the book. Hank happening committed himself in meta fiction has gotten so meta fictional that now somebody is trapped in there and they can email though so that's nice of course they have access to text but that's all they have access says to. I think what they mean to say. As in this novel based the main character off myself because why wouldn't i almost immediately essence it to my best friend friend. She told me that she loved the book but hated the main character. Should i deal with this information. Does she secretly hate me or is it just the way i've portrayed myself tomkins. I'm concerned penguins at six. I think many different things could be happening here. One is that we imagine ourselves differently than people around us imagine us and yes and to be more negative about how imagine how many people probably most people tend to imagine themselves more negatively than the people around them. I think that's fair to say. I think that is probably going on. I don't think that your your friend finds you annoying. I think your friend found this character annoying for the characters choices and even a lot of times at least in my i early experience writing when i when i wrote sort of autobiographically even when i would write about characters i felt like i knew intimately because i felt like pretty closely connected to them. They would still make different choices from the choices i would make because they would make like narrative choices right because it would be important to the plot yeah yeah and so like they would do things that i wouldn't do that. Maybe weren't likable. I wanted the character to come across a certain way. The real question is did you intend for the main character not to be likable because if not that may be a problem or it may just be one reader. Read it that way yeah. I i also also think that we sometimes hope for more out of characters than out of real people that's true too and then when when book characters act like real people were like well that that i'm analyzing that in a way that i wouldn't with a real person and i like you know oftentimes when when characters are portrayed realistically realistically they start to be like people say like that was an unsympathetic character and i'm like well now i mean like we all make bad positions yeah i i don't know when we introduced to the idea that characters exist primarily on a likability unlike ability <hes> suspect yeah yeah yeah yeah because as i don't find that spectrum that interesting or that morton like is hamlet likable is not the most interesting question. That hamlet has to offer us. Yeah i think think there's a lot of <hes> sort of superheroes fiction and when it when the person isn't jason born oh well i wanna kinda wanna see like an ideal person not like a real you'll person yeah and that has its place just think born i want room for lots of different kinds of reading and lots of different in kinds of storytelling and i worry that when we put everything on that axis of likability unlike ability we lose a lot of the richness of what story can they do for us. Yeah this next question comes from veronica who asks lieber gruden buddha german that i mean it was the best fluent and moved out of my best friends zero. Do you know what it means. I imagine says it means dear green brothers. I think it means hello idiots. I moved out of my best friends and my shared flat last year because i had the chance to get my own place close to my work so i did. My best friend was fine with it saying that she'd just get another roommate and sometime later. She told me that girl called katrin would move into mild room however i've never seen katrin at the a flat or any proof of her existence. Yeah i've even asked my friend if her roommate was a ghost and she only laughed a bit too loudly for my tastes ghost remain so does my best friend actually live with the ghost of course know what's happened is that your roommate has cracked the ultimate roommate code which my friend shannon and i- cracked two thousand and two i still remember the day <hes> we were interviewing potential new roommates and dan the architect came over and he interviewed and i hope i hope dan you'll forgive me for delic- news story listen i am catholic and my girlfriend is catholic and are four parents are catholic and therefore i need to rent a room in an apartment and we were like my parents look at my finances so you're saying that you're he you're going to use this room of only when your parents visit and he was like correct and i was like welcome to the family you still have to do the dishes once a week i mean dan spent maybe five nights in that apartment. In three years. Holy cranny paid his. We felt bad charging him a third of the rent but he was like i could have somebody else paying third of the rent. You need that third of the rent right. You have to yeah oh my god. I love it yeah so that's what's happened. She cracked the roommate could correct the roommate code or well. The thing about ghosts is they never pay ram no they're. They're terrible with that. That's at like a hundred percent of the time or or when they do they did. They're like oh. I only have ghost currency on me right. Absolutely that's like pay it all when pennies from the eighteen hundred oh no you and i don't have i don't have cash for you but i do have this. Nineteenth century blood spattered address. I've got this out of tune piano. Take down to the pawn shop. See what i can get for it. Drop it from the ceiling. Every once in awhile the three you can a ghost be like my roommate in college and accidentally leave a piece of chicken between the newspapers and the recycling for three months. <hes> i mean no is the president don't exist. Yes okay yes. Ghosts can leave chicken and uh-huh. I hate improv. Both are true. I had a big mac under the bed of my freshman dorm. That arrived arrived under the bed of my freshman dorm in october and departed from under the bed of my freshman dorm the day that i moved out of that dorm in may <hes> seven months big mac. That's amazing was a dark time. I am so glad you made it through. John do do that me. What a weirdo all right. Let's ask this question from sydney. I don't know if this is our mom different sidney but sydney writes dear john and hank how did conspiracy theories get created and circulated before the internet like now we have read it and tumbler and fake instagram videos for it but how did conspiracy theories get bigger than a few people before the internet p sherman forty-two while he'll be way sydney top-class finding finding dory joke oh good so i was just at the farmer's market here in madison wisconsin. They were a number of people who wanted me to stop by their booths <hes> talking. They weren't really booths. I think that they are sort of free. Speech down there <hes> talking about one thing or another <hes> and that's not really an internet activity. They were really there was a dinosaur found at the bottom of the deep sea disproves evolution. I oh they wanted me to know about it right. So there's that strategy. <hes> there's a phrase called getting on your soapbox that comes from people really standing on soap boxes and saying whatever they wanted to say which sometimes people need human rights including the right to free expression russian and sometimes would be like the moon landing was fake yeah and so in a world of free expression you have all of those voices together and and then and then once information started to be distributed differently. All of those vehicles were used for disseminating incorrect information nation. That was the case in newspapers newspapers. Would many newspapers fostered conspiracy theories. It was the case in on radio like all early radios tejano radio a._m. Radio during our childhoods like that's how you found out like nixon was married to an alien and yeah and nixon's daughter was half alien and it's the same you know like it's it's funny to be like how did ideas spread before the internet same way like books people wrote books about how the kennedy assassination was faked baked and people talked about it and like information spreads like yeah it doesn't it like information spreads more efficiently now yes right always spread and like the story of the human. It's like the story of being able to spread information more efficiently and quickly right and that's really the thing that freaks me out about right now. The the most <hes> like you can say that like weapons technologies are kind of the scariest thing but communications technologies are the thing that shifts society the most and we've never had a revolution communications since technologies like we are having right now i think we have had one before but it was also very very destabilizing and it was when the printing press was introduced yeah within fifty years of the introduction the printing press the number of books went up by a factor of a million or something yeah crazy like that and it was very destabilizing. I think that we are we're going through a weird time and it is partly because our our ways of technology are changing and that means the systems that we've built up over the last few centuries to kind of deal deal with incorrect or misleading or sensationalized information though systems aren't working very well right now because those systems are built for communication strategies that most people aren't using. I remember when i was a kid. Somebody gave me like i was walking around. <hes> wake ill whoa yeah this happened to me too in orlando and somebody gave me a book that was essentially like a book of conspiracy theories and twelve year old me just eight it. <hes> <hes> like i remember one of them was that stephen hawking the physicist <hes> had actually died in nineteen seventy two and had been replaced waist with different physicist and evidence for it seemed so overwhelming and obvious when he was presented in this conspiracy theory format and you see how how in especially in a world of lots and lots of data you see how you can find data points that support your feeling that there are like big forces at work in the world trying to make things bad for you yeah yeah and i think like it's very appealing to be be able to think you know something big that other people don't it's sort of like a shortcut to being powerful right or at least in your own sort of like come comfortable in your own power power and it's sort of a shortcut to feeling smart yeah. We'll you're in on something that other people don't know about <hes>. It's the the phrase in in our childhood. Was she people. You know that they still use that one. They still say sorry i haven't. I'm not familiar with what the kids are doing. This is a really important questions on that. I don't think that we really covered okay adequately that people probably have many people have a deer hanging john recently scrolling through your most popular wagner. There's videos and notice eldest at nine of the fourteen of your top videos have to do with giraffe mating or another type of animal. I found this particularly odd as you have both made in my opinion much more interesting contents so i guess my question is why are your most viewed videos. All about draft sex who finds that appealing giraffes and dreams christina china who finds that appealing first of all drafts are fascinating giraffe. Mating habits are especially fascinating because male giraffes hit female giraffes in the bladder and then drink rink p to find out if they're ovulating. That's the kind of stuff that in two thousand seven america's fourteen year olds found irresistible yeah no not just america either hi there we were at that that he was huge all over the world true. It's really are only global hit. The only time we've really broken out of the english speaking world so christina one of the things that you'll notice notice if you look at a giraffe is you'll think to yourself. Wait how yes right so. I think that's part of it people sitting around a table just like we we are right now. At a contemporary art museum will talk about drafts and be like wait but no how does that work yeah and then they google video comes up right and it's the same thing with the other other animals so back when the hanging high were trying to get lots of youtube views it was very interesting to try and do that excited felt the yeah it felt like <hes> it it felt it felt important in a way that frankly today it doesn't fight back when we were really obsessed with that we noticed of course the people responded funded these videos and the videos that they responded the most were the ones with weird mating habits but more than that the ones with like anatomies that would make you say how wait wait what is that like toward sees its yantra yeah and also there was a time when youtube rewarded a click much more than it rewarded a watch. A lot of people cooked on the thumbnail dixon's. They wanted to watch a giraffe do it and then they were like oh. This man is talking about. Giraffes sex not really interested in the details and just want to see it happen right right. That's very true. The other thing though is that there is a small subset of viewers if those videos <hes> one of whom left a comment that is seared in my memory in a way that no other youtube comment ever has no can you please do more videos of animals kissing and other other. It's the and other than i can never forget the last thought i'll ever have will be and other all my other memories will be gone. I'll be alone in a nursing home and my eyes flash open and those will probably be by accidental the last words and other and other actually pretty good good to not enough context. No one will know everyone will have forgotten someday. Someone will listen into this podcast. It'd be like oh you guys thought it with some deep thing. No he was thinking about drafts boning right yeah. It'll be like the rosebud of my life by the way i <hes> i just watch citizen kane <hes>. I know that it's the best movie of all time but it is very good. Everybody talks about how if the best movie of all time so. I assumed assumed that like that it was going to be kind of torture to wash right but it was great it it is really good. I get it's really good things spoiled. It's not like the <hes> it's not like the six harry potter movie or anything like the spoilers to citizen kane or are not especially devastating which which reminds me actually today's podcast is brought to you by citizen kane citizen kane john recommends it of also brought to you by your ghost roommate always a little bit late with rent always laid on the rent and and also inflation is so much that they won't get it together. It's been a lot what i what do you what do you need. I got twelve cents. That's that's a lot right and my day that could buy you a model t. and a picasso today also brought to you by the madison museum of contemporary art the madison addison museum of contemporary art the unwitting hosts to our episode of deer hanging john and this podcast is brought to you by skin monchy bacteria skin bacteria. It's cute necrosis. This darinka jonah supported by wicks dot com with wicks. You can manage and grow your business online on one platform. You can create a professional website with with built in s._e._o. Tools an easy to use scheduling system and more all on your own no matter what industry which has the tools you need to create a sleek digital title presence just go two weeks dot com slash hank and john to get ten percent off when you're ready to go premium. That's w i x dot com slash h. N. k. a. n. d. j. away chen. I prefer to think of it as john hank how well let's do by. That's not the code john. This question actually comes from our show last night. We didn't get to it but it was somebody in the audience who sent this one ends from tricia who asks six dear hankins john. Mama mia is my favorite movie and it's slowly becoming my only personality trait. How can i stop relating every situation in my life to the plot plot or songs of mama mia that being said my ambulance song would be s._o._s. by abba. Here's the things this is actually say pretty easy one to solve because i've been in this before where you love something so much that it becomes difficult to talk about anything else yeah so the key to this solution is watching the movie mamma mia the two here we go again because then you'll never you'll never talk about mama mia again here. We go here we go. I believe it's called l. Mama mia to here we go again he goes to the subtitle should have been mama mia to all the dad. Dad have been columbia to hank actually didn't realize that the dads were gonna show up and that one hundred percent surprised him so much he cried. I'm concerned that i might have i might have stolen the joke. I'm searching for mama mia to all the dads and i'm not seeing anything but if i stole that joke i'm sorry to whoever still from do you have this in your life. Sometimes where you get so into something. Everything seems to relate to it. That's the music video for smashed all star of course for me. It's usually a break-up. You know like i'm sure you remember this. Hey after my big breakup for six six months to a year no matter what someone said i would be like oh that reminds me of my heartbreak which is ongoing and omnipresent one time i saw someone opened the car door and i thought to myself. She opened the car door just like that so that's the key though is just get your heartbroken. You'll stop thinking about mama as we have said before. Diversify your identity more in the world then mama mia. This next question comes from iris. We did meet last night. Yeah i remember yes. They were nice. I was great to meet you at who asked deer hanging john. How would phantoms an online communities be impacted by a devastating worldwide apocalypse level event. Oh that's a great question that how would different phantoms respond to the apocalypse yeah so i'm gonna i'm gonna reveal my bias here and say that i genuinely annually think the harry potter fandom would yeah come together. Come together and work they do the they do. The spell that goes up into the sky and they'd be like everybody nobody gather around yes. I think it's called curriculum. Which is something that i that's shouldn't know. That's a deep cut then gathered joe rollings house. Hey we're big fans france. We we hear you have stuff you. We believe you have resources which are now in short supply. <hes> then there's the like contemporary young usually shirtless tower where the guys like so y'all wild day yesterday right so many people died. It was like super sad. Hey everybody what's up. <hes> really i mean half the human race gone in one one yeah. It's crazy so merchant in the bio boy man i just it's a tough tough day for everybody but you know we're looking at it honestly also so kind of a great day right <hes>. Maybe a good day to get a today's a great day t shirt. I think i think the <hes> a._m. Radio fandom would do really well. Oh god i mean a._m. Radio and people would just be they would get on on a._m. Radio and they would be like i told you so. Oh my god aww talking about this for fifty years they would have that link weird glee that sometimes things happen. They've been predicting oh yeah. That's the worst thing about thinking something bad is going to happen. Is that when it happens. You're like see like i shouldn't have a good feeling to know you. Don't wanna be you know you never wanna be gloating sitting in the face of tragedy. It's the worst work yet but no i think the a._m. Radio community would crush it also crushing it of course the survivalists who would live an extra three weeks than skill die like the rest of us. Yeah i think that iras you are optimistic about the ability of internet systems to survive an apocalyptic event. Yeah the cloud would cease to be cloudy very rapidly blake right one of the weird things that would happen. Is that the last youtube video. It's very possible that the last youtube video would have absolutely nothing to do with whatever the cataclysmic oof the last youtube video ever uploaded might be somebody like hey. You'll never guess what my cat did today yeah and then like click click well. I think that we're not gonna go extinct as a species yeah. I do sometimes feel like i need to reassure people about at this because there there is this eschaton anxiety than i remember i remember happening before i remember it happening in the nineteen eighties. When i i was a kid and we would have to do these drills where we literally got under our desks to prepare for a nuclear bomb attacking orlando florida yeah and there was an expectation dictation that at some point in the next few decades there would be a cataclysmic nuclear war and there was a lot of anxiety about the end of the human species species and people feeling like they didn't wanna have kids when the human species was about to end and now we are facing a lot of that same anxiety and i do not in any way want to minimize minimize our problems because i think our problems are real and in some cases they are existential but i also think that we are not about to go extinct. Civilization is not about to end barring something you know very unforeseen like a you know yellow yellowstone super volcano or a a disease that spreads quickly through the world because we refuse to fund primary healthcare systems and impoverished countries because we don't think that people are people short of that. I really do think we're going to be able to adjust every other time. People thought the world was about to end and they have thought it many many times they have been wrong now. Eventually they will be right but not today so the wind the wind starting to pick up as you may be hearing <hes> and that means that it's time for the news from mars and a._f._c. wimbledon. I'll i'll go first a._f._c. Wimbledon played. Maybe the only team in league one. That's definitely worse than us. Stanley got a red card and we tied we tied. We got our first point of the season. There's two ways of looking at this one way. Is that after three games. We've only got one point. Another way is that that we are in eighteenth place well out of the relegation zone <hes> in no small part thanks to bury and bolton wanderers having respectively negative twelve vinh negative eleven points so a._f._c. wimbledon not doing well definitely alarm bells going off. I i would say at this point. We're looking at ah level nine crisis so it's not catastrophic. It's not cataclysmic but boy. I wanna stay in league one for one more season and a news from mars johnnie johnnie lon musk a really apparently wants to nuke mars. It's back. It's a science. It's a sign of the tremendous stability. He has as an executive giving a person he just tweeted nuke mars <hes> with an exclamation point <hes>. It's got two hundred thirty nine thousand likes so apparently that's how you get big on. Twitter is just you want to nuke mars of course the plan to nuke mars is to introduce a lot of energy to the system potentially evaporating a lot of the carbon dioxide oxide ice which would create a larger greenhouse effect would fit increased overall warmth of the planet and also essentially atmospheric pressure which would make it easier to live on the planet certainly wouldn't make it so that we could walk around or anything. That's the idea no one has any idea if it would work but there's only one way to find out which just to nuke marks i mean can i just say on a personal note that if we nuke mars before sending people to mars that will be the most both the most elon musk thing imaginable and the most human thing imaginable that like all right we do. We do want to settle settle this planet but first nukes. I understand the reasoning behind it but i just seems to me like we don't have nearly enough information to to make that even remotely good idea yeah well <hes>. We've never engineered a planetary system <hes> except for the once doing it a little bit right now. Here are not on purpose vest but it's happening. My worry is that if we nuked mars and it worked. We just knew everything else. Jupiter jupiter jupiter stagnate so it worked on mars. Maybe we live everywhere how hey come over and say hi cast. I yeah so that's that's the news from mars <hes> we've we've. We've just been spotted by some friendly. People who i think are going to come over and <hes> say a quick. Hello hold on come. Say hi taylor day or a nice to meet you. How's it going hi nice to meet in your house going. I feel like i've seen your necklace before. Oh that's cool out. Oughta haven't really got to candidates and it's like oh yeah yeah. You're not allowed to take take take it in there. <hes> do you think we should nuke mars. All you on musk. He's he's informed. I don't think it'll work because i think it will evaporate over time and it won't actually form atmosphere. It's yeah it's i read on it. Oh wow he's he's up to date. We've got does way more than i do. Maybe we should replace tank taylor awesome. Yeah yeah no well. It's great to me. You really push back. Take care thank you and with that john. Thank you for putting with me today. It's been a pleasure and also thanks to taylor doniger for dropping by yeah. So if you want to send us your questions you can do that at pankin jonah gmail.com. I think everybody who sends them in. We had a great show and madison yesterday. <hes> that'll come out as a podcast <hes> sometime in the future <hes> we're doing a minneapolis tomorrow and that also will be a podcast sometime in the future and we're going to be doing more of this touring over the next year to support our communities project to reduce maternal mortality in sierra leone so look for tour dates coming up. Thank you again for listening to podcasts edited by joseph tuna mesh. Our head of community and in communications is victoria. Buongiorno were produced by roseana halls real hot and shared didn't gibson our editorial assistant is book chakravarty the music you're listening to right now is by the we're going to roll it and as they say in our hometown don't forget it'd be awesome.

john hank kane john youtube Mama mia kyle l madison wisconsin madison contemporary art museu elliot orlando harry potter A. n. k. a. n. D. jerry skateboarding madison w france jonah elliott shannon
2 - Thou Shalt Know Your Starting Point

Everywhere

37:57 min | 2 years ago

2 - Thou Shalt Know Your Starting Point

"Go further than ever with the discover. It miles conned they automatically match the miles you own at the end of your first year so your thirty five thousand miles could become seventy thousand discover it miles limitations apply discover match for new card members NBA's only learn more discover dot com slash travel pie and welcome to everywhere. I'm your host Daniel Shuffler. I was always traveling from the beginning and might vary young mothers barely eh around Southern Africa with Ron Stewardess a soundtrack to on life together. Maybe this is why thirty plus years later. I have such a Bushel Para my hand. I Dunno perhaps more importantly this is why I feel like Travis so much part of who I am not in the obvious let's Daniel for some travel advice on where to eat in inserts city here but in a much deep away so may once I was speaking to me when she said and I paraphrase good boys go to heaven band boys go everywhere today's days travel commandment thou shalt know your starting point. I always say my booth mother is Norma Jean not quite Marilyn Monroe but what she did do it's travel with wild abandoned topless with the wind through brass. She was in Africa and third all Phelps Afri to her okay. Let's establish published this right now. Africa's link van it helps you lose those strange inhibitions. You tend to own over time. Remember when you were just a we less or lad you just tried everything twice and again if he wants to and you did own without thinking about a two months and he on today and you questioning whether to go to age-old incredible Mexico because the media's spock's fear in you over some bonus situation and there's something that's gone at bloody soil of Africa that stays in my being I leave again and again and somehow being born in Africa means. You always get tugged home. That umbilical cord is so taunt I know when I get off the plane and I smelled an air and alters me every time no matter who have come from it smells like the Bush building everywhere animal sweat for Clint the the clouds or extra enormous and when the afternoon roles in just as you thinking about a lovely teatime they do at dance of storms. It's louder than what you is think they can handle and it's wetter than any rain you've ever felt built big drops tasked clean your soul and they come with two riotous frenzy and all you shits washed away. The drill is always the same I kick off my shoes and I find my feet ban. The sand soil dust somewhere and immediately roots right there my feet become the very beginning of life as we know it it taps into centuries of humanity in all its cruelty eighteen beauty. Only Africa can make you cry and love all at once. I'm not supposing that Africa doesn't have its problems and I'm not suggesting that just because I was born on the confident that somehow miraculously I understand it better than by the Koi sand or others that have been there before me. You've spent centuries reveling in it protecting it on the country. I'm white boy from Africa. I can partially see they both the sword and the shield I read this beautiful line in wild the Cheryl strayed book and she was talking to Oprah and they would having this conversation and she said something like the Wilderness has a clarity that included included me okay sure granted. She was talking about the Pacific Chris Trail but that somehow stayed with me. Africa's shows you exactly that ponding about that gorgeous sentence wants more is the thing we're all looking for and maybe the reason we even leave to journey across oceans and even now space just a little more inclusion please so I think my birth mother must have stuffed me with some of those liberty jeans. I'm always climbing up a land rover so I can watch the wild dunks play running up a hills so I can see the nearby islands or some open plains and then they are these endless endless mountains. I'm hiking up to see when I can see from there in fact whenever I get to a city besides for finding a poor over coffee specifically which I'll Shamo details with union movement I try and find a rooftop or a hilltop or pl P situation to observe. Just what I'm dealing with Lemme demonstrate so think about a city Lake Santiago Chile you hike Little Mountain which is right downtown and of course there's like an enormous religious statue looking down at you possibly judging you and this is where you can survey almost the entire city and those incredible Andy's in the distance so that's how I understand it and I'm able to swallow it. Listen about another place like <hes> Birmingham Alabama that has the room and God a fire Volkan on a hilltop right downtown gleaming down at the southern urban heyday glimmer of a hope city. That's the first thing I did as I arrived. I went to hold hands with this. Kosta and burly bid bad bottomed man so that I could really see the city. Why shall I the first thing I did as I go to? The plane in Alabama was to go to a gas station in the tiny little town annexed to Birmingham for barbecue gas in a rube. I was eating flesh at this point and I'm much more plant orientated at the moment for all kinds of reasons we could definitely debate. Life is simpler when you can drive a truck full of gas and eat a piece of meat. I was told by the man behind into smoker but let's get back to the poor of a coffee. When I'm traveling before I arrived somewhere new whether it's Atlanta Alaska or Australia I put into the little google search bond the falling phrase this poor over coffee and to city him and I pressed search so the theory is that if they serve pour over from a chemical maybe it'd be sixty an even an Arrow press they probably in lots of certainty? Take the bean seriously so then you know and this is what I know is that I will find not only a fantastic cup of coffee but probably people who also give a shit about the cup and if we found found naked coffee kidding but series of course there's nothing I love more than bearing some skin. I'm not saying that I'm a nudist joining thing but since twenty three and me says I have some very serious German roots we could do a whole episode dedicated dedicated to the German love for baden-baden on I of course proposed to my New Jersey Italian husband in the nude we will leisurely swimming off the coast of Sicily newsom terribly old bruins in Hungary dental they would Nova style cliffs over to the left and some fucking crazy game of thrones consuls to the right in a place called the lovely sounding reserve not to let the Ponta Bianca in my best Italian so think about it proposing while travel while that make sense. That's what you WANNA do in the nude even more sense whilst you traveling. Maybe Oh God is down down a little and you're more open to something. The dog isn't waiting for you to take out and this a magic shit. That's about to happen. Travel gives you that little opening cranny in the universe to promise your whole hot to someone and my boy is always busy as hard to get his full attention on anything I mean let's not even try and get undivided attention but you know at deserted soft heavily beach with waves quietly kissing in your feet and inviting you in for a dip in the nude hell yes that held his attention not because of this dramatic and not because of the selfie inducing moment but because we were together and the skies opened. Opened up and gave us this private moment to share love to us and that was the starting point like no other Michael and I starting in life together just like the one my bio mom had envisioned and then a life was changed forever. I'M GONNA pause this right here for a moment for sponsors to weigh in but do come back to him more about well. I've been skirting around this suite with the discover it miles cog. You can go further than you've ever gone. Befall like stunning your facebook in your hand kids playing in the sand further because the discovery of miles conned office unlimited one point five miles on every purchase inches. They'll automatically match all miles you own at the end of your first year so you're thirty five thousand miles could become seventy thousand. It's just that easy. Get out there with your discover. It miles con today. Limitations apply discover match for for new card members only learn more at discover dot com slash travel tray tables up you returning to everywhere land. That's my experience with Sicily. Now I also like to think about it in terms of now and then some inviting my dear friend holy onto the show to give us the then yes and we're only going to focus on a little bit of then because history of course is very rich in Sicily. There is a lot to discuss and talk about and this is gonNA sound. Perhaps a bit almost morbid compared to your story but there's a reason I want to go there. I want to talk a little bit about its military history green. I mean there are ruins near where you propose to your beloved sold them. He saw the maybe didn't fully process them. No I was non-processing mind elsewhere totally understandable <hes> the DELLUCCI military battery is there and that has been there percents early on in the twentieth century it was built between Nineteen fifteen in nineteen twenty-three so around World War One but what we really want to talk about in terms of what makes Sicily important in world history is reward to. I thought you gonNA say the wine culture <hes> all the delicious prosciutto no no also very important on both points but when Sicily was invaded by the Allies on July tenth nineteen forty-three that was known as Operation Husky. It was is a very very important moment in the war. It's one of those places that I think again to Western ears. We think of Sicily is a very small part of the world or a small part of Europe but it was really pivotal that actually is considered by many historians to be one of the most important Anglo American campaigns of the war for one. It was the first time that the Western allies made an assault on what was called fortress Europe in essence and it also became this important experiential essential learning curve for the allied forces like they took from that a lot of knowledge in a lot of experience in a lot of learning that they could apply to the rest of the war going forward but here's the thing that to me is always very very very important whenever we talk about historical wars or any military action. It's really easy to lose sight of the fact that those are real people involved. We tend to talk about you know the dates and the names in how power changed but there were young men nair that didn't make it out the allies had twenty three thousand casualties at Sicily. That is a lot of people that is still the smallest number that I'm about to us in this quick statistics list German enforces had thirty thousand casualties but the Italians had one hundred thirty five thousand one hundred thousand access troops were captured so those were a lot of young men but here's really why it ended up shifting lifting part of the war because at this point by the spring of Nineteen forty-three Mussalini was in some trouble like his own people were were starting to rise against him. They were opposition groups that were forming. There were people that were saying like I really think we should should make peace with the allies. I really think we should broker some sort of situation and get out of this war shoe and wine to get back to all be cool who wouldn't prefer that I it's hard for me to understand why anyone otherwise but the problem was that there was a lot of German military presence in Italy at the time so it wasn't like they could just easily go no poor voting on this we have changed our minds where washing our hands of this war they couldn't they were German forces verses literally everywhere so that is sort of why this becomes so pivotal Sicily had been part of Italy since eighteen sixty so it was considered a very important part of the country befall so before that it was ruled by the bourbons and it was considered a a different municipality and then actually merged with the Kingdom of Sardenia in eighteen sixty technically and then <hes> became part of the Kingdom of Italy officially in eighteen sixty one. This is why all the American Italians go to Sicily to uncover old all does history yeah and it's kind of like the heartland in many ways and also we've discussed the delicious things that come from their holly happily put down those headphones. Let's go. You don't really have to ask me thrice but don't when asked me second time because we gotta finish this segment so when this invasion happened what was happening in Rome was that this was really such a hard hit on Italy particularly again considering those casualty numbers that Mussolini's government began to just collapse and so two weeks after the allies invaded Sicily on July twenty fifth he was forced to resign by the fascist grand council <hes> he was actually arrested that day and in essence this removed Italy from the war from the their little access agreement and they were no longer part of it and that met one more country that the allies were not fighting so that made it very very important. What's really really lovely? Though is that there has been the was waiting for the loveliness to come coming military history is often really dark but I think very important you can't turn away from those things because they are part of our shared history in the twenty teens and effort started to make it into a nature preserve at this point like thank you saw them. The military buildings there have all largely collapsed or crumbled so environmental groups convenient Palermo in two thousand fifteen. They actually asked the Italian army to also be part of these because they wanted to make sure that that the military history of the area was documented just as they were preserving all of the the natural things that have grown there they also want to make sure we don't lose any of that in the process but what I really love about your story and why this is so important to me to talk about these unfortunate things that happened there in these young men that lost their lives there is that because this is a place that has seen blood and pain and horror and yet you have found it to be a place that is nothing but beauty and charm and magic love and you add to that by sharing your love with someone else there and then intern sharing it with us so to me like these of the moments that redeem the ugliness of humanity is that people find a way to get through that and then build something else beautiful in those same spots holy. I know you crying but I'm gonNA cry but that's how I feel. I mean when I proposed Michael wasn't planning for to be a necessarily on a military area but now did you told me this my proposal to him and I'll love together is somehow more meaningful to me like somehow like the two of us to men in the freedom of the twenty th century can come and be together. Uh in a love found at a place which is wasn't about love was about fair in about a hatred yeah you have made this place for a lot of young men died into a place where young men shared love and to me. That's what makes it magical. That's what makes traveling traveling the way you do such a beautiful thing like you can heal these spaces where bad things have happened in some ways and in absolute the same vein the place can heal you. That's why I find myself trying to leave my house and pack a bag and climb on another flight is in fact the possibility that I could get healed and then there's this beautiful synergy where that place now is so unbelievably beautiful that it also heels you in return and you kind of Crete this this beautiful infinity of sort of a healing energy that goes back and forth that sounds a little hippy dippy than I usually get but I think to build on really your whole message right like you have the opportunity when you travel to heal places with your own love like that's part of what makes humanity great is a counterpoint to all the things they can sometimes make humanity not so great so thank you for adding love to the world into that part of the world in particular killer crying holly thing you could throw glitter in the air and Yell Kittens and I'll probably cry but this is to me very meaningful. Let's take a break to him from sponsors and we'll be. Right back with more travel from everywhere this episode is brought to you by care of make health and wellness. Your priority care of is a subscription service that delivers vitamins and supplements customized honest for your specific health needs. I travel every week so health and wellness is a priority for me care of makes it easy to upgrade my health routine. I did this fun online quiz that asked me all about my diet health goals and lifestyle choices it it only took five minutes and now I have a personal scientifically-backed vitamin and supplement recommendation care of delivers daily vitamin and supplement packs all customized so I can take only what I really need care of has vegan and vegetarian supplement options for someone like me available to match my dietary needs and to ensure. I'm getting all my nutrition care of make sure that what you putting into your body comes from the best sources backed by honest guidance and transparency currency all available to you on their website for twenty five percent off your I care of order go to take care of dot com and enter everywhere. That's T. A. K. E. C. A. R. E. O.. F. Dot Dot Com and enter everywhere. The time has come for more everywhere now. Where would we welcome back? I was in Washington D._C.. Recently interviewing being Stephanie Establish the Director of the Smithsonian American Art Museum we spent the moaning chatting about using on as a way to better understand America and I could listen to her for the rest of my life hi hi Stephanie Solely to be in D._C.. With you thank you for having me. I wish I could offer you a perfect day. Yesterday was a perfect day for the cherry blossoms. It's true I saw some cherry blossoms and I'm thrilled to be in D._C.. At this time of the Yeah I've never done it before so well. Once you see the Cherry blossoms that suggests that return visits of like seeing Mount Fuji tells you that you're going to return man. Tell me exactly what you do in D._C.. Stephanie I I work at the Smithsonian which is best described at in four words everything under the sun and if you know the Smithsonian it's a sun symbol so that works well for us but in truth it is the largest museum and Research Complex Flex in the world and in the family of Smithsonian museums of which there are nineteen. I run to them. Can we back up one second. I WanNa talk about crofting before moving to America. I had never crafted anything for me. Crafting is the very American thing. Tell me a little bit about crofting as an American thing well Daniel. I think language is important so when we talk about kraft kraft can be both announ the object the crafted object and it also can be verb the way you're using it and I would say today in particular we're living in the midst of a <hes> makers movement right like Itsy Oetzi craft beer. You know handcrafted breads are Tis Noel all right now back to the making of the hand and if you know your history which I imagine you do know terrible there was the industrial revolution and there was a counter revolution so just as things were becoming mechanized and and made the same which in many ways as was an innovation in and of itself to repeat in making the exact same kind of object there was a counter movement led by artists of course to go back to the handmade to go back to the human scale and that of course took place mostly early in the realm of craft whether it was the Wallpaper by William Morris or crafted objects and furniture like Goosestep stickler here in the United States or pottery or ironwork. That was a moment at the turn of the nineteenth century entry. Now of course we live in a moment where once again I would say. We almost don't know how things are made anymore so some days I want to go back to the handmade. It is meditative. It is quiet right and we even see it in the industrial world. Have you been to a Nike store recently. I have they now have a counter and many of them that invite you to make your own exactly now. Some people are terrified that I would like just the regular choices others are excited to be invited to create their own versions and I think it speaks a little bit to identity America's very distinctive as you know in your travels. <hes> one place feels very different than another place and yet it can feel the same right we have. We've shared malls across the country. Sometimes it's comforting to travel again as I did as a child and no there would be the comforts of a Holiday Inn everywhere you went. It was a happy sameness or even McDonalds. I know the menu and again and with every movement I think there's always a happy counter movement and then suddenly you felt well. Shouldn't I be seeing something that's unique to this place. <hes> whether again it's food or fashion or architecture and that's why I'm such a big fan of when you travel you should go to museums. I fully agree I'm not juggled up at a lot and eat and not just art museums which talk about the creativity of a place of a region of a moment but I like going to Charlotte North Carolina and going to the Museum of the New South and learning about how air conditioning forever change the south not something I thought about before I had gone into that museum and saw a fabulous exhibition on that topic well. Isn't that the point of your museum this very museum. We're in it inspires you to travel America and beyond in ways that you may not have thought about people travel and they don't realize that museums Econo- -tarian it's for everybody. There's nothing nothing to be scared of of a museum. I certainly think so. I always fascinated by the house in which the museum sits. There's a great movement to create new museums and they often are in brand new buildings with fabulous architecture often signature architecture and of course also museums are said in historic buildings. That's our case we sit in the old patent office which is actually one of the most spectacular buildings a great example of Greek revival architecture but more importantly it's the house of American ingenuity in the driving force of America in many ways is entrepreneurship is creating new things as mechanization is making improvements. So of course you'd expect to see a few patents that we still kept here in some wonderful shelves of the Patent Office Building. One of my favorites to point out to people is an effort to improve the mouse trap. Why do you think people don't understand museums people travel to all over the world and you like yeah should go to the museum and it's almost an obligation like Oh? I like. I guess I'm here in Barcelona limited the Produ or our I'm in South Africa should see the Holocaust Museum. I'm in Cape Town. All the Apartheid Museum in my whole thing is don't see it as obligation. Don't see like a whole day adventure. Go phone our go for ten minutes. Go and explore in a way that's yawns as opposed to the museum telling you how and that's like. I don't know if you guys have been to museum hack they do I've heard about them but I would have to go into skies. Okay that's doing date in New York in Los Angeles and you'll be in disguise and you should experience that it's one of the most amazing ways to see a museum because people I think as travelers are confused about how you interact with the museum well if you think about the history of museums. M.'s museums were not for everyone. Not everyone was invited in the hours. Were Limited. One of the great revolutions of the French Revolution was actually throwing open the doors of the loof of extending the hours so that the working person could come experience a museum and what are museums. We are storehouses in many ways what we really are our treasure houses of things that people care for so this is the American Museum of aunt. What one is American aunt? It's a big definition. It's very definition so we at the Smithsonian American Art Museum have a special duty. We cherish a forty four thousand works of art te across four centuries across all media so we have from Folk Art to photography we've craft to something called time based media so things made with video and and lights and l._e._D.'s we obviously festive paintings and sculptures. We've Prince and drawings we have a definition of America. That doesn't really reach all of the Americas. Some museums have a broader definition and you and I spoke earlier about boundaries again. How do you define? Line America but it really is about the American experience artists capture something about the now and the contemporary that is also hopefully universal and that's why it speaks to US across time across materials sales and <hes> it invokes hopefully wonder sometimes upset and that's okay as well. We tried to help our visitors understand a little bit of the time in which the art was created. We often try to talk about process and again I think artists speak to us through their own creativity and <hes> when they do it very very well they stop us in our tracks and they create something that's unforgettable and that sparks hopefully some combination of reflection inspiration and a sense of wonder that is the American experience I mean I chose to come and live here in search search of that and to me part of that as the American dream like the idea of Americana Apple Pie cowboys it's very limited and I think that we're expanding. I'd I'd like to think we're expanding. As much as there's a current administration. That's tightening on this very limited experience. I think that we as a nation of immigrants and people that have been here from the beginning as a combination of these wonderful people we want to expand that definition in order to enrich <unk> experience the American experience my best friend touchdown this morning for the first time in his life to America and he landed the New York and his first impression was everyone feels part of the world and it was such a his Dutch and it was such a beautiful thought that I had like I live in it so I forget the end but I was like yeah. That's exactly America from here and everywhere yes in in many ways we think of America's young country which of course does not take into consideration that native peoples who were here for centuries reason centuries what we also have to think about America is in terms of the founding of modern America is its place in the rest of the world and so I think there was initially a bit of an inferiority complex a sense that the grandeur of Europe these great castles and Cathedrals and these artistic and intellectual contributions they came from Europe and I think that was little daunting initially in America until the Americans in many ways realized realized or or came to understand this notion of American uniqueness and begins with the landscape it begins with <hes> the power and majesty of Niagara Falls a subject matter that was much much painted and photographed so the sense of natural wonder and beauty and then captured by artists and then you repeat the sense of wonder when you a march across the country from the coast lines to the Assembly Semisi to the Grand Canyon. I love the way Ken Burns has described the American National Park. He says it's a uniquely American idea to take lands and forever make them private for the enjoyment payment of all for the benefit of wildlife for understanding our or nature and coming back to a place to refresh ourselves and as a pretty radical idea because coming to America was wow look at these endless timber forest look at these stores look at all these resources to exploit to build with whether it was ships or or skyscrapers and so to stand back and say no this belongs to us all that's a wonderful sense of <hes> common need and common purpose who so beautiful those are the things that I think about America that I think a lot of people forget and all you have to travel right Daniel exactly clasby I must travel as a great dino freelance Ed indeed and early on the railroads understood that they would have an evolving purpose. Yes they would have to connect this great country. They would have to determine Herman places of settlement being on the railroad was being connected and then later on the railroads needed to bring not only materials across country but they would need to bring people they would need to invite people to explore to put down roots to to grab land and and make their fortune this kind of manifest destiny of the country and it also frankly spread out across the country as there are pouring onto our shores whether it was on the West Coast with Chinese or on the East Coast with the Irish who arrived before the Germans so the Germans were sent across country and to settle the Midwest so again artists were part of that storytelling of bringing people together to understand stand <hes> I see a lighthouse that must be New England. That must be the coast. <hes> I see a barn I see feels that must be the midwest they kind of gave us the language for understanding America. That's why I one everyone to come here. I feel like if you understand that and then you sent yourself out on America you whole experience will be different. I mean I feel that I feel for the first time that I'm part of something something. I may not have been born here but I immigrated here and I feel part of that fabric Daniel. You haven't touched upon this but I think it's a little bit implied in in the sense of America and when you travel when typically encounters the national flag when you come to America you encounter the Stars and Stripes everywhere right everywhere and then other things that the world thinks of as Americans so car culture American car culture is unique. Take the scale of the place again back to landscape suggests that we can have oversized cars that are open that invite you to to breathe in as you crisscrossed the country on endless stretches of road <hes> artists to are drawn ron two cars to road trips. I also think that they're up subsets of American car culture that we should always be attentive to how do people share their identity in the choice of their hubcaps or choice of music or in choice choice of color wheel size. We'll size or adornment <hes> we think about the limits of travel because of discrimination the Oscar Award Winning Movie Green Book that was a reality for many people bull <hes> in terms of they're not being welcome and having to make routes and having a kind of a coded book for travel. Certainly women don't always feel safe traveling l._G._B._T._Q.. I A. Plus community struggle with those things still today. I don't know if you've seen <hes> killer Mike they go to show that they were doing together on net flakes and basically the premises they were GonNa spend twenty four hours in Atlanta Atlanta only supporting black African American businesses meaning everything they do have to be owned or the C._E._o.. Of had to be African American so no phone they struggled glued to find a hotel they have to stay at an ambien be. They couldn't get into a calm because no car company has a lack C._e._o.. On an I've been thinking about doing an l._G._B._T._Q.. I A. Plus version of this. At least you can use your iphone with right exactly and I could definitely find a gay owned hotel in New York but the idea of that to replicate that on a journey when you travel I think is genius and that gives you a small window into that is how travel used to be. That's how the experience was African Americans Green Book and etc right and it's the diversity of America that makes it a whole it. Is this notion that we strive hopefully for a better union than the American story is not complete their unwritten chapters. There are overlooked chapters. There are dark chapters that we must reckon with and then there's a question about what is your contribution to the American story and we celebrate American creativity whether you're working end up at the Smithsonian American Art Museum. I don't know time will tell thank suspending the morning with me Stephanie. This has been the to delight thank you thanks for hanging out connect with us on Instagram at everyone podcast twitter and everywhere pond or on the website website at everyone podcasts dot com. I'm Daniel Shefrin signing. I'll be seeing you everywhere.

Americas Sicily Smithsonian American Art Museu Africa Stephanie Daniel Europe NBA Atlanta New York Michael D._C Daniel Shuffler Africa Southern Africa United States Travis Birmingham
Another Returned Painting

The Good News Podcast

03:58 min | 2 years ago

Another Returned Painting

"The. Hi, I'm calling your host of the good news podcasts. And I'm Neil. The other host. The good news podcast is your source for good news, fun stories auditory, delight and sonic. Joy. We're bringing all of this goodness to you from the cards against humanity studios in Chicago for today's episode. We're bringing you another story about a loss piece of art being returned to its rightful owners. The story comes from Connecticut. We love Connecticut. We really do. You're from Connecticut. I'm from Connecticut. Connecticut got some hometown pride baby everybody. Connecticut. People have the most. Yeah. Well, we're we're nutmeg years. To set the scene. This painting is called secret departure of Ivan the terrible before the upper China. This is a very descriptive, title, Ivan lick sad and coal to me. But it looks like he's making it out. It was painted by Mikhail Pennine in nineteen eleven the painting disappeared from a Ukrainian art museum in World War Two. Now, we meet David and Gabby, Tracy. The most recent owners of the painting another thing to know about the painting is that it's huge like seven feet tall by eight feet wide. And that's a monster paint. You know, that makes me think about the painting in Ghostbusters to. Oh, yeah. Absolutely. I am mansion that says it's very similar. Oh, yeah. So when David moved into his current house, the gigantic painting was included in the price of the house. Can you imagine that you're signing the contract, and they're like, you know, what we can't move. This thing is yours. Now. I mean one hundred percent I would have expected that to stay. They loved the painting. So they got it in that house. But if since moved and moved the painting with them, they love it that might they they loved it enough to move it. So now, David and Gabby are retiring he and his wife were moving and they wanted to see about selling it. They had the painting listed with an auction house, but they were hit with a cease and desist letter from the original Ukrainian museum working with ambassadors and investigators from the US and Ukraine. The painting has been returned to the Ukraine, the previous owner of the house and the painting hasn't been identified but had been a member of the Swiss army and died in the mid eighties. The Tracy's were happy to return, the painting and hope that someday in the future. They can make a trip to visit the painting in its new old home back in the Ukraine. Wait, how did it get the United States? That's a great question as a huge painting. Yeah. This unidentified Swiss man, rolled it up and. Put it in a duffel bag somewhere. Just so mysterious. It is super Mr. I think the fact that it's huge adds to. Yes. Yeah. In my head. It's a wealthy Swiss nobleman who is is leaving Europe. And this was some loot or some booty. Yeah. And it must have been in like a trunk or something. I'm imagining like a large leather red leather trunk full of art. Yes. All drunks. If a truck was a muppet. Thanks for listening. Do you have good news? Awesome. Or maybe wanna tell us a joke or idea? That's amazing Email us at good news at cards against humanity dot com, or leave his voice voicemail. Seven seven three two one seven zero one five six you can also tweet us at the good news pod. And if you love the good news podcast review us on items. We'd appreciate it. Most of our music is by putting bear same place. Same time tomorrow.

Connecticut David Ukraine Ivan Tracy United States Gabby Chicago Swiss army Ukrainian art museum Mikhail Pennine Europe China one hundred percent eight feet seven feet
GSMC Book Review Podcast Episode 182: Interview with Stephanie Kane

GSMC Book Review Podcast

44:02 min | 1 year ago

GSMC Book Review Podcast Episode 182: Interview with Stephanie Kane

"It's cutting into your exercise time it stabbing you in the back nine and it's attacking your peace of mind. It's pain and it's getting in between you and the life if you want to live CD medic target your pain added source. It's fast acting relief with active. OTC ingredients plus the added benefits of THC free hemp oil get get back to your life with CBD medic available online and that CBS these statements have not been evaluated by the FDA. This product is not intended to diagnose treat cure or prevent any disease golden state media concepts. Bring you book review podcast. I haven for bookworm of all ages and the whitest genres from mystery to memoirs romance to Comedy Fantasy to Sci-fi if you look to read this is the podcast. It's the Golden State Media Concepts Book Review Podcast CPAP hope you are having a great Friday in that. You have some fun weekend. Plans coming up you know obviously time to read because that's what I always wish for. You is lots of time to to read but you know whatever other ways you find fun. I know there are other sources of fun in the world besides reading. I just have a bit of a one track mind. I I know this you you don't have to tell me but speaking of reading and I don't know one track. Mine's not exactly one track mind but I do have another author interview for you as I mentioned at the end of the last episode today. I am speaking with Stephanie Cain about her new novel. it's called perfect picked. I and before I forget because I forget it seems like every time I do an interview I have copies of this book giveaway and if you would like to win a copy of this book book please listen until the end of the podcast to find out what you need to do to be entered to win a copy of a perfect I by Stephanie Cane so now that I have actually remembered to do that before I say it's time for the interview and then I say no wait. like I always do here is the description of a perfect. I some are born with a perfect pallet others with perfect pitch. Lily sparks was born with a perfect I as conservator of paintings at the Denver Art Museum. She uses her keen visual powers to restore masterpieces and detect what's authentic and what is not when the Museum's billionaire benefactor is brutally Italy murdered and Lily is dragged into the case. The grisly tableau stuns her. It's the human embodiment of museum's prized landscape by famed impressionist precious Gustav Cala bought. Oh I think I just butchered that name. Louis comes to believe that the Kaya bought I it could be either way. I don't know Stephanie says it Multiple Times in the interview and she's right so I can't remember how she said it terrible okay so when lily comes to believe that the painting getting was forged and the killer painter the art world spurned but this knowledge comes at a terrible cost as she confronts where art ends and fraud begins she must face the deceptions of her own passed so there is a lot that goes on in this book. It's a mystery story. It is about you learn a lot about art. I learned a lot about art. Lilley has this perfect I which her father helped instill instill in her and she uses that in her work in a lot of ways and she uses that when she gets drawn into this investigation by an FBI agent that that she used to have a relationship with so she is an art conservator but she's also kind of an investigator because she she used to be a lawyer so she's had numerous careers and in her role as a lawyer she did some investigative work in terms of art forgery before four and so she is well suited for this case because of her experience because of the eye for detail that she brings to the plate etc so you you get you get the art aspect you get a little bit of romantic tension between her and this man she used to be in the relationship ship with the FBI agent that she used to be relationship with you get family dynamics as you learn more about her relationship with her father and what it was that ah caused him to to instill this attention to detail in her at a very young age because he started working with her on it when she was is five after her mother died and so there's there's a lot of layers to this book in you know. I love those. I love those layers so again. It is a perfect. Id Eighty author is Stephanie. Kane and let's go ahead now and let Stephanie Talk About her book in the Interview Hi Stephanie Welcome to the PODCAST. Thanks thanks Sarah. I'm delighted to be here. I am so glad to have you here and we are here to talk about your new book which is called perfect. I it's a crime novel before we we get to the book so If you could just share a little bit about yourself that would be great sure well. I've had three careers. I've been a karate teacher a lawyer and a crime novelist I was born and raised in Brooklyn New York. I went to Colorado as a as a college freshman and I stayed after college I owned and ran a karate studio and then I went to law school so I did corporate law at a big firm and then quit that and you did criminal defense and I actually started writing novels partly as an escape from practicing law wow I we could. We could do an episode on each of your different careers. I would love to hear all about owning a karate studio eating but do you still practice karate. No I don't okay once saw the practicing it I'm I. I never went back to it. He'd never went back. Oh fascinating well. We are here to talk about your your careers and author so on the new book is called a perfect I if you could give I'm just an overview of the story sure well. The heroine Lilli sparks is a conservative paintings at the Denver Art Museum and and from the time she was a little girl. Her Dad trained her to be very observant have a perfect I so when the museum's chief patron friend is killed lilies. I tells her the killer was inspired by one of the museum's prized paintings which is an impressionist landscape eight by Gustav kyw Box and so lily of course goes after the killer yes and yeah it's it's definitely one of the more more unique premises that I've read. You've got so many different aspects between the art and Louis Perfect I plus then the murder the the mystery so I found that just a really fascinating combination but what about lily the main character after you think might resonate with readers well what reason I made Louis an art conservators because I wanted her to actually do something not just live in her head and what an arch conservative does is that they work hands on with paintings to clean and repair and restore them so unlike ordinary museum visitors like you and me who have to stand a foot or two away conservatives get to physically touch the art so I think one thing that that will resonate about Louis is she's passionate about her work. She worked really hard to get where she is and she's passionate enough about it that she'll butt heads with higher ups at the museum even at the risk of losing her job the other another thing about lily is she doesn't depend on men to bail her out. When she goes after the killer she doesn't expect anyone to come to her rescue and also she's still in love with a guy who broke her heart so who can relate to that. Yes yes absolutely and and a big part of her character. Is that eye for detail so so let's talk a little bit about that aspect because it really come from her relationship with her father so you can you flesh that out a little yeah and I'm really glad you asked that because that is actually the foundation of her character art so actually what happened is after Lily's mother died she was raised by her father and when she was five he started taking her on neighborhoods walks to teach her to be observant and to remember what she saw made it into kind of a game with them retracing their steps and him asking her if anything had changed and all of that was to hone her I so what starts out as a way to bond with her father becomes talent that sets her on her path to becoming an art conservative but at the same time you have to ask yourself why apparent would train his daughter to do that is this is it to protect her or maybe distract her from something. He doesn't doesn't want her to see so that question. Really is the foundation for her character arc because what she learns about her own past in in the course of solving the murder will change her forever. I think that's the perfect time to go to our first break. You know it's kind of like cliffhanger. It will change her forever trevor. Well why how what's going on. we will talk more about a perfect. I with Stephanie Cain after this break so stay tuned you're listening to the GMC book of YOU PODCASTS and I'll be right back hi. It's Jamie progressive's number one number two employee leave a message at the Hey Jamie. It's me Jamie this. Is Your daily Pep Talk Doc. I know it's been rough going ever since people found out about your acapella group mad harmony but you will bounce back. I mean you're the guy always helping people find coverage options with the name your price tool tool. It should be you giving me the pep talk now. Get out there hit that high note and take mad harmony all the way to nationals this year sorry it was pitchy progressive the Casualty Insurance Company and affiliates price and coverage match limited by State Law. It's cutting into your exercise time it stabbing you in the back nine and it's attacking your peace of mind It's pain and it's getting between you and a life you want to live. CBD Medic targets your pain at its source. It's fast acting relief with active. OTC ingredients plus the added benefits of THC hemp oil get back to your life with CBD medic available online and at CBS these statements have not been evaluated by the FDA this product it is not intended to diagnose treat cure or prevent any disease. You want to be healthier yet. You just don't know what to do. All these shows telling you this and that but nothing seems to work will listen close golden state media concepts has got something great for you you the health and wellness podcast dedicated to work are transversely eating habits die and everything about healthy living join us in our banters deters as we help you not just live life to the fullest but live it to the healthiest the new own it smelled about renewing the giveaway and the universe that reminded me. I shouldn't be small because I realized that I did not introduce myself at the beginning of this podcast. I in early say this. I am your host. Sarah and I assume if you're a regular listen listen to this podcast. You have figured that out after one hundred and eighty two episodes but what if you're if you're new you'd be like who is this person even though her name's in the show notes but yeah. I didn't introduce myself so I apologize for being rude leg that let's go ahead didn't get back to the interview and I will try not to forget other. Things yeah like you said there's so much. There's so many layers to the story. I really really liked that that you just never quite know what's GonNa what's coming next. I know good you know because there are there are so many different layers. Ah Lilies a little bit like you and that she you know had should his second career. She was a lawyer so she brings that to the table as well. she just got going on really does well. There is an autobiographical elements of the book and it you know as you say before before she was an Arkansas or she was a lawyer and of course before I was a novelist I was a lawyer but it's a little bit more personal than that in this way when I was forty a bit older than really I went back to college. I was a partner at a law firm and I went back to College College to study physics and chemistry so that I could apply to med school. I didn't get in and I had to go back to law and I couldn't go go back to the big fancy firm where I'd been a partner at because by then I had resigned my partnership so I had to go back to you know a uh-huh criminal defense lawyer was actually the only one who would hire me and he paid me you know like ten or fifteen bucks an hour so I know how it feels is to leave something. You're good enough at earn a living for something that is completely unknown and then fall flat on your face. Lily wasn't afraid to take that risk so so the auto biographical element runs a little bit deeper than just star shared past as a lawyer absolutely and Are you. you know a lot about art or did you have to research that part of the book. I knew absolute. I have absolutely no training in art and so I had to start from scratch but luckily I am a research research junkie. I I read you know I had to find an artist that would be the inspiration for you know the murder in the book so when I when I decided it would be Gustav high bought the impressionist painter whose landscape inspired the murder. I read everything I could get get my hands on about him and then I started reading everything I could find about our conservation impressionist painting technique the Museum World World Art Fraud. Everything I went to museum lectures like interviewed art conservators curator's and doses and I visited conservation labs and then I turned art forgers so there's two aspects of pulling off a successful forgery. The first I is perfecting the real artists technique and the second is creating a false chain of title so that the painting looks like it was lost cost and has just been rediscovered so I started looking into forgers and I read up on the famous ones and and finally I found one who fit my bill bill. This name is Eric Heck born and he was a British painter who trained at the Royal Academy of the Arts and he forged old master drawings. 'cause you wrote a manual for forgery called the art forger's handbook and the thing about Hebburn is that he loves to talk about himself so so he was interviewed extensively on Youtube and I watched as interviews and they gave me his mannerisms and and really some critical insights into his mentality so he became the model for the bad guy in a perfect I and actually have borne met a very bad end. He was murdered word on the street in on a street in Rome right before his book. The Art forger's handbook was published and that murder order is unsolved but forgers this purchase tend to meet that ends they foul of all sorts of people in in that case you know truth is probably a little stranger than fiction life disaffected. He wrote a manual on it fascinating yes this. It was fascinating book because it actually give a window into his mentality. I mean he provides recipes for making period authentic ink doc by boiling acorns. I mean it's in growl and anyhow you know it says where you can find canvases that are hundreds of years old he by combing the the flea markets throughout Europe I mean he he just and then he he talks about how he perfected his technique. You just lays it all happen and actually he's a really good writer. I mean I was surprised you're right or he was wow that is fascinating and I love love. You read the book even so what I don't like that whole those too deep for me. Run Down you know I love it well. I don't know much about art either and so I I read the book with my phone next to me so that I could google paintings paintings that you were talking about throughout the book so that I would have a better idea so that was kind of fun. I I got to learn a little bit more well that that was one of the fun parts for me to you know because it was so visual and I I'd written earlier books starring a criminal defense lawyer you know they were legal thrillers and I basically just drew on my own legal background but but there was nothing graphic or visual about what a lawyer does not the whole elements of art just informed. I mean it. You juiced me. Up is really what I should say that it was just visual so was the art kind of your inspiration for the story or how did it come about this this mixture of our and thriller and Law etc well. I I let me just address. The loss thing well first of all the art world was so foreign to me I mean I I love going to museums when my husband and I travel. We always go to art museums. we have a lot of art in our house but I have zero zero training in it and I'm the kind of person who goes to a museum and looks at the paintings but doesn't read the labels you know so I I really tab zero exposure to the art world beyond that and so I gave lily a legal background not that she uses it at all in the book or hardly at all just to give myself a little bit of something that was familiar to me that I could maybe fall back on as a writer because I was creating a world that was completely new to me but lily was actually inspired by a real person. A woman named Amy Herman who is an art historian who wrote a book called Visual Intelligence Herman Teaches Med students lawyers cops and FBI agents agents to be more observant by studying paintings in museums. I thought that was a totally cool. Skill set for a detective so it it is sort would've married my love for museums with you know an interesting kind of detective so that was really there was sort of a joint inspiration for That's really cool. You have written will you. You mentioned the the crime the the the legal thrillers How many books have you written so far I have this is the fifth book that I have published. Okay and N- did you WANNA take the time to highlight any of the other books or do on and I'm glad you're asking the of as I mentioned Kim before lily. I wrote a series of legal thriller starring Dyslexic Criminal Defense Lawyer named Jackie Flowers and the hook with Jackie is that she was actually a better lawyer because she couldn't read or write or had difficulties with reading or writing but one of her books extreme streaming difference is a real favorite of mine and it is about the effect that our daily indifference has on the people around around us WanNa Colorado Book Award Colorado Authors League Award but that's not why it's important to me. Extreme indifference is the only book I threw out when it was one hundred percent complete. I was under a deadline from my publisher scribner but I rewrote it from scratch. After I saw something happened in a courtroom that was much more compelling than the story I originally wrote that was real. My story wasn't isn't and it was a much more powerful springboard for story about a judge's indifference to the effects his rulings have on the people in front of him in court then the story that I'd written so extreme indifference taught me a really important lesson. It taught me not to spit out a story but took truly care about the ones I tell because if they don't matter to me how could they possibly matter to readers so I learned a lot from I'm not experience from that. Book is very dear to me because of that absolutely that is that's really amazing. I mean I know a lot of people bowl would not want to do that. You know would not want to say I'M GONNA. Redo this because it's not it's not quite right and it's not what I want it to be. They'd be like it's done. I'm going to move on so that's really impressive well. You have to remember that your books hopefully will survive you yeah and if each one John doesn't represent the best that you can give to a reader why right it why put it out there actually going to let you ponder that question while we take her second break of the podcast when we come back we'll have the conclusion of this interview so stay tuned. You're listening to the GMC book view podcast and I'll be right back. It's cutting into your exercise time it stabbing you in the back nine and it's attacking your peace of mind. It's pain and it's getting in between you and the life. If you want to live CD medic target your pain at its source. It's fast acting relief with active. OTC ingredients plus the added benefits of THC FREE HEMP oil get back to your life with CBD medic available online and at CBS these statements have not been evaluated by the FDA. This product is not intended to diagnose treat cure or prevent any disease. It's cutting into your exercise time it stabbing you in the back nine and it's attacking your peace of mind. It's pain and it's getting in between you and a life you want to live CD medic targets your pain at its source it's fast acting relief with active ingredients plus the added benefits of THC free hemp oil get back to your life with CD medic available online at CVs. These statements have not been evaluated by the FDA. This product is not intended to diagnose treat cure or prevent prevent any disease tired of searching the vast jungle of podcasts Nell. Listen close and here this out the there's a podcast network that covers just about everything that you've been searching the golden state media concepts podcast network is here the thing less than our podcast list with endless hours of podcasts coverage from news sports music fashion looking entertainment fantasy the football and so much more stop blurted around and go straight out to the golden state media concepts podcast network guaranteed to fill that podcast outcast is whatever it may be visit. WWW DOT GS MC podcast dot com follow us on facebook and twitter download us on itunes soundcloud and Google play welcome to the club today talking about her novel perfect I and before we went to the Brake Stephanie was saying how you know it's important to put your best work out there and put something out that you would want to read yourself etc so just wanted to remind you of that since my follow up question ties directly into what she was saying saying so let's go ahead and get back to that interview and speaking of the best that you can do and putting things out there you mentioned before we started recording recording that you've got some good news. Yeah I just got. I just open the newspaper this morning and got the thrilling news that perfect. I just made the Denver Post Bestseller list. That was actually very exciting. Yeah absolutely and you find out from the paper. You didn't know that no it was recipe recipe over well. That's a good thing you read the paper. Yup Yeah in terms of writing. Are you working on anything anything new now. I'm working on a sequel to a perfect. I again starring Willie and set at the Denver Art Museum and this time the artist is Edward would hopper he is the Mid Twentieth Century American realist who painted lonely people in diners and apartments and hotel L. You might know him from his a very famous painting. Call the nighthawks which is a diner. That's lit from the inside and you're looking through the window from the street and there are couple of people sitting there drinking coffee late at night another very famous painting and his is called the automatic and he it shows like a a woman in Nineteen Thirties garb sitting drinking coffee alone in an automatic at night so there's just something about him the isolation and loneliness of his from of his subjects that that has really frankly always giving me the creeps so that's a good start for a writer who wants read mystery of inspiration plus what I'm working on. Okay thank you and you. You said that you started writing to distract yourself from practicing law. Had you always thought about writing before that or did it really just come later in life to you well as a kid. I loved to read and I also like to write. I went to public school in New York and and you were always having to write these little composition books with you know stories as if you were a little pioneer girl or something like that and you know I always listen joy doing that and my family was really big readers. we'd go to the library. We go to a used bookstore but we my my everyone in my family was always reading so I love to read but I never imagined becoming a writer myself. When I was a lawyer I wrote contracts and brief and but it never occurred to me to write a book until I had a story. I wanted to tell so unfortunately in college I never took a creative writing course I and when it came time to start to write I or to try to write I I had to sort of be self taught and so I started with reading a ton of craft books and experimenting and my first novel quiet time became sort of a laboratory for learning how to write fiction it went through about twenty one drafts those are just the ones that I you know kept copies of on disk probably went through many many more than that and I started going to conferences and and you know learning from other people and gradually I learned I know there's gotTa be much easier ways to do it than that but that's just sort of my own process well. I was just thinking it makes sense. If you are a research research junkie you this was kind of right up your alley. You'd just know you jumped in and you did what you do and and yeah learned a lot. I'm sure there's much faster routes else but got to you got one thing. I've learned basically from my writing career and coming back to it after after having not published for for a while is i. I've learnt to respect my own process. You know it's going to be different for every writer and a lot of it is based on. You know what you're strongest learning channels. Are What your habits are. You know all sorts of things and I've we just learned that you know other people might do it faster or in a different way but I have to approach it in a way that that is sort of the way I'm wired fire to do it and when I went back to writing. I'd I'd taken a few years off. I I was just shocked at you know one of the things that sort of took me by surprise was how many books that were out there and how many people out there were were. Uh thought they had the secret to writing a bestseller and there's you google it. There's lots of books about it and it's almost as if people in in fact some people did find or create sort of an algorithm for it and I was initially seduced by that because wow there had to be a better quicker quicker way than I right you know and and if this was the wave of the future I just you know better jump on the bus you know and for a while I I oh I got very sidetracked with all that until I finally realized that it just wasn't the way I think you know and and writing is just one one of the end results one of the products of the way you think so it just it really didn't work for me and for awhile it it really really messed up my writing and then I I sorta step back and and realize reminding myself why I right. It's not too even though I'm thrilled. I'm on the local bestseller list today with the Denver Post it isn't it's not my main motivation for writing so you you know I I stepped back and reassess and you know I changed my process a little in ways that that made sense because you always have to be open to you you know better ways of doing things but I basically realized that I had to honor the way I think yeah and I kept thinking while you were talking. I mean you have to find what works best for you and I kept thinking about you. Mentioned the main character of your your previous series who who is a lawyer who's dyslexic and I really I haven't read that series but I really appreciate that you included a character that has you know a some some people might see it as a disability but she finds ways to make it work it sounds like and to the a great lawyer or a good a lawyer or what kind of lawyer she is better lawyer than me. Okay and the inspiration was a young relative of mine who has dyslexia and I. I watched him grow up. I watched him basically get battered by an educational system that that that rewarded the things she didn't do well. You know not the things that he did do well and he's survive didn't became a very successful engineer and a strong reader and when I that intrigued me so I went I had a website and I posted a questionnaire on it that that was directed to learning disabled people and their friends and families and teachers and I asked him a whole bunch of questions about how it affected their creativity you know what the challenges were and what their successes were and and that was that became a large part of the research search for that character and one of the questions. I asked on the website. Was You know where is the greatest need and a guy. I wrote back to me and said he thought that there was a lot of attention starting to be paid to children but there was also a great need with for learning being disabled adults like himself so I volunteered at a literacy program and for six months I tutor to learning disabled mold adult men one on one you know not at the same time for two hours a week for six months in reading and and so I you know I I got a little bit of a sense of of what it was like and also their successes you know one woman wrote into my website a lawyer and she said she passed the bar exam by by memorizing legal series by making them into Jingles so she made for herself and also one of the foremost lawyers practicing in the United States. Today is a guy named David boies and he is dyslexic so it has absolutely nothing to do with intelligence no absolutely not and I I really appreciate the the time that you put into that but also the fact that you did make a main character who's a little bit different because representation matters and you know people need to see themselves and the books that they read yeah. I agree yeah so you are as you've said arrays reader. Do you have favorite authors or genres or is that too big of a question well. I I really read very very very widely and when I working on a book I don't read fiction because it's just too distracting. I just read you know a ton one of non-fiction that's relevant to what I'm working on but I really liked just about all varieties of crime novels and psychological suspense anything anything that gets into why people do what they do. Historical crime books grabbed me to. There's a guy named Paul French who writes about crime. I'm in very unusual setting and one of my favorite books is a book. He wrote called midnight in pay King. It's the true story of a murder order in nineteen thirty seven of a British diplomats daughter and pay Kim and it's set at the brink of World War. Two just before the Japanese invaded and boy does he do a fantastic job setting the stage. I just love that book and there are great. Denver is a very very rich writing meeting community and there are great authors locally to like Harry McLean and Mark Stevens and I just love their books. It's it's it's a really vibrant place to be a writer so I'm very lucky in that regard yeah wonderful well. Thank you for that and I know you have a website so if you could give the address of the website and where people might find you on social media if you have it sure on my website is writer Cain. That's W. R. I T. E. R. K. A. N. E. Dot Com and on my website. You'll oh find a blog called cold-case story blog. The blog is about a murder that happened in nineteen seventy three and was reopened as a cold case thirty forty years later I'm also on facebook at author Stephanie Cain again with a K. and I'd love for people to visit me either all right. Thank you so much and we have. We've talked about a lot of different topics but is there anything that we haven't covered covered. You'd like for people to know about this new book or any any writing topic. We haven't covered yeah. I'd like You might be interested in a little piece of advice that I have for spiring authors. I don't want to sell to older preachy here but something assuming are I've given a lot of thought to and if I was going to give one piece of advice to aspiring writers it was the right something you care about. We've already touched on this but don't try to write to the market or in a style or boys. That isn't your own. Take the time to learn the craft. Respect your own style of learning if you like conferences and retreats and critique groups go to them. If you're more comfortable like me studying on your wrong there is no shortage of really good craft books and online resources but at some point on the personal feedback from real readers I find the ones who appreciate your work and WanNa help you make it better and then listen to them because those people are priceless and I I have a couple in my life and I cannot begin to tell you how much I value their feedback because I know that they're that they're trying trying to make my books better and and they have so you know I acknowledged them and I'm i. You know that can't begin you to be to express gratitude that I feel for them. So at you know at any point in your career. You may come across one of these wonderful wonderful human beings and when you do don't take them for granted. Don't be angry if they criticize your writing or your story story. As long as you know they want to help you make it better. They are just priceless so watch for them. mm and thanks him. Yes absolutely thank you so much for that and thank you again. seventy for taking the time to talk to me about your new book a perfect. I as well as your other books. I really appreciate it well. Thanks a million. I've enjoyed it very much. Good questions thank you. Thanks so much thank you once again to Stephanie for taking the time to talk to me about her. New novel a perfect I as I mentioned at the beginning of the podcast in all of my smugness there I do have copies of this book to give away so or if you are interested in mysteries in kind kind of a crime novel but with a different sort of protagonist instead of your normal kind of police officer or investigator Lily definitely definitely is is not quite your typical protagonist in that light if you're interested in the art world or if you want to learn a little bit more about the art world then you should definitely enter to win a copy a of a perfect I all you have to do is go to our social media pages. GMC Book Review Facebook twitter or Instagram. You can find those on our website website. You can find them in the show notes for this episode and or you can just type in. GMC Book Review and they will come up so just go to GMC book review facebook twitter or Instagram instagram comment on this post which is episode one eighty to interview with Stephanie. Kane and let's this week comment on your I want. I have been trying to shake it up a little bit in the comments. Give me your favorite childhood book. I would love to hear that because then it's just going to add to my. TB ARE LA's it's all about let me clearly no not really I would love to hear about your favorite childhood book so go to social media comment on this episode which is one eighty two and tell me the name of your favorite childhood book. If you can pick just one you can list multiple if you need to so thank you again to Stephanie. Thank you as always to you. My listeners sner again. I hope you have a wonderful weekend and I hope that you find some time to get lost in a good book. You been listening to the Golden State tape media concepts book review podcast part of the Golden state media concepts podcast network. You can find this show and others like it at. WWW www dot GMC podcast dot com download our podcast on itunes stitcher soundcloud and Google play this type type in gs MC to find all the shows from the golden state media concept's podcast network from movies to music from Sports Ah Entertainment and even reared news. You can also follow us on twitter and on facebook. Thank you and we hope you have enjoyed today's program. Now is the chance to use reliable energy to grow your money with the Dominion Energy Reliability Investment. Our new investment product offers competitive returns no maintenance fees and flexible online access to your money. Make the reliable investment in reliable energy energy the Dominion Energy Reliability Investment to find out more go online to reliability investment dot com. That's reliability investment dot com now is the chance to use reliable energy to grow your money with the Dominion Energy Reliability Investment our new investment product offers competitive returns no maintenance fees and flexible online access to your money make the reliable investment in reliable energy the Dominion Energy Reliability Investment to find out more go online to reliability investment dot com. That's reliability investment dot com.

murder Stephanie Lily sparks writer Denver Art Museum Stephanie Cain cure FDA CBS facebook Google twitter FBI forgery Louis Sarah GMC Kane
164: A bitter pill to swallow

Smashing Security

34:14 min | 1 year ago

164: A bitter pill to swallow

"It's just it's just a waste of time. What this podcast no well? Maybe uh-huh smashing security already episode one hundred and sixty four a bitter pill to swallow with Cannell -Tario and grand clearly. Hello Hello and welcome to smashing security not upset one hundred sixty four. My Name's plea and I'm Carol -Tario Hello Crow you back from the Canadian. Tundras Excellency I am. I'm getting less unless jet lagged. Yeah I was there for a month so it has its impacts. Doesn't I miss the snow already. Yeah we're pretty but it's I I don't notice this also code and slushy yet. It's good for the body though doing good old shoveling. Well oh I thought you meant you're rolling around and ripped all you now. We don't have a guest today. We don't when we did have a guest but we had some technical issues technical issues so We will reschedule schedule her. There's a hint but you're going to just put up with the two of us this week. Our podcast will be so much easier if there was no technology involved. Yeah yeah well it would be possible nor and if we had more time if we didn't stick to our schedules so closely so rigidly so rigidly system at sessions. We are professionals awesome token of which. What's coming up on the show this week crow? Well first. Let's think this week sponsor last pass it support helps us give you the show for free now. Graham tries to show Oh his more cultured side and shares the diesel an unusual art heist and Gab. About an innocent looking though not so innocent Acting medical patient software. Just wait all this in. Lose more coming up in this episode of smashing security. Now Chum Chum like it like. We aren't just security experts. Are We know God. No well I mean I don't no no I mean we are. We are experts but we also have other things. We've got podcasts. Therefore we must be access right. I mean I consider myself also something about Bon vivant. A goal owned owned a national treasure. Food Grow I've seen your feet that you must be a body part model and of course you're an artist now on your How's the outgoing? Nor the painting and things that yeah you know have an art show coming up again too. Yeah Oxford out weeks you participate in that again a loveless okay. Yeah Sarah Ready well as an appreciator of art. I'm sure you appreciate the works of John Constable while Yes. He's a hero. Beautiful beautiful skies. One of England's greatest paint is famous for his landscape. Of course the suffolk countryside in the first half of the nineteenth century. You don't like landscapes though. Well I for people in my pictures I think I know him sort of. Yeah like that sort of thing. But but you come from Canada where there are no people just acres makers of land. Yeah I like a good old landscape. Well word reaches us that hackers have managed to trick a Dutch Art Museum in paying them a two point four million pounds which is about. Oh that's gotTa hurt the museum about twelve dollars fifty space for our friends for John Constable painting. So would you like to hear the story of how this happened. Yeah Oh yeah all. She was sitting back. I'm sitting back. Okay let's go while the story starts in March two one thousand nine hundred ninety that director of take a run up of this. The director rector of their reach museum. Twenty art museum in n Shetty in the Netherlands. Put an accent on just to give it a bit more than uh-huh director popped alone to the European fine art fair to check out the pictures when that's nice. That's lovely all the great artists we're presented Turner Constable Terry. Oh they were all there but the picture which caught his eye was constables. Eighteen fifty-five painting. I'm sure your art view of Hampstead. Heath I don't recall it my head like that. No Oh well I'll tell you what I wanted to. What is I just put in the document which we shed models linked twit in the show notes? Now I'm not sure it's amazing you from cities but you're not looking at a finished painting here. The when you put in the document is just like the study is just. It's it's called the grids I is it yeah is there. It's just a tonal tonal. Sketch of the landscape in one color. You kind of go. This is where the lights going to hit. This is how the competition the paintings going to work. So it's kind of a study I saw. He hadn't colored in okay so rectum at stake. I well so anyway. The director of this Dutch Museum. He saw this anyth- oh I'd love to stick that up a mobile I think that looked marvelous and so he began negotiating. And we've a London art dealer could Simon Dickinson to by the constable paint. Okay so this would be like you falling in love with one of my paintings tings and you call up your local art dealer your your your call your local art dealer and say we Shari Shar call corral and I want this painting on my wall Oh and to look at it every day. Yes okay I got you so this art dealer. Oh yes we should. I mentioned. That's how it works on. The negotiations cushions began. You can imagine the or is a bit of a bit of tune throws or will you include a little bit of string to hang up on the wall can get me a rusty nail. Well he is the director of museum presumably. He's got a few of those things in the back room. I'm going to take off. Some of the processes isn't colored in that kind of thing right. I've got a few more paintings this year. Yeah well these things things take time. It's a lot of haggling going on. But then ha breakthrough occurred right and the price was agreed to point four million British pounds or all three point one million dollars and Dickinson. The London Teela delivered the precious painting the masterpiece to the Dutch museum. Okay so they agreed the agreed price. Everything that they did. A digital handshake like agreed works would funny handshakes but yeah. The painting has arrived marvelous. Everything's good right if things get well K.. And he's got his money Okay with the museum Zima to some nothing no good or what happened. What are the museum? Weren't the scammers. Okay so the price had been agreed right in the email and the money had been transferred in in the email. It said you know. Transfer the money for payment of the painting into a Hong Kong Bank account and the museum shore enough funneled the money over over Tonko. Oh okay was that. I guess that was agreed. Well it was agreed in email and the museum thought it was the art dealer in London who was telling them the the banking details but of course Kaboom yes disastrous. You see I kind of feel a bit like I would have got someone on the phone. Suddenly it was a different bank. Canton had to use the I band number for Hong Kong. Right so you would. You would have it. Almost I thought he was in Hong Kong or she wasn't Hong Kong. Who has yet with? I suppose that's possible bliss. Well so you would. If you'd been the museum you would have asked the person emailing you wouldn't a hacker. I'm assuming talking two point four. Four million right yes. We've talked and he says yes. Of course I'm in Brussels. That's where I'm based right. Wherever there would have been some information passed on however however that does not mean that the person who's actually paying from the museum mentioned you know it could be someone else who wasn't involved in the negotiations so just paid it all? I think it was the museum who will buy uh-huh maybe two people to different dogs right. Oh I see so the person I nance department Ali Department okay. Yes that's that's what was possible anyway. This this has now ended up in court because as you correctly surmised it was a hacker who had intercepted the compensation between the art dealer in the museum jumped in on the negotiation posing as the dealer and given those phony bank details. The money's be put on and it's not the hacker who shown up in court then nowhere to be seen. No no one knows who they are in stayed. It is the museum which is trying to sue the art dealer. The one who's provided the painting. Yes yes the one hundred and forty million to forty million. Yes exactly so the museum which paid the money to the wrong people is blaming in the art dealers saying that the art dealers should have noticed that the fraud was taking place because they've been copied on the email thread even though the bank account had been changed to Hong Kong and and the Lewis for the museum. Actually say that the art dealer by saying nothing. They said everything so they should have spotted what was going on about. Oh you're a those. Aren't our bank details what's going on here. What's depressing about getting older knife? Wh What's his just. How many chefs de moves there? Dr Like why wouldn't why wouldn't you just both go okay. We screwed up. Let's see now I don't know tear the painting and half let's split split the diff- turnpike Eh. This isn't this isn't a pepsi. which gets should to member in that painting by banks? He got shredded six months six months. Oh just sort of have co ownership ownership ownership. Oh no that's rubbish. Because the art dealer owned the painting right now they only own half the painting and they've received none of the minor no money money as well. They should split the money. I think the museum should pay him. One point two half the money for six months of the year now just pay half and then they both author have equal loss and equal gain. Okay okay look sorry I can sort this. This isn't like some sort of divorce settlement where you get visiting rights that we can't know oh because the art dealer owned the painting outright maybe they want to sell it to someone else he would offer two point four million run getting one point two million and they're never be able to sell them and the other half of the painting. I understand K. It's not an ideal situation. However it is it is what it is and the actual oh problem? The actual person should be getting the finger. Is this mysterious hacker. They pulled the resources go after them. Well interestingly assuming BIF- The art dealer and the museum are blaming each other for Jack. Well that's Kinda stupid. What was an issue at Arima hacked? Eight must have been you you so this has gone to the courts now the welcome. No no doubt clearly the museum would would it be wise to have independently verified the legitimacy of the bank account that check in money into but they argue that the Audela as well should have been a little bit more vigilant. So it's just it's just a waste of time was podcast. No no but my story my stories about people in this situation. Okay so here. This is the problem here is to innocent parties that were trying to make a deal got screwed yes right right and now they're blaming each other for getting screwed as opposed to just saying okay. There's a bit vague and both are faces here but really it's because we got targeted and like what so if whoever is found to have the malware or the issue is going to be the one that has to suck it up. Is that the idea. No I don't feel that that necessarily necessarily means you're one hundred percent to blame. No if you're the one behind it it's an some very wise old. Judge is gonNA decide this right. Yeah A Computer Program I. That's not in a Dutch accent. Obviously and she's probably a blessing for us. So what kind of advice can we offer people. He he might find themselves in a similar situation. Obviously double check and check via a different method. Don't use email if you've been chattan. Vary Mel Sofa. Cool them on on the phone. Oh maybe find some software where you can have what they call it sort of digital meeting the the sort of safe rooms. Aren't they safe. Online rooms have exactly ackley virtual safe rooms. These are places where companies can go or individuals can go in order to negotiate a deal with high stakes in a way that they it can be guaranteed. Nothing leaves the room right all the all the paperwork. Everything is going to close setting so it means no one can infiltrate so when you're talking this kind of money. It's kind of have a good idea to look into these virtual safe rooms No the communications can be properly encrypted and you can have lots of security in place to prevent unauthorized people guessing mm-hmm Eve we get into the room. Well crony phony. They were as is you and tell grow. What's your story for us this week? Okay do you remember when you hurt your cooter. It was like years and years ago. Maybe it was your. Maybe you've had a number. We need to the longtime. And you've had a number of instances where you've had really bad pain. I think there was one called beaver fever at one point. That wasn't a problem with my beaver. Stressed that close your eyes and take yourself back to whichever one hurt the most okay. It's as hey now what you do. What do you do in that situation? You're like ow. Oh it's easy. I'm a man so what I would do. Is I complain about about a lot but I won't go to the doctor in your case you had quite a fetching doctor so you rushing off. I did eventually go. Oh NC I mentioned a name but I did. She no longer works for reasons which might become apparent. I did go and see my doctor and she wanted to examine. Let me right okay. Let's see everyone's imagination Charlie so okay. So she's examining you. I want you to. She's examining this is GonNa get to personal right. She's examining you she. She's probably filling in an online patient record right. She's saying Clooney's come in his little guy. I'm the help whatever right computer right. And she's well Graham it is it is two thousand twenty th. They're not doing it and one of the questions you probably asked you is. Can you rate your pain Graham right can you. How do you rate your pain for on the level from one to ten yes and longer bit spinal tap so I try and up to seven complaining and whining so okay imagine even your doctor puts that into the system and Bish Bash Bosh? At the end of the examination. She She goes okay. We'll think very much here some painkillers. I think should take them to deal with your pain. Gene Pain right and you would trust this recommendation. Because you like your doctor. And she's advising that you take the pills service and the doctor and effectively you is trusting that the software is literally not trying to influence you and do anything that none of you are aware of so. She's got a piece of software and computer. which has made the recommendation? Oh something she's not. Just googling the symptoms because I can do that at home. uh-huh sit down unless K. She said so meet practice fusion this is a San Francisco medical startup. Okay according to its own website practice fusion streamlines the running of typical healthcare practice. And it does this by providing a cloud based electronic health record Kurt System Okay and you may remember that my first job was working at a medical office at kind of place a practice a medical practice the kind of place that the software would be perfect for. You will feel bad when I was working pre I was working at. The paper was moving to computer so We still still had paper files and I actually come fired from that job by Dan. Your dad fired from that job because nobody I did some really awful. I didn't do it on this but I lost. I lost a a patient file and the guy went to hospital. The guy went to hospital oil and they couldn't find his file because I'd accidentally tucked it into someone else's file accent when I was putting it away anyway so they chop off the wrong leg or something more. Doing I got fired as well. Yeah that's the most important thing so back to practice fusion okay. So it's website says it's it's super popular. Four million patient visits per month eighty million patient records Yada Yada Yada. We're number one and the software is apparently used by tens of thousands thousands doctors offices across the US of a right so presumably should be all ticketing boo. Oh yes. I'm sure that's why you mentioned on the show. Yes yes yes so yes. This software had this electronic health record systems. So this is where all your information was being inputted by said doctor or health practitioner owner. It's going to be a data breaches and occasionally a pop up window would show up with a question asking about a patient's pain level and in your situation you would say oh you know. I'm a twelve right and said node Graham. Could you please take this seriously right and you would say whatever remember you'd say. The software stopped menu. Would that provide a list of treatment options. Including perhaps a prescription I ate oxycodone in or for another opioid. Okay now this is how it worked. This is what makes it all a little bit. Tricky this tool existed. Thanks to a secret deal real. This is all according to a Bloomberg article in the La Times. I read so it turns out that practice fusion was paid by a major opioid manufacturer factor. Pharma Co ex. Let's call them that for this moment. Because they're unnamed okay so this major opioid manufacturer payed need practice fusion money in order to kind of boost prescriptions. To addictive pain pills. Oh crumbs yeah and this went on for three years between two thousand sixteen twenty nineteen and so the software is telling the doctor to prescribe these addictive pills so it would just show up. Wouldn't show up on everyone's system so let's say so sometimes with some patients suddenly this pop up which show and the PUP would ask about pain level and it was targeting it was targeting patients that weren't currently taking opioids and patients that were maybe on on medicines that were less profitable for the company. Oh my goodness epistle recruiting there. I'm selling up selling people tune addictive drug. So it's like it's back to the forties with cigarettes. This is horrific. Yeah and this is the doctors did know this rights. You'd go toddle off to your our local medical center and your doctor would go you know. Hey you have a headache. I think maybe Maybe paying bills this okay. Maybe he's tries them oxycodone if deal deal with that. Goodness save now been hit the DOJ did a big investigation and the DOJ alleges the practice fusion took financial kickbacks from drug companies companies and let the drugmakers draft the language in the so-called clinical decisions. Support alerts what we're talking about. These are these pop ups that were presented to Dr so they were able to massage the wording and decide. I don't want the levels would be and what would be presented as possible options. I'm I'm slightly speechless. Crow which is no good for a podcast. I've got lots more to say finally OK. Hey listen to this song. Employees Inside Cave Drug Company instead that they bolstered opioid sales by as much as eleven point. Three million through this partnership so in the contract the drugmaker payed practice fusion. Almost a million dollars for the opportunity to present their drugs to patients in this way. Wow how researching the story right. And I'm what I'm annoyed about is. Who is this drug company? Because we know I wasn't alone though because Reuters Peters figured it out K so despite it being redacted from the government documents and if you want to read about this I've got as you know I do a ton of research so there's a ton of links inside inside the Mexicans Kiddy web page when more about this so Reuters published that the oxycodone meeker was in bed. Practice fusion was none other than Perdue Pharma. Sir To Pharma now purdue was not criminally charged in this case or accused of any wrongdoing. In fact there's been no determination of liability or civil uncivil claims. Seems like so. I don't know I was thinking about this right so say your doctor had done this. Immune read about this. And you might think I was oxycodone for my hair which you know you might in some instances Wanna sue that medical practice. The medical practice would then probably like there has to be rid rigged up chain. I mean that's how it works in America isn't everybody everybody. Practice fusion have agreed to pay forty five million squids to resolve this and this is to basically pay for any criminal pay lawyers and play civil investigations. But golly yeah what a story reminds me a little of to remember back in episode one hundred twenty two of smash. Oh yes of course I remember that just looked it up. That's why I'm having office depot. They were fined millions because they tricked customers into thinking that computers were infected with malware. Because what what would happen. Is You take your computer into office depot and say. Oh we'll check. Cyo computers running slow where you're having crashes then run this piece of software. which would falsely claimed it was infected affected by malware and then tell? You need to buy a certain antivirus. So yeah let's at the time and they they ended up having to settle with the FTC millions and millions and millions over those tricked consumers. But it's a little bit like that because although you genuinely did have the symptoms of some kind of illness or pain. The software is the thing which is to take the wrong remedy or perhaps well no. It's people stronger. It's both rock maker. It's the people that created the software and the people that allowed the software and the practices. So they're obviously just buying an just buying electronic patient record holder. They weren't even expecting these pop ups I wasn't they. Were just looking for place to hold data but still that's patient data so thinking of the vetting they did. They obviously did no security testing. How clear are they that the data that there's holding on patients sexually secure it just makes the whole thing feel a bit? Not It's one thing really gets my goat. I don't think a financial penalty is enough. I think someone has to have they cut off because of this. If they have no Dooley's what then well plan to remove ovaries. Oh Okay Yeah. Maybe I've gone too far as usual Okay I'M NOT GONNA lie to you. Passwords often are a pain in the you know where but they don't always have to to be take for instance last passes single sign on feature now. Single sign on is very cool because it is integrated with more more than twelve hundred different applications applications that your users need to do their jobs and this simplifies accessing those applications making thing it far more streamlined. WanNa learn more check it out at last pass dot com forward slash smashing on with the show And we'll come back and join us on our favorite part of the show. The part of the show that we like to call pick pick the pick of the week the part of the show everyone. She's saying they like could be a funny story book that they read a TV show a movie a record a podcast website or torn up. Whatever they wish doesn't have to be security related necessarily should not be and my pick of the week isn't really security related is instead see what I like to do to third? I like to we the themes through the podcast. It's very that this isn't some ramshackle shambolic recording in Cro. I've put genuine thought into this because I am now coming back to the topic of art and that's very good Graham. Never did you do this. Before specifically an artist could Simon Wecker. Or maybe it's Simon Beckett who is based in Berlin which is in Germany? Don't you know and he he did say rubber extraordinary this week and he produced video and you can read all the batteries where page we linked those in the show notes. What he did was he generated a virtual traffic jam on Google maps? Okay how explain okay. So do you know how Google maps apps works regarding traffic warm. Assuming it's going there's a lot of people here and we know that through there. We know that through the. GPS is or their phones. Yeah owns owns exactly say people are carrying phones. Running Google software racing around in their motorcars. Rand Apple is able to identify Where they are roughly in its at all? There's a lot of them here and they did look like they were Nicole and now they didn't appear to be moving very fast and etc etc.. So that's that's how Google is able to tell you. This is a busy bit of road. This is a quite right right recruiter. So what. Simon Vacant did Kids little trone like a little audit up we've ninety-nine secondhand smartphones and he walked walk around Berlin and just ambling land down but don't love it and then basically you go maps for single traffic jam. Traffic jam a Google map so that was loads of traffic jams happening very cute however I can see see some serious problems. Here actually. Look what magic if you were having a heart attack. Oh yes right and the ambulance is like. Oh Shit well yes exactly exactly. The ambulance might take a longer route. Yeah I don't think he's planning to do this on a regular basis. I think he's proved his point. But yes if other people wanted to or someone's being held at knifepoint the cops can yes exactly exactly or if you transport. Remember an old episode of Captain Captain Scarlet a very dangerous nuclear. Missile was being taken of advice. Some sort of vehicle through the streets of London for reasons which were best known to itself the bad guys. The bad guys wanted to divert the course of this nuclear weapon to go the particular way that they want it so that they they could try to steal the weapon so you could create a fake traffic jam and get them moving away or if there is a very important person like I dunno a politician or something like that and your security detail are trying to get you through the city right in emergency and they don't want to be ambushed by the bad guys. Well they might see a traffic jam. Google maps Oh yeah that's way more for it and then someone being held at knife throwing. You're right right good point anyway. I thought this was Rava cunning and clever and also cute cute and for me. That's what counts and that is why it is my pick of the week. Yeah cute but dangerous. I think needs bit more thought. I think the system people do it but just interested in that phase now denim concept any Oh so you. He's back now. I'm not okay. It good has a fellow artist. You just competition straight. That's right Oh no no seriously. I'm looking for artists. Friends actually looking to expand my artist friends so unfortunately Graham you might get dumped okay my pick of the week okay. So Molly pick of the week. Do you remember. Last we had Lisa Forte on the show and she was talking about her story. which is a game? I played and She mentioned also that they had a new one out. A new game called telling lies and So I played it and I can. I can attest it's pretty cool. So it's basically kind in a cold a desk top thriller. That's one of the creators goals in his gift. Imagine you have four characters right and you only get one side of the conversation you are basically an NSA Person Right and you come to a computer you sit down and you are now going through files okay and you are hearing snippets. Some of the files are thirteen seconds. Some of the files are eight minutes long and it's one side of the conversation. It's like a digital puzzle. You have to go win. Find the two bits of conversation that go together okay. So it's like if So it's like a maybe a telephone conversation. But you've got two different recordings according to one from each and exactly exactly what it is so you and I were planning something really bad heist or something right. And then you had my side of the conversation. But there'd also CD's all these moments where. I wouldn't be talking right because I'd be listening to you because you yeah be happy abby. VIP So sometimes you're you're watching it right and they're doing nothing they're just looking at you. They're looking right in the camera as you're speaking and that can go on for minutes at a time. It's really bizarre. Her however the story is fantastic and slowly slowly as you start kind of dissecting all these different little audio clips and video clips you can figure out what's going on. And what makes it. Great is the acting super cool. Right acting is great and the script is is noticeably tight. And there's a number of different and endings number of different things you can learn. There's no one ending and the one thing though is I'm not really sure what the goal is like. I haven't figured that out yet. That's more realistic. You don't necessarily seventy no what you're investigating. Yeah so there's like a number of different story threads. I'm not finished yet but I'm still this stage. I'm like I don't know how to conclude and I think. I think that you have to have actually built this baby obsession while my husband and I came down with thread obsession and Blu tack and a few three M sticky posts and they're all over our front or front room but I don't think we're doing it seriously enough because there's all kinds of little clues he's like timestamps in word clues one. No there's one conversation going on and they'll say something you'd like. Hey they mentioned up four and that's how you find your clips. It's by doing a word search. It's it's not like all the clips from front of you. You have to kind of go. Oh I want to look for the word Liar for example right well. I'm going to look for the name Peter and then clips were that's mentioned comes up up. Anyway I've talked too much. It's really cool. Check it out. It does cost money but I think it was seven dollars. You got the the IPAD. I got the iphone one. I got the iphone because I was traveling but then what I ended up doing. We ended up doing in our living room. And I beam to the telly through the APPLETON. So you could both so we are playing together and we were three of US actually and it was great fun. I'm just checking out the website. Now you can also for windows on steam. Yep Yep anyway I thought it was great fun and it's it's something you can do in a Friday night with your other half right if you need to have something because it's you get pretty into it anyway. That's the week telling lie howling allies. Excellent okay I just wanted to repeat that because we had we had a listener. Say can you always try and remember to tell us what the pick of the week was at the end of the pick of the week. It's published by Anna Purna Interactive and it was published initially in August. Twenty nine thousand nine hundred ninety Benny year old still fairly nascent. Well sounds really COCO. Is I think that just about wraps it up for this week. If you'd you'd like to follow us on twitter do it follows on twitter at smashing security. No G twitter last average and you can also join us on Reddit in the smashing security guilty bread and don't forget if you want to be short never to miss another episode of smashing security subscribing your favorite podcast app such as cost books which is currently featuring smashing security. Thank you thank you cast box and a huge thanks to all of you for pointing your ears are way supporting us on on Patrie on and giving us snoot giving that's wonderful reviews also a big shout out to this week smashing security sponsor last past I support helps us give you this show for free. CHECKOUT SMASHING SECURITY DOT com four past episodes sponsorship details an information on how to get in touch with us until next time Chiro cheerio bye bye and they missed the guest speaker. She would've been a very good guest. She'll come back looks plain. What happened is we're not going to blame any no? No we're not blaming anyone we're not gonNA take not your story computers full. I don't WANNA get into I blame Babich V._M.. Nice eight a lovelace as well nice.

Graham London director oxycodone John Constable Dutch Museum US Hong Kong Simon Dickinson twitter England Dutch Art Museum Google office depot Cannell -Tario Sarah Ready museum Zima