35 Burst results for "arlene"

"arlene" Discussed on Horror Soup

Horror Soup

04:09 min | Last month

"arlene" Discussed on Horror Soup

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"arlene" Discussed on Horror Soup

Horror Soup

07:41 min | Last month

"arlene" Discussed on Horror Soup

"Not okay. Hold on. He was on his own vibe though. I am now on that. Loved it. Audio doesn't know what's going on, but it's one I'm feeling the. Shades. He starts feeling out the plays Nigga. This bath and he's like red water blood blood. She died here she died out. She's Oh my God. She slit her wrists. In the TUB. Oh my God, and then they cut the cameras like. Joey. Got Him. So I. Thought He. Yeah fucking posers do you the legit? fucking wrong and then the movie unfortunately starts turned found footage with the dude with shitty hair and beard going. Yeah. The camera only. Get to this next scene was really cringe. Dude. That I. This is what I kept going back and forth. Okay that they do they do know what they're doing but. I don't know. There's movie really confused me like generally yeah I don't know how to feel about getting the answer's. No didn't interest single fucking thing. Automatically go to hell or Tunein dimension when they were locked in that building or. or or what? I. Can't see these fucking glosses. So This is when the movie started found footage. Already. Yeah you guys didn't hear that Yeah. So the next scene and There's plenty of these ghost things that really like anyone that's ever seen any kind of ghosts movie or show or anything knows exactly what all these ghosts instruments are like you know you got like the ghost sound. Bobber, you got the the ghost Sierra and the the ghost electric? Box everyone knows exactly what it is down to the last detail and they showing us all of it but I mean like they're really showing it. Like three minutes of just going yeah. One point you've brings. Is things bad ass like if I wanted to know what's up with all those gadgets, youtube it. Yeah. If I really want to know I can find out with these things are at least like maybe just say the names let go emt fucking. Those showed reader. showed reader can look that stuff up. It's not that big of a deal. You'll be fucking fucking child. So then they make the album cover for their new metal album. Remember that shot. All my God. When they're doing those really ugly poses. The camera turned around all standing next to each other Clint Eastwood Guy, his face was like the best expression and the. Best I love it was definitely the unclean vocalist growling. fucking. Two. Kids that are like showing on his lawn. Touch his fucking grant around. It shows fucks. Is Pretty great though you know I liked album I, I would listen to that band. What do you think? Would you called graven calendars? Screaming counties what the band when I think of it. Even know the name would just be grave accountable would be given counties. Then and then, and then the the font for the logo of the brand whatever go sex. Yeah. Go sick sex goes. Yeah. Yeah it'll have like the typical lake though the phone will have the typical squiggly like branched out. Ways like the metal bands have for their logos. Likes that likes. Nettle music is going to be pissed that not only I just said that the you're just like Oh. Yeah. The little metal swivels. squiggle. That's exactly what I recalled it right. Let me what else would you call it that what the fuck else is a Ridiculous Grow Up. Metal People. What are they like being called metal heads at allow? Stupid. Texas tag the big old dumb Texas. Well, we all stupid Texas. So they start trying to call it a spirit and then ethnic are Clint Eastwood. decided there's probably a ghost till left of them. So they go to the left. The the is just he added this gray line. He's like, Oh, you know there's a ghost behind me we will know. Until later. Easily, one of my favorite lines, the whole movie. Is Good. You know it's just. It's still. A little bit later like no begging you. Don't act like this. It goes behind you even if they might be. Going like, Oh, I'm really creeped out in. Year. They had out in these tunnels and I tripped over some uh, some noises and some smells I. Pretty sure ship themselves without point. Yeah. It's actually just rats. while. Shit themselves probably so much. Let's just say so much it themselves. The host he's he's been a real fucking pussy about these rats. Everyone else is gonNA find with they're like Oh yeah. Rats David deal on this guy's like. I'd be the only Gada pursue. Surrounded by rats, hell Ya it's just lower out. Missile Buddy. He went so crazy. He'd freaking read. Your singing about eating rats earlier. Is this. About it though. We. Were they four shattering? Is that what this was? The just showed a rat foreshadowing. He's going to eat around later. Maybe Ha. Oh. This is only source of food or whatever it is. He's is going fucking crazy. We'll both actually because they were in there for days. You're right. But if that is the foreshadows awash fuck and foreshadow in the world trail so ectoplasms gets discovered by the grave encounter. Teams might be ges but the host decide that they need to get some floaty hallway shots and then a points out some glory holes find a wheelchair in the middle of the hallway. nope. nope. Paraplegic though and gets a call from his girlfriend, his daughter and he sets the camera down and this is a really missed opportunity to fucking murder him. True. But I'm also upset because I was TC. To. As my man I fucking love easy. He says the camera down starts talking to his girlfriend wife whatever in his daughter and the wheelchair. Slightly moves like Justin inch like just ever. So fucking slightly, and it really pissed me off with thirty minutes and and that was the first ghostly thing of any sort that happened I was like really does that you gonNA move it a little bit that could have been a gust of wind. As fine. So Adore ends up shutting next time right after this gets on film and stuff. So the other people wait you got it on film you like. Yeah. So they're like I got some in this ghost by screaming at him. He's.

Texas Clint Eastwood Guy Joey murder Clint Eastwood. Justin inch Gada David
What we've learned about Barrett's views on abortion cases

Her Turn

08:11 min | Last month

What we've learned about Barrett's views on abortion cases

"Judiciary Committee hearings in full swing this week. Arlene's outta wrote this report. For many feminists, it is the most painful, outrageous and sad irony that the Supreme Court seat once held by Ruth Bader Ginsburg, one of the most staunch supporters of women's rights and civil rights, will soon be held by another woman. But one who seems to be the mirror opposite of R B, G and all her views the Senate Judiciary Committee hearings this week on the nomination of Amy Cockney Barrett to the Supreme Court. But her views on full display despite the fact that she repeatedly refused to answer questions about her opinions, questions on such settled issues as the right to birth control and the right to vote, including a peaceful transition of power. As the result of that vote, all got I cannot comment answers. When asked about her view opposing same sex marriage, she offhandedly used the term sexual preference when referring to the LGBT plus community, even though many activists say the term is offensive. One after another Democratic senators tried to press her on her record, such as the fact that she previously signed onto an ad describing abortion as barbaric and calling for the Roe v. Wade decision to be overturned. Her two dissenting opinions and abortion related cases, one of which involved allowing minors to get an abortion without notifying parents by way of judicial bypass, and another that would have required fetal remains to be formally buried. Observers say 17 cases related to abortion are one step away from the Supreme Court and three including a 15 week abortion ban from Mississippi could be taken up as early as its next session. And her only nod to any progressive opinion. Barrett seemed to support the idea of desegregation by calling the Brown v. Board of education decision a super precedent that isn't likely to ever be overturned. The Judiciary Committee is set to vote to approve barrettes nomination next week with a vote of the full Senate by the end of the month. Bang. With the nomination of Amy Cockney Barrett to the U. S. Supreme Court. Questions about her ties to the religious right have raised concerns about the fate of Roe v. Wade and a person's right to reproductive choices. Her turn. Reporter Ellen La Luzerne spoke with Karen Garst, who author to anthologies about the impact of religion on women. Women beyond belief, and women versus religion. Last received her PhD in curriculum and instruction from UW Madison and is a current resident in the state of Oregon. 2016 you published a book Women Beyond belief. In the book's introduction, You stated that you wrote the book after learning of the 2014 U. S. Supreme Court decision regarding Hobby lobby's denial of reproductive care for their employees. Your reaction was to question why a corporation can use its religious beliefs. To dictate the healthcare a woman could receive. Fast forward to today when we're witnessing the Supreme Court nomination process for a woman who is a valid Lee, a member of an extremist religious sect that believes that women should submit to their husbands What was your reaction when you heard about the nomination of Amy Clooney Barrett for the U. S Supreme Court. First of all, I wasn't surprised because Trump has already appointed people to the Supreme Court. I didn't watch quite a bit of the confirmation hearings of his previous nominees, so I wasn't surprised that he appointed someone who's conservative. He vowed when he was elected that he would appoint justices to the Supreme Court who would overturn Roe v. Wade. If Connie Bear is confirmed, What is your opinion about the impact that this might have for future cases such as the Affordable care act and a woman's right to choose? Well, I think it's going to have very dilatory ous impacts because now we're going to have a Supreme Court. That is considered very conservative. I believe six of the justices will be considered Catholic, and there are going to write decisions as they have for that have a conservative bent. I think it's very unfortunate that the Supreme Court has become so politicized. If we look in our history. One of the things that I was doing some research on was previous decisions and Brown vs the Board of Education. Which desegregated schools was fundamental change to the way this society was operating was a 9 to 0 decision, and people saw what was happening in society, and I talked to a friend of mine who is a lawyer there. Who said, you know, there's this public sentiment. That's how culture changes. And people were attuned to that, And now we're not appointing people to the Supreme Court who have an open view. They're very, very one sided, and I think it's totally tragic that she's going to replace Ruth Bader Ginsburg. What do you think the consequences will be for Roe v. Wade and access to freedom of choice? An abortion? There will always be abortion. The question is whether it's going to be safe and whether it's going to be legal. There has been throughout time before Roe v. Wade. It was back alley abortions, and I think younger women today they don't know what it was like before then Roe v. Wade. If it were completely overturned, I think would have a revolution. It might take a while to put it together. Rather, I think what they'll do is just approved all these restrictions on it, making the doctors who on abortion clinics we associate with the hospital, whether it's making AA lot regulations on the clinic itself and what it can have and what it has to have delegating more. The authority of states and people are going to have to say I don't want to live in a state like this. If they overturn it completely and make abortion illegal. I just Hey, I'm ready to start the revolution. I don't think they're going to go that far. But who knows? What do you think, drives the women who are supporting people like Coney, Bharat and Support these types of efforts to keep women as subservient to men, such as the belief system of Annie Cockney Barrett. Religion is an indoctrination in a set of beliefs. I'm 70 when I was growing up in the fifties in Bismarck, North Dakota. Every person I knew went to a church or there were three Jewish families who went to a synagogue. But it was part of everybody's life. So you're indoctrinated in that It's your family. Everybody else around you is like that. Unless you're exposed to something different. This shapes who you are. And we know that Trump was elected by conservatives by people who identified as religion, particularly fundamentalist religion. That's too he appeals to, and it's unfortunate that the religion hasn't changed enough to deal with our society today. What is interesting to me? Is that this woman, Amy Cockney Barrett is very intelligent. She is ah, Notre Dame professor. She's an appellate court judge, and she has seven kids. I can't imagine trying to balance all that. But in spite of that conservative religion, it is pretty hard to say, Well, she's helped meat of her husband because she is Ted her own career. In your

U. S. Supreme Court Amy Cockney Barrett ROE Wade Ruth Bader Ginsburg U. S Supreme Court Judiciary Committee Senate Judiciary Committee Annie Cockney Barrett Brown Arlene Senate Hobby Lobby Mississippi Donald Trump Bismarck Ellen La Luzerne
Northern Ireland will lock down for four weeks, as England begins new restrictions

News, Traffic and Weather

00:27 sec | Last month

Northern Ireland will lock down for four weeks, as England begins new restrictions

"Northern Ireland, introducing the tightest Kobe and 19 restrictions in the United Kingdom. These are your world headlines from ABC News, Northern Ireland's first minister, Arlene Foster. A lot of these decisions will make a huge impact on people's lives, but they are for four weeks were very determined that this will be a time limited intervention. The plan includes the closing of schools, pubs and restaurants to slow the spread of the virus.

Northern Ireland Arlene Foster Abc News United Kingdom
Prosecutors charge 3 with threatening women in R. Kelly case

Dave Ramsey

00:38 sec | 3 months ago

Prosecutors charge 3 with threatening women in R. Kelly case

"Have been charged with harassing alleged victims. Of singer R. Kelly. ABC is Aaron Carter Ski with more federal prosecutors in Brooklyn, said R. Kelly's longtime friend, Richard Arlene offered a woman 1/2 $1,000,000 to keep her from cooperating. Another friend, and now Russell allegedly threatened to reveal sexually explicit photographs of a second accuser if she did not withdraw her lawsuit against Kelly. Ah third man, Michael Williams set fire to a car in Florida that prosecutor said was part of a campaign to harass, intimidate, threaten or corruptly influenced the alleged victims in the racketeering case against our Kelly, defense attorney said the singer who has pleaded not guilty, had nothing to do with this. Aaron

R. Kelly Aaron Richard Arlene Racketeering ABC Michael Williams Prosecutor Russell Brooklyn Florida Attorney
Solving the mental load  update

Ladies, We Need To Talk

05:41 min | 3 months ago

Solving the mental load update

"When we first spoke about the mental load on this podcast, there was a fringe cartoon cold. You should've asked that was going viral. It explained the mental load with such clarity that when I first saw it, my reaction was fury. I wanted to. Shift to the ground. It showed a woman with a baby and a hapless male partner who was kind, but needed to be told how to help and it so familiar. So common. So exasperating and so profoundly unfair. Journalist, Tracey spicer new. What I was talking about. It was an absolute lightbulb moment for me, I sir, Clementine, Ford's facebook page. I share with everyone and I knew that went viral swear words and it happened in the time when I realized that my life with my wonderful husband who's fifty fifty with the housework fifty, fifty with the childcare, but it was just the little things. I'm always the one who organizes school holiday care or who takes the time to look after the kids or rangers everyone's Christmas presents or birthday present in his extended family and my extended family. So after reading that I, decided to go on strike in the household so he had to do it drove him Berserk. He said this is crazy. Such little school holiday cared Australia. I said now you know my pain. Jenny talk about the mental load in your life. I think when I saw the catching was like, oh, no added that to my mental learn. About. How often I think about the mental load? That's Jenny Leong amp in New South Wales Parliament I was very lucky and I consider it to be like that. My partner was able to access paid parental leave. So he was the primary care for a significant amount of time and in that case he did take the mental Lloyd and a lot of that was then there that the what's interesting is once we're both Both. Back at work where the default position falls back and the expectation of WHO's supposed to know those things to me. Then you feel like part of it is also all of my being bad feminist because of that because I think then adds another level to it to how much you should make a deal of this or not I noticed the gender dynamic with my. Friends that are in. Relationships, they're both men they quite comfortably into stereotypes, gender roles that old without all of the challenges and the. Doctor Leah. Repent on a lecturer in sociology at the University of, Melbourne. She racist as domestic labor, and this idea of the mental load is her field of expertise. I'm going to start and say a little bit controversial. Say That everyone actually carries the mental load. So some portion of your mental load may go to thinking about your career. Some portion of it may go to thinking about your family and some portion of it may be going to thinking about your personal life and the differences, the balance across men and women. So you could imagine men are spending a lot more of their mental load thinking about how do I advance my career thinking about the day to day challenges of work. That is a very different mental load than who is going to pick up the child from daycare. or WHO's GonNa Organize School holidays or who's doing the housework wise. House a mass. And one leads to economic outcome, career mobility and one is just unpaid sometimes recognized sometimes not recognized labor. And I think that's really the difference. How do we shift the ratio? Definitely does seat more with women the. Yeah, I, K-. So we're all in agreement about that. Absolutely. Absolutely, the balance in terms of unpaid in terms of thinking about the experience is disproportionately shouldered by women. Yes. Absolutely. Once, you get your head around the idea of the mental load. You start seeing it everywhere in the lives of your friends, colleagues, your mother, your self. It. Happens to women in all walks of life and age and six urology, but it seems to hit hardest when there's a baby. So. Now, we have a name for the mental load. But. The problem is naming, it doesn't make it go away. As I was sobbing thinking. I used to be able to manage employees teams. And now I'm too overwhelmed to even manage a grocery list. And more importantly. How did I become the default for every single child care and household tasks for my family? It wasn't supposed to happen to me. This is a road ski shades La, and she's written a book called Fairplay, which is all about fairly distributing the mental load aves marriage nearly ended when her husband center, it takes saying. I'm surprised you didn't get blueberries. She was furious at the assumption that she had gone from high powered lawyer to full-time Default Blueberry shepper. Eight. Knew she had to do something about it? She says, there are a few ways to look the mental load. My favorite was a term from nineteen eighty-seven and American sociologist named Arlene Kaplan. Daniels. coined a term called invisible work. In why like that term so much is because that's the only one that had a modicum of a solution in it. Because I kept thinking to myself. Maybe. Maybe if I can make. Visible all the invisible things I was doing from my home and family for my husband, Seth? Maybe then he would value what I did.

Jenny Leong Partner Tracey Spicer Australia Arlene Kaplan Ford Lloyd Facebook Seth Lecturer New South Wales Daniels. Melbourne LA
Supreme Court rules federal civil rights law protects LGBTQ workers

Her Turn

05:21 min | 5 months ago

Supreme Court rules federal civil rights law protects LGBTQ workers

"For people I know that a lot to of remain people right non now partisan are looking for something and to do we I think all feel this decision that this is a moment gives where we us all need to come some together hope that and that will so Monterey in fact is be the case a space for Capstick that and I want to invite might people look to at come this to decision our website and at Monterey say oh dot yeah org they're throwing the and ball learn about ways but you can wait support the till work that we're doing other hot with button grassroots issues women come all up over I the mean world we're still waiting sign up for to the our mailing decision list and thank on you very the much abortion for the opportunity right Hey that was Diana Dewart we gonna come Crowder down is next director week of policy maybe on and Monday strategic engagement so maybe speaking this is with Arlene that soldier throwing from her us turn a bone because on Monday they're going to take away a woman's right to choose I actually don't think that it's going to be that extreme but I'm not feeling very hopeful that we're going to get a great good liberal decision out of this report I'm at okay that was pines in market tourney Temer Packard speaking with Richard got reporter loose ski is sandy the state genitals treasurer for Wisconsin she took office in twenty nineteen and has been diligent performing the many duties of her office welcome return back reporter everyone sandy jungle welcome recently back talked you with Sarah were listening to Sarah Godlewski her says infinite the Wisconsin varieties state treasurer celebrating has many responsibilities women in music she talks culture about the things and that have been arts accomplished just here this on year W. one O. of my R. roles T. eighty is nine to be the point chair nine of FM the school trust fund in D. and beautiful that is Madison a fine I'm that your has host one point two billion Meghan infectious flowers dollars disease and here with you on what the third we do is through Sunday our of every investment month earnings and we are we provide well on money our to way all public schools through in part Wisconsin three to of biotechnology our three part series and box all about so women things and are really electronic critical music resources for you've our been kids listening to learn to the in greats this year as the queen's chair the presidents we provided of Detroit the largest distribution in the history Detroit of the fund techno which is in over particular a hundred years over thirty before eight million that dollars we went heard to public schools this year to a buy divinity technology and books divinity for is original kids mix before that but it's we heard not just DJ about mix distributing the money with it's DJ also mixes thinking meltdown through how we doing mix one of the both things that really great we artists called have been it working struck together in back the Detroit in March scene for I remember of Colleen a school backlash librarian probably in the last northern thirty Wisconsin years in talking DJ with minx her about was how one of she those doing first you know how out is there she feeling as about things in techno what were her concerns in the techno scene in her work for with teachers women she said look making there at waves the end of the day and she we are doing really everything helped to we lift can other women to who DJ support our in kids but that scene it sometimes and by just incredibly starting challenging her because own record kids label don't have the you know resources she was like available raising kids to them and to going learn to school remotely got her business degree and so started in women kind of having on that wax conversation and we really were able to created provide a public schools platform in April of this year over for five promoting million dollars looking recording to address the digital artists divide concerns women who throughout Kobe DJ so providing and schools and with hot DJ spots divinity so was we can use those tools one of the for kids people that might who not have she really access to internet helps lift it or up ebook and they and so yeah they that still was play something that together was really important all around for us to all step over up Detroit and do that United quickly States in this cold environment music when the need was really great in addition to that venues it's really all talking over about the world even our and investment policy we DJ minx last month and passed the our divinity updated investment can policy still be and there were two big changes to that policy found one is that whenever recording possible actually we pretty are focusing and on Wisconsin pretty regularly investments and also because hosting one of the things a that radio is prior a radio to station being state shows treasurer impact in investor Detroit in really both value of them the ability to do have these when been when featured investments pretty and regularly so keeping along with money Stacey in hot Wisconsin wax hill whenever who possible heard before whether on it's investments Deep Space in real estate radio are which supporting is all music curated other by some local of the greatest venture minds and so in Detroit that was techno one piece that we added to and our policy that's how statement a lot of was the Wisconsin women based who investments DJ got the started other big so piece that we're we added as to there our were investment policy is how a we lot look of men at in risk the scene at the time and we in the now in the late evaluate nineties mid what's to called late nineties ESG risk who were factors starting these which collectives are environmental a lot of the women were really social and make governance it issues and with regards and to the our radio investment stations in corporations and then really and that's really important just because moved if out you think and about and the environmental develop peace their sound and we're and actually the clubs looking all at over companies Detroit that value and so climate welcome change back everyone we that we that are looking was are at going their heaven CO to keep two by movin emissions K. that are hand looking through at deforestation also stereo known are actually as Kelly taking hand and that into we're gonna consideration check got her out start if in you look at the the social Detroit some peace within techno of our scene our risks the that's looking at the women two companies who one DJ of provide the queens today like in this of cold who environment were deeply I would influenced say our Detroit companies that by we're techno investing and are they where providing it really by honestly their employees the techno house health care and techno it's got are its they start providing scene of them Detroit he simply you where know it moved out because to these techno Berlin are all important and has came become back factors synonymous that in companies in with the United need States to embrace and you know because a lot not of only leg are they so good we're policies full gonna get into of and that they're multi good a little for employees billion bit dollar but but they're electronic good for us and music right industry help now with we're the supply crap going to chain and meeting demand listen the and so massive to these are things drug that fuelled we one have festivals updated a and new with DJ has this our because idea investment DJ just holographic sort policy of you know there are no who critical part is of how Europeans we a native look in ecstasy at Detroit our portfolio she and calls party herself and so a all that's this just one stuff within and my role funk techno as an investor at least as changes I was machine learning and about this I think important is and things that really she we are have born delivered amazing and raised in to Detroit and Wisconsinites beautiful music to hear just that within twenty twenty at its she's root got the it's beyond slate uniquely that creek midwestern really one of the great things uniquely that musical I ran Detroit cuisine on it's it's that like I thought was really beautiful house missing beats it's black from the conversation delicious that it's as the chief got financial its unreserved sound officer we should in new be the talking early disco about is the economic security R. to N. mid B. D. eighties treasures across and the she developed country we're in yeah really the nineties talking she's got about this a and and lot this as was of great something dishes that was next answering seen Detroit to check in what techno out we one and have of hers Chicago been doing called house with economic diary was security at its height is really of looking a whose at Detroit start it in was even two then perspectives center in the early today nineties starting one and to get is packaged this is homeownership all about presented as I as kicked it is off the a smiley lot the of treasurer's retracts face of its like Berlin her homeowners speaking and task Manchester to herself force to build about a minute originally music her scene diary I'm our not mission as trying a black to was hit to on woman the look music at in but a how black woman can you know Detroit's we a lot help of that so Wisconsinites let's check achieve the that this American one out dream by buying by a home DJ USAAC that but holographic also start got started staying in Detroit in their home just and addressing that the beautiful foreclosure unicorn crisis emotional since sound Coleman just we have kind of got a shift a bit white in our wash priority to be honest and and we so are now hearing developing about a techno pilot as program it was originally conceived to keep people in their as homes a reaction because to with inner city decay unemployment as a byproduct and under

Some people are making bread in quarantine. Others are making TikToks

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

03:15 min | 6 months ago

Some people are making bread in quarantine. Others are making TikToks

"The short video platform tiktok was already a big hit before the pandemic but since so many people have been stuck at home since march a lot. More people are discovering it and even though tiktok is in the news for its new. Ceo kevin meyer. Who was poached from disney and for record labels who think the service should pay more to publishers and artists for using their songs and for actual calls to ban it in the us over its chinese ownership and security and privacy fears. Well people like marketplace own. Hey super alvarado are finding that in quarantine. It's just kind of fun. More than three hundred million people downloaded tiktok in the first quarter of this year. That's fifty percent more than last quarter and total two billion downloads. Laura pearson a student at usc who happens to be my roommate started hearing huge buzz about tiktok ride before her spring break. Her friends were sending her lots of links sketches and dance videos. So she downloaded the out thinking. Yeah nice easy way to kill some quarantine time. It's like this cute little app. You can record videos. She started to spend more and more time on tiktok when she wasn't zooming into her classes soon enough. She started producing. She recruited arlene. Pereira are other roommate. She's of course also home from her teaching job at el camino college here in southern california. They chose zico's any song. So we spent the whole night trying to figure out how to do the dance and have a certain level of swag arse it out of the way in the living room wall. My roommate's discovered how much time it takes to perfect tiktok dance and that just gave me a whole new perspective on tiktok that you see these super silly videos but boy is it quite the production darlene. Then we all decided well. Let's do this. We invested in a really nice phone Tripod with a Cute Little Bluetooth control on Amazon. You can even find bundles. Called Tiktok kits including a ring light tripod and some other fancy stuff with prices ranging from forty five sixty and even up to ninety bucks. My first tries to sketches not amazing but still funny right now. Almost two thirds of tiktok users are under the age of thirty four. It's especially popular with eight hundred. Twenty four year olds. Yup that's us. Talent agents are getting in on the action managing famous tiktok trying to get work in Hollywood and connecting social media. Influencers already making big money. Laura is showing the TIKTOK universe for crocheting wizardry and as for our lean. She has a few dance. Talks and droughts including one two the song wannabe by the spice girls and for me keeping my day job for now that was marketplace

Laura Pearson Disney CEO United States Kevin Meyer Alvarado USC Zico El Camino College Pereira Arlene Hollywood California Amazon
Adam Greenwood and Dr. Arlene Astell discuss alleviating loneliness in care homes

The Voice of Healthcare

04:23 min | 7 months ago

Adam Greenwood and Dr. Arlene Astell discuss alleviating loneliness in care homes

"So we'll get started here The audience wants to know what we're talking about today so I'm going to give each of your chance to describe the product and say this is what we're doing. This is the advent of it and this is why it matters so adam go ahead started for us last year when I watched a tedtalk. Khuda what makes a good life by Robert Loading and he said a Hob- professor and he was talking about the Harvard Study of Adult Development I'm sure you guys are aware of it. Seventy five years seven hundred plus men and then about two thousand that children where they were looking at the work the hung life and the health people from lots of different socio economic backgrounds For for an unprecedented length of time and the. I suppose what the amazing results were that it wasn't about upbringing. It wasn't about health or money. It's good relationships. Good relationships keep us happier and healthier Social connections all good for us and ultimately loneliness kills and I was doing some research And I came across a piece by a UK charity Kool aid UK and they said that around half a million older people. So that's sixty five plus you can go as long as a week without speaking to another person We as an agency is digital digital agency have been looking at ways that we could use voice. Tech- Lots of different Scenarios over the last two years and this is something that I felt really stormy about And so we wanted to find out if we could use voice tech- to help to tackle the problem of loneliness. In order people excellent Arlene so my interest in this has come from working with older people and trying to get technology into their hands to make lives better The this many existing off the shelf devices and APPs we can download really have functions that can benefit people but often the pros has tried to connect people with the technology trying to find the people who will benefit has being challenging particularly came to us with some work. A few years ago is set to pay 'em a network of Ph D. students who are looking at Health and wellbeing in later life. And how technology could help and one of them was very interested to work with the the people who are really hard to reach people who are lonely. The people who are isolated who may be not having contact with services but sitting in their own homes with Shrinking social network shrinking an ability to to make contact to make new contacts. And how could we stop to to look at where they emerging technologies could could assist them and particularly things like Anything would make new social connections so I was up to see delighted to To be connected with with Adam and Greenwood Campbell when they wanted to start looking at putting boys technology to to tackle loneliness excellent. So what is the product do? And how do you deploy it? And what's been the response what we wanted to do with this study. First of all was just find out if the if the acts of talking to voice assistance would help in in tackling learning us so what we did is So we've been working with an organization called Abbey Failed. I'm here in the UK they They have a bow About four hundred retirement living homes around you can't about seven thousand residents so We all stem if we'd introduce Alexis Google assistance into some of the residents rooms so that we could start to do some qualities studies about the Their effects on loneliness. And that's that's when we start to work with Arlene to help us to try and understand initially how to gauge loneliness in order to people And then often the study we could find out if it made any Tackled it in any way

Arlene Adam UK Robert Loading Harvard Study Of Adult Develop Hob- Professor Abbey Greenwood Campbell
"arlene" Discussed on PODSHIP EARTH

PODSHIP EARTH

02:23 min | 8 months ago

"arlene" Discussed on PODSHIP EARTH

"We've had <Speech_Female> a monthly caused <Speech_Female> with <Speech_Female> one hundred scientists <Speech_Female> all over the world <Speech_Female> who specialize in <Speech_Female> house. We've been having <Speech_Female> monthly calls since <Speech_Female> two thousand thirteen <Speech_Male> and sharing <Speech_Male> all this news <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Science and policy <Speech_Female> from all over the world <Speech_Female> so we took <Speech_Female> that and put it on this <Speech_Female> central <Speech_Male> websites of people put <Speech_Female> him pizzas central. <Speech_Female> They can get off the latest <Speech_Female> news <Speech_Female> on pizzas so <Speech_Female> we we try <Speech_Male> to again to <Speech_Female> educate based on <Speech_Female> science. And <Speech_Male> I'm just <Speech_Male> a standard how successful <Speech_Male> it has <Speech_Male> been with blame <Speech_Female> Muhtar into Foss <Speech_Female> anti-microbials. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> So I when <Speech_Female> we encourage more people <Speech_Female> more scientists to <Speech_Female> do policy <Speech_Female> more policy <Speech_Female> people and NGOs <Speech_Female> to be science-based <Speech_Female> so that's <Speech_Female> kind of our <Speech_Female> our place <Speech_Male> and we'd like <SpeakerChange> to see lots <Speech_Male> more people doing that. <Speech_Male> I mean I'm not <Speech_Male> that surprised every <Speech_Male> single thing you've put <Speech_Male> your mind to in your <Speech_Male> life you've been successful <Speech_Male> at and now <Speech_Male> you're being successful <Speech_Male> this you've got <Speech_Male> an ability <Speech_Male> to seize the moment <Speech_Male> and understand <Speech_Male> how to bring different <Speech_Male> things together. What <Speech_Male> what does <SpeakerChange> the rest of <Speech_Female> your day look like <Speech_Female> well? <Speech_Female> I'm at home these <Speech_Female> days <Speech_Female> so <Speech_Female> look at my email <Speech_Female> which occupies <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> me a lot. <Speech_Male> I <Speech_Male> I would be <Speech_Male> happy not reading <Speech_Male> one hundred emails if <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> I got to do this everyday <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> with you. So thank <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> you arlene. <SpeakerChange> Thank <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> you actually Love My. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> It's always very exciting <Speech_Music_Male> and into <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> a huge. Thank <Speech_Male> you to Arlene for talking <Speech_Male> with us today. <Speech_Male> I leaned believe <Speech_Male> that we can do <Speech_Male> seemingly impossible. <Speech_Male> Things <Speech_Male> is the foundation <Silence> of a life of adventure <Speech_Male> as <Speech_Male> Arlene said. <Speech_Male> Once you start <Speech_Male> to realize that you can <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> dream up these things <Speech_Male> that seem impossible <Speech_Music_Male> and then get other <Speech_Male> people who think <Speech_Male> it is possible <Speech_Music_Male> and then make <Speech_Music_Male> it happen. <Speech_Music_Male> It's very empowering. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> I doubt I'll ever <Speech_Male> climate highs as Eileen <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> but I do strive <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> to follow her wisdom <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> walk <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> every day in nature <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> realized that <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> getting lost teach <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> us more than we think. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Don't reject <Speech_Music_Male> crazy ideas <Speech_Music_Male> out of hand <Speech_Music_Male> bring people together <Speech_Music_Male> especially when they <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> don't see eye to eye <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and never <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> stopped pushing <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> forward <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> during these very <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> difficult times. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> These are ideals <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> that we can all <Speech_Music_Male> live by because as <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Eileen has shown <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> us they really <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> ain't no mountain <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> high. <Speech_Music_Male> Thank <Speech_Music_Male> you so much for being <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> part of the <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> journey from the entire <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> project earth crew. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Sound Engineer Rob <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Speight executive <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> producer. David <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Konin from Major <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Blumenfeld. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> I hope you stay <Speech_Music_Male> safe and healthy <Speech_Music_Male> during <SpeakerChange> these very <Speech_Music_Male> tough days.

Arlene Eileen David Engineer Speight executive producer
"arlene" Discussed on PODSHIP EARTH

PODSHIP EARTH

15:15 min | 8 months ago

"arlene" Discussed on PODSHIP EARTH

"Dream one day ride bad in Alabama little black bars and black girls will be able to join hands with little boys and girls as sisters and brothers. I have three days one of the things that modern society prevents us from doing is getting lost when you were doing the Trans Himalayan will now. It's nearly impossible to get lost like and I love the fact that you have a poor sense of direction which means you must get lost quite a lot so tell us like what it feels like to be lost. Well not only do I get lost a lot. I am an acute optimist. Himalayan mountain climbers have to be an acute optimist. I do remember night where I was going to be meeting a bunch of hikers at a high Sierra cabin on one side of the Twin River and somehow I was on the wrong side and I was sure there'd be a bridge but there wasn't so I walked all the way back and caught up with them. So when you're lost it's actually good that I always try to think of that. When it's when I'm lost I do not keep going forward thinking they'll be a bridge. I turn around and go back to the last place where it was newer. I was because then I can find my way if I can't find my way to where I was having trouble. I love that. That's fantastic advice for life in general so before you took sabbatical and your daughter was born. What was the emphasis of your science scientific inquiry? Sellin I came to Grad School at UC. Berkeley I was given a project to try to figure out the structure of transferring may which is an important small biological molecule and it has like eighty bases and a few transferring as had been sequenced. So I went and got four. Colored Strings of hippy beads on Telegraph Avenue in four colors and I- strung all the sequences on wire. And then I kind of folded them around. So the right ones paired with the right ones and I discovered for all the knowns sequences you gotTa Clover Leaf shape and a lot of people thought that was remarkable and should be published but my adviser wanted me to do experiments to prove it. I spent several years than climbing every weekend in the sodas and Inbetween doing experiments. Just before I was finishing I went to the movies. What was the movie that was playing the endless summer? The beach boys with great big surfboards. Going on around the world looking for the perfect wave and I thought wow. I'm a climber I should look for the perfect mountain so I spent fifteen months climbing around the world. We did a bunch of sense and I was very lucky to climb in Iran and Afghanistan Kashmir and if the opium lots of places that unfortunately have not done well since so I felt really lucky and again that empowered me that I could dream up something that I was there kind of a moment where that mountaineering experience kind of influenced how you saw the scientific world. Well when I was a post doc at Stanford I was trying to understand the structure of proteins and how they fold and nobody at that point. Thought you could actually look at a half folded protein and start actually physically measuring what it looks like. And so I went off to an expedition to Soviet Central Asia to climb peak lennon the highest peak of twenty five thousand feet and there was a terrible storm. A lot of people died. I just got down. I was in the storm near the summit and managed to get down and I was sitting at the bottom of the glacier watching the ice dripping and I realized what you should do is freeze the protein and then put it into a spectrometer where it was warm and as it thawed you could take pictures of the thawing protein and you could get evidence for what it looked like. Nobody'd ever thought to do that before and I came back and I did it and it worked and that actually sort of started the field of protein folding. My Professor. He later told me that the person who got a Nobel prize for protein folding came to see him and said there was one experiment that he wished he had I done. And that was my experiment that I thought of sitting there on the glacier watching the ice drip incredible and with so many Nobel prizes that should have gone to women that just went to two men. That's probably another example. So how did you then transition to where you are now which is full-time science advocate policy advisor scientists powerful and our model of using really good science to change policy and to change how people purchase things does work amazingly while it started in the seventies when indeed a friend of mine died climbing? Who was an early environmentalist? I wanted to do something for the environment in his memory and went to see a guy named Bruce Ames who developed a bacterial test for which chemicals are likely to cause cancer. I said what can I do for the Environment? And he said well. I'm worried about these. Flame retardants and kids pajamas. Their ten percent of the weight of the pajamas. I think they're coming out and getting in the children. I think they may be cancer. Causing might test will show if they're likely to be cancer causing do you. WanNa work on plummer. Titans and that sounded really bizarre to me but I was depressed so I said sure. The cancer causing flame retardant in question is cold trysts. How did you go about making the connection between that and products? We found a little girl whose mom had bought her pajamas in the UK. And so we put her in the tryst pajamas and collected her urine and the first day her urine had trysts flame retardant breakdown products known cancer causing chemicals and every day. She where the pajamas the level went up. She stopped wearing them. The level went down so it was clear that the tryst chemicals we're ending up in the child in America chemicals in products that go into our mouths like foods drugs pesticides regulated but the rest of chemicals pretty much are not regulated like playing retardants. So that was alarming and then we ran a screen to see if this chemical change. Dna was it. A Mutagen was likely to cause cancer and it was one of the strongest mutagens ever measured. A Mutagen is a chemical that changes DNA and that can likely start cancer to start growing so chemical sit cause mutations are likely also cause cancer. You really don't want them inside your children. So we reported our result in a lead article in Science. Very High Impact Journal and the subtitle of article was the main flame. Retardant in children's pajamas seems to be cancer causing it should not be used. And so that's a really strong statement and then we did media those days. Were on all three TV morning shows. Good Morning America the today show and within a few days every parent in America knew. They wanted out of their kids pajamas and three months later. Twist was removed from all the kids pajamas. In America. We thought the problem was solved. This was one thousand nine hundred seventy seven. You jump ahead now to two thousand and seven my daughter. Starting College. I have not been doing science for very long time and I wanted to go back to doing something useful and maybe I can get a job washing test tubes in somebody's lab and then I discovered that trysts same tryst. We've gotten out of kids. Pajamas was back in the nation's furniture and it was like five or ten percent of the weight of the foam in most furniture most baby products and it was just as harmful and nobody knew about it. I have to say it's been thirteen years and every day of that thirteen years. I've sort of felt like I was on an appearance like they're exciting. Things happening there opportunities. Because based on that I wrote an op Ed in the New York Times about the fact that Chris was back in furniture connected with Russell. Long a local activist. Who said let's write a bill and we'll change that because actually it was a California law that was followed across all of the US and Canada. That was responsible for all the furniture and children's products in US and Canada containing these harmful and it turns out not even useful flame retardants so if these chemicals are not useful why why are they being used there primarily to make a profit for the people who produce them and they're in all of us and all of our children. Our pets are wildlife. Somebody did a study of honey. All the honey has a little bit of flame retardant. Well that means all these a little. Bit of flame retardant. That's maybe not why they're having so many problems but we know it's not helping their health. The impair neurological development. They impair reproduction. The I guess. The storm analogy with Anna. Anna would be the chemical industry spending upwards of twenty million dollars to try and defeat you every turn in Sacramento when you're pushing legislation to ban. These flame retardants how you ultimately successful. Well actually weren't banning flame retardants. What you have to do is change. The flammability standard. Because if you ban one flame retardant it's replaced with another one that's very similar so we had to change the standard and Sacramento and that was really hard because the chemical industry of course claim that fire safety would be impaired but the fact is that you could stop the fire before it reaches the foam. That really helps more than just putting a lot of chemicals in the phone which just makes the fire smokier and more toxic. The thing that really changed everything was going hiking with that. Then governor senior adviser this very place being able to educate him about the fact that the flame retardants were harming the health of everybody in our country and that the fire safety standard needed to be changed and so with the help of Jerry Brown. It was changed. So the flame retardants in furniture and children's products problem has been solved and it was based on good science communicating the science. But just like it doesn't sound late you'll policy advocacy today's over because you were successful on flame retardant now and indeed. The flame retardant industry is busy trying to bring them back to furniture. Unfortunately there unrelenting I mean when the law changed. They sued the State of California's saying they couldn't change the law they lost and now they're doing all kinds of underhanded things trying to bring the flame retardants back but what we're working on now is other chemicals. Were the whole concept that we wanNA think about chemicals in families because sadly if you ban chemical you often get a chemical replacing it almost identical and you can keep doing that forever and the chemicals were now working with the worst of the worst. These are the stain and water. Repellent chemicals called pizzas per and polly flora Alco substances a big mouthful abbreviated. Pf as and there forever chemicals. They never breakdown. They've contaminated the drinking water of tens of millions of Americans There's huge liability now for for having used them and what we've learned is remediating them as expensive if impossible you know. Once they're out in the world all you can maybe do is give people clean drinking water but you can't really clean them up there so expensive and so the best thing is to stop their use in products and we have contributed to the outdoor industry which has used them. A lot is moving out of them. You can buy outdoor without them. The fast food industry used them to coat wrappers and pizza boxes and they're moving away from them. The carpet industry has moved away. They major source of exposure for children was carpeting and they've pretty much stopped using them and the clothing industry. Many companies have stopped using all pizzas. And you want to stop using the whole class. We think it's really important to stop using all P when they're not central when they're not necessary and so we've been working with different industries and industries are setting. They understand it because it's about seven thousand plus Y- different types of fastened in those classes which is stunning. I mean you think to your point if you ban one or two this still six thousand nine hundred and ninety eight left and it turns out that the chemical industry new in the sixties about the harm of before that because it wasn't officially a hazardous substance. They didn't have to tell anyone you know things happened. It was really shocking. But they discovered that one Mice were exposed pregnant mice. The babies would be born with an I. Fact and at the Dupont. Plant a chunk of women had babies with the same. I'd effect and Dupont not report that they just took them off the line for Awhile and that was like in the eighties and So they knew for fifty years about the home before the chemicals were phased out and then they replaced P P with which are eight carbons with very similar chemicals. That were six carbons and that's kind of where we are now. But a lot of manufacturers retailers companies are realizing that they don't WanNA use any members of this class unless they're essential are you observing kind of corporate sensitivity to these issues in a way that you didn't see ten years ago well certain companies are very values driven. Akira is our star example. They learned about P in two thousand fourteen and by two thousand fifteen they had it out of all their products worldwide on they had substitutes. That were not fast. They used in raincoats. Umbrellas shower curtains. And they said for tablecloths. We haven't found a substitute that provides resistance. So we'll just stop selling tablecloths and KIA stopped selling tablecloths worldwide. They still don't know that's very valued driven. Unfortunately many companies are more bottom line driven than values driven the organization and the Green Science Policy Institute is really a global hub convening scientists and advocates around this particular issue..

cancer America California Sacramento Twin River Nobel prize Alabama Berkeley Dupont Bruce Ames Soviet Central Asia Grad School UK UC Green Science Policy Institute Ta Clover Leaf policy advisor US opium
"arlene" Discussed on PODSHIP EARTH

PODSHIP EARTH

14:47 min | 8 months ago

"arlene" Discussed on PODSHIP EARTH

"Dr Arlene Blum is a biophysical chemist and author a mountaineer and Executive Director of the Green Science Policy Institute. The Institute Scientific Research and policy work with government and business has contributed to preventing the use of harmful chemicals including flame retardants and fluorinated chemicals like pizzas in children's sleepwear furniture electronics and other products worldwide. Arlene blum received a PhD from UC Berkeley and has told at Stanford University and Wellesley College. But that's only a fraction of Alino story arlene the first American and all woman ascent of an opponent. One considered one of the world's most dangerous and difficult mountains. She Co lead the first women's team to climb. Denali completed the Great Himalayan traverse across the mountain ranges of Bhutan the Pollen India and height the length of the European Alps with her baby daughter on her back. She's the author of Ana Pana a woman's place which was named one of the top one hundred best adventure books of all time by National Geographic. She also wrote the highly acclaimed book breaking trail. A climbing. Life. In two thousand eighteen bloom was inducted into the California Hall of fame. She was chosen by the Guardian as one of the world's one hundred most inspiring women. Dr Bloom is a fellow of the American Association for.

Dr Arlene Blum Dr Bloom Green Science Policy Institute Institute Scientific Research Ana Pana Executive Director California Hall of fame European Alps Great Himalayan Wellesley College Guardian Stanford University Alino Berkeley American Association
Arlene

PODSHIP EARTH

08:05 min | 8 months ago

Arlene

"Dr Arlene Blum is a biophysical chemist and author a mountaineer and Executive Director of the Green Science Policy Institute. The Institute Scientific Research and policy work with government and business has contributed to preventing the use of harmful chemicals including flame retardants and fluorinated chemicals like pizzas in children's sleepwear furniture electronics and other products worldwide. Arlene blum received a PhD from UC Berkeley and has told at Stanford University and Wellesley College. But that's only a fraction of Alino story arlene the first American and all woman ascent of an opponent. One considered one of the world's most dangerous and difficult mountains. She Co lead the first women's team to climb. Denali completed the Great Himalayan traverse across the mountain ranges of Bhutan the Pollen India and height the length of the European Alps with her baby daughter on her back. She's the author of Ana Pana a woman's place which was named one of the top one hundred best adventure books of all time by National Geographic. She also wrote the highly acclaimed book breaking trail. A climbing. Life. In two thousand eighteen bloom was inducted into the California Hall of fame. She was chosen by the Guardian as one of the world's one hundred most inspiring women. Dr Bloom is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. And if that wasn't enough Eileen was elected to the whole of mountaineering. Excellent Hey uh keep me from getting. You remember the day where we're sitting right now. I mean we're sitting in Tilden Park on. Trail called seaview with a wonderful view of the bay. While flowers greenhills Gorgeous California. And why so many people on the trail today? Well it turns out that everyone has been ordered to stay home or go outdoors and everything's closed so there are a lot more people outdoors than usual. Which is a good thing and you walk every single day. Tell us about that routine and and how you got into it. Well I do pretty intense work and I work really hard because I have so many opportunities and I've discovered that if every day I take a walk with friends or colleagues or sometimes even the chemical industry executives with whom I do not see eye to eye. It's extremely good for my physical health. My mental health and my work. You have an incredible history of climbing of mountaineering. Have you always had a passion for climbing and mountaineering? How did that start? I was raised by incredibly cautious and conservative Orthodox Jewish grandparents in Chicago and was not allowed to do anything and I push push push to just be able to take swimming lessons and so I guess I started early with coming up with things I really wanted to do and then pushing to be able to do them. When I was a Grad student at Berkeley I heard about an expedition to Denali Mount McKinley. The Highest Mountain in North America. And I'd been climbing a lot with my friends from Reed College and had climbed higher than Denali in Peru and apply gone the trap and was told that women could go as far as base camp to help with the cooking. And when I called to say well I've climbed higher than Denali. They said. Yeah you were the only woman. You probably didn't do your share you know. Women really can't time high mountains. I wonder if a team of all women could climb high mountains and I found five other women and we went and kind to Nali ourselves. All women were the first all women's team and indeed not only. Did we climb it? But our leader had altitude sickness and became unconscious just below the summit and at that point. I was twenty five. I was the deputy leader because I'd organized and suddenly I was in charge of our Denali expedition with an unconscious person at twenty thousand feet and a big Arctic storm. Coming in and We actually made a stretcher dragged her down the mountain and it was really empowering to me. I mean I'd had a lot of negative messages in my childhood about what I couldn't couldn't do and I thought wow we got grace down from Denali Alive. We can do anything. We dream up so that was really inspiring for me to realize sick. We can all do things and we believe possible when we have to then. You just kept going though. That wasn't the end of your mountaineering. No I love being in the mountains. I love being outdoors. I love being here. I seem to like challenge. I was on a nineteen. Seventy six expedition climbed Everest. We were the second American expedition in those days. Hard to believe we have the whole mountain to ourselves and I climbed to nearly twenty five thousand feet and on the way back. I thought at that point all the world's highest mountains over eight thousand meters. That's kind of a magic height They all had been cleaned by men but no woman had ever climbed eight thousand meters and people were saying maybe women couldn't and I thought well we climbed. Denali got twenty four Everest. Let's give him a chance. So on my way back from I I applied for a permit for Anna Purna one and it was the first eight thousand meter peak ever climbed. It has the highest fatality rate. And it's now considered the hardest climb and we did not know that and so In nineteen seventy eight. I did organize an an all women's expedition and we were successful. We were the first women and indeed the first Americans to climb out of that reinforced my belief that we can all do seemingly impossible things and I'd say now is a good time for all of us to be doing seemingly impossible things because it's it's tough right now. Your experience shows me and the tough things that I've done in my life is that you can move past them that they're not insurmountable and even if they are to continue moving forward with with those challenges. I've never been above eight thousand meters. What what is it like? I mean the physicality of losing that oxygen. Do you get addicted to that. It feels like a very rarefied club of people that understand and know something that the rest of us don't well first of all it's the most beautiful place ever being above timberline with clouds on your feet the extreme beauty and peace and so it is so beautiful. But you know being here until the park is so beautiful to you. Don't have to be on top of Anna Perna and there's a huge amount of focus. You have a goal and you get a great team and everybody shares ICAL. But I'm always kind of looking for family and a climbing expedition is like a family but perhaps better family dynamics and some families have so you have a family of people all focused on a goal. And you're in a beautiful place using every bit of your physical energy but your mental energy problem solving. So it's it's super focused. Every since I became a mom didn't want to risk my life because if you know this but the chances of dying about one in ten climbing those mountains so it seriously dangerous so for me as a mom. I don't want to risk my life on the other hand what I'm doing now which is reducing harmful chemicals that are in our bodies and our products and our planet so it's got a very similar similar feeling of of getting a great team family of people who share a common goal and then persevering through avalanches and storms and Yetis. And what have you

Dr Arlene Blum Highest Mountain Denali Mount Mckinley Denali Ana Pana Great Himalayan European Alps Alino Green Science Policy Institute Institute Scientific Research Executive Director Guardian Anna Perna Stanford University Reed College Dr Bloom Wellesley College Tilden Park Berkeley
New York City Comptroller Scott Stringer Mourns Death of His Mother Due to COVID-19

Steve Scott

00:21 sec | 8 months ago

New York City Comptroller Scott Stringer Mourns Death of His Mother Due to COVID-19

"Arlene stringer Cuevas the mother of comptroller Scott stringer passed away this morning from complications due to corona virus stringer quit us was a former city councilwoman in the nineteen seventies Scott stringer called his loss incalculable and said his mother was a genuine trailblazer Arlene stringer Cuevas was eighty six years

Arlene Stringer Cuevas Comptroller Scott Stringer
Coronavirus Aid Package Is In Turmoil In The Senate

NPR's Business Story of the Day

03:58 min | 8 months ago

Coronavirus Aid Package Is In Turmoil In The Senate

"What is the best way for? The United States to spend almost two trillion dollars are negotiating over. Exactly that question as they try to help the economy endure the hit. It's taking because of the krona virus. Pandemic Senate Republicans say they know what they want but then yesterday Senate Democrats blocked vote to proceed on a bill NPR. Susan Davis has been following. All of this morning sue. Taniwha would happen last night. Exactly well. It's important understand. It wasn't on an actual piece of legislation itself. That's still under negotiation. What Senate Majority Leader Mitch? Mcconnell was trying to do was fight the process in the Senate and those negotiations so they could get to a bill in the coming days. Democrats blocked it because they didn't like where the status of the underlying negotiations are as long as you have that leverage you can keep negotiating but that delaying tactic was really infuriating for Republicans. And this is Senate Majority Leader Mitch. Mcconnell on the Senate floor. After that failed. The American people are watching this festival. I'm told futures market is down five percent. I'm also told that. That's when trading stops so the notion that we have time to play games here with the American economy and the American people is utterly absurd. Mcconnell concern obviously when the markets open later this morning that they will look like a Washington isn't responding system fears there although Cinnamon Arlene Minority leader. Chuck Schumer said. He still believes they can have a deal. It's important to know. Negotiations continued early into the morning hours Secretary Treasury Steven Mnuchin up on the hill. Talking to Schumer and other Democrats so things are still moving. Yeah it seems like Democrats and Republicans would be equally worried about the economy given what we've seen in the markets over the last week so when it comes to this bill. Where does the difference of opinion lie? What are they disagree about? Important to know that they do agree. On the main structural parts of the bill in two of the main things are small. Business loans gloom guarantees and direct cash payments to Americans one of the big hold ups that first of all Democrats just want more. They want more money for unemployment benefits for workers. They want more money for hospitals and they want more a language in the bill. That would clarify how it's going to help corporations they they don't want to quote unquote bailout. The current draft would give the treasury secretary a ton of discretion on how to spend that money so they're essentially saying they need to know that the money that's going to go to corporations is going to go to the workers themselves And this is a sticking point. That's probably the main sticking point before they can get a deal and this is becoming more urgent sue because there are now some. Us senators who are self quarantining right. Yeah I mean the current viruses already come to Capitol Hill. There was already to house lawmakers who have said they tested positive for the virus. Senator Rand Paul. He's a Republican from Kentucky announced that he did two yesterday. There were already two. Republican senators in quarantine to additional senators have had to go into self quarantine because of contact with Senator Rand Paul. There's also you know that's a very clear public health concern on Capitol Hill where senators are still gathering. There's also just a legislative math reality that Mitch. Mcconnell now needs even more democratic votes to move forward with a piece of legislation because he's down five of his own people who are self quarantining quickly. They can't vote from afar. They can't there's no rules or infrastructure in the House and Senate to allow lawmakers to vote remotely and You would have to change the rules of both chambers arguably it might be unconstitutional. So it's not as simple as many people believe it would be vote remotely so interesting Assu. I guess the big question now is what happens next well. Negotiations are ongoing minority leader. Chuck Schumer spoke last night. He said that he was Had plans to meet with MNUCHIN. He said he was optimistic. They could announce a deal as early as this morning. However House Speaker. Nancy Pelosi says if they don't make any progress she's looking to put forward a bill of her own and if that happens that does mean that negotiations are going to drag on NPR congressional correspondent. Susan Davis Sue. Thanks so much for your reporting on this one you're welcome.

Chuck Schumer Senate Mcconnell Senator Rand Paul Mitch Secretary Treasury Steven Mnuc Susan Davis United States Susan Davis Sue NPR Nancy Pelosi Washington Kentucky
The evolving photography industry, with Arlene Evans

Photofocus Podcast

08:11 min | 10 months ago

The evolving photography industry, with Arlene Evans

"Our topic as it will be how conferences and major photography magazines are changing in the industry. Now before we do that. I know you're an amateur photographer. So how did you get involved like this. Whole photography conferences in mm-hmm magazines? Well I was living in Los Angeles at the time which is where. WPI was headquartered in the mid. Two thousand cents and I was friends with the gentleman you know named Skip Cohen. He was he was president. WPI at the time and the director of WPI's left and he asked me if I would be interested in taking the position because he wanted someone on who wasn't really involved in the professional photography industry sort of a neutral party to come in with fresh eyes and little little. Did I know that fifteen years later I would still be in this industry but I said yes. So was you know. SKIP SKIP incredible judge of character. So that's a lot for you. Thank you know. And he always has a way of thinking outside the box and try to bring somebody in in a position. Bishen that you have that doesn't that's not a full-time professional photographer. I think speech volume. There's no ego involved old. You're looking at it with a fresh set of eyes. And I. I just think it's a great. I'm out of time. So congratulations for that. Well thank you very much I. Yeah that's great so let's talk about the events that are happening now. I'm you guys just announced a major bomb show. What was that? Yes we announced announced that the PDF brand was going to be retired. And with that was We were discontinuing the publication not not only magazine but range finder. As well you'll still have range finder the digital format. That's correct where we're we're going to be creating all the content now on range finder online dot COM We are actually in the process of redesigning the website to better. How's the information that we want to put on there now? We want to expand coverage we WANNA cover industry trends gear and not only what's happening in the wedding portrait world but other areas of photography as well so that we can better her serve our customers the photographers who have been very faithful to the range Finder magazine since the nineteen fifties. So that's a really exciting. You know it's funny because some people look at that as a negative. Oh my Lord. I can't believe this. PDF when they're no longer having print publication will think of all the major Magazines not just the photography world but outside of the photography world that are switching to digital. Just it makes sense. It's cheaper you can make changes to it immediately And we get things out to the public faster so I'm looking at this kind of a positive step. How do you as a content creator yourself? How does this? How does this affect you were were were you? How are you looking from your perspective? Well it it's going to be a big job because as you know putting putting out. A monthly magazine is very different than creating content on a daily basis. Where you're going to keep photographers will want to come? I'm there and learn the latest of what's going on in the photography industry and We really try to on top of that with both magazines. But now we were. It's GonNa be a fresh look. It's going to be fresh perspective we've discovered through surveys and you will know this as well younger photographers take in their information from social media or online whether it's youtube or the looking at facebook to see what other photographers they're doing the reading their news on CNN dot com. So we're just trying to be not cognizant of what our readers want and they want to get their information online hole that makes sense to pdf N.. What shift to different magazines yet? PD had range finder. That's what was the difference between the two well. PGN was focused more on commercial. Fine Art Photographers. It was a very different. There was Assam overlap but it was more Commercial photography whereas range finder started as a wedding republication then expanded into wedding portrait and as you know. Portrait now has really taken off a so many different genres whether it's boudoir pants. It's just not the typical family portrait anymore that you think they're just so many different areas in portraiture sure so range. Finder has also got along with those trends as well so it really was a different focus than PD N. Gotcha that makes sense. And then that's where you have the different groups which you have. WPI as a conference and then photo plus so you had WPI on the the west coast of the United States and then you have photo plus the east coast of the United States so did try do info plus on the west coast once a long time ago and they did at work so they is definitely the best place to have federal plus Gotcha Crepe I so without Canadian with that part of the publication gone. Where do you see the what you see that being integrated with range finder or other things? You're doing well. The content is not going to go away way What we're going to do is look at all the content we've had over the years from pgn and we're going to take what was meaningful meaningful from that and disperse it to the other side so whether it will live on photo plus dot com range finder online or WPI VPI that content will still be there as because it's still relevant and we WANNA make sure that people still have access to it? It's interesting you go back to twenty cornell for example you go back to some of his books he saying the same thing he said all all those years ago but he's saying the different and a fresher with a fresh voice and people are like. Wow I didn't know that in here thinking really. He's been talking about this. A how many years but but Tony has that way of taking the knowledge and disseminating it to a new generation as a a little bit. He's he's great at it and I think that there's something to be said for the teachers that have been around around for years and they have such an expanded knowledge base. And all they're doing is cultivating a new audience. The younger photographers is who may not necessarily have access to season photographers. Who have worked in the industry for years at know how to to apply these concepts and ideas that they're teaching? You can't get that necessarily from a youtube instructor. Who is going to talk about? Things is that they've only had experience with for two or three years.

WPI Range Finder Magazine Youtube Skip Cohen Los Angeles Content Creator United States President Trump Monthly Magazine Tony Assam Facebook Director CNN Instructor
'Reckless and selfish': Huge climate protest looms amid extreme fire conditions in Australia

BBC World Service

03:31 min | 11 months ago

'Reckless and selfish': Huge climate protest looms amid extreme fire conditions in Australia

"Protest as a set to take to the streets of Melbourne in the state of Victoria to Dimond urgent action on climate change amid this extreme bush for a season the protest organizes the university students for climate change say they will go ahead despite being urged to rethink the plan by police and some politicians say it will drain resources on a day when fire activity is expected to flat across the state let said totally protested now Annika d'amato LA welcome to Newsday the thirties urging you to re think clearly they have a hands very full at the moment well I won't say our system for university students to climate jump not the credit check I'm sorry my mistake no problem well I think that this is a false argument that artist is our trade on racial says you should try each they are very strange in society are in Australia and the fuel companies they get twenty nine billion dollars of subsidies Hey yeah it's a political I'm about a practical argument is today of all days when bush fires are raging and we are going to have extreme temperatures and the authorities and knocking on people's tools to try and evacuate them get you get them out this is the wrong time first place to be sent to your demonstrations to to police them to put out a statement saying that they will not be diverting resources away from the bush by side they put out that statement I morning sorry it's pretty clear that actually is a I thank my they should well let me give you this car than acting assistant commissioner Tim Hanson H. fan minded Victorians to reconsider attending these climate demonstrations he says that listen to this what you saw we see frontline police returning from the fire ground returning from fires and they'll fatigue they need a break this is now another open it operation that we need to resource and what I've said is that the police are welcome not to attend the demonstration all the police usually don't write yet they demonstration by could guide the five nine started actually many things that the great the other day intimidated away having demonstrations Arlene Victoria they made when they are warnings intimidation or is it just a practical concern that they're giving up if they say they the they say they've been working with other groups to move the plan protests from January they've been having some headway they can't understand why you're not meeting them half way that saying don't protest you know don't know protest just protest at a different time well I think that's trying to make people feel consent to add about expecting a democratic fry the purchase I'm pretty sure that a demonstration that is calling for more resources it to push five right it's a pretty important demonstration we want a levy on the crime and criminals to pay for the next I have created when writing money for a five or grade eight eighty thousand dollars for a truck before I can even get government funding quickly for more resources and ran up the race of trying to I know lots of people will be sympathetic because they've seen the drain and the strain is put on the firefight as many of the volunteer firefighters very briefly that you're not losing sympathy through this demonstration I don't think so I think people if you want climate action that pretty aware that ed tactic to try and make people feel concerned about protecting that never you're right time to cry test in the eyes we will have to leave any cut DeMolay thank you for joining us here

Melbourne Victoria Dimond
Britain and Ireland launch bid to restore Northern Ireland government

BBC World Service

01:34 min | 11 months ago

Britain and Ireland launch bid to restore Northern Ireland government

"To it the British and Irish governments have published a proposed deal designed to restore the devolved government in Northern Ireland they say the proposals are fair and balanced and that and the British minister with responsibility for Northern Ireland Julian Smith says the assembly should reconvene on Friday at Stormont castle with the parliament is based this report from Chris page in Belfast three years to the day since the storm with executive collapsed the two governments have made a bold move to restore power sharing in the next twenty four hours the document contains plans to reform public services and then the bill still disputes involving any chest workers and teachers among particularly sensitive issue the government's supposed to should be commissioners to protect the hours language arms cultural elements associated with British identity Judy Smith said he hoped the evolution could be restored very quickly now is the second time I have tonight's written to the speaker of the assembly and often to record it tomorrow to enable the restoration of the executive before the weekend what happens next will depend on whether the student parties in particular the democratic unionists and should fit in except the draft agreements do you P. leader Arlene foster has said on balance she believes power sharing can be reestablished the storm and would be more money the British government has said financial help would be available on the figures would be finalized rapidly the Sinn fin president very loving thoughtful to serve her party's considering the paper and its ruling Foley will meet later today

Northern Ireland Julian Smith Stormont Castle Belfast Executive Judy Smith British Government President Trump Foley Ireland Chris Arlene Foster
"arlene" Discussed on Mental Illness Happy Hour

Mental Illness Happy Hour

03:07 min | 11 months ago

"arlene" Discussed on Mental Illness Happy Hour

"They need to give themselves are what they need to do and even though they haven't done it yet it's it's in their mind and finally. This is a happy moment filled out by women or calls herself. I can only feel weird or neutral and she writes two weeks ago. I woke up and on my way to the bathroom. I was as usual welcomed by the voice in my head telling me you are a piece of shit and you should just kill yourself. Maybe you should have that as an alarm to go off and just have an actor with the really deep voice say that or even worse a middle school girl I had been so used to having these. He's thoughts first thing in the morning then. I hardly even paid attention to them anymore. But this time a new much louder voice replied. Hey don't you talk to yourself like that. This brain behavior was so new to me that I stopped in the middle of the hall stumped later in the shower I had a strong sense that I've changed and I'm I'm not going back. I don't know what did it so radically overnight. I look read this right after I was like no changes. HAP happened overnight and why I am only now. Seeing the results of three years of learning to decipher and allow feelings. But I look at myself in the mirror and it's still me but it's also somebody different. Somebody better stronger a week ago. I got some bad news about my business and instead of getting depressed for a week I cried for fifteen minutes. It's then decided to go finish the things that I could control turns out instead of wallowing in despair. I can make myself feel better by making other things happen. This would would never have occurred to me To the old me I used to fantasize about cutting myself because it seemed like reclaiming control of my feelings by making myself feel pain on demand and that will give me relief. There wasn't a toll I learned to accept my feelings as a fact with no judgment or shame that I finally got that relief. I'm happy and I don't even have to add. I'm puking in my mouth as I say this it love it. Love it well boy. We haven't done an episode this long while hundred and thirty five minutes. I hope you guys enjoyed This this episode the interviews surveys and I hope your New Year's Resolu- resolution isn't don't ridiculously unreachable mine is that I'm GonNa fly to the moon and actually moonwalk on it. Think I can do it in a way. If you're out there in your struggling don't forget you are not alone and thanks for listening everybody. I know bizarrely beautiful. Everybody on so weird ways arlene beautifully fucked up in some weird ways beautiful yeah..

arlene
6 killed in New Jersey gun battle

First Light

01:56 min | 1 year ago

6 killed in New Jersey gun battle

"City New Jersey was rocked by a gun battle that lasted for a very long time yesterday and when it was over a veteran police detective and three innocent civilians were dead two gunmen also killed several other police officers wounded so let's bring in Steve cast and bound to find out what the heck is going on in Jersey city Michael the gunfire echoed through the streets of the Greenville neighborhood of Jersey city at times it sounded like a war zone heavily armed police converged on a kosher grocery store where two gunmen were held up earlier they were involved in a shooting of a police officer at a nearby cemetery a Jersey city detective was approaching a van that he thought was connected to a gang related murder in Bayonne officials said he was shot in the head and was pronounced dead at a nearby hospital later in the day police say the gunman stole U. haul truck which they then ditched and ran into the store that's when the gun battle erupted our offices are under fire for hours Jersey city police chief Michael Kelly said the gunmen were firing high powered rifles indiscriminately at anything and everything that included a school across the street the response from police for several jurisdictions followed several hours later five people inside the store were dead we believe two of them are bad guys with only three of or not that may be civilians that were inside the store they were reportedly to customers and the cashier chief Kelly said preliminarily they believe the three innocent people were killed by the gunmen but the investigation will make a final determination the detective who was killed was forty year old Joseph seals the father of five chief Kelly city work daily with the unit dedicated to removing illegal guns from the streets I was Arlene police officer removing guns from the street dozens and dozens of hand guns is responsible for over from the street

New Jersey Officer Murder Steve Cast Greenville Jersey Bayonne Michael Kelly Forty Year
Explainer 189: Why are Ethiopia and Egypt fighting about water?

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

05:23 min | 1 year ago

Explainer 189: Why are Ethiopia and Egypt fighting about water?

"The weeds Nobil Committee has decided to award the Nobel Peace Prize for twenty nine hundred to Ethiopia Prime Minister I'll be off mid Arlene Nabil Prize for peace is a considerable Accolade It bestows not mealy immense Gravitas but a fortune in political capital upon its recipient this is especially useful the recipient is as two thousand nineteen recipient Ethiopian Prime Minister Ahmed is an ambitious reform seeking to forge progress in different Colt and unstable environment will discussing how to change the political landscape and how mixed upcoming election democratic free and the battle of the previous well there is however a downside to life as a freshly ennobled Nobel Peace laureate which is that it somewhat circumscribes your options visa the wielding of military force releasing doves whilst rattling your Saber is an unwieldy maneuver to accomplish simultaneously such is the conundrum currently contemplated by rb Ahmed in between polishing his acceptance speech prior to flying to Oslo collect fees Nobel Gong in December Ahmed has been hissing increasingly thinly-veiled menaces towards Egypt at issue is a dam which Ethiopia is building across the Nile and which Egypt would prefer if you didn't being on the project known as the Grand Ethiopian Danz damn has been a dream of Ethiopia's since long before amid became prime minister in April last year it would be Africa's largest hydro Electric plants work began on the site in two thousand and eleven is currently scheduled for completion in two thousand and twenty one and would be potentially transfer formative for Ethiopia development it is costing the thick end or five billion US dollars and is being built by the Italian firm Cellini Impregillo the gypped however is less enthused Egypt is down river of Ethiopia and depends on the Nile for roughly ninety percent of its fresh water and even on current form is anticipating serious water shortages by two thousand and twenty five. Cairo fears that the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam Could Sir if it's a boot heel on the hose which irrigates it Egypt's two previous regimes under Mohammed Mossy and Hosni Mubarak both muttered military sounding threats the dumbs direction Egypt's current tyrant Abdel Fattah El Sisi has sounded content to tread a diplomatic path so far appear has not seemed especially interested in Egypt's concerns no force mid has sullenly warned can stop Ethiopia from building a Dam them if there is a need to go to war we could get millions readied this was pretty bracing chat from someone recently garlanded by the Nabil Committee his efforts to achieve peace and International Corporation panic is not the proper response just yet however it is really not the case that war between Ethiopia and Egypt is likely nor is it clear how war between Ethiopia and Egypt would even work geography enthuse I will be aware that these antagonists are separated by the not inconsequential buffer of Sudan and geopolitics buffs will know that Sudan is hopefully in the process of transition from government quite like Egypt's to one more like Ethiopia's Cairo may be struggling for an ally on this one even Sudan recently overthrown dictatorship was broadly supportive of the Damn egypt-us spent several years negotiating with Ethiopia and Sudan attempting to rowing at a resolution of the grand chief European Relations Damn conundrum with which everyone can live but no such compromise has been reached and as is the usual way of such impasses everyone insists that this is everyone else's fault Egypt has suggested inviting a fourth party intermediary and the United States has invited the foreign ministers of the three countries concerned to a summit in Washington DC as we go to air only Cairo has ours. repeat in the affirmative even if no blows are exchanged over the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam Events will merit close observation it would be a great boon worthy of another Nobel prize indeed if a framework for negotiating water disputes between countries could be assembled on a he Ching Drawing Planet. This will not be the last such conflict monocle twenty four. antisemitic.

Ethiopia Egypt Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Da Prime Minister Ahmed Sudan Prime Minister Arlene Nabil Prize Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Nile Cairo Nobel Gong Nobel Prize Rb Ahmed Weeds Nobil Committee Africa Nabil Committee Abdel Fattah El Sisi Cellini Impregillo United States Hosni Mubarak
Johnson's N. Ireland allies vow to keep rejecting Brexit deal

Bloomberg Politics, Policy and Power

00:23 sec | 1 year ago

Johnson's N. Ireland allies vow to keep rejecting Brexit deal

"Boris Johnsons allies in Northern Ireland have vowed to keep rejecting the British prime minister's divorce deal with the European Union until his government wins more concessions from the block Arlene foster the leader of northern Ireland's Democratic Unionist Party told her party conference in Belfast at that regulatory and customs borders between Northern Ireland and the rest of the United Kingdom we're just not acceptable

Northern Ireland Prime Minister European Union Arlene Foster Belfast United Kingdom Boris Johnsons Democratic Unionist Party
Brexit deal on a knife edge but talks continue ahead of EU summit

Weekdays featuring Bloomberg Radio

01:56 min | 1 year ago

Brexit deal on a knife edge but talks continue ahead of EU summit

"Roger in starting with brags that talks on a knife edge in Brussels today's European leaders converge for the summit that's supposed to decide on Boris Johnsons proposals Johnson's do you P. allies remain unconvinced tweet saying earlier this morning there's a lack of clarity on the A. T. and that they could not support the current suggestions on customs as being back Westminster Sebastian sol reports that could still stymied the whole plan the latest make or break day begins with you Kay and do you negotiate is pretty much on the same page but European the does a keenly aware that what plays in Brussels is still worthless if it doesn't play in Westminster the U. P. have only ten MPs but Boris Johnson needs that support to have a realistic chance of getting parliamentary backing for any deal he brings back right now the DP leader Arlene foster appears on willing to bend on the party's aversion to anything the different chase Northern Ireland from the rest of the U. K. even with a concession that the regional assembly comparatively review the new customs arrangement this deal could still fail in London house a busted sonic boom back daybreak here at twelve noon flipping back Westminster will be speaking to a live demo and P. Tom breaking the parliamentary mouth is really interesting cumbia just said math I meant to say maths Raja of course the Bloomberg story says math but it's really interesting because I'm playing back has she done the calculations and said that to get the majority of Boris Johnson need sixty one seats and he does actually have a pool of eighty five to sort of draw from of course that does include the two U. P. it also includes labor and it also includes the ecology in sort of a holiday breaks it waiting so he has a big pool but of course without the do you P. it's still very difficult is about a lot of the people in the pool to have much in the way of water wings of swimming capacity quite honestly because it's really looking very dicey caught rely on the rebel Tories you count really rely on labor labor talking about possibly moving the whip from people who support the deal a it's very complicated I think the mass yeah I was saying is yes he

Roger Brussels KAY Boris Johnson Northern Ireland P. Tom Boris Johnsons Sebastian Sol Arlene Foster London Bloomberg
"arlene" Discussed on SuperTalk WTN 99.7

SuperTalk WTN 99.7

02:07 min | 1 year ago

"arlene" Discussed on SuperTalk WTN 99.7

"Today call six one five five six five forty two hundred that's six one five five six five forty two hundred so you know before I get into this thing let me let me hit something right here and and and Arlene in here with me today and that didn't just coaching show live in the studio okay so question about every you are you deal with a lot of our you've you've dealt with and and have some knowledge about college you know some people are dealing with college education funding and and see our ships in those types of things I want to ask on behalf of a client what are some of the the ideas some of things that you tell people to think about regarding any got a kid going to school yeah yeah all that junk but you know one of the one of the earth the things you really want to do is think about it earlier than you think you have to think about it and I don't mean just saving for college that's you know that's a whole different conversation in the days are warm kind of deal right but really if you have someone that's entering their junior year that's when you really want to start looking at some of this whole financial aid calculation unless you already have you know other students that are in college excuse me but you want to be aware of the integration between your ten forty your tax return in something called the facts of the free application for federal student aid and sometimes things that makes sense for tax reasons can hurt you for financial aid sometimes things that don't make sense for tax reasons can help you for financial.

Arlene
"arlene" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:59 min | 1 year ago

"arlene" Discussed on KCRW

"Marlene Martinez SunGuard Arlene is not what you might think of as a typical NASA engineer. I remember my first field was beans, and then I worked in sugar beets, and then we potatoes. She's the daughter of migrant workers from Mexico starting at age thirteen for the next three summers. Get up at four o'clock in the morning, we had to be in the field by five o'clock, and we would just start working we'd be working for the next nine or ten hours from the potato fields to JPL here. Ston zeal has Marlene story. Now, you're gonna see where other really good toys are the real insight. Lander is a robot on Mars down here, Marlene works with an exact replica. It's about five feet tall the same size as she is the Lander stands on three stilts. It speak dome is covered in gold foil. It has up panels and along with claw on the end nearby. Our size, meter and the so-called mold built to hammer deep into the Martian surface. This is where all the good stuff happens, and we actually get to use our hands and, and do things that we're going to do on Mars and actually see how they're going to come out as close, as we can replicate. The, the systems Marlene is a thirty five year old engineer her doc hair falls over the white lap code, which almost reaches her ankles, she's very jeans, and white sneakers underneath. To simulate the red mar surface Marlene moves gray gravel in the sandbox. She is not surrounded by the vast of space. But by measuring instruments caution tape cameras, and lights, I would love to go to Mars. I know it sounds crazy, but ever since I was a kid, I've just always wanted to go to space. I've always wanted to look back onto the earth wanted to just go. And explore Marlene stream of space exploration started.

Marlene Martinez Lander engineer Arlene JPL NASA Mexico thirty five year five feet ten hours
Two horses dramatically rescued from icy Pennsylvania lake

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:37 sec | 1 year ago

Two horses dramatically rescued from icy Pennsylvania lake

"Three very close. Call about two hours outside of Philadelphia where crews helped to rescue a pair of horses who fell into the waters of an icy lake rush to save to fifteen year old clydesdales today fell through the ice. In the middle of the lake firefighters helped rescue the pair that escaped from. A farm in stroudsburg, Pennsylvania. Neighbor, Arlene reading witnessed it never in fifty four years has this ever happened. We've never had an animal or human lost in the lake. So this is the first rescue crews said they had to create a trench to guide the horses to dry land. And then vets warm the horses up covered in ice. But with no major

Stroudsburg Arlene Philadelphia Pennsylvania Fifty Four Years Fifteen Year Two Hours
"arlene" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

03:57 min | 2 years ago

"arlene" Discussed on Here & Now

"This is Arlene page on Twitter, and Dr saccharin you've also been sharing grim insights into treating gunshot victims. But you are also one of them. That's correct. I was a victim of gun violence when I was seventeen I was nearly killed after being shot in the throat with a thirty eight caliber bullet this is during a high school football game nineteen ninety four and my hearing a little of that. Now, I mean shot in the throat. Yeah. So you know, I actually have a paralyzed love focal horde. And so I do have a little bit of a raspy voice. And you know, when something like that happens. It's such a young age, it really changes your life and this. This second chance that I got really inspired me inspired me to go into medicine inspired me to become a trauma surgeon, and then really figure out. How do we work at that intersection of medicine public health and public policy, in fact, he trained with the same surgeons who saved you to be the trauma surgeon that they are. And so now you see gunshot wounds every day, would you think when you for saw these tweets from the NRA stay in your lane? Well, you know, when I first saw that type of communication, I really was incensed. And it honestly was a clear demonstration to me the rest of the medical community, and frankly, Americans all across this country that they are not serious about moving this forward on this public health issue that we're facing. Well, look this is been going on for a long time. We remember congress hasn't substantially funded gun violence research since nineteen ninety six and that was after the CDC got curious about the NRA claim that guns made homes. Safer. So they did research and found out to officials horror at the time that in fact guns made homes, far less safe. The NRA was so angry about that study. They went to congress and lobbied to get funding for that kind of research cut off, and they essentially did with the Dickey amendment, which is why we haven't seen this kind of research you and all these other doctors now in this study that came out that prompted the NRA tweet this time around, you know, are saying you need that research. Do you think you're going to get it? The research pieces such an important point because gun violence has less than one percent of the research funding that other diseases, for example accepts this have even though gun violence and sepsis kill about the same number of Americans every year. So having federal dollars to be able to figure out what are the solutions to dealing with this problem? Similar to what we've done with motor vehicle fatalities in the sixties and seventies and tobacco is going to be so critical to move this conversation forward and really be able to implement appropriate solutions. This is about all of us United together. And so right now a lot of us are in conversation with other organizations to team up with them to be able to again work together. Similar to what we have communicated with the NRA. We feel like everyone deserves to be a part of the solution. So we're not going to style ourselves off. We are. Going to break down the silos and work with existing gun bonds prevention organizations, gun owners in order to really help move this conversation forward and implement action that's going to save lives and make community safer. But do you think that things have shifted, and, you know, the response from the doctors would seem to indicate that maybe they have we've surprise lots of F bombs in tweets and people saying that must be my lane come into my lane. I've cared for victims of gun violence for the past twenty five years. This is from one doctor another neurosurgeon shared a picture of a bloody bullet she'd removed from the brain of a six month old that had been shot at trauma surgeon, New Jersey posted the picture of the blue plastic chair..

NRA Twitter Arlene sepsis New Jersey CDC congress twenty five years one percent six month
"arlene" Discussed on WLAC

WLAC

01:53 min | 2 years ago

"arlene" Discussed on WLAC

"We hit. Our busy phones. Arlene is in Tampa, Florida. Arlene, you're on the Sean Hannity show. Welcome to the swamp known as our nation's capital. How are you? I'm doing great. Thank you. What's going on? I'm just curious about everybody, including our side calling Dr Ford credible. She might be a very sympathetic pitiful. You know victim here or whatever you wanna call her, but she's sympathetic, but she's not credible. And that goes to by by the expert opinion of a prosecutor a specialist in this field. Prosecutor Mitchell says that this wouldn't even meet the minimum requirements to get a warrant. Let alone presented in court. Listen, I don't really have anything. I think this is such a serious topic. I literally have nothing at all bad to say about professor Ford. I don't like the Dianne Feinstein hooked her up with a radical left wing attorney who's known for going after Paula Jones. Well, it was only ten or twelve minutes. That's Bill Clinton, then attorney general of Arkansas, exposing his penis and saying kiss it that ten or twelve minutes. She says doesn't meet the definition of sexual harassment in the workplace. So. So you got a political operative all arranged by the Democrats, they perfectly the purposely hid this from the Republicans, and as he's now been heard, but it doesn't the stories not corroborated by the very people. She said would corroborate the story including ace alleged eyewitness to the alleged incident, that's problematic for her at that point. It becomes he said he said.

Arlene prosecutor Sean Hannity Dr Ford Paula Jones professor Ford Tampa Dianne Feinstein Bill Clinton Florida attorney harassment Mitchell Arkansas twelve minutes
"arlene" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"arlene" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"We hit our busy phones. Arlene is in Tampa, Florida, Arlene, you're on the Sean Hannity show. Welcome to the swamp known as our nation's capital. How are you? I'm doing great. Thank you. What's going on? I'm just curious about everybody, including our side calling Dr Ford credible. She might be a very sympathetic pitiful. Victim here or whatever you wanna call her, but she sympathetic, but she's not credible. And that to by by the expert opinion of a prosecutor a specialist in this field. Prosecutor Mitchell said that this wouldn't. Even meet the minimum requirements to get a warrant level alone. Presented in court. Listen, I don't really have anything. I think this is such a serious topic. I literally have nothing at all bad to say about professor Ford. I don't like that Dianne Feinstein hooked her up with a radical left wing attorney who's known for going after Paula Jones. Well, it was only ten or twelve minutes. That's Bill Clinton. Then attorney general of Arkansas exposing his penis and saying kiss it that ten or twelve minutes. She says doesn't meet the definition of sexual harassment in the workplace. So you got a political operative all arranged by the Democrats, they perfectly the purposely hid this from the Republicans, and as he's now been heard, but it doesn't the stories not corroborated by the very people. She said would corroborate the story, including ace eight alleged eyewitness to the alleged incident, that's.

Arlene Paula Jones Sean Hannity prosecutor attorney Dr Ford Dianne Feinstein professor Ford Bill Clinton Tampa Florida harassment Mitchell Arkansas twelve minutes
"arlene" Discussed on Women in Business

Women in Business

11:54 min | 2 years ago

"arlene" Discussed on Women in Business

Facebook Gail Carson Arlene editor Arlene I YouTube Gayle Arlene his writer Twitter six months thirty days one year thirty seconds four minutes ninety days seven weeks three days
"arlene" Discussed on Women in Business

Women in Business

08:26 min | 2 years ago

"arlene" Discussed on Women in Business

"Hello and welcome to women in business where we interview entrepreneurs and senior managers and show you the straits successes, obstacles and roadblocks, women experience in business since I believe every person in business needs to be visible, I'd like to invite you to watch WWW dot SOB. Six. That's the number six tips dot com. Which will give you some valuable information. Should you get the call to be on radio or TV, which I think is extremely important if you'd like to contact me personally, drop me a line at Gail Carson. That's g. a. y. l. e. Gail Carson thirteen at gmail.com or go to my website WWW dot spunky old brawd dot com and sign up for my weekly newsletter. My guest today is Arleen Gayle and she is known as the book writing business coach, and she is just now launching her eighth book book, business blueprint, build credibility, stand out from the competition and skyrocket sales. By writing your book. Arlene uses her thirty years of combining business marketing and writing expertise and speaking about these topics to help entrepreneurs communicate positive, productive professional messages that are clear and consistent. When adding the power of a book, she teaches how today's technology allows different book formats and platforms for business building credibility and marketing to grow the bottom line. Welcome Arlene to women in business. Well, thank you, Gail, it's so great to be here. I appreciate the opportunity now you you teach people how to write books, which I personally believe every single person has a book inside of them. So what kind of books do you help people right. Well, just about any book imaginable. But you know, when people think about a book, the first thing that comes to their mind is what I call the big bestseller, and that's a great book, but not everybody's ready to start with the big bestseller. It's a little intimidating. So sometimes I have to start them with other things that are great marketing tools as well. But you referred to the technology issue and technology has helped people write different types of books that exist in different ways on different platforms to do different things. And for example, there's the mini marketing book which is a lead behind. You'll hear people refer to that as the new business card. It replaced kind of the Tri brochure that we used to live leave behind with people. And then there's also a website based book that's designed to live on the website and its marketing purpose is to help business people give a taste of what they do. What their expertise is to potential clients who then come to them and say, hey, yeah, I wanna work with you. 'cause I've learned these things about you. So that's called a website based book. So I help people right all of those things. All of those types of books to help with the number one goal is building credibility, credibility and building business with their book. You know, that's so interesting because it's, it's interesting. Yeah, that people think, you know, I'm gonna have this great, big bestseller. And if if people knew how many books are are published every single day, they wouldn't think that is so easy. 'cause I know how difficult and as well. Yeah, you know, I mean, most people think you get this big advance which publishes are not really doing that much of anymore unless you're a really proven author and you know, it's, it's really interesting. See that the western, we say, the myths that people believe in terms of writing a book. So I would have to say you probably by by giving all these different alternatives, you really get people to wake up and say, wow, it didn't know all of this was was involved. So what kind of clients with. Well, you you, you hit a hot topic and that book. Yeah, I don't know why we keep losing people. Go back. I'm here. She me, you dropped off. So let's I don't know. You went, you went away totally way. All right. So that's where 'cause I'm sitting still that me ask that question again. Okay. So Arlene. What kind of clients do you work with. Well, I worked with a variety of clients. First of all, I believe that if you're in business, you're an expert and every expert should have a book again to help them position themselves with credibility to the right kind of clients who want and need their services. So my clients can be people who have our new to business and have little to no content because what I do is help them write the book and outlining lay out the book as a marketing tool, a credibility piece. And then from there it clarifies their branding, their unique selling proposition, their client base. So we can start with the book and work backwards to develop content and and find tune branding. And the flip side of that is working with people who have a lot of content and helping them kinda clear away the trees to figure out, okay, which piece of their content or which piece of their business branding do they wanna feature in this book. Because sometimes they have so much content, they don't know where to start. So from the book we can, it also helps them to say, okay, so this book is going to be about this piece of your content. This book can be about this piece, your content because they don't want to leave any of their quote babies behind. So in helping them lay out a plan for how to deal with content development and turning that into a book that really helps the people who've been in business for a while to gain clarity to write that good business building book. So on either side of that occasion, I can work. But then I also have people who've got no books written and people who've written a lot of books and either way if they have it in them to tell their story, whether it's personal or professional, I can help them organize that and create a great business building credibility book for them. So as a book grinding business coach, do you ever get anybody who asks you. To help them with something that's fiction. Oh yeah, I can help people. There are several book tools that fiction writers can use. Also, I specialize in nonfiction, that's just by primary niche, but I travel around also a lot working with fiction writers because for example, this website based book is a great tool for fiction writers to use to build their fan base. And because fiction writers writers in general, spent so much time and energy, creating the world, creating their settings, you know, breathing life into their characters and their story that they, they miss the business part of that. And if you're selling a book, whether it's fiction or non-fiction, you really want to get the word out so that people know that you and your book exists. So just as an example, this website based book helps fiction writers build their marketing, their business platform, their fan base for the book that they've got coming out now or. The any books in the future and these there variety of different writing tools that can be used before their book is ever finished being written or published that help them build business. So I'm all about combining that writing with the business element because nobody writes a book thing. I just gonna I'm gonna put it out in the world and I don't

Gail Carson Arlene Arleen Gayle thirty years
"arlene" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

08:06 min | 2 years ago

"arlene" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Arlene Shimla university of. Alaska Anchorage archives it happened at five. Thirty six PM everybody. Knows that time on. March twenty seventh nineteen sixty four it was Good Friday so a lot of the businesses and the city offices were, closed that tastes a lot of people. Were at home preparing meals and not, out at work it was. Epicenter in Prince William Sound which is southeast of here it was a little, closer to, than Anchorage and it. Was a nine point two magnitude which is pretty substantial It's the largest that's ever happened on the, North American continent and it's the. Second largest that has happened in the world so this was substantial it was I test services and systems nobody had really gone through in what was a somewhat remote section of the United States. So the federal government had a presence here, certainly but. This was a challenge in so many ways these are some of the things that we full, today these the the ones flat on the table the numbers photographs the black and white all come from Frank FOX who was an air force pilot so he was. Actually flying around the city for the federal government and they were getting photographs. Of the damage so. They could get kind. Of a sense of scale of what was going on a lot of these are the turn again arm area there, has a fairly new subdivision that had. Just gone in its now known as, earthquake park and there's no. Houses there anymore because most of them the, bluff just kind of collapsed and, went in, waves on down the The Bank and so it destroyed number of homes in, this area I believe there are a few fatalities also in this area As. You might expect looking at this level of damage and the fact that a, lot of people were. At home when it happened this is probably one. Of the better known images is the JC Penney building which was fairly new it sustained obviously a, huge amount of damage there there was at least one. Individual killed because of the collapse of the side panels on, the building which were large. Side panels embraced up on the. Sides they weren't cross braced like we do today for an earthquake and they, basically slid down you can see that poor corvette there's. It's been partly crushed by the by the slaps falling down That building was a total loss I believe they actually felt, the quake as far south. Is Washington I know they felt. It in Fairbanks which is about an eight hour drive straight north I have been told there. Were actually some some effects of it, felt in places like Louisiana Mississippi that the water In small ponds could be seen to be moving so it was a pretty substantial quake. That that really affected there were people killed on the Oregon and. California coast line because of. The army that resulted these are some documents. From the lemon who was a, social worker her name was Margaret Hofmeister she was working in Seward at the time she was doing. Primarily children's services but of course she was a fully trained. Social worker and because of her work in that. Role she did a lot with kind of the civil defense response and so she kept a lot of those documents so one of the things she, kept was, this bulletin that was issued on Sunday. From the city of Seward to. The people of Seward talent saying you know this is what you need to do they're talking about the. Boiling water, what you need to do about outgoing now where. The outpatient clinics are all water must be considered contaminated of course all the water lines were, taken, out by this You, know at bleach to it to make it drinkable You can't use the toilets so they set up Honey Honey bucket says the Alaska term latrines basically gasoline was unlimited supply that there's also some concern about things like the potential for disease in a quake like this between not having palatable water and. And and not having toilets that flasher. Working Seward system you have to be worried about disease and so there's one requirement in. Here that typhoid shots, will be given on. Monday March thirtieth at outpatient clinics. Nine AM until noon you must underlined must get, yours no matter when you had, your last, shot orders which I find an interesting phrasing So this one was written by Edith Lindsey to her daughter in. Bellingham she really Monday evening after the. The quake was Friday she wrote it Monday evening and she notes in the top the, the daughter is labeled, this before it was. Sent to us that they have. Electric back they were living right downtown Anchorage in, an apartment building overlooking ship creek And, she says we are. Still getting along fine so, much better than many I still have on the same clothes I had on at seven AM Friday morning I sleep in my. Wool socks lung underwear Ed Francis and feral get PJ's but not me So you. Can't blame her though I mean they were still. Having aftershocks at that point and if, you, wanted, to get up. And get out of your apartment. Building in a hurry you probably stay dress I think that was pretty common for a lot of people it's interesting for such a widespread and traumatic event it's still. Very much a, local story Anchorage people sections of. Anchorage people felt laying in. One way certainly the people who lived in turn again might have had a very. Different response than people who lived, up on hillside, because they wouldn't have been, affected as badly For Valdez it's very much. Of l. d. story changed the nature of, the town, for Seward it's a Seward story it change the nature of the town seemed, for Kodiak there have been so many. Projects on gathering information from survivors. Of the quake and their experience of it some of. That was done immediately it was done to kind of figure out what would you do in, the future something similar. Happens there were a lot of psychological studies done of the. People involved but it really is a local thing. I people in Seward it's their quake, people, in, Anchorage it's their. Quake people and Valdez quakes so. Because they were all fighting different things sewer Seward almost entirely lost their economy for awhile over this Anchorage could still function Valdez which is largely fishing at the time A lot of their economy because a lot, of the, boats were away far inland due to the NAMI ways that took them up, plus support facilities were damaged so badly So there's too many factors to really say this is the Alaska response even though it affected so much of Alaska There's actually a huge Facebook, group of people who lived through, the nineteen sixty four. Earthquake it was created I believe shortly before the fiftieth anniversary, which was a few years back but they're incredibly, active even now when people, are constantly sharing their memories and photographs we periodically get. A call from somebody who says you. Have materials on this or I have my dad's photos which would be interested so there's still regular topic of conversation part of that is. Because we're a fairly seismically active place where, just hopefully not one that, big anytime soon I could do without that They it's, it was so life changing, it of of an event it really is one of. Those lifetime events where it's where were. You win and if somebody lived through it they can tell you they'll tell you every bit of it is permanently great in their memory Arlene Shimla and university of Alaska Anchorage archives The twenty eighteen summer, solstice Mark the one, hundred thirteenth annual midnight sun game in Fairbanks Alaska the amateur baseball. Game held at the home of the gold panners starts around ten thirty PM and because the. Sun is out for nearly twenty four hours there's, no need for additional lighting up next week continue our special look, at Alaska as we speak with Mary shields the first woman to complete the idea rod, and, the author of sled dog trails.

Alaska Anchorage Seward university of Alaska Anchorage Earthquake Valdez Arlene Shimla university federal government Prince William Sound Fairbanks Alaska JC Penney United States typhoid Washington Oregon Arlene Shimla Ed Francis Frank FOX
"arlene" Discussed on Life of the Law

Life of the Law

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"arlene" Discussed on Life of the Law

"So we have a lot of people who are giving up the right to trial because they're afraid of these draconian consequences so it's bad when you get the full brunt of this in your face like arlene gotten in and these other folks that collaborated but there's also the people that are serving lesser sentences that now are basically deterred from pursuing their constitutional right to a fair trial because they know that they're going to get something absurdly draconian if they are convicted so i think the sooner soon point to burn it bartered adversarial system which is where he started her dr and one of these always struck me above average zero system is how it parallels our economy so there is a certain canova market sensibility the idea that competition would yield the most appropriate result and that assumption drives our our our our commercials is our commercial enterprises dries or financial capability for financial interactions and we see that that is not always true that oftentimes you type of market competition often yields outcomes that are not optimal for society he can meet their parallel to what we see your navasero system so i guess my question or some that we talk of our think about is is there something inherently flawed with adversarial system where it produces these extra now these were l allows for overcharging other types of a suboptimal interest to drive a a system that should first and foremost have both the defendants and and societies and you know uh interest in mind as opposed to allowing these type of other types of considerations.

arlene
"arlene" Discussed on The BreakPoint Podcast

The BreakPoint Podcast

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"arlene" Discussed on The BreakPoint Podcast

"What's really more unfortunate is that so many christians are absolutely confident this is what jesus would do without actually digging deeply into the scriptures themselves and that's where we we talk about secularism power it's not an discreet in ising that no jesus would've bake the cake and he would have been wrong it's basically saying no i believe jesus would have done this and so you must as well that's the power of secularism and so this tension between you know what would jesus would have done what jesus was revealed to do the idea that script christian the christian worldview is a revealed set of truth that's really what's under pressure melo arlene agents to christ must always trump it's a it's unfortunate that we've lost that really good verb right i mean just can't really just throw it out him our liege was such a good one i'm going to use in any way 'cause i don't know another one hour allegiance to christ must always trump our allegiance to nation whether it's patriotism or our country's call i e whether it's our country's history and and caused or whether it's our country's culture and the temptation to compromise is both both ways when we do that we joined the great heroes of the faith but but more than that and i wanna be clear on that we not only are we first and foremost allegiant to christ because we're first and foremost allegiant to christ as christians whether it's you know talking about the history of talking about the culture of our nation.

melo arlene one hour
"arlene" Discussed on Graham Norton

Graham Norton

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"arlene" Discussed on Graham Norton

"I love cream musical nude fairness three museum and i can i could i can say returning with may be a little of a mix of we will rock you tooth in title the mix okay this is a good question ruin in order to i wonder if i think maybe of austria's forevermore fred astaire or gene kelly who us i have to say fred astaire was complete and utter magic but you could never really choose between the two because gene kelly just came out there and he put jazz onto film and that was thrilling but also you so maskhadov kelley law wherever it took a look a bloke gathered in the out he was the bully was yeah yeah he's all balls strong masculine tough villa musicals which is your favorite eric and chester west side story oh why story emphasize attorney a would it would have to be websites do i tell me this so the the tour you're going to edinburgh to store sources and then are you i mean traveling with an entourage how you have you having land this now well what his plan obviously abby chat traveling with jackie story these and going to chat to me and m a branches the producer of course i'll take alana phillips along because my hair makeup on my law all important so you know i did you talk about glamour saw content mailed neutered is yes you have to you have the worker dance yeah yeah con a as i'm going to wrestle arlene exclamation mark the clip for gover the goals of it starts at edinburgh on the twentysecond runs six wars and then all around the country it's been such a lovely pleasure to see you again arlene handy.

austria fred astaire gene kelly eric attorney producer alana phillips chester west edinburgh jackie arlene twentysecond