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"anorexia" Discussed on The Carlat Psychiatry Podcast

The Carlat Psychiatry Podcast

01:43 min | Last month

"anorexia" Discussed on The Carlat Psychiatry Podcast

"Tonight on sixty seconds psych meds for anorexia. People with anorexia usually don't want to take their medications, but does pharmacotherapy even work? Not at all concludes Emmanuel, Casio Lee and colleagues this new meta-analysis. They don't raise weight and they don't change ones that goes for antidepressants, anti psychotics and a p.m the most studied of the drugs. Not only do they not help the Anorexia? They did nothing for Co Morbidity like depression and anxiety with the possible exception of Satala Pram which helped depressive and obsessive compulsive symptoms, although disappointing, these conclusions make sense. We don't even know which neurotransmitters to target an Erica and the malnourished state itself might render some medications like Serta energetic ones ineffective. A two thousand eighteen trial did find better effects with medications after weight was restored. The authors found one ray of hope in lithium in a very small randomized trial from nineteen eighty one. We're talking eight patients. Lithium improved weight gain with a medium effect size at a certain level of one point oh another mineral zinc was left out of this Meta analysis, but does have a positive randomized controlled trial in thirty five patients with Anorexia at a dose of zinc. Glucose made one hundred milligrams a day. Anorexia is notoriously hard to study. Only one in ten patients are willing to sign the consent forms which worn about the possibility of weight gain and once enrolled. The dropout. Rates are very high.

Anorexia Satala Pram Erica Casio Lee Emmanuel
Meds for Anorexia

The Carlat Psychiatry Podcast

01:43 min | Last month

Meds for Anorexia

"Tonight on sixty seconds psych meds for anorexia. People with anorexia usually don't want to take their medications, but does pharmacotherapy even work? Not at all concludes Emmanuel, Casio Lee and colleagues this new meta-analysis. They don't raise weight and they don't change ones that goes for antidepressants, anti psychotics and a p.m the most studied of the drugs. Not only do they not help the Anorexia? They did nothing for Co Morbidity like depression and anxiety with the possible exception of Satala Pram which helped depressive and obsessive compulsive symptoms, although disappointing, these conclusions make sense. We don't even know which neurotransmitters to target an Erica and the malnourished state itself might render some medications like Serta energetic ones ineffective. A two thousand eighteen trial did find better effects with medications after weight was restored. The authors found one ray of hope in lithium in a very small randomized trial from nineteen eighty one. We're talking eight patients. Lithium improved weight gain with a medium effect size at a certain level of one point oh another mineral zinc was left out of this Meta analysis, but does have a positive randomized controlled trial in thirty five patients with Anorexia at a dose of zinc. Glucose made one hundred milligrams a day. Anorexia is notoriously hard to study. Only one in ten patients are willing to sign the consent forms which worn about the possibility of weight gain and once enrolled. The dropout. Rates are very high.

Anorexia Satala Pram Erica Casio Lee Emmanuel
Does coronavirus spread through the air?

Science Magazine Podcast

07:34 min | 3 months ago

Does coronavirus spread through the air?

"Cova nineteen might actually go through the air from person to person what has brought this idea back to the forefront. I think part of it is is just that people continue to learn lots more about this virus as time goes on and so the wealth of understanding about it and how it likely spreads continues to increase. And I think what you're seeing is public health officials and policy people trying to be flexible and try to be responsible to pay attention to the latest data. And perhaps err on the side of caution. So how do you decide? If something is transmitted through the air I mean we know that respiratory droplets can carry this virus? But what changes the definition to airborne transmission? What has been clear from the outset of this? Pandemic has been that that. This virus transmits pretty readily from what they call respiratory droplets when people cough or sneeze so these are much larger. I mean sometimes menu sneeze. You can actually see the things coming out of your mouth. That's been the primary. Understanding is the main route of transmission and those larger droplets which can be on the order of one hundred micrometres or even up to a millimeter or something that they are big enough whereas gravity will essentially pull them to the ground. Pretty quickly and so. That's where the whole social distancing recommendation for keeping two meters apart from each other. That's where that comes from related to the drop size and how long they stay in the air and and basically how heavy they are in so these all these drops tend to be encased in saliva and Mucus and so they gravity post them to the ground. What has been less clear? What about smaller droplets. So when we breathe or talk or saying or what have you. We got give off of continuous mist of ultra fine droplets. Maybe on the order of a micron or so below five microns. What they call an aerosol and so these droplets are so small and lightweight that they can essentially suspend for up to hours in air and sort of dance around like little dust particles that you might say or something like that and so then that raises. The question of okay is this happening with Cova. Is the virus being transmitted in these droplets? And so that's where some of this new information comes in new studies and now new recommendations right so there's a recommendation from the National Academies of Science. Us National Academy of Science to consider that this might be an aerosol size particles correct. They have a Standing Committee that is now looking at emerging infectious diseases. Trying to offer the best insight. They can do to help. Guide policymakers on recommendations for Public Health. They gave a sent a letter to the White House on Wednesday saying fire prefers but this is not an April fools joke unfortunately but they did send a letter saying the evidence they see is consistent with aerosol spread of the virus. So that doesn't mean that it's nailed down for sure but they're trying to think I'm not. I can't really speak for them but I think what they're trying to do. Err on the side of caution and say look it. Looks like this might be happening in some cases so we need to to let people know about this kind of evidence. Did they see that it might be an aerosols? There's several different lines of evidence here back in March some researchers from the NIH wanted to explore this question and so they they measured aerosol droplets below five micrometres and they found that yes in fact these could suspend an era for up to three hours with active virus. Now that doesn't necessarily mean that if you or I were in that situation and be brave those in that we would necessarily get sick. We can't say that we don't know how many viral particles it takes to get some infections. Patients are actually producing these either. A couple more studies. They look out to try to get at that a little bit in one. Some researchers led by folks at the University of Nebraska. They sampled the air and surfaces in the rooms of patients isolated with Cronin virus disease. The patients were bedridden and so they sampled beyond two meters away. So right this would then assume an aerosol transmission and they found hard to reach surfaces up high or down low or things like that they did isolate viral and they also did air sampling again for more than two meters away and and registered viral. Rene there you are with RNA. Instead of actual particles they sounds like a lot of pieces are coming together from separate kinds of studies so they were careful to say that they did not isolate live active virus but they did isolate buyer Arnaiz so that does suggest that the viruses being transmitted so that is again suggestive of the fact that you can have aerosol transmission and then another study that came out in March from researchers at the University of Wuhan in China suggested that personal protective equipment. So the gowns masks things that medical workers who are being heavily exposed to chronic virus when they take them off after a shift that could be re era. Sizing the coronavirus again. Because it's so light and it can re-suspend particles in the air and so that they found some evidence that might be occurring as well taken together. I think the National Academies just wanted to let the White House now that this is possible route of transmission. It's hard to say that this is what's going on majority of cases and so. I think that played into the White House's decision last week or the CDC's decision to make a recommendation on his voluntary that when people go out in public that they recommend that they wear cloth masks are they helping prevent the spread from infected people or are they protecting uninfected from infected people. Or are they doing bud? If this aerosol spread possible so there's another study that the national academies looked at to try to address this point and that was worked by folks at the University of Hong Kong that was published yesterday. I believe South Friday the third public yesterday they took respiratory samples from patients with a variety of respiratory illnesses. And some of these people were wearing face masks and some of them weren't not all these patients had coronavirus but with those who did have corona virus stay found are from the virus in respiratory droplets. Both from the larger droplets and from aerosols. Who WHAT THEY FOUND. Was that the masks. Reduce the Corona Virus Arna in respiratory droplets and aerosols. That's suggestive of the fact that mass might be playing a role here in reducing transmission. So I think the pretty notion is that cloth masks are so porous are not really gonNA prevent bio particles from getting in. If you're breathing the men but what they could do they could trap some of the respiratory drops as they emerged. So if you and I go out in public wearing a mask if we're a symptomatic we could still be spreading the virus and it might help reduce transmission there and so I think that's why public health officials are saying. Look be a good citizen. Do your best to try to wear a mask and just do everything. We can to reduce transmission everywhere. We can

White House National Academies Of Science National Academies Cova NIH University Of Wuhan China Cronin University Of Hong Kong University Of Nebraska Rene CDC
Jameela Jamil Has an Ambitious Goal: To Feel Things

The Hilarious World of Depression

09:16 min | 3 months ago

Jameela Jamil Has an Ambitious Goal: To Feel Things

"It's the hilarious world of depression. I'm John Mel on this episode person who has become famous in America rather quickly as a Sitcom star and an outspoken activist. The Sitcom has ended but the activism. Who It's just getting started. Hello my name is Jamila Djamil and I am at the Hilarious Weld Off. Depression and And what do you do for a living? I'm an actor and activist at a pain in the US. Three job titles multifaceted. Jamila Djamil was a TV and radio host or presenter in England for several years. Welcome to fish. Wrap up with me. I am here to deliver onto you all of the latest chart news and gossip in less time than it takes to make a couple of so last Sunday Cigna American audiences. I got to know her playing honey. Djamil the name-dropping high-society Londoner on the NBC. Moral Philosophy Sitcom the good place. But we've been through a lot swell you. I haven't been this upsets. My good friend Taylor was rude. Yep Stage in Konya was defending my best friend. Say Jamila grew up in London. Her parents emigrated from Pakistan and India says. Her family had a lot of mental health problems. Schizophrenia OCD bipolar depression suicidal. Ibm for Jamila. There was anxiety. There was depression and coming to grips with a lot of trauma. I wouldn't say who within my entire giant family unit because South Asian families huge. But there was an abusive background. Came From and A lot of bullying at home and at school That happened to us. Because we were Pakistani and My Dad is I think. Technically Indian We were South Asians living in a very racist time in Britain such as very tense existence to grow up in where people constantly hounding you with racial slurs calling you a monkey and not wanting to sit next to you at school and just a general night Great doesn't doesn't so no it was really bad. I'm amazed I made it out of my. I've made it our of my twenties even but I've had like a full nervous breakdown gone completely just totally lost it looking back on it now. It was pretty bleak. She had big time mental health issues but she says South Asian immigrant. Culture didn't talk about that kind of thing and neither did British culture. What was being talked about? Was the necessity for girls to be ridiculously skinny. And Jamila Developed Anorexia so I think is a combination the fact that I was growing up in the nineties and so- Heroin Chic could time the adults using non ironically. Where you to? In order to be beautiful you had to emulate the look of someone who does not eat and only Consumes heroin is also look a famine? That people were trying to achieve which is fucking insane considering that famine was and is still occurring in this world and millions and millions of people are suffering and dying from it and how much those people would love to be able to eat something Having their own physiques considered chic in this Bizarre and shallow industry. I was seeing people in my own country. Flights Pakistan and see 'em like skill lethal people on the side of the street begging for food. And then I would come here and see people starving themselves deliberately to emulate that look in order to fit into runway closed just so tiny so the look was just everywhere you were supposed to have jutting out hipbones and believe me. It was a badge of owner. It wasn't something that you hid. There was a long queue outside the girls along line outside the girl's bathroom. Everyone throwing up at lunch one. After the other. The other there was a girl. Easter bring her weighing scales in school and e on them. I remember without giving an interview saying she eats nude in order to stop us from overindulging. In Your Kate Moss talking about nothing tastes as good as thin. Feels well tacos. Pizza cake was their decision that you remember making A. I need to start eating way less. I need to start. Was that a conscious thing or do they just emerge suddenly it was a very very conscious scarring moment of my maths teacher wanting to teach us about graphs and pie charts and she weighed all of us to collect all of our weights as data to show a chart. The dumbest thing you've ever heard how I was. Eleven I was one of the tools guarding was the second oldest girl in the year and I was choppy. Because you gotta get like why toget- toll and also I was just. That was just my build at the time I was loving the curry and I had no self conscious about my body whatsoever. I loved having a tummy. I didn't know about thighs very innocent child. I wasn't remotely interested in the way that I look and That moment changed everything because I was the happiest girl in the class. I was ridiculed by the entire year I came home. My family founded shocking upsetting. I was the happiest girl year and I was immediately encouraged to diet and so I started my first I about eleven and it was. I was dieting. The way an eleven year old were diet which is with no understanding of any nutrition. I was living on somewhere between like two hundred three hundred calories. A day sometimes lasts which is insane because I was very tall and even by the time I hit five ten in my early teens. I was still consuming sometimes. Want two hundred calories a day a belly move passing out all the time didn't did stop menstruating and thought that I was winning. It never struck you as something wrong with us. No everyone was doing it. Everyone was doing everyone who's taking laxatives. Everyone's drinking teas that. I now rally against so hard There was slimfast cans all over our school. I want you know fell over. One on the steps steps passed out a tiny like fake chocolate bars instead of meals. It was just people were afraid of carbs and Pasta and everyone was on the Atkins Diet. So everyone's smell like metal and also it was just disgusting. It's terrible time and we were all on it so it didn't even feel like something. You really hit ego also at the time because of Hollywood there was this fucking Brag that I think kind of still exists of women pretending they eat so much just unnaturally thin. What a dumb witted Brag finding other mental illness conditions emerging with the eating disorder or. Were you just two out of even notice a depression or an anxiety? I wasn't even out of it. I was high on it like I was just sort of I was I was such a devoted anorexic and I was so it's so time consuming beyond our exit. The amount of time you spend learning new tricks trying new tricks hiding your food all of the all of the things that you have to do with so consuming. The I didn't even know that I had any kind of mental illness. I didn't think I had anorexia. I didn't think there was no. I didn't think there was anything wrong with me. The only thing I thought was wrong with me that I wasn't enough I was never thin enough. Do you understand what Anorexia was and just think it was something other people had. Yeah I used to be jealous. I thought Anorexia could only come in the form of of someone who weighs like three or four stone forty two to fifty six pounds and I would be envious if those people for being able to achieve that. I really didn't get it. But that's the problem is if you give this misinformation children. We don't have the whole picture. We do we also have this like youthful arrogance to us where we think our health will last forever. Our lives will go on forever will never be Will never face the side effects in. No one knows about osteoporosis. Kidney damage or liver damage all the IBS. All the different things that happened to people who mess around with their health my thyroid. My drains. Everything is exhausted. I mean I even now sorry twenty years after I started sobbing myself. That's what I was gonna ask because so often people think of it as. Oh anorexia is when you're not eating enough but it is a mental thing that even if you people can have anorexia yeah and and even if you find better eating habits later on the reasoning the processing of the idea of food is still always there. So many of told our weaponized food in our minds. So we're taught that like food. Is You know if you have a parent who beats you and then feel bad about it and then gives you a meal afterwards. You start to associate that meal with love or if your parents are. You're not supposed to eat then. Food becomes rebellion and food. Become self harm so we can. We can give food all these kind of different personalities and I think a lot of people lot more people realized then they realize even during the the guilt associated food and the coding and the words that we use around food of clean eating dirty foods. This is just this shame Sort of slipped in an envelope within all of these ways of discussing this thing that we need to give our body nutrition so it can function food fuel and I didn't know that until I hit thirty

Jamila Djamil Anorexia Depression Pakistan United States Heroin Konya John Mel America Kate Moss IBM England NBC Taylor Britain Toget- Toll Osteoporosis Overindulging London
5 questions: When ‘picky eating’ gets serious

Podcast Central

02:24 min | 4 months ago

5 questions: When ‘picky eating’ gets serious

"Or in children the inability to gain weight our food can even develop into another eating disorder like anorexia or bulimia and the condition can also emerge from problems with low appetite and low food enjoyment or from fears of negative consequences associated with eating like choking or having to go to the bathroom because the study of picky eating adult is relatively new it's hard to say how common it is at what point it becomes a problem how to diagnose it and how to treat it if it needs treating at all but it's gotten to a point where a support group called picky eating adults support exists for those with different tastes according to the organization's motto however picky eating doesn't usually just sneak up on somebody one day studies show that most adult picky eaters report experiencing P. in childhood take fifty seven year old real estate broker Marlon Lopez who also goes by the name French fry lady according to her blog focusing on a lifelong peak condition she has only ever tasted a handful of foods most of them the color white she's never even tasted a vegetable other than a potato and after cooking scrambled eggs for her son for twenty years she finally became inured to the smell of them to the point of being able to try them in two thousand and twelve these days she will occasionally eat scrambled eggs but only if they're cooked very very well done no Lopez is an outspoken adult picky eater but the condition can be difficult to diagnose because not everybody is vocal about their habits like she is and there doesn't yet exist an objective and reliable way to measure picking us order parts preference from affliction so how would someone get diagnosed with Pete to begin with Jordan Ellis a doctoral student in clinical health psychology at East Carolina University studies PP that's correct in the study the does propose a way to measure these behaviors according to Alice most past research has relied on simply asking an individual whether or not they consider themselves to be a picky eater the new measurement tool Ellis developed called the adult picky eating questionnaire or a pack looks at multiple aspects of picky eating behavior including rigid food preferences lack of food variety meal disengagement avoidance and aversion to bitter and sour tastes says Alice we hope to start to understand which of these aspects are most related to problems and which could best be targeted through treatment other treatment might not be necessary for all picky eaters on the severe end of the P.

Marlon Lopez Pete Jordan Ellis Alice Anorexia Bulimia East Carolina University
Weight And Health Are Not The Same Thing Ft. Lisa Hayim

Diet Starts Tomorrow

08:47 min | 5 months ago

Weight And Health Are Not The Same Thing Ft. Lisa Hayim

"So today we are joined by an amazing guest. Lisa hayme she's the founder of the well necessities these founder of fork the noise. She's a master's degree in nutrition and exercise physiology from Columbia University. And you may you probably know her from her instagram. At the the wealth necessities welcome. Thank you so excited to be yes to you. Know it's funny because okay so after last week's episode there's a lot of like noise a lot of noise. There was a lot of feedback and a lot of people. Were like. Go Watch while necessity story. She's a whole thing about five or in general the Diet and so that's how we were introduced to you and then I was watching your whole instagram and I was like wheat. People were showing me this girl's wedding time when I saw your instagram before when I was just talking you for your wedding so that was funny that we were. I was like brought back to meet like connect with you on a different circumstance. But welcome to this this podcast. Thank you thanks for coming to my wedding online. You not tell me about her wedding number one number two. We did know that showed us the wedding idea because I will tell you after everyone was sending me your profile. And they're like I love girl. I got deep into your profile and I was like well. Let me check out her wedding. It was to me so I definitely when when did you got married. We got married in November nine congrats of nineteen eighteen yard. Just got married very newly married. How is it? It's it's better because the wedding stress is gone. Yeah Toto I just think it's a really special time of of just like peaceful sacredness of relationship. Do you agree exactly the same I think for my husband and and I we plan the wedding ourselves like our parents weren't really and so like the day to day stress every night he came home. He's a doctor so his days aren't very calm. Either he'd come home the eight o'clock and then we'd have a rush dinner and then go right into wedding planning so a wow having that off of our plate and being able to like sit on the couch and watch. Svu has just been been able to connect again you know. Yeah Yeah but it's nice that he was so helpful. Yeah massage last night. was I did right every single thankyou note and all of that. Yeah but I will say he was sick. He had a fever for tuning. Blue Light cannot the myth and the man flew where it literally becomes Donald. Yeah well you have. A great man came out why they don't get like regular people sick. They just like turn into dead. Ed Fish Hold. They don't care but they expect you to be this overwhelming sense of nurturing. Yeah but it's funny because is obviously and then he transforms until I'm like who are right. Yeah anyway well welcome. So what are we talking about today. Okay so what do you do in your your your Nardi right. So what do you do in your practice. What do you specialize in? What do people come to you for? Yes so it's been a journey as all things really are and I think it's so important to evolve with your practice so where I once was with my practice is not necessarily where I. AM Today. But I feel so aligned with what I do because it's exactly what I needed and would have been my rescue boat during my days of disordered eating so my mission mission in life is less about the food. It's more teaching you real tools to listen to your body so that you can honor trust and listen to them and again. It's less about the food it's just just when you're so connected to yourself. Everything else isn't about the food you're leaning into your highest power and being able to do the things that excite you whether it's a a hobby or a career or just be a better person. Okay so this is. That's a big jump. That's a big transition. How long did that take you and so just to give us some background? What were your struggles with disorderly day and then how did you get over it? And how long did that take to be where you are now. So I'm I'm thirty one years old. Which means the word disordered eating didn't really exist during the time when I was going through my struggle so my relationship to food like most people's it's not everybody's but got a rocky at the end of Highschool and then into college because this is a podcast? I also just want to say that I'm thin. Body I've never been told to lose weight always actually been complimented for my thin frame and nonetheless. I had an overwhelming fear of gaining weight and began to attach my worth to my size and eventually down the line to my health was my entity as I began to pursue nutrition so anyway ten years ago in the absence of not having Anorexia. I always always eight. Even if I wanted to restrict never happened. I never made myself through up even if I had the desire. And so in the absence of these two known eating disorders. I was fine because I didn't have those. I was just the healthy girl. There was no nobody knew about Kombucha back then or any of the stuff that I was like an early adopter to and I sought out all of my meals in college. I went to University of Miami. where like everybody got like bagels for lunch with the whole foods by myself and had a twelve dollar? You know be huge salad bar so during during this time it just became my identity and over the course of probably the next five years or so what that looked like started to shift so it was clean eating veganism for the wrong reasons not for the environment not for ethics but rather as a way to control and downsize the decisions around around food is that what people would now call orthodoxy. Ah Yeah and or the wreck so you can look like different things you know for some people. It's very clean eating for some. It's about like detoxing axeing orthodoxy. It can be this deep commitment to just health and not about weight at all for some people is about the way but yes I'd say I definitely fell under the umbrella. Also what what were the things that you were doing in college and like out of college that you I know you touched on them but like specifically that you now look look back on and say these were definitely disordered. Yeah and I always say it's I call it disordered eating but it's disordered living because it's about food is all of the time time so you're right. I remember being in college. And this was the first time I sought out therapy specifically for eating was because I was going to sleep and I was thinking about breakfast while I was eating breakfast. I I was thinking about lunch while I was at lunch thinking about dinner and it was just consuming me and and I knew something was wrong. I didn't know what was wrong and do something was wrong. Yeah so it's not normal then the way that I was doing it and the way that I felt I had these strict set of rules about what was good and yeah it was bad and so it wasn't restriction of total food but the good foods were allowed in the bad foods weren't so it's this constant stint state of been restrict restrict even if it's a not technically like a binge like we think of as a bit more than you were allowing yourself you more than as allowing myself but also more than most people were eating because when you have rules about what to eat or went to eat. That are really strict you you along gate mealtimes because you don't know when the next time you allow yourself to eat is actually was getting quite full or feeling quite full but it's not like eating a meal and then I was like like finally moved on with my life right so your life was sort of like constructed around how your meals food would make you feel. No one has ever accused of having healthy eating habits. So it's really how did you. What like like hit you that this was not okay? Because it's it's hard to identify the things that we've always done that we think are just normal So how did you realize that this was an issue and then like how did you get to this. Idea of being. So in touch that you don't have to obsess about food. Yes so I think I had little wakeup calls throughout it like I. They said I went to that therapist. In in college. In undergrad and again this sort of felt like I got it under control a bit and then when they went to Grad school it kind of turned into something the new start to see a therapist again and so there was never this like one moment. Where where I I even said I have disordered eating in this moment when I talk about disordered eating disordered? Living it's really in hindsight it feels like and so there was never this one moment when I was like. That's it we're done but I've felt it when I transitioned out the rules and allowed myself to eat foods in this peaceful way and I was like. Oh this is different. What's different about this? I'm eating chocolate cake but I'm not eating all of the chocolate. The cake

Instagram Founder Columbia University Lisa Anorexia Nardi Fever Donald Trump Grad School University Of Miami.
Magic Mushrooms Pass First Hurdle as Depression Treatment

News and Information with Dave Williams and Amy Chodroff

01:22 min | 7 months ago

Magic Mushrooms Pass First Hurdle as Depression Treatment

"This is interesting another party drug it's not the first one showing signs of going legit as magic mushrooms have cleared the first hurdle of testing required to become a treatment for depression magic mushrooms key active ingredient is subtle Simon and was found to be safe as well as tolerated when given to healthy volunteers in a study by researchers at king's college in London by the way side effect the subjects got very high yet very stoned kind of figure out a way to get the good part of the mushrooms without the bad part of them so that's what they always try to do I'm not so sure they really should try but I you know what it's not a problem MP walking around high all the time no no that's good but you know so it's a Sir seeking to enlist patients to test the chemical for ailments including addiction Alzheimer's disease anorexia obsessive compulsive disorder and migraines and anything you can do to avoid having to make new chemical drugs if you can use natural in a natural substances well why not I wonder how many people are gonna raise their hand to sign up sure that they'll have

Simon London King Alzheimer's Disease Migraines
"anorexia" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

Stuff You Should Know

05:24 min | 7 months ago

"anorexia" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

"But it's important to know that it's it's across the gender spectrum across the age age spectrum If you think that it's just something teenage girls go through. That's just not the case. Yeah not just teenage girls for a long time. It was a teenage white girl girl problem. And they're starting to realize. Now this is is like you were saying like it it spans ethnicities genders nationalities. ages. It's it's a much bigger problem than than we used to thinking. I don't know if it's become a bigger problem or if just under awareness and understanding of it has grown or something like that but did you mentioned suicide Don't think I did so you were saying that this is. This is one of the reasons we're talking about this Anorexia and Bulimia are one of of the maybe the deadliest mental disorder. There is as far as statistics like you were saying and one of the big reasons because so many people with Anorexia or blame Lima die by suicide something like two hundred times at a two hundred times greater rate than the general population. Yes says here one in five of Anorexia deaths by suicide and then if it's not by suicide there's a host of other ways that you can die from Anorexia you can simply starve to death where you're yeah you you Your heart can stop. Your organs can shut down and it's from this lack of energy that you're putting into your body you're your body's ladies Oregon start to Kinda slow down to metabolize more slowly to conserve what little energy they do have and eventually it. It just doesn't work any longer your body stops basically and you can die just from not eating and not because there wasn't any food there's plenty of food and everyone who was around around. You wanted you to eat. You just wouldn't do it because you felt fat. Yeah and I don't even think it's a Lotta Times a matter of if I mean if you don't get treated could you don't get help and it gets bad enough then. You will die from Oregon failure at some point. Yes but we have to say we only get all like horribly grim because there are studies that are coming out now that are saying. Actually we've been studying these people for like twenty five years and we're finding that over the long haul you you can cure anorexia or good it just a while and it also from what I've seen takes a patient who wants to be cured bright absolutely And then one more thing here if we do need to talk about puberty and adolescence because it can have really long lasting effects if that's the time of your life where this is happening thing long-term effects on your development on your growth If you I think it says if you Have Anorexia beginning beginning at age. Ten all the way through twenty s You can have permanent stunted growth you can ever do sex secondary sexual characteristics like Your pubic care won't grow in. Your breasts won't develop and maybe a lack of administration from the beginning not like this cessation administration. You may never get your period Ryan you may be infertile as a matter of fact as an adult. That's right so yeah just because of the age that it's the the age that it sets on. I guess this is such an important time for the developing your body. It's like the last time you should be like I'm just not GONNA eat for a couple of days yeah It has some real sweeping reaping affects for sure. Yeah and Bulimia to for For its part is really roughing teeth yellowing decaying teeth sensitive teeth US swollen sore throat acid reflux like all the time And then you know electrolyte imbalances being the bathroom a lot. Because you're you're you're you're tricking. Your Body. Essentially into thinking is getting some nutrition and then getting rid of that food really quickly and that nutrition really quickly And that can lead to fainting fatigue teague and eventually heart attacks and strokes serious stuff. Yeah it is extraordinarily serious stuff. A lot of people are like well. It's just you know this. This is how my daughter and my sister. My friend likes to look. She likes to be skinny. And this is a really persistent problem with dealing with Anorexia. Is that I've seen it most places. It's not a lifestyle. It's a right till health disorder. Yes and it has to be treated because again. It is statistically speaking the deadliest mental health disorder there. is she take a break. Yes we're GONNA take a break and we're GONNA come back with a whole list of jokes. That's right The.

Intuitive Eating and Cultural Identity with Christyna Johnson, Health At Every Size Dietitian

Food Psych

09:20 min | 8 months ago

Intuitive Eating and Cultural Identity with Christyna Johnson, Health At Every Size Dietitian

"The question. It's from a listener named Jen and who writes Hi Christie. I'm up and down with eating struggles and I'm not sure how much of it is a lack of intuitive eating versus eating disorder related. I have a history of Anerexia UNBELIE MIA that I mostly recovered from. But I still have a bit of food obsession and body image issues that I'm holding onto it seems to go in phases a few you good weeks of feeling good and then back to it. I often find myself eating related to emotions frustration boredom etc and having a hard hard time listening to my body's cues hunger. I have a hard time saying no to myself. Even if I'm not hungry it feels more like my mind wants it than my body. I don't binged like I used to but I feel I am over eating and eating unnecessarily and trying to get satisfaction from it but often don't I often feel unsatisfied died despite allowing myself sweets regularly. I know in your podcast. You often emphasized to eat what you want but with my history. I don't know that I can trust my body's cues to do so as it often doesn't seem like a physical need for food. I'm wondering if you have any advice for me to deal with these urges. Do I need to pursue eating disorder help or intuitive. Who would've eating help? Thank you so much in advance Christie. I really appreciate any help. So thanks Jen for that. Great question and before. I answer just my standard disclaimer disclaimer. That these answers and this podcast in general are for informational and educational purposes only and our substitute for individual medical or mental health health advice so first of all I wanNA send you so much compassion because it sounds like you've been through a lot in your relationship with food. Sounds like you're still going through a lot lot in your relationship with food and you know Kudos to making it this far and recovery has it's no easy feat to get out of the depths of Anorexia and bulimia even even if you're still in this gray area early recovery. I think it's amazing that you are not as engaged in the eating disorder behaviors as it. Sounds like you used to be but that said it definitely sounds like you still have a ways to go and your recovery and specifically it sounds like you still have a lot of diet mentality or eating disorder mentality going on and really. They're kind of in the same. I would say the eating disorder mentality is sort of maybe sometimes a more amplified version of the Diet mentality but it all comes from the same place place which is internalized beliefs from diet culture about foods being good or bad or issues about weight feelings and thoughts about weight right beliefs that higher weights are bad and things like that. All of that is internalized. Dia Culture beliefs that you have made your own right. So that's that's what the Diet mentality. That's what the eating disorder mentality is. And that is really evident in some of the phrase. You used here and your question Mike when you say I have a hard time saying no to myself Alf. Even if I'm not hungry and I feel I am overeating and eating unnecessarily so it sounds like you're thinking that you should be eating less and you're policing facing the amounts you eat and you're perceived reasons for eating and that's very much a restrictive mindset. That's very much a diet mentality eating disorder mentality. I'll be mindset. The reality is there's no such thing as quote unquote eating unnecessarily right. If you're eating it's necessary. It's necessary because has especially in the case of recovery from disordered eating. Your body needs to learn to trust that you're not going to start it again and Jenn. It's likely that your body body really needs a lot of work on rebuilding that trust since you had anorexia and bulimia which are really severe violations of trust for your body. Those are in trauma to the body trauma to the brain. A real disconnection of that body. Trust that we're all born with and you know it takes you away from your intuitive relationship with food when you have a disorder anorexia Bulimia which is very harsh very driven by diet culture rules and beliefs and not at all intuitive intuitive not at all honoring the hunger and fullness and satisfaction cues that you were born with and that we all deserve to be able to honor so I would really encourage you to work on this mindset and stop seeing these urges to eat and this perceived eating in response to emotions as wrong or bad the way. I think you're seeing them now. I would encourage you to get help from a dietician who's versed in both eating disorders and intuitive eating and health at every size because I think you need all of that in order to recover I think you need probably definitely still some recovery from your eating disorder. It sounds like you still have some really restrictive thinking going on that you need to to be able to recover from. Maybe some restrictive behaviors as well. When you're talking about trying to get yourself to stop eating right but you also you know? It sounds like you need some help in tuning earning back into your cues and starting to trust those cues Allah intuitive eating so finding a provider who gets that and also gets the health at every size paradigm and is not going to shame you for if you're in a larger body size of your body or say anything that inadvertently makes you feel like you have to lose weight or anything like that. It's really important to find a Dietitian who gets gets all of those things. So you can check out Kristie Harrison dot com slash providers for my recommendations of providers who get it. These are people who've been on the PODCAST. Who who really understand the anti diet philosophy and who? I think. Have the best chance of being able to help you recover. Unfortunately there are still too many eating disorder providers Out there and even intuitive eating focus providers out there who are caught up in diet culture to varying degrees. So if you WANNA try to avoid that I think my shortlist list of providers who've been on the podcast is a great place to start because I try to vet everyone really thoroughly before I even invite them onto the show so you know at least I have a sense that they are pretty well versed in all of these ideas and these philosophies and they're not gonNA turn intuitive eating into a diet for you and they're probably gonNA call you Out For trying to join intuitive eating into a diet so Christie Harrison dot com slash providers is where to get that also as I shared a few episodes ago on the podcast in the listener. QNA for episode two. Oh nine with amy severson. Hunger doesn't always manifest as sensations in the stomach in fact far from it. So when you're judging yourself as quote unquote eating because you're not hungry. I don't think that really tells the whole story either. You likely are having non stomach. Sensations nations of hunger that you just aren't identifying such as thoughts of food difficulty concentrating anxiety. You know lots of other things. So check out that episode for a deeper dive into that where I talk about the non stomach signs of hunger and the sort of things that people overlook when they're trying to learn to honor their hunger you're that's at Christie Harrison Dot com slash two oh nine Christie Harrison dot com slash two. Oh nine or wherever. You're listening to this. You can just look for episode two. Oh nine so I hope that helps ups and just want to send you a lot of compassion and a lot of support in breaking free from these last vestiges of the Diet mentality these restrictive thoughts and beliefs. About how you're eating and just give you full unconditional permission to eat whenever you feel like eating for whatever reason because you deserve it. You don't have to second gase reasons for eating. You don't have to second guess whether it's really physical or emotional or mental. It doesn't matter those distinctions. Don't matter what matters is allowing yourself full unconditional permission to eat for any reason so that you can rebuild that trust with your body after having it so damaged and so broken by the anorexia Bulimia which are really really harmful to your relationship with food right. and your ability to eat intuitively so again. Thanks for that question Jen. And for those of you listening if you want to make your own question for a chance to have it answered on an upcoming episode go to Kristie Harrison dot com slash questions that's Christie Harrison dot COM com slash questions. And then if you want to ask me any question you want and have me answer it much more quickly than I can hear. That question was from over a year ago. You can can join my intuitive eating online course intuitive eating fundamentals the course has a wealth of audio and written content that teach you the principles of intuitive eating help you not turn intuitive eating into a diet and also do an exclusive monthly Q. and A. Podcast. Where you get to ask me anything you want and listened to hundreds of answers? I've given to other people already so that you can really work through all the sticking points in putting intuitive eating into practice in your life when you join you also get access to our private community MM unity forum which is exclusively for course participants. It's a wonderful place to go to get support from other people on this intuitive eating path and support forty charter. Answer each other's questions and just have a sense of solidarity as you go through this recovery from diet culture participant named Hester recently said. Thank you for all you do to support me and fellow participants in this fantastic course and another participant named Corinne said. I love how much this course has helped me. Cut Down on on the food chatter in my mind and has helped me make more room for the things that matter to me. Most like hobbies and family

Anorexia Christie Harrison JEN Bulimia Hi Christie Kristie Harrison Christie Harrison Dot Disorder Jenn Mike Corinne Hester Amy Severson
Anorexia is a metabolic disorder as well as a psychiatric one

WBBM Early Afternoon News

00:26 sec | 1 year ago

Anorexia is a metabolic disorder as well as a psychiatric one

"A new study sheds light on anorexia doctors have long assumed that the metabolic abnormalities anorexics developer calls by the starvation they put themselves through now US and British researchers say it appears the metabolic changes may in fact help power the disorder so rather than treating anorexia as a purely psychiatric problem future treatments may include addressing the physical as well as the emotional aspects of the condition Vicki Barker

Developer United States Vicki Barker Anorexia
Anorexia stems from body as well as mind

A Public Affair

00:45 sec | 1 year ago

Anorexia stems from body as well as mind

"An international study has found that anorexia nervosa is not just a mental illness as previously thought that can be caused by chemical processes in the body doctors at king's college London funds that changes in DNA which alter the way fats and sugars are processed may make it easier for some people to starve their bodies anorexia is a potentially life threatening illness professor John it treasure contributed to the research is very significant because there's been difficulty knowing exactly what sort of disorder anorexia is in this been swings and our understanding I'm now we know that it's a complex mixture of both aspects from the body and from the mind that interact in courses complex

Professor John King London Anorexia
Jack Dorsey: super influencer or troubled soul?

FT News

08:41 min | 1 year ago

Jack Dorsey: super influencer or troubled soul?

"Twitter. Chief Jack Dorsey has been hailed by Silicon Valley acolytes his personal fitness regime, but others question, whether he really merits, the role of a wellness guru Horatio Harrod discusses whether the Dulcie regime is worth emulating and what might be motivating his ascetic lifestyle with Joe Ellison. So obviously, for most of the people listening, Jack doesn't really need much of an introduction, 'cause he cofounded Twitter and the mobile payments company square. But why are you writing about him to in your recent column? I was writing about Jack Dorsey on the basis of the fact that he's been held as a super influenced by his Silicon Valley tribe of acolytes, and there was a big profile, I think, in the New York Times, but also kind of increasingly on other platforms, sort of hailing, his wellness regime in and also talking about the fact that he has become, you know, this character who has the same sort of power and influence as Gwyneth Paltrow, who we all know founded the wellness and pug, oop. So I thought he was an interesting person to look out because it just struck me that a lot of his advice seemed quite extreme, and I thought it was interesting that, if you're looking at it on the basis of gender. A man who comes up with a ten point plan includes extreme fall staying and depriving yourself of low of things should be seen as a kind of heroic manly endeavor of self discovery. But if it was a woman should be just discussed as kind of bats. I mean you know that. Well, don't you because when you interviewed Gwyneth Paltrow, flinch FT early this year. You know, you've got a few comments accusing her of being a sort of snake oil, saleswoman, very different sort of response to her wellness tips and stuff. She puts on group. I mean, I think generally anything where a woman is advocating healthy practice, or some sort of tree hit. But all, you know as someone who works in fashion, where I think, beauty and style, a very much of wrapped up in the same topic. There's a real hostility towards a lot of people advocating an extreme lifestyle pan and Gwyneth got a huge amount of very, very, very hostile Comanche under the. Which I did. And they really, really resented, her advocating anything radio, she they just thought she was crackers and also the other thing, which I thought was interesting as, as an actress, what does she know about this cheat doesn't have the right? Whereas Dulcie, who is to intensive his attack onto knows less than nothing also. But for some reason when he tells everybody he gets up at five am and jumps into freezing cold ball. It seems perfectly acceptable, and it was just us of weird guru status immense seem to have without any founding qualification whatsoever. Seems to be especially the dudes of Silicon Valley. They get away with quite a lot of what in if it were more of a female lifestyle context, would be seen as either very silly and frivolous poorly informed. That seems to be like people are in thrall to men with money and power. And I think that can just tip into a much broader kind of relation where it doesn't seem to matter what they do. I mean, if he suddenly sti- peg football, he probably be a brilliant, footballer. It's a kind of seduction. I mean there. Fan, boys. I mean, I know the west coast of America is oversee worth fatty diets sort of guy, an those long long decades on history of slightly with mystical, kind of quays. I religious of practice goes on. But I think that particularly now these tech gurus of merge, these tech leaders ever merged increasingly focused on how to make you a better person rather than there are about how to make a much let letting leads money because that seems to be what is actually very good. His voice loan, what new up and coming company. Would you invest in bitcoin? Awesome. You know, about the virtues of journaling, which is a fourteen year old, that's one of his eleven wellness tips or infrared, saunas. And why should an infrared bow, but your desk, minutes, all such hokum as well? I mean some of these things have got a modicum of medical evidence to support them in their favor. But lots of them are completely groundless. I mean, I have no idea whether there's any academic study that suggests that drinking salt juice. Use as he calls it, which is, I think lemon Himalayan salt water, which distributes in his Twitter offsets globally will do any tool or just make vomit. But the idea that someone could implement this in their offices, and everyone thinks this is a great idea, and not just say you're crackers, just seems I it just seems like typical of the gender gender-bias. We have, but people listen, calm being kind of a rabid feminist about these things, but I really feel as though people are inherently quite naive and the other thing about Jack Dorsey regimen, which I think, for me was particularly poignant is that in reading about it, the first thing I thought, when I was reading through the specifics of what he does his seven-minute high intensity workout his five mile walk toward that takes him an hour and a half. It's freezing cold buff, that all very self controlled, and quite punishing behavior, especially the fasting when she does from Friday until Sunday. So this, actually, it was very reminiscent of the sort of schedule. You might read over anorexic, who is in care, like a young girl. And if. She was exhibiting these behaviors you'd be genuinely quite concerned about her. It certainly thinks she was or he was putting too much pressure on themselves. And that was the other thing that just struck me as that anorexia or he's got an eating disorder. This is not healthy and you would Li certainly from the New York Times, piece, anecdotally, it seems that all of the things that he's recommending the infrared, Sooners the era sleep tracker which Prince Harry also were supposedly sales have skyrocketed since he mentioned them. So it seems like people really, really buy it. People just have a very different attitude intensive influence. I mean, going to culture can also shift, you know, she shifted courts eggs, which I think there was sexual healing eggs, or something she did get sued and had to pay a fine for claiming so but subsequently the sales of it still continue to rise. So she similarly has the power to create a bit of Rudra around a product with really, really sort of GPS values, but I think the something about that very powerful. Male leader who does the Ted talk. They take on this woman slight respite and like reputation. I mean, I think, historically, there have been people who held as kind of positions. I just think it's interesting that the most recent incarnation is this forty two year old tech entrepreneur and the other thing that we noticed today is that I think as of last year, he had a twenty three or girlfriend who was a Sports Illustrated model. And actually, when you think about it like that, he's just go having a kind of crushing midlife crisis was that was that was the conclusion, we did a lifespan the dramatic weight loss kind of obsession with physical appearance like the long kind of bid, the disguises bits of your face is so Mangone. This is this isn't about wellness is just about wanting to make an hot next year. Much, much younger more attractive girlfriend. But there was it was. So another point I think you made in your column, which was the, you know, he doesn't look and this is going to sound very sort of code psychology just doesn't look very happy. But it's interesting, do you think? There's a kind of elements of an incredibly wealthy successful porno kind of doing penance for either being successful, particularly being successful with Twitter because it's become oversee a platform that so controversial, and people took about him as basically make you fortune from helping to propagate hate speech, or allowing hate speech to ferment on his platform. I think if I was a hang at him as I called psychologist, which is what will like to do try and analyze what's going on? He doesn't look to me, like a person who is slightly enveloped in kind of shame buys person. You know, he looks almost unrecognizable he wears closed that swallow him. He has this huge curtain of hair across most of his face. And whereas it beanie hat and he does look sort of haunted. He sending doesn't let like a guy living as best life, and I like to think that some of that is possibly a physical manifestation of his unease around the thing that he's created. And I think, you know, social media Twitter, Facebook. Have had this extraordinary ROY of late where they're being they're being held up Jack Dorsey and his like a big held up for the world's ills and I think his strange retreat into this quasar religious slightly remote isolated status. It just doesn't reflect a very healthy mindset to me. I think he seems a bit like a man in retreat.

Jack Dorsey Twitter Gwyneth Paltrow New York Times Silicon Valley Horatio Harrod Dulcie Anorexia Twitter. Mangone Joe Ellison America STI Prince Harry TED Facebook
How does body image impact mental health?

FT News

07:02 min | 1 year ago

How does body image impact mental health?

"Impact is body image half on a mental health Darren Dodd discusses while bodies often cause of shame and distress and what can be done about two with Chris O'Sullivan, the UK's mental health foundation and London deputy teacher vanilla Kennedy. Chris this year steam for mental health wellness week in the UK is body image. Why they chose in that? Well, it's something that many people relate to. But there isn't always disgusted and always out in the open something that baiters all ages and stages of our life from schools in young people to lay to life. And it's the bit challenging is something that people don't find it easy to talk about. And as we get further into our work to promote mental health awareness. We want to explore some of the more difficult topics and make some progress on those you put up some interest in research gives you the top lines from that. Yeah. We wanted to know bit more about body image. So last year, we covered stress and we discovered around twenty percent of people felt by their body image caused them to feel overwhelmed or unable to Cape in the last year. So we wanted to know more about body image. And the figures are quite stark. I mean, we expected to see quite a high proportion of people having. Ng trouble with their body image, and how it made them feel but around eighteen percent of UK adults in our survey of four thousand five hundred dollars with yougov said that they had had suicidal thoughts as a result of their body image around a third had experienced feelings of anxiety and around third. So thirty five percent had experienced depression. We also asked people whether they had felt take your emotions in relating to their body image and nineteen percent of UK handles had said that they were disgusted as a result of their body image and twenty percents said they hid experienced shame. So these are emotions we don't want people to feel particularly since the proportion of respondents saying that they felt proud or happy was relatively low at nine percent and sixteen percent. So we see that there's an issue here. And we wanted to look into that a little bit more we had gender. For example, we find that more women than men had reported having liberally themselves as a result can. Of their body image around one in ten of the women who responded to the survey compared to four percent of men but twenty five percent of men in the survey reported feeling depressed about their body image. So it's not just a women's issue. Although is something that affects women in particular young women and that needs to be addressed. It's not just adults accosted spats, though, the image and worries among school kids and teenagers. You've got some research coming out on that swell. Right. Absolutely. So in the main survey we look to eighteen to twenty four rediscovered the eighteen twenty fours generally had more concerns about their body image. But we did a specific poll with teenagers and one of the things that came up were cross the board with social media. So twenty percent of UK adults belt that images on social media had caused them worries about their body image. And that was forty six percent of eighteen to twenty thousand survey. Amazon broadly similar to what we were hearing from teenagers. What indeed we've been hearing from young people through our schools programs and our young people's programmes. Which is just another reason why this is an issue that we need. To concentrate on less. It could time to turn to finunc. Finale. How much of a problem is it causing? I teach at a very academic girls school with an Aggripa very academic gull schools, and I really agree with Chris that this is an issue that justifies girls. However, what's really interesting to me is that when a prospective parents expect the atmosphere our school one of the questions, I always ask is is there a lot of issues around body image. Is there a lot of anorexia bulimia your school? Obviously. I answer gory. No because we're incredibly practical about it. But it's interesting that they always ask that of girls schools, and I say to them did you also have eaten when you send your boy there in the answer's always. No. And my feeling is that with women in particular, we buy into the beauty and diet and exercise industry with such vigor, and we spend billions on those industries, and it feels to me that the lack of funding and awareness around. These issues is actually quite cynical and deliberate because it's not really an industry or government interests. Make this a better situation for young people. You see, for example, the lack of regulation around social media. Now, I think we'll all agree that we don't know yet because it's grown so quickly and without any sense of control and any real research into it. How much of an impact session media hasn't body image? But I do know that having been a teenage girl and worked with literally thousands of them, the teenage girls potential to compare herself negatively to others, and particularly the way that she looks has to be exacerbated by the opportunity to do that relentlessly online. So you know, I used to pats compare myself Kate Winslet in a magazine, but I wasn't looking at the celebrities ation of ordinary people all over my social media for seven to nine hours a day. So I think it's potentially really dangerous, and I think we have to look at more than just providing child and adolescent mental health services at the end of the process where things have really fallen apart and teenagers sent hospital's director and focused much on early intervention. And that's why what Chris in the mental health foundation. Do. Doing in terms of lobbying against the relentlessness of messaging by advertising campaigns. And so on is so important social media, usually grabs the headlines for this. Oh, we confusing cause and effect here. Could it be that troubled kids are seeking solace online? How could we ever know? But what I would say a totally buy into the nation that only child may well, spend more time gaming on social media than a child has an active healthy Seychelle life with lots of hobbies. And so on However, I don't know any young people he wants online, and I don't think that we have an entire generation of lonely children seeking solace online. So what we do know is the genie's out of the bottle, and I wouldn't want to demonize the internet, and in some ways, if you look at how for example, politically active generation is you look at someone like gratitude and Berg and the way that she sees the internet to raise environmental issues young people use the internet incredibly, positively as well, so it mustn't demonize it and make the move feel like they can't look at Kardashian without falling apart thing, that's an issue. But what I think is that we really need to be helping them build. Sense of self esteem is actually about liking themselves not just focusing on the shell of them and what they perform to other people. It's actually about I own my space. I like my voice I like my opinions. I've got good friends just social media traditional majors well-placed apart. Of course, it does. I recently rates are letter to net flex about a film to the bone, which in my view in numerously glamorized what it is to suffer manorexic, which is a potentially fatal and incredibly dangerous disease. And what that film, which was watched by literally millions of young people were saying was in fact, being thin is a good thing. And it was teaching you how to be just in enough but not being hospital, which I think is insane. Chris at

Chris O'sullivan UK Darren Dodd London Yougov Anorexia Kate Winslet Numerously Glamorized Kennedy Depression Finunc Amazon Director Berg Seychelle Kardashian
A New Green Deal: CVS To Sell CBD

Business Wars Daily

04:36 min | 1 year ago

A New Green Deal: CVS To Sell CBD

"This episode of business wars daily is brought to you by central online from Pitney Bowes. They make it easy to save time and money. No matter what you ship or male. You can try it free for thirty days and get a free ten pounds scale. But only by visiting PB dot com slash b w daily. From wondering, I'm David Brown and this business wars daily on this Wednesday, March twenty seventh. Well, CVS is going green the company recently announced, but don't expect to see any solar panels. At least not anytime soon. This shift is more of an herbal variety. That's right. The nation's largest pharmacy chain plans to start selling products infused with cannabis the retailers taking on a brand of products infused with cannabis all or CBD marijuana or hemp derivative that has no THC in it THC's, the active ingredient in marijuana that makes people high last Wednesday CVS announce that will start selling CBD lotions, skin patches and other topical products from a company called cure, Elif holdings. It'll carry the line in eight hundred stores in eight states as more and more states legalized cannabis and its derivatives CBD's popularity has been growing it's seen as something of a cure all for a wide range of ailments ranging from anxiety to. Chronic pain to acne to even cancer symptoms? There are a few FDA approved medicines containing CBD one for epilepsy. Another for anorexia and a couple for cancer patients. But it's long been illegal to use federal dollars to study marijuana. And therefore there's been little researched on that would prove the vast number of claims around the CBD benefits still with all the buzz, but will has been showing up in everything from coffee and beer to jelly beans, and even dog food that kind of growth, and the associated revenues has hardly escaped CVS notice the companies jumping into the market only a few months after congress passed a farm Bill that legalized commercial sales of hemp based products along with selling various forms of CBD cure leaf claims to be the country's largest chain of marijuana dispensaries. It's worth noting that people who have been buying CBD based products. Elsewhere. May not think of them as medicine, but that perception could be wildly different for pharmacy customers who could expect that CVS pharmacists have expertise around how to dose CBD oil. The FDA has not approved the use of CBD in foods or dietary supplements and the legality or the perception of it remains murky on the same day that CVS announced it's purely partnership federal agents raided stores in Texas seizing marijuana and hundreds of pounds of CBD oil, the legal confusion didn't restrain the exuberance with which CVS announcement was greeted cure leaf is a public company it stopped jumped seventeen percent and the news could also bolster CVS in. It's endless rivalry with Walgreens today that chain has an announced anything similar, but if the green gold rush, we've been seeing doesn't slow down seeing CBD pop up at Walgreens and other major chains. Assume would hardly come as a surprise. From wondering this is business wars daily. Hey, we would love to know more about you. Take a second. Visit one dot com slash survey. An answer just a couple of quick questions widget. We appreciate it. Thanks so much. I'm David brow. We'll see tomorrow. This episode of business wars daily is brought to you by central online from Pitney Bowes central online makes it easy to save time and money, no matter what you ship or male, plus you can print shipping, labels and stamps, right? From your desk with Centro software. You can compare rates between shipping carriers and gain access to special USPS savings. You can try it free for thirty days and get a free ten pounds scale. But only by visiting PB dot com slash w daily. That's PB dot com slash BW daily.

CBD Marijuana Pitney Bowes FDA Cannabis Walgreens Cancer David Brown Centro Elif Holdings David Brow Anorexia Congress Texas Thirty Days Ten Pounds Seventeen Percent
When It Comes To Race, Eating Disorders Don't Discriminate

NPR's World Story of the Day

07:12 min | 1 year ago

When It Comes To Race, Eating Disorders Don't Discriminate

"Eating disorders had the highest mortality rate of any psychiatric diagnosis this week. One organization is trying to spread the word that eating disorders affect all of us from NPR's coats, which podcast Charene, mice Marashi has more. Carla Moseley wants you to know that people with eating disorders, look like her two. I'm a woman of color, and I certainly didn't know that people like me had eating disorders. It seemed like it was a white rich female adolescent disorder only one of those identifiers fits Moseley whose black and binged purged for years. She also struggled with obsessive thoughts about food. I've experienced so many holidays and social. Events where I wasn't present with people because I was focusing on. What was on the table? What was going in my mouth? Then once I ate. It is gonna make me fat the next day food haunted her at times food comforted her at others. And when she threw food up she says, it was actually a way to purge pent up sadness and anxiety. She says there was a period in her life where she was throwing up every single night Moseley's an actor. She's been a regular on the daytime soap the Bolden the beautiful since twenty thirteen but a decade before that she was working on a kids show in Australia at night. I was doing this really violent thing by myself up all night. And then during the day, I was like smiling and entertaining children, and it was very strange, Dr Jekyll Mr Hyde moment, and I was kind of like barely keeping it together. And then my aunt passed away. Her aunt was like, a second mom, and when she got that news, the very first thing she did was run. Into the bathroom to throw up. Her colleagues were aware this was going on and begged her to get help which she did. And speaking honestly about her eating disorder, and her recovery is Moseley's way of giving back. She says she was lucky to have colleagues who supported her, and she knows not everyone has that luxury. So she's using her platform as a black actor with sixty thousand Instagram followers. You know, my picture shows up in their feet every day. And that's a wide range of people. I'm on the number one soap opera in the world is possible that by my telling my story people can be helped Carla Moseley's an ambassador for the largest nonprofit in the US helping people affected by eating disorders the national eating disorder association or Nita this week marks its annual eating disorder awareness campaign. And this year's theme is inclusivity the tagline come as you are. And one of our big goals with ambassadors is to really carry forward. This message of commas. You are that's the head of Mita Claire Miskito ambassadors like Carla or sharing their stories this week and miss go wants other people to do the same using the hashtag come as you are. She says thirty million Americans have struggled with an eating disorder at some point in their lives, and that number is probably higher because the stereotype of who has an eating disorder affects how we talk about eating disorders who seeks treatment who gets treatment and how they're treated miss. Go hopes people of all genders and racial and ethnic backgrounds will participate it's really about against celebrating community and busting these myths that prevent an have prevented so many people from coming forward. Another myth people with eating disorders are all thin Chevy's Turner who founded the binge eating disorder association in two thousand eight says that's just not true. She's struggled with both binge eating disorder and atypical anorexia. That's when you restrict your food intake in your calories. But you don't look super thin. I have always lived in a higher weight body. And so part of what the greater eating disorders community back in two thousand eight was not doing was really representing people in higher way bodies with eating disorders binge. Eating disorder wasn't recognized on the American psychiatric association's diagnostic manual back. Then as something Turner worked on changing and that officially happened in twenty thirteen now that there's more research on binge eating. She says demographic data's emerging the Latino community actually has the highest rates of binge eating disorder, and they are followed by the black community. A researcher told me that Latina she worked with who crossed the border from Central America and Mexico had gone without food for so long. They started binge eating once they finally had it so food insecurity can be a trigger. Trauma can also be a trigger as well as anxiety and depression, but most of the studies on what causes eating disorder. Have been done by white researchers on white women with diagnostic tools designed by white. Researchers for white women Turner who's white wanted to address this lack of representation in her own way. So she invited an equity expert who's black to speak at the binge eating disorder association's annual conference a few years ago. She says that expert desert Atalay got up on stage. And she said I just want to let y'all know that this is a room full of white supremacy. And until that point I had not really realized just how white are organizations were and just how much we were not listening Chevy's Turner has a new job. Now, she's at the national eating disorder association. She joined forces with Clare miss go at Nita to quote, unify the eating disorder community and miss go acknowledges, they have some work ahead when it comes to being more inclusive as a white woman. I'm sort of putting forward that typical picture of who struggles needed doesn't have a Latina ambassador yet. But they reached out to someone to help get the word out about come as you are her name's Gloria Lucas, and she started her own thing because like Chevy's Turner. She felt like the eating disorder community wasn't serving her knees as a Latina with an eating disorder who identifies as chubby. So she created not going up positively pride. Now, Gordon means a woman with the big butt. And it's also sling rights, I think that people relate to that. Right. That's big Spanish like, oh, this is familiar, Lucas, his Instagram. Also called nine going up, positively pride has eighty thousand followers, and she gives toxic schools and in bilingual bookstores, basically wherever she can gather an audience of people of color to share her own recovery story, and how she came to the realization that trying to prove her worth in a society that doesn't value her was making her sick. She says she read that eating disorders are saying reactions to insane circumstances, you know, but I think that KamAz your is like everybody from all different types of backgrounds. Come as you are and talk about our struggles with food right because eating disorders thrive in isolation. The national eating disorder association's come as you are campaign. Ends march. Third Shereen mighty Marashi. NPR news.

Binge Eating Disorder Carla Moseley Turner Chevy NPR Instagram Dr Jekyll Mr Hyde Gloria Lucas Kamaz Researcher Black Community Bolden United States Mita Claire Miskito Australia
"anorexia" Discussed on Food Psych

Food Psych

04:11 min | 1 year ago

"anorexia" Discussed on Food Psych

"And then there's the whole issue of atypical anorexia, which boggles my mind because essentially just I think if disturbed weight bias like in effect because I believe that atypical interacts yet for use. That term is the individuals, the small subset of the population of people who have eating disorders who lose that incredible amount of fleet in are, you know, essentially ceded, I think that's probably atypical anorexia everybody else who's may be larger bodies or or who's a smaller amount of laid of probably way were missing all of that on my God. Totally that is. Yeah. That is the much more. Typical pattern. Right. That's the much more typical way that it does show up is people are in larger bodies and don't lose enough weight to be considered to have the standard, quote, unquote, anorexia, and so they're just lumped it, you know, either they're if they're lucky they get the atypical anorexia diagnosis, or they're just given some brush off usually like, oh, well, you can't possibly have an eating disorder you or or, you know, miss categorized as having binge eating disorder, even when they never binged or they only been secondary to restriction or whatever that it's. So problematic. It's such an invalidating system. I mean like except for like, you said, the subset of people who feel like that labels, helpful they feel seen. But I think the rest of the time it's so invalidating in. It's just also just like the I don't know the behavior cutoffs kind of make me, I don't know cringe at times because it's like much together. Instead like two times a week this behaviors clinical one time a week, or you know, one time every other week. That's not all that's not upsetting or distressing enough. Yes. As though it wasn't upsetting distressing to be doing those behaviors at all like, right? It's like the specially the compensatory behaviors which you know, it's like blaming behaviors. Nobody's meant to do that the compensatory part of it like nobody's meant to do that. And that's actually very dangerous. Even if you're doing it once a week or at all, so right? And even if it's not medically dangerous right now for whatever reason are. You're not adequately. Whatever it's still emotionally dangerous. It's just a distressing to participate in. So that's why I like to say to people that I don't really give a shit. What you're diagnosed? I mean, I care for managed care force, essentially, if you care a lot in let's talk about it. But if you don't have a diagnosis that's not really what's important yet. That's so important for therapists to be into have that position. 'cause I think it's it makes it so much safer for someone to come to you seeking treatment for disordered, eating whatever they think that you know, it's like they could think maybe I haven't eating disorder. Maybe I'm just kind of weird about food. But like let me get some help for this and to have a therapist who says like, yes, let's help you with that is like leaps and bounds. More productive and healing than having someone be like, well, you don't actually meet the clinical criteria for this. So it's no big deal. You know, just along with your life, which Adly so many people, and I had that experience to or it was just like as fully dismissed out of hand for not being thin enough or not having frequent enough behaviors to meet some criterion. So therefore, it must be fine. It's like, no it's causing a lot of emotional distress. So as a clinician who told you that? Yeah. Couple clinicians. I had the first one that I opened up to about it. Because again, it was like I was twenty when I I really descended into the eating disorder. And I started to recognize that I was having a problem because like so many people it's like the restricting wasn't a problem until I started binging. And then I was like oh my God. I'm out of control, you know. And what I wanted at the time in my disordered mindset was of course, just be able to like stop the bingeing and keep their survey, which is not possible. So the first like four AM trying to talk to someone about my eating disorder was talking to them about the binging. And I actually talked to my mom about it, who is a therapist herself. Obviously..

anorexia binge eating disorder Adly
"anorexia" Discussed on Food Psych

Food Psych

03:23 min | 1 year ago

"anorexia" Discussed on Food Psych

"So yeah, I I'm not a fan of calling it a typical I think just by the nature of the word. It sounds uttering. I just think of anorexia as a disease where people intentionally restricted starve and use unhealthy compensatory behaviors. That's kind of what I think. And I think sometimes people lose a lot of weight, especially if it's the first time that they've tried it. And then I think as people get older and have done these behaviors for longer often weight Loss's not coming forward as a primary symptom or people's bodies may actually gain weight while engaging in these. In these self-starvation behaviors. And so I think as long as we continue to rely on weight as the primary indicator of the disease, we're going gonna miss many people who have not only mentally significant disorders, but we're going to miss people that have clinically like medically significant disorders, and that's another finding from the review that I'm doing right now is that kind of regardless of weight, we're seeing similar medical symptoms manifest for folks. And so it doesn't even seem to be a good Indyk weight doesn't even seem to be a good indicator of like when a person needs medical attention, but is huge because I know so much insurance and care decisions are based on whether a person is quote, unquote, underweight, and that would allow them to get reimbursed for a typical anorexia diagnosis and also I think a lot in a lot of clinicians minds. And I know I used to be like this to it's thought that the weight loss. This causes those medical complications. And in fact, it's not actually the weight loss at all that's causing them. It's like the act of starvation, right, which is different than weight loss. Yes. So curious if you can illuminate that part a little bit. Yeah. So that is definitely what I'm finding in many of the studies that I'm reviewing and to put that in kind of. So my research is is not just review is kind of the background for my research in my research, actually has to do with speaking with patients who've had these symptoms in these disorders and hearing what they're disorders have been like how they've changed over the years. And then also how they've interacted with medical and professional like eating disorder professionals and one of the things that I'm finding so I asked folks Pacific about medical complications that they've had documented in a medical chart, and I also asked them about the actual like lived symptoms of it. So for instance, when you are severely restricted or. Or experiencing a lot of compensatory behaviors. Specifically, Pershing your body might become static which means that it has difficulty regulating its blood pressure when you change positions like when you go from sitting to standing or laying to sitting, and so we might see whereas like a normal happy healthy nourished body kind of strives for this place of homies stasis where it, you know, like you stand up and you sit down, and it's not like a life threatening situation, and it just kind of adjusts, and you're good to go, and we're really thankful for that like automatic nervous system that does that for us for somebody who is starving. And or who is having a lot of purging behaviors you might see that their body can no longer perform that kind of really basic task of regulating their blood pressure..

anorexia underweight
"anorexia" Discussed on Food Psych

Food Psych

04:12 min | 1 year ago

"anorexia" Discussed on Food Psych

"Right. Wait by us as as a large part of what creates this disorder thinking about food and bodies. And so if we're reinforcing that in our treatment programs than we're just taking away people's ability to recover, and it's no wonder so many treatment. Grams have such high recidivism rates, honestly, you know, with that sort of mentality. Yeah. And can we call it out when we see it? You know, you you have a fat staff member on a treatment team. And you have patients that are afraid or mocking that fat staff member. How do you use that as a teaching moment, and like how do you call attention to like, hey, what's going on right here is weight based discrimination? And it's not okay. And this is part of the root of your eating disorder. Like, no, we're not gonna we're not gonna have this fat person. We're not going to put them over here and not have them eat with you anymore because you're afraid of their body. I mean as long as it's okay with this poor fat person has right? But we're actually going to talk about this. You had this behavior. You had this joke or whatever that came up in this treatment milio that you are, you know, and we're actually going to talk about it. And what it means, and how it connects to you in your own fears or the fears of the eating disorder. I know how mazing would that be? If treatment centers could do. Do that. And it's an uncomfortable conversation for sure, and it's there's a lot of nuance to making sure the person is. Of the fat person is comfortable being in that conversation. Of course. But yeah, it's just it. I think that would be revolutionary and yet it's not what we see. Right. I mean, I'd love to hear some of what you've found in doing this research on well, you know, higher weight anorexia and just the idea of why it's even called atypical in the first place. You know, like what what's that about? Yeah. Some actually I'm working on what in research, we call as a systematic reviews that means you look at all of the research out there on a certain topic. And kind of evaluate it for how good is it's quality. And what is it say? And you 'cause you can find like a study anywhere that says anything pretty much we really wanna know. Like was that actually a good study? And if that was a good study that said that one thing have other people found the same thing, or is that just kind of like special to that one little area of the world. So yeah, I am working right now on a systematic review of all all back to two thousand seven when we first started looking at changing the DSM to include a category for highway anorexia, and many of the studies out there have found that what we call a typical enter Xia is actually more prevalent than what we call typical interacts which would be the underweight version of anorexia. And there are other studies that show the opposite that it's less common. One thing though, that I think is missing in this literature is even when we are saying that we're looking at highway anorexia, many of these research studies still have what I would consider a very small weight range that they're willing that they have participants in. So these are participants who are still either in a what we would consider the normal range of BMI, according to current BMI standards or patients who are just slightly out of that who are just slightly above. And so we're not actually seeing what higher way anorexia looks like across the weight spectrum. And I think many of those folks who are having that restrictive eating disorder behavior, but are still at higher weights than we would consider they they seem to be put into like another category, even like this unspecified. And I think that's because there's a lot of resistance to classifying someone with a much larger body. As having erect CEA when in fact, when we when we're actually looking at just what people are reporting in terms of their behavior their intake their compensation behaviors we can actually see that disease of anorexia manifest across the weight spectrum whether that's underweight, quote, unquote, normal way or in higher and much higher weight categories..

anorexia underweight CEA
"anorexia" Discussed on Food Psych

Food Psych

04:09 min | 1 year ago

"anorexia" Discussed on Food Psych

"But I definitely came. I knew kind of from a young age that I wanted to do something with eating disorders. And I think it was more in my gosh would have been like late twenties that I kind of started focusing a little bit more on eight what we call a typical interact Zia and weight stigma, and for me that came out of a personal experience. Where I presented with a typical anorexia had previously been what we would call typical anorexia and then. I now because my body was larger had the same eating disorder, at least I perceived it to be the same it. Sure looked at Bolton sounded the same. But my body was larger, and I actually had to inpatient experiences wanted that typical level and wanted an atypical level and looking back at the treatment experiences. They were so different. And if I hadn't already had so much training in Hayes from I like decade of treatment prior. I can only imagine that. I mean, I I actually I did need treatment after I came out of treatment. And so I I can only imagine what it would have been like if I didn't have access to those resources. And so that was kind for me one of the start of like, what is going on that experience was just so formative and how I started to think about weight bias, and the fact that for me from my lived experiences a person this was pretty much. I was kind of reliving a very similar eating disorder that I had had in my youth. But for all of my providers, at least in this particular center, I was treated just very very differently. Where it really was like you said you made that joke about the extra snack. I had like an hour nutritional session about like whether or not I could put cheese on a sandwich where I was advocating for cheese because everybody else had it. And I was feeling even though my eating disorder. Didn't want me to have it. I just didn't wanna stand out. And I was like, you know, really like what is one slice of cheese have to do with anything. Like, this has no. The cell has no long term impact on like my physical health whatsoever. But it has a really big impact on my mental health. When I'm with my peers and everybody else has cheese, and I don't and so things like that. Where like it's just like, not your standard anorexia patient conversation like. And so I think those that experience in particular was very formative for when I did get to a different place in my recovery. Coming back with the idea that this is not how treatment should be for folks whose bodies are heavier. We need to do a better job of it. And just really seeing how some of the kind of standard ways that we practice eating disorder treatment can really cause harm for folks in larger bodies. And I would argue that that also causes harm for folks in quote, normal weight or thin bodies. Because anytime that we're partnering with phobia or we are Norman or okaying thinness as as preferable to fatness, we are really subtly reinforcing the lies of an eating disorder. Whether that's for somebody who's higher way over someone who's lower weight. So I think by focusing on. How do we improve treatment experiences for people in higher way bodies? What we're actually talking about is how. Do we get even better at beating eating disorders? Like, how do we get even better about finding their lies finding those sneaky subtle places where they are looking like health or looking like normalcy or looking like beauty and kind of like trying to get that out of our or at least like bring it to light. So that we can actually treat those parts and have a critical dialogue about them to write like, yes. Not let them just be sort of unconscious. Yes. That's such a great point. And you're right that it really is just like that's what good care looks like for eating disorders is not having weight bias in the picture because weight bias is like what got people to this point..

Norman anorexia Hayes Bolton
"anorexia" Discussed on Made Of Human with Sofie Hagen

Made Of Human with Sofie Hagen

05:01 min | 1 year ago

"anorexia" Discussed on Made Of Human with Sofie Hagen

"You need to lose weight, but it wasn't healthy done. And I remember writing around that time in we had a school project where we had to write our life story what a school project, and I remember writing saying, I I wished I was on a wreck sick. And. Skip ahead to when I was fourteen and that was when I a boyfriend which vegetables offer cost my focused. Your first triggers was boyfriend. I had a boyfriend secondary school has about twelve eighteen months. He broke up with Madden really like him that much but just stuck out. 'cause I'm physically stubborn and loyal. And when he broke up with me, I had put all of these emotions about my family about not fitting in with my family about being different them being sent to boarding school as well and the trauma that all of that into this relationship, this this boy, this this other entity I'd become obsessed with and I told him I do anything to get him back. And he said well in that case you need to lose weight in front of his friends. And I let him physically do things to me as well that once that want healthy for a while. And it was it was a piece and I'm still learning about that within my own therapy. Do you wanna say it's physical emotional both? But mainly physical stuff that went on. And it was it was really I have had so much guilt. Guilt was a already entrenched in my family as well. And shame and secrecy. And I was very depressed. I had regular about said what tantrums and that would be wrong word to use like fits of just conceived with grief, and it was so about this boy. But I I was very unwell at times, although everything happened was consensual. It was not in a healthy. It wasn't enthusiastic consent. It was very unhealthy and. I developed when I stopped him. I can't do this anymore. That was when almost almost that Cup coupled with operation I went through. I I something like open owners that that's stopping myself is is the answer is the way to have a voice. It's a way to. It's the way to express myself. This is this is the thing. And I just committed quite an all the ways committed to anorexia. And that was one of fourteen was first diagnosed and an time remember going. Yeah. Well, yeah, I mean, obviously, and then all my friends continue their education, I fell out with boarding school, which is not necessarily a bad thing. They didn't let me back off my first hospitalization because they said that I was a bad influence on the other girls because of all the crazy. Yeah. And yeah. So I I was also pleased voluntarily and then sections when I was seventeen section mean does that mean that it's forced or your? Yes. So I I had I didn't human rights taken away from me. I I was and that's one of the things that I'm she racing mental illness embassador four now they have a campaign that moment cooled such five days to thirty five years. Very recent campaign that I've been quite vocal in the legislation around being sectioned under the mental health act detained or committed hasn't changed in thirty five years, even though all mental health attitudes have changed. So when you're section, you have no human rights, they can treat you any way. They do anything to you. And legally you have not offered to stand on an I pretty fucked up. It's completely God. Yeah. And I when I was sectioned I the way I was treated was not was not. With respect didn't dignity and the stress of being sectioned. It not being explained to me and having I'm not allowed to wash or take lots of my things taken away from me. I didn't feel respected in the stress of that exacerbated my own mental illness, which meant I then had a psychosis. So I had audible visualizations for full blown three weeks and then for on and off for another two to three months off to that. Which I think was possibly avoidable had I been treated in a different way. So so yes, that was all Geeta anorexia, and the anorexia stuck around is it's still in the, but then also moved when I was nineteen year old from anorexia and very quickly to compulsive region disorder..

anorexia Madden psychosis Cup thirty five years twelve eighteen months nineteen year three months three weeks five days
"anorexia" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

News Radio 920 AM

02:55 min | 2 years ago

"anorexia" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

"Nine four five five. Researchers say that their new study, adds to the avenue that certain diet And potentially the amounts in types of bacteria in the gut may also contribute. To mania, and other disorders that affect the brain future work on the. On this association could lead to dietary interventions, to help reduce the, risk, of. Manic episodes and those who have bipolar or who are otherwise vulnerable to mania It's. Not really a side note banana different note here a lot of times when I've seen cases of people that have eating disorders in particular let's say More of the anorexia versus the bulimia, what a lot of people don't realize with bulimia is that. A lot of people are either average average weight or a little bit above above average, weight and And I, think a, lot of times when people think a believe mea which is actually benching and purging right they think that the people are going to be really thin or if they're not going to be you know they're gonna look more like somebody that's in Iraq And that's not the case so I just want to bring, that up for a moment and, then? Also went someone's anorexic I will tell you that when I've had clients come in say a hundred, and they, say they wanna be eighty for whatever reason and We're working with them to you know they're, working with a social worker. They're working with their medical doctor and they may. Be working with a psychiatrist or nurse advanced nurse practitioner but it's a team approach always bought. One of the things that sometimes happens ably and it's not, what we want to happen but we're working with them the parents are worried You know, the parents. Are worried about the child so they're bringing them, in but the child doesn't really want to gain weight. She wants he or she wants to lose weight, and so sometimes but not always the child's will meet those goals and what happens. Then is I will I'll, I see it every time all they wanna do is lose weight lose weight, lose weight, and then when they finally, get to, that weight their spikes like crazy. And their depression go so bad they're going to have to be hospitalized either way but, they're getting hospitalized, for being underway for being. Malnourished for having an eating disorder but in addition to that I would say like most the time, there's underlying strong anxiety and. The the you know So the. Depression gets worse and worse and worse so you have to understand, that if you're not letting your body be at. The way it wants to be that you are actually going to probably experience some symptoms of anxiety and the, other thing, is too. If you're not feeding your body correct lay the, white matter in your brain changes and then you're not..

bulimia Depression Iraq anorexia
"anorexia" Discussed on People's Pharmacy

People's Pharmacy

03:59 min | 2 years ago

"anorexia" Discussed on People's Pharmacy

"Have family meals anymore they become more withdrawn for anorexia they start might start wearing more clothes that might be to keep them warm because their body temperature tends to drop it also hiding the progression of the weight loss so those are all signs and again pediatrician visits when you see your child you know falling off the growth curve but also sort of selective reducing of what they eat so they might start cutting out whole food groups like no meat and then no carbohydrates and then no fats and just this constant sort of decrease in what's okay to eat in the scary thing about that is sometimes it starts out sounding really healthy might come home and say i really want to start eating all organic or yeah i really want to reduce red meat or i'm worried about sort of the health of america's chickens so i'm going to start eliminating chicken but when you start digging down and looking at the pattern you realize that this really is a selective way to just start decreasing how many calories and how much food they eat so let's say you've identified an individual part of a family whether it's a child or whether it's an older person what happens in that therapy session what are the steps that you begin to go through to help change the course of this condition right for kids it's pretty straightforward when you do family base there be and what you do in the very beginning is you sort of restructure the rules of the family because usually when they come in anorexia sort of ruling the roost it has taken over the family it has made people sort of start doing separate the mom or the dad whoever cooks doing separate dinners for the person with anorexia and the rest of the family all that gets erased and the power balance gets reshifted so so that the parents again are in control of eating for the whole family especially for the person with anorexia nervosa and then the parents decide how much is going to be eaten with help of the therapist and then they sit there until that child finishes the meal and everything in the beginning stages of family therapy is about renewing that child and making sure that they get the nutrients and calories that they need to get well it's tough work we've seen families have to like temporarily quit their jobs we've seen parents who've had to stay in their children's bedrooms to make sure that they don't exercise at night anorexia is a tough cookie and it really is hard to treat so it needs you need all those people on board to treat the onus does help to prepare the food together as a family sometimes yes and sometimes no because what anorexia likes to do is it like to sort of say hey mom use less butter or hey dad you know don't put that extra bacon in there or something like that so in some ways it's better just to to have done to serve the bill and then there are no questions there aren't those sort of obsessional questions about how you kept cooked it or what you did it because that's sort of anorexia talking rather than the child talking and what about for adults what do you do in in that situation for adult it's a different situation because this the power structure is different in a couple and we really individualize it for the couple's so for some they might actually want their partner to be very involved with renew rushing them for others that feels to infantilized and it's got to be more equal but the most important thing for the couple's is the no secrets approach you have to get it all all of the symptoms out on the table and you do that with the therapist there you talk about whether you know after they go to bed at night you actually open up the computer and start looking at those pro ana websites that encourage eating disorder behavior partner thought you were up watching the late night shows you were actually you know looking at the computer for inspiration to stay underweight and some of them cook together some of them if they really have difficulty in the middle of the day we've had some couples who've decided it'd be really nice if the partner could come home for lunch and then they would eat lunch together if that's possible other more creative solutions are skyping lunch together so we've had a couple of.

anorexia
"anorexia" Discussed on People's Pharmacy

People's Pharmacy

02:08 min | 2 years ago

"anorexia" Discussed on People's Pharmacy

"Unified strategy to renew irish the child is the way to go with this sort of illness with anorexia nervosa with all eating disorders you have got to bring the family into the treatment picture and you have to give parents strategy as for dealing with this such as such as for anorexia nervosa the parents really take control of nutrition so you completely take it out of the hands of your child you prepare the meals you do the family meals together sometimes the siblings are even involved you don't want any sort of cracks in the structure to let them be able to sneak out because anorexia can be a really sneaky operator and these kids can try real hard not to eat people think it's manipulative but what you have to understand is that eating makes these kids really anxious and our job is really to get past that point where starvation calms them so is this essentially innings iety disorder we've gone through history of eating disorders people always try to make it into something else so is it really a depressive disorder because so many of them are depresses it an anxiety disorder because they're so anxious i like keeping it in its own ballpark i like saying that it is an eating disorder but there are are aspects of it that are related to anxiety control because the interesting thing about these people biologically is most of us getting more anxious when we're hungry you know lunchtimes coming up and we start getting a little scratchy and irritable you might snippet each other a little bit more you might get a headache these people often feel that way at baseline and then when they starve it reduces that anxious feeling so don't lures them in because you wonder what makes them be able to not eat for so long in it's reinforcing to them because it reduces their dysphoric it reduces their anxiety is there a metabolic aspect to this as well yeah that's a great question so we just finished a very large study and we're about to even bigger one where not only did we identify the i locus for anorexia nervosa on chromosome twelve interestingly one that was also implicated.

anorexia
"anorexia" Discussed on WTRH

WTRH

03:26 min | 2 years ago

"anorexia" Discussed on WTRH

"Get irritated and impatient and not with clients never with clients like that's when i know god is there i always pray before i mean someone no matter what community or home or shelter whomever i find becau and because i supervise people and it's really let him in that role you supervising therapists counselors case case managers and social workers which is different from therapists but there's a lot of overlap not always so godly because part of my role is quality assurance my tech all the documentation and you know the teacher in me is very precise but i have to be and i'll get impatient if someone's still hasn't you know i don't there's parts of me that i'm not so pleased with anymore and i just it's like i wanna be further chiseled to be more effective uhhuh so is the pope catholic well of course look at my history looking at mitalent is i mean yeah you realize okay now i mean let's see if we can okay just just a surface view okay anorexia is control that is out of control and you've shared with me that that even though we we just we just mentioned it and i thought this is helpful but connecting the dots when you were a child i look at this from your earliest days you were a victim of all kinds of abuse we're we're talking about nothing it breath about light things we're talking out if you're taking out significant you know sexual abuse and that which is the most the greatest betrayal of your own physical body and so so what happens then is it's like i hate to be out of control because it's not safe okay so then what this is where the anorexia kicks in this is the one thing i can't control how long i keep a bite of food in my mouth how long you know what do i do with it and it's it's like it's not that you want us but during our anorexia rick who are anorexic or those who have anorexia they look at and there is something about control so i look at the past and then obviously this is not.

anorexia rick
"anorexia" Discussed on Season 5 - Christy Harrison - Intuitive Eating Dietitian, Health at Every Size Coach,

Season 5 - Christy Harrison - Intuitive Eating Dietitian, Health at Every Size Coach,

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"anorexia" Discussed on Season 5 - Christy Harrison - Intuitive Eating Dietitian, Health at Every Size Coach,

"Paul yeah that was really important i mean interestingly my anorexia was the worst wall who was in graduate school getting my doctorate in psychology so you know it's sort of this like very concrete example of how the mental health field is really arbel at talking about these things you know i had lots of psychologists around me all the time and not one person said are you okay and can we do anything to help so i don't know how i would have reacted to that but i also edged seems like such a concrete example of how we avoid talking about the stuff even when it's right in front of us right totally while from what i've heard about psychology graduate programmes and social work graduate programmes the workload seems incredibly not conducive to selfcare compared to my graduate experience as a dietician and masters of public health i feel like i had time to say study had time to have jobs i even worked fulltime for awhile owes and grad school and like took night classes and was there part time but like it it worked dino were verses i feel like graduate school first psychology and social work at least the friends i've had gone through this programs it's like they can't ever go out because they're studying 247 there's always something more to do and an internship anna long commute and all the stuff it's like neverending seems like he adds so shirley that a lot of work n not a lot of focus on self or even just like downtime just having a break what i actually ended up doing i was i had gotten that far too graduate school and i was sort of like i just need to finish so i was so focused on getting through everything and then once they finished all of my training i actually moved back home and took some time at that point to really focus on recovery and i was talking earlier about like the imf.

Paul anorexia imf
"anorexia" Discussed on Season 5 - Christy Harrison - Intuitive Eating Dietitian, Health at Every Size Coach,

Season 5 - Christy Harrison - Intuitive Eating Dietitian, Health at Every Size Coach,

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"anorexia" Discussed on Season 5 - Christy Harrison - Intuitive Eating Dietitian, Health at Every Size Coach,

"With diagnosed anorexia and people in larger bodies who were these suppose it success stories quote unquote for weight loss and yet stopped short of making be admission that like actually people in larger bodies who are engaging in these behaviors also have an eating disorder like also could be clinically diagnosed with anorexia you know and that it's incredibly harmful and problematic to try to figure out how to prescribe things that people with anorexia due to people in larger bodies like that is unconscionable and why are we even publishing a paper about this it's just just boggles the mind yeah i mean it just goes to show how pervasive wave i as is and this fear of fed is just that it overtakes people the ability to think rationally you know like these researchers like you said who are wellrespected people in the field and i don't think our intentionally trying to cause harm but through this entire process it didn't occur to them that these same symptoms and behave voters that they absolutely would diagnosis anorexia and somebody in a larger body are also anorexia in a person in the larger body mmhmm right yeah the same symptoms just the body sizes different that's the only difference train yeah i know it completely boggles my mind that that still happening and i know that you've spoken and written about higherweight anorexia and the fact that that is a thing right in that people can have in our xia in a larger body what do you want clinicians to know 'cause we definitely have a lot of clinicians and physicians and stuff listening to podcast what do you want people to know about higherweight anorexia when it comes to helping someone and also for people in the audience who have someone in their life or maybe themselves suspects that they might have this going on how do we help people who are struggling with us yeah i mean i think that for people in the field so for providers who are doing us work they really need to look.

anorexia
"anorexia" Discussed on Season 5 - Christy Harrison - Intuitive Eating Dietitian, Health at Every Size Coach,

Season 5 - Christy Harrison - Intuitive Eating Dietitian, Health at Every Size Coach,

02:03 min | 2 years ago

"anorexia" Discussed on Season 5 - Christy Harrison - Intuitive Eating Dietitian, Health at Every Size Coach,

"What somebody with anorexia looks like and so my body was much smaller and so that was when people started questioning and saying are you okay and i often wonder liked what i have gotten help if i had it ended up in a much smaller body because i think there are lots of times that people are restricting and are in larger bodies and nobody's even asking the questions about their patterns with food or are they eating enough totally yet is that situation of like people praising the behaviors or whatever it takes to get there because your body's eyes is changing and that is seen as a good thing in diet culture and it's only when it reaches that threshold like you said of obvious emaciation where people are like oh no this is bad like we have to help this person and meanwhile the same behaviors in the same patterns have been happening for months or years before that that eventually did lead to this point of emaciated but it's not about and my kids the behaviors themselves and the thought patterns themselves were what drove it in the first place right exactly like my anorexia was not worse when i was in a smaller body than it was when i was in a larger body people's reactions to it were different but the anorexia wasn't worse i was doing the exact same things at a lower weight as i was at a higher weight and that's just so problematic from the perspective of like trying to treat people with eating disorders in diet culture 'cause i think that's where it always goes is like so many healthcare providers and i heard this myself and my eating disorder because i had an eating disorder that was also characterized by restricting and binging but at a certain point i was at a very low wait for myself and not clinically considered to be at the time it was the dsm four and it was you know the clinical criteria for anorexia had this bmi cut off and i didn't meet that so i people who talk to me were like well what you're describing.

anorexia
"anorexia" Discussed on People's Pharmacy

People's Pharmacy

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"anorexia" Discussed on People's Pharmacy

"Benneh than and essence that it it wants to be and it's gonna sort of fight to stay there no matter what you're doing to us exactly right and we've known that on the obese side for a long time but it's new news on the anorexia side and the difference is it's quite fatal down on that end of the spectrum um you know there been some movies lately that say it's important to have people given the opportunity to reach rock bottom and treatment for anorexia nervosa and that is patently false because rockbottom means death for anorexia nervosa i would like to know how you deal with anorexia because this is something that you have spent a great many years and your career trying to understand and treat and you know for for those of us who who are not in the field and who kind of look at this research of amazed i i remember going out to dinner with uh an acquaintance and um he and his wife looked yet very professional really great uh it's a lovely dinner she was thin but not superthin just thin thin and she seemed to be eating and afterwards i asked a friend who is there you know why why was he calling her anorexic he said well you know she didn't need anything and i said what do you mean i saw her eating he said no no she is so adept at hiding the food that you didn't even see her.

anorexia
"anorexia" Discussed on WTRH

WTRH

02:10 min | 3 years ago

"anorexia" Discussed on WTRH

"Is an observation we happened to him material on anorexia and i subtitled it control that is out of control this is not be negative about her but put is classic with those who have anorexic x anorexia is they were in a situation where they felt they there was negative control over them they did not on have control of their lives and so this is the only way that they could exercise control and it's what they either put into their mouth or what they did not put into their math or what they had to eat within a how long they could keep it in their mouth and get rid of it where people wouldn't see it my point is when when i hear that someone has anorexia i know that there was something outside of their circumstance it was painful to them and therefore it was very important for them to find some way to get some way of some means of of control and you see this with karen carpenter from years and years ago who made a popular at the two the word anorexia brought it to the uh to reality people who didn't even know that that terms of course she died of anorexia it typically people die of him mm of heart attacks their they're electrolytes get off and so they're heart stopped so as i see that only because without knowing her without ever having met her if i if i know that she has had any anorexia in the past she can be very sensitive two feeling a sensitive being controlled are feeling out of control.

karen carpenter anorexia
"anorexia" Discussed on WREK

WREK

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"anorexia" Discussed on WREK

"The at each of these there was a substantial consideration of suicide among all the people who were suffering from these conditions yet anorexia is the single most dangerous mental health disorder inter arms of the risk of death uh people with anorexia are at a very high risk of suicide and uh it's not it's a somewhat lower for the other eating disorders but there's a significant burden of suicidal thoughts in all of the different kinds of eating disorder ars yeah i think we we take those much more likely than we should i i have actually heard people say in public well you know it's it's still worthwhile to fight obesity even if it increases the risk of more people getting eating disorders because obesity is bad for you and the answer to that is obesity is not anywhere near as bad for you as these eating disorders and there are many many things that we can do to mitigate the risks of obesity and allow people to the live healthy happy lives it's much much harder to mitigate the risks that are associated with eating disorders though lots of people.

obesity anorexia