Audioburst Search

17 Burst results for "angus reid"

"angus reid" Discussed on NewsRadio WIOD

NewsRadio WIOD

12:41 min | Last month

"angus reid" Discussed on NewsRadio WIOD

"Show every week folks you know we always take some questions from listeners and you can always info William and the team at info at cutter's H. dot com William had a question come in from lady by the name of Tiffany right she lives in port Saint Lucie and thanks for listening all the way up on the treasure coast Tiffany Tiffany says William love the show really glad on June and I have a question I had a new royal poinciana tree installed several months ago and and it's about a twelve foot tree when should the stakes be removed and also how long will it take to start flowering I'm gonna let Mike answers question all right Mike yes hi so as we get out of what you really want a lot going for about for a full year and then you want to concentrate on when we're looking at hurricane season okay and then the the stakes could be removed as far as how long it's gonna take to flower that depends on the root growth but tell within the year should start flowering in flushing out sorry all right and the folks that is of Mike see all he's chief operations manager at cutters edge and also joining us today Ron Frank business development manager and designer obvious intento business development manager large account specialist role goal denies super intended and run L. Joseph senior superintended employee on boarding and training at cutters said Jim the focus of our show today is to talk about career opportunities and landscaping and the William you have so many facets of the business but let's talk a little bit about opportunities in landscape maintenance mowing landscape maintenance there is there is there's multiple things are going I mean obviously it's not just cutting the grass right which a lot of people think but there's you know detailing the plants every plant has a different shape or form on how you trim on some they have to be hand and stepped which shares some have to be done with a hedge trimmer some have to be done with Lauper's so there's all different types of stuff when you're doing your lawn maintenance side of your business right keeping trees at a certain height so you know on the bottom of them so people can walk around and they're not hitting him in the face or not eating their cars while they're driving so maintenance of a property there's a lot of different aspects to it and there's a lot of different skills so we have all kinds of levels of skills within our our IT staff we have guys are really expert hedge trimmers we have really guys are good on detail we have guys that spray herbicides the weeds in the in the terror so each one of those have a different skill set and and as they progress in their career you know they make more more money sinistra so it's a really rewarding industry from really from the bottom up everybody wants to be with a company where there is room for advancement yep and that's the that's really important in our and we know what we do is not we don't only do lawn maintenance you know right we have geisha and we have pest control the lighting lighting Arbor care right right so you know somebody starting with us we have a great example in the room as you know role he started as an educator with us and he's now superintendent and manager of you know about eighty guys and gals standing next to him he came in a little bit more advanced and roll because he had worked for another company okay and so but he starred as our landscape installer and then went to help us when we launched our tree division built did our trees forest as he had experience with that and then now he's worked his way up to the superintendent a role and he's the senior superintendent you know he manages all the foremen and young and stuff so you know these are guys that came into this industry and they do very well for themselves you know yeah I would say so guys of many of you have risen up of the ranks at cutters in jazz William was saying and is that the possibly part of what it may have attracted you to cutters edge in the first place yes because I work with so much going to be feel yeah when I can with because H. M. C. while America is it so okay as I've been focusing is working with because it's you know the long term or a long time any special requirements so when it comes to working in landscape management I mean I know we talk about like I'm always fascinated by the topiaries Sir William and that's got to be somebody who does of some very precision work yeah there's there's a a person on every team beyond other several guys on the team that can help you detail but there's always that one or two right have that touch because you know it's it's kind of like an artwork to do those things and you know you got to be very efficient very fast doing it so yeah it's it's definitely is definitely is a a talent to do the topiaries we had the Alan Scott from hunter industries with us not that long ago and we're talking about irrigation now that's another thing that cutter said showed us all how do we look at irrigation in terms of a career well you know the other allegation Gaza starters went check guys they come in and they have to learn how to use the clocks there's owns the right ring right they have to know coverage they have to know the difference between all the different parts of irrigation system right so when irrigation is a little more technical and and there's a lot of stuff above with that but then they move up and they move up into a technician's role you know we have a couple technicians have been with us almost fifteen years also okay and they have to know pump stations after no pressure volume of water that goes to the system right after no out of wiring clocks popstar relays so that becomes a very more technical opposition when they get up to that bill and then you know there's a licensing you're right to be a license well that's where we are in the street yeah I was thinking about that myself I mean one thing that distinguishes the cutters edges everybody who works for you is certified in what they do is they are licensed in what they do gentleman I'm I'm going to guess that you all have some sort of license so or perhaps a multiple licenses and certifications so if anybody feel free to elaborate on that if you like more of like a separate I was young it's a company that actually is the licensee right they become certified sort of going under the Karni certified under the company also so everybody in here as has gone through whether it's best management practices whether it's going through the Arbor care classes on how to train properly getting the Burke county certifications F. and G. LA which is more in the horticultural side of the business we have Ron it's sorry what actually is a certified has control of Congress so he can follow fire for the company all right so you don't you have all kinds of different aspects of the business okay all you mentioned pest control and we've touched on the subject of integrated past management Ron can you tell us a little bit more about that well integrated pest management is using the proper chemicals to get rid of a a problem you have like insects or Angus Reid that are attacking the plants and then changes it there's always new insects coming in that seem about you know and there's also the government taking controls away from us that we've been using for years so we have to adapt and come up with new controls so it's a constantly changing a situation and I think at home integrated pest management it's your target the insect instead of blankets rain we're right we're right at our firm Arment absolutely absolutely it requires training obviously but it's really more than just insect control yeah that's fertilization you know it's knowing you know what is wrong with the plan as an interrogation issue as a dry isn't an insect issue could be a disease like a fungus or bacteria right in the planetary or is it a nutrient deficiency mmhm so you know our our pest management folks they do are integrated pest management now they they have to be really school so that's even another level of of of knowledge that you have to have in the industry uhhuh uhhuh uhhuh young Y. so I think we've spoken on other shows about it seems there's always new pests and insects that maybe are coming from other parts of the state or the country or maybe from other countries well also the insects build up a resistance to the all locals are using okay sometimes it's a problem to try to get it solved because the insects again are resistant and it they are affected by it so even even some of the insects that have been with us for a long time here in South Florida you say they're building up an immunity right yeah it's almost like you know antibiotics right you take too many of antibiotic your bill will resist running separate to clan bottom right you gotta change up your chemical oils you know when you're using them out there sometimes we just go to in the cooler months like we're we're entering now we use horticultural oils to to take care of the past we get him off of the pesticides for a little bit okay because like like he's saying they will get resistant oil and then your soprano men and it's not really working welcome okay all right very good we talk a little bit about opportunities and landscape design and again low Ron you are one of the designers what kind of opportunities Arthur there are lots of opportunities is just you have to have a a creative bent you'll have to be able to visualize what you want to do before you do it to pay for it so it works right you have to have a wide experience with plants and knowledge of plants mmhm you get the contrast texture of fine texture color in the it's just a a knowledge base that you have to worry about right all right Mike Scott a lot experience to a landscape design so I'm sure you can fill in on some of those absolutely I think plants around any structure building a really important to give you your whatever your desire ascetics are but from a design standpoint of there's nothing better than a like Ron said creatively coming up with a solution to get things together it does require some plant knowledge and and visualization of what it's gonna look like not only now but as it grows and fills in and making sure that you're choosing material that is gonna fit without him and I which also is probably the most rewarding to see just like when we finished I heard here at home watching the employees walk in and you know just seeing their faces the arms and all come together right right so it's it's it's one of the most rewarding positions you can out because once you get done with it it's you know it's beautiful it just changes the whole aspect of everybody around you role and run LOL you're out there you're out there in the field supervising the projects and everything what's your experience like and so you watch some of these designs come in to place and that obviously it takes us some time to get to the finished product sometime when I get to a bubbly is thanks I see could they could have like a little plants in that door and that plan good film a column of say guys listen when it'll do it better so that's almost a deal I mean supervisor guys make sure that things look good all right now your band your Vietnam all there we're not we're told everything that Rondon Mike put together he's in charge of actually making sure gets executed on so you know you could say a little bit about you know the landscape designs and believe me.

William port Saint Lucie royal poinciana tree Tiffany Tiffany
"angus reid" Discussed on White Coat, Black Art

White Coat, Black Art

10:48 min | 2 months ago

"angus reid" Discussed on White Coat, Black Art

"Infected and sadly more than five thousand have died from the virus. Most figures are from the Public Health Agency of Canada That was the first wave. But there's a second way that's underway one that plays havoc with our emotional wellbeing an Angus. Reid poll last month found half of all Canadian said. The pandemic has worsened. Their Mental Health Stress Anxiety and depression are on the rise. So we're substance use and domestic violence and unlike that first wave the second one may linger so this week to help you and to help make sense of what this pandemic and others before have done to our collective psyche. We've decided to call in a specialist alerts Mackenzie. We'RE GOING TO BE FORMULA. My going to have to call you doctor. Brian Goldman Dr Graham McKenzie. Or do I get Cooler Brian. I hope you will comedy Brian. Cooley you grind thank you. You've been on my list of somebody. I've been looking forward to speaking to on white coat black for a long time. So thank you my word that pressure there then right especially their doctor Queen. Mackenzie is one of Canada's most illustrious psychiatrists. He's a professor of psychiatry at the University of Toronto and Director of Health Equity at the Center for Addiction Mental Health. He's also an international expert on the social causes of illness suicide and the development of effective equitable health systems as a virus Kobe. Nineteen attacks the human body but the disease also preys on our mental health. And it's especially hard on those who come from disadvantaged social cultural and economic backgrounds all of which makes Dr McKenzie the perfect expert to help take our emotional temperature and provide thoughtful guidance on how to cope how you doing as well as can be expected obviously covered nineteen eighties challenging for everybody and Like every family. We've had our challenges. Canadians are being affected by covert nineteen in so many different ways socially economically medically. Which do you think is having the biggest impact on mental health in general in this country? Well that's a very tricky question because we started the pandemic already in a mental health epidemic. So we have very high rates of anxiety and depression because of the way we set up a Canada and what in nineteen is very good at doing is exacerbating An exaggerating existing problems in a in a country or in this society and not surprisingly a nineteen has made a mental health worse for many people and is it covered nineteen itself. Is it the Public Health Response? And what's happened with physical distancing? The lockdown is it the fact that now mental health says the some people less accessible or is it the economic downturn. That's happened because coded nineteen we happened. Actually tried to quantify that an Acoust- for any particular person they may be being exposed at all things and it's difficult to say you know on depressed today because the local where I'm depressed today because You know I've had to lost jobs. I it is pretty difficult to try and disaggregated line up one way to queen. Mackenzie just put it this aggregate to tease out. Why one person or another is depressed or anxious is by listening to the stories of individuals which is why we asked you to share stories. About how your coping or struggling right now? Our thanks goes to Christie Franson Hamilton Ontario for this contribution. I suffer from agoraphobia. Severe form of panic disorder. That has left me completely. Housebound simple tasks that others take for granted like running to the grocery store for milk or going to the bank to pay. A bill are impossible for me but it wasn't always like this. I used to be a contributing member of our community. I went to work. Her University. Degree married my high school sweetheart. A good doctors appointments and take road trips and visit family to celebrate the holidays. My life wasn't perfect but at least I was living in ten years ago. I experienced my very first panic attack and little by little. My world started shrink. When you're a prisoner in your own home you run out of things to live for very quickly. Not only do you lose your freedom but you lose any sort of self worth that you once. Had you become useless? Powerless over nineteen restrictions. Starting to slowly lift. I hear stories from people of all the things. They can't wait to get back to going to work earning living getting a haircut and I think it's important for people to hold onto hope through this to have something to look forward to when life resumes again but for those of us like myself who struggle with these types of conditions. There's nothing at the end for us. When Gobert is over I am still alone. Housebound isolated from the people that I care about. I hope that Cova nineteen is shown. Our mental healthcare workers the importance of inclusivity and accessibility. The services that are being offered so freely right now such as zoom therapy sessions and virtual doctors appointments were not so readily available for months ago. I hope that once over nineteen viruses past us that these positive changes we have seen in our mental health. Care system continue. Let's IT stays that way and changes the world for the better. Christie says her life before the pandemic wasn't much different from the way. It is right now because of her agoraphobia. What are your concerns for? People like her who were already dealing with health issues before the pandemic Cova nineteen is likely to exacerbate some existing mental health problems. Interestingly ripe had two different things from a people with agricultural and Social Sabia some have said that the Kovac nineteen pandemic itself has made that life easier because things that used to be difficult like going out the need to do and things can be delivered. Everything's a lot of those things happening easier. And I've heard others. They think at the end of this knife will be more difficult know the economic downturn another other things means that base last live four and we have seen as stock rise in SOME PLACES IN SUICIDAL. Ita Shen and also people making attempts their lives and so I think that the real problem brewing and some people calling the ACA EPIDEMIC. That then will be this sort of rising anxiety depression now and ofter cove eight. Because of all the stresses and strains people under how do you address those thoughts of self harm in those who are having them for the first time but also in those who are having more intense Thoughts of self harm who've had them before and now during the pandemic tense. One of the things talked about during they started doing in the Utan is offering to anybody who wants it. A training in a suicide. Prevention training is a sort of I say thirty basic because anybody can do it but very effective in learning to listen to people and learning to understand how not to try to instruct people of what they should or should David listening to people and then guiding people at the resources whether it be the help line so they crisis lines at all the imagine. Cd comments that are available to help people who suicidal but trying to ten people into therapists poten- people into listening as that will help people move to get the right to spam support and resources that they. I'd like to switch Topics at the moment to talk about kids and I wanted to do so because an angus survey that came out this week looking at how children are feeling during this pandemic found that. They're they're bored. They're missing school and their friends. But what struck me? Was the number of kids surveyed. Who are worried about their parents. Twenty two percent of them or other family members getting sick twenty six percent of them nearly one in four. How concerned are you about the stress on kids right now? I hadn't seen the survey results and I haven't seen him in detail could just as figures really the chill out my spine. Charlton is not really supposed to be a time. Where you worry about your parents. I remember being a kitten. Must've are you be forever? And that is part of the basis you need to be able to go forth confidently and grow. You don't need those sorts of Need sorts said he had that many kids are worried about that. Parents really makes me very concerned. We got another story. That really moved us. From Don Kelly a schoolteacher in Vancouver. Dawn's husband died last year and she's sharing with her students how she's dealing with her grief as a teacher. I see feel hear all my greasy bits in my charges. I see them in our online learning. I sit and chat with them on the phone. I listened to their words. I feel anxieties disappointments depression. Sadness family challenges financial insecurity social disconnection for them so much. I walked beside them. I know this because my husband died. I hear the sadness and they're not to be worn Grad dresses. I hear their anxiety in their learning assignments. Keeping up not keeping up. I tell them about my routine. I talked about finding control where.

Mackenzie Brian Goldman Dr Graham McKenz agoraphobia Public Health Agency of Canada Canada Cova Center for Addiction Mental He Reid Director of Health Equity Christie Franson Hamilton Onta Cooley Acoust University of Toronto professor of psychiatry Christie Gobert
"angus reid" Discussed on Front Burner

Front Burner

05:58 min | 2 months ago

"angus reid" Discussed on Front Burner

"We have a certain capital on loneliness. In other words it is such a huge phenomenon. Says the research that it's become epidemic levels holing data from the Angus Reid Institute conducted in partnership with Cardis shows. Nearly half of the population says they are somewhat lonely or very lonely that chronic loneliness some experts say can actually be lethal situation as you well known the in the United Kingdom had the government. They're appointed minister of loneliness two years ago. New Role will tackle solitude in the UK where more than one in ten people feel isolated. I've been shocked and indeed humbled by some of the personal stories. I've heard twenty three m up on the shoe and there were so many people around me and I was just so banks not one single US and looked up postal or spoke to me so talk to me about the toll of chronic loneliness and what it can take on someone. Because this isn't like I feel lonely today. Tomorrow will be fine. We're talking about an ongoing state of loneliness. I think and the emergence of Administer alertness and so on percents recognition that leading us is very damaging it's damaging because it costs a lot Bluntly a lot of older people who are lonely creates a kind of burden on the state. And that's a lot of the language in which people use when they talk about the epidemic of loneliness but people are also talking about teenagers being lamely in Canada. We've done a study about university. First Year University students sixty six percent of them feel extremely lonely mothers being lonely. You're in this fog of newborn and motherhood and it is a really long time you questioning everything. Women who are unemployed in this does not now a category of society that we can't as Looney at some point in time now the challenges. I think that as you say. There's a real difference between being chronically lonely. I'm being a temporary loan date There are pinch points of existence in which all of us are going to Bologna at some point while we're working out who we are what we want from life but then that's compared to chronic loneliness which is when it's accompanied by severe psychological and physical health problems often and that's when it can become a real problem one of the challenges. I think with covert nineteen is that we simply don't know how long people will be in isolation and that and time and loan intersect in really complicated ways and so there have been warnings about you know the consequences of the state that we're in right now. Things like depression substance abuse. Ptsd even post traumatic stress disorder. Not People taking their own lives. The study warns that the isolation and the anxiety from the lockdown may be responsible for as many as seventy five thousand drug overdoses and suicides over the next decade. We're looking at the three things unemployment isolation and of course the uncertainty. We don't have a vaccine. We simply don't know what's going to happen from Beta Day. That's the part of this corona virus puzzle that we are perhaps just seeing the front end of and will play out over time. The me I think one of the most challenging things. This whole epidemic has been seeing people have to deal with bereavement and loss and not being able to go through the usual rituals that we associate with saying goodbye to someone and I do think that that is going to have longer term implications on On high levels of grief and mourning in society and I also think that's going to be a lot of anger too about how set and governments have handled things so there's going to be a lot of emotions Coming to the fore this pandemic you said that look it doesn't matter what your demographic is loneliness doesn't just affect one demographic and we have for some time now talked about Teenagers and young people and the loneliness crisis that has befallen them. We've tied it a lot to them being on their gadgets and their phones and not Interacting in a physical way with their friends and so on so forth and yet here we are in Cova. Nineteen saying look. You got to stay away from those friends. Connect on the zoom or the skype. How we're talking all those things. Talk to me about that aspect of it. Like teenagers and kind of turn. We've asked them to make and how that will might affect their loneliness. I think it is a real problem for teenagers right now. And and as you say we've often been quite worried collectively about the impact of social young people's lives. I'm positive that is I think. At the moment we're having to recalibrate anxiety around social media because historically we've always had an anxiety about new technology that changes how people relate The same kinds of arguments were made about telephones As they have been made about social media I think that many teenagers now a very pivotal moments in defining who they are and not to be able to see their friends. I think he's particularly challenging but it would be a lot more difficult. I think for teenagers if they did not have social media. It's only really since the nineteen fifties that we thought teenage them as being a particular state that we have to move through particular time of our lives And it's now associated with time as a time when we really define who we are. We make these long lasting friendships and learn how to engage with other people And I think temporary loneliness is necessary politics that as we go through life and it would be only expected. I think when people trying to work out who they are that they will have pockets of loneliness. One of the interesting things I think in terms long term chronic loneliness is that there are definite associations between people who are lonely in later life. And I'm when they're not and people who are lonely when they yeah so the seems to be some correlation between the coping mechanisms and the ways in which we develop relationships as a child and a teenager with how we are.

United Kingdom Angus Reid Institute Cardis Bologna Canada Looney Cova
"angus reid" Discussed on Party Lines

Party Lines

04:22 min | 2 months ago

"angus reid" Discussed on Party Lines

"Comes from inside the country. As you see you know my sister having a cocktail on a patio and me sitting in my house and more what happens if someone goes off side And it puts the rest of US potentially in jeopardy and and I do think it's fair to say what Quebec is doing is offside it's it's different. I'm not sure that it will work or not work. I don't know but I know that it's completely different than what we're seeing elsewhere but when you ask the prime minister as he was asked this week will you do something. Will you say something? Can you do anything? The answer is a very careful one because it is Quebec. And interfering in jurisdictional issues in Quebec takes on a whole new sort of political life than if you were doing elsewhere. Wouldn't go over well anywhere in the country but particularly not well there. So I mean Y- Okay Doug Ford might be criticized because we don't know when we're all getting haircuts but is that is that just is that worse than someone taking what his own Health Public Health Officer Quebec's public health officer harass you. A rudo said was quote unquote risky. Bet I don't know like a to me politically. I would be more comfortable hedging than than doing that. It's certainly like it's a situation where you know you think. Six seven months down the road. I can't think take some but but if I were I can't imagine that many people being mad at a government for waiting too long to open but some people might be furious if you if you don't wait long enough and some people die because he didn't wait long enough and that sort of political gamble that we're seeing here and I would also say this to be fair to Quebec. It is optional to go back to to send your kids back to school. You don't have to do it right. They said this is the plan right now. But if in two weeks we feel like it's not gonNA work we'll adjust the plan and I I do feel like people in. Ottawa are sort of not only waiting those two weeks. The Prime Minister talked about it this week but also hoping that the two weeks will Either dramatically changed the case load in Quebec or Quebec will come around to a different way of thinking now. I broadly speaking consider myself to be a reasonable person for the most part. But I'm starting to need a date like and I'm starting to need a date and when things will begin to move towards whatever normal is it doesn't have to be soon and we don't even have to keep to it but I'd like to sort of desire an official say. Hey June fifteenth is when. We'll start to reopen everything. And then maybe you know on June the tenth. You tell me. We can't do June fifteenth anymore. We have to do a little bit later. He's that irrational. On my part. No I think that's so normal. Yeah so you would like a date even if the date gets pushed back even if the day gets pushed back because like this indefinite businesses just starting to weigh on me in a way. I'd never anticipated. Yeah you're not alone when I sat down with Dr Theresa Town. I sat down with her last week and I asked about like. I didn't ask about you but I asked him about the push and pull of that of of the reality that you know people are like you they wanna date. They like their okay doing this. But they also want to know when it's over and and that's a real like you know live conversation with with public health officers and government officials knowing that beyond you an Ansi. There are a lot more serious things happening to. There is a mental illness which has Really seen an uptick. According to an Angus Reid survey fifty percent of Canadians. Say they feel worse Mentally a ten percent feel very. Much deteriorated. there are questions around Increased Abuse of alcohol and drugs There's questions of increased domestic violence. My colleague Ashley Burke did a story on that This week as well miners. That are invulnerable home situations. Maybe not being cared for. These are all like real public health. Pressures that are now exacerbated. Because everyone's staying home so like you're right to want to have a date date is also going to mean that it protect society from other problems that we're going to have to deal with down the.

Quebec Health Public Health Officer Q Ottawa prime minister US Angus Reid Ashley Burke Dr Theresa Town Doug Ford officer official
"angus reid" Discussed on The Current

The Current

11:12 min | 2 months ago

"angus reid" Discussed on The Current

"Sinclair is a columnist with Winnipeg. Free Press Chachi Curl is executive director of the Angus Reid Institute. She is in Vancouver. Good morning to you all Marie. Let's start with you Dr Teresa Tam. The chief public health officer in this country delivered a little bit of positive news yesterday. Where is the light at the end of this tunnel? Well we don't know the date yet but the news was positive as you show in the prime minister's clip earlier that things seem to be slowing down but in the short term They are going to get a tiny bit Starker if I may say so. Essentially Public House agency reviewed their projections for the short term taking into account the very high death rate that we've seen in long term care harm whole homes mostly in Ontario in Quebec so essentially we've surpassed what the public health agency was predicting three weeks ago and at that time when when they released their first projections the death rate was two point two percent. It is now five point. Five percent and seventy nine percent of those deaths have happened in long term care residents so the numbers had to be reviewed. Take into account that more. People unfortunately are Falling victim of Kobe nineteen and so by next week. Canada should expect to see between thirty three hundred and thirty nine hundred deaths and between fifty three thousand in sixty seven thousand cases that being said though there the bit of good news was that Dr Tan reported that the the spread of the virus is very much slowing down in the country. Despite those those stark numbers that we're seeing so if the rate of the doubling of cases in Canada I if those were doubling story every three days a few weeks ago now it's every two weeks so that's good news in the sense that it's spreading less but the message was very much. We still need to do a lot more. Because we're not out of the woods. The Prime Ministership Claire. How difficult is it for? The prime minister to thread that needle politically he wants. People obviously to stay vigilant but people are looking for the good news because they want to get outside and they want to resume some sort of normal life so politically. How tricky is this for him? Yeah and don't forget to Canadians. Are looking down south and seeing this Thirty fractured United States dealing with it in various different ways. We have the Prime Minister's navigating a complicated issue in that it's very much tantamount to the ways of the Virus operates for all of us If individuals don't take responsibility that it's impossible for the collective to and of course. The prime minister is the head of that collective and we've got individual provinces who all have different experiences with the virus on the for example out here in Manitoba we're seeing single digit positive cases daily whereas in BC spiking Ontario They're seeing large amounts per been in long term care facilities and so the the experience is is that the prime minister has no jurisdiction in order to tell the problems is how to operate but can come out with things like tones or gestures or Specific directives but really the provinces have to deal with this on their own means. That means a whole lot of politics and a whole lot of backroom discussion than what we're really seeing is. We're seeing a lot of re- rhetoric used by the prime minister to try to navigate certain prime minister certain premieres and certain directions particularly in Quebec Ontario. Mary out I WANNA bring Shochu in a moment. But back to you. How does the Prime Minister do that? We'll be hearing from as I mentioned the premium Scotch coming up. They are getting set for some sort of reopening within the next couple of days the Education Minister from Quebec who was just on talking about reopening some schools in a couple of weeks time. How DOES THE PRIME MINISTER TRY TO OFFER GUIDANCE? But also respect provincial jurisdiction. Yeah you guns right in the sense that it is tricky first of all. It's all this is not his jurisdiction right reopening Retail stores schools how to deal with the healthcare aspect of all. This is not his jurisdiction. There's a limit to what he can say And the prime minister tried to come up with these general national guidelines that he agreed to with the provinces. But when you read those. They were pretty vague. It's essentially trying to make the cases go down and try and make sure that everyone has the right equipment to Stay safe and try to make sure that your hospitals and healthcare institutions can can care for these people. But there's not a whole lot he can do. The trick is yes that you want to provide modeling because people are asking quite aggressively when this will end rightly so but there's also first of all the risk of being wrong which unfortunately the candidate public health agency has been twice Twice their modeling has been proven wrong when when we actually got to the date where they had projected the number of cases or death and we have surpassed them and there's also the risk that if you give him good news while people get a little bit too optimistic and the essentially stop Listening to the public health measures and then things go south. So it's a difficult balancing act and it's not really in the prime minister's Court if I may say it's up to the provinces and as we see and we're going to discuss well they have a very different approach to it and it remains to be seen whose approach will be the safest one in the end curl. You have been polling. Stir crazy nation. How eager do you think are to see these restrictions lifted so it's a balancing act between that cabin fever factor And depending on where you are in the country and what the weather's like in the country and I can tell you on the west coast. It's been very nice indeed Then people do want to get outside the do understand the need in the imperative for businesses to be able to survive. And so the reopening. Or you know the so-called return to normal or lifting of restrictions Does depend on on that. And it's an argument that holds sway but ultimately ultimately what you're seeing is a country that is airing on the side of caution. Overall people are of the view that restrictions should be lifted slowly. They should be lifted between sometime between sort of you know the the end of May and the end of June and that they themselves when their own provincial governments do start to open things up particularly when it comes to commerce schools. A return to work They're saying you know what I'm not going to be all that Eager to necessarily jump back into my normal life just because it's okay to do so for many Canadians. The idea of getting back onto transit to to work going to the gym going to the hairdresser. It D- it just feels really daunting especially when you've got Canadians who have been listening to their public. Health OFFICIALS IN THEIR PROVINCES. Four weeks hammering home. The message that staying home is the safest thing to do. It's actually going to take some coaxing on the other side to to feel like okay. Things really are safe but I want to say this and started to go there. Which is this story is very much. A regional story in a provincial story. Canada's not monolithic across the country on this the Quebec government is able to start taking some steps in the direction of opening things up because quebecers are among the most eager to see things opened up and as well as the prairie is. If you look at what's going on it's a schedule and a Manitoba public opinion. There says. Open it up right away sooner than later. Much more than it's likely to say. Wait indefinitely or wait for months and months so it really is a matter of what are people ready for where they live the other part of this bringing back in a moment. But we've been talking about some of the other data that you have around the toll. This is taking and particularly on on our mental health. Indeed and you were talking about this yesterday on the show. I've been talking about it since since we released our big report on this earlier in the week on Monday look Canadians. are are feeling quite squash and flattened by fifty percent say that their mental health has worsened since the effects of the pandemic took cold. So whether that's been the result of the shutdown and having to stay home the result of of losing work losing a job or certainly just the uncertainty around the public health aspect of it. But it's not just about money. It's not just money. That's driving that anxiety. A lot of it has to do with. What's your situation at home? Are you in a situation where you're getting along? Okay with your spouse your parent your kid's whoever it is that you are home with but the overall when we think about the words and we asked Canadians. What are the words you would use to describe how you're feeling at the moment and over the last couple of weeks worry is at the top of that list? Anxiety is at the top of that list. Boredom is there but you know gratitude is there as well and your province are people Chomping at the bit to get things reopened. Yeah well we. We don't have unlike schedule when we don't have a firm plan although or suspected to simply copy with Scotch one's doing or repeat it which is to open dentist office. Healthcare providers may fourth and then may nineteen hair salons and other kind of shopping places. I mean it's no surprise that in Quebec. The very first places that people are looking at opening is schools or elementary schools daycares because frankly referring to You know she's mental health. I think people are fulltime parenting and when I say. Fulltime like a fulltime fulltime parenting and having to also cover things like education schooling. So there's kind of this I think there's this Stressor of being We live in a society in which people work outside the home for the most part. And and that's where the money is earned it so now. They're forced to do the job with teachers and then also do job of also parenting on top of their already existing workloads and so that's more the mental health comes in and we're also seeing some stressors in terms of the effects of on relationships and there's been a spike in homes coming on the market from You know young couples for example. So we're seeing the split rates and also the issues of domestic violence increasing Not to Manitoba but also nationally and so. There's there is a stressful and mental health. That I think people are urging because it's a new normal and it's a new challenge for people's everyday life and routine therefore I think people are itching for come back more aggressively due to that but the bottom line of it is is that in provinces like Manitoba It's going to be kind of looking like You know two steps forward one step back. And then assessing as each each Restriction.

prime minister Manitoba Canada Quebec Ontario Dr Teresa Tam Chachi Curl Public House agency Winnipeg Marie Vancouver Sinclair United States Angus Reid Institute officer executive director Ministership Claire Kobe
"angus reid" Discussed on The Current

The Current

08:17 min | 4 months ago

"angus reid" Discussed on The Current

"Provinces and territories for the healthcare system and to help with the Cova nineteen but in the oil and gas sector. I think there's a little bit more vulnerability when it comes to going. After the prime minister on this issue of questions as to whether the budget would even be delivered delayed. What is your sense? Yeah that's a really good question because right now we had heard different dates we heard potentially before the Ontario budget which is the twenty four. Th that I'm not sure that's going to happen. I think they need more time. And even today the prime minister was asked about what the cove in nineteen response is doing to the budget. And he says that don't worry is having an impact but they still say they're in good shape fiscally so she had mentioned. The Canadians are worried and Canadians are concerned. You have researched this morning talking about that. What did you learn about how Canadians are feeling around the crown of ours? Well there is certainly a heightened level of concern and anxiety. No doubt about it. So we've been tracking this issue. Since the corona virus covert night was subsequently named covert Nineteen Started popping up on the national and the international radar four or five weeks ago Canadians were more inclined to think that the situation was overblown fewer were inclined to think that they themselves were going to get sick. They weren't as worried about friends. Family ELDERLY RELATIVES. That's changed three in ten are saying today that if they have already paid for international travel at trip overseas that they would cancel And so these are. These are significant findings in that what it shows us as Canadians are more engaged on this. They're more worried and interestingly to Hannah's points what is remarkable is how politically divided. We are on this which you would think in a situation where you've got a public health crisis or a public health situation that it is almost beyond political and yet for those who are on The the Anti Trudeau side of the political spectrum for those who tend to vote conservative. Far Less likely to say that the federal government's been doing a good job handling this file far less likely to say that they Have confidence in the in the federal government to to handle it and interestingly far less trust in public health officials in politicians and the media in terms of the information. They're hearing and that's critical. So yes well. I think it has been canny and savvy and wise for the government to put people like Theresa Tam and Bonnie Henry. Out there every day to be communicating as clinicians they have the highest level of trust but their vast vast differences between who Canadian trust in terms of. Who's doing the talking on that? Definitely what do you make of that? Well first of all. It's just an indication of how much our public discourse is deteriorated and that should worry in alarm all of us Particularly at a time when we need to talk to each other and trust each other even in a moment of crisis. People are still. We're still sniping at each other so absolutely I think it's It's concerning because if we can't If we can't figure it out under circumstances like this You know what hope do we have for each other? And I think that is why I emphasized earlier. I think a lot of people are you know. I think they'll be Happy to hear that the federal government is committing money in very targeted areas and indicating. They're prepared to invest a lot more but I suspect a lot of people are looking to local officials for calm and and guidance and I think largely We've seen that happen and again. These are not politicians providing that COM. These are our officials but as the economy. I mean that's on the medical front and people trying to stay save right. I think the larger question of you know our economic viability and the challenges ahead. That's what we better figure it out. People have defined this Kathleen in some ways of some sort of existential crisis for The Prime Minister's government that this is his first real. There's been a lot of things that have come on his plate but this is his first real test of leadership. How important is it for him? Do you think to get that that tone. If not the message to get the tone right in this moment I I guess what I wondering you know Hannah. What have some insight into this is You know part of. It's his tone I think is tone is actually you know based on my observation pretty good. I think it's more about the tone of the opposition parties you know. It's about the whole all the ingredients in that STU put together and how people respond to that when people are afraid. The last thing they're interested in is listening to politicians sniping at each other trying to score points. Sorry Sorry Hannah Beth I guess I would also say that. Canadians do tend to respond positively in situations like this to a leader to prime minister. Who comes out sort of sounding serious and sounding intentional and sounding like he's doing his job and we saw the prime minister's approval tick up certainly seven points which is a big jump for him in the wake in the aftermath of the Iran plane crash that killed fifty seven Canadians and left so many more families here reeling and it was the seriousness of the tone. It was the The sombre tone that really resonated with Canadians We then saw his approval tank. Ten points as as they watched him deal with or not deal with. What was going on with the blockades around coastal gasoline. So it really depends on sort of what prime minister. They're seeing in which situation and that will have an impact on how they respond. So he actually. I mean everything's political from analytical standpoint. He has an opportunity to hit reset a little bit After what had been a pretty rough month on the energy filed Hannah just quickly on that when it comes to the healthcare side of this I think they have done a remarkably good job because they have the experts out there and they're not relying on politicians to answer those questions. Unlike the United States like the United States Donald Trump is coming out and often giving wrong information incorrect information. I think that's really important for journalists important for Canadians to sit there and get the facts and not have politicians tried to squirm around those facts on economy. That is where his true test will be when people are talking about recession recession. Losing their jobs not being able to buy food pay their rents so this will be a good indication as to whether he is successful. If this one billion dollar package so far reassures Canadians who may have to go into site? Self-isolation that they won't lose their jobs and that they will have a paycheck and this will be a preview. Perhaps what comes in a budget? If the budget they connect the people are going to lose their jobs not because they're going into isolation that's the bigger problem that he's got to address people are gonNA lose their jobs because people are going into business because people aren't flying because they're not traveling got airlines Going on vacations. They aren't going on those vacations anymore. Maybe there's a stewardess or something that doesn't have their job anymore because they've they've canceled those trips and were pumping oil and we're not getting revenue to Ottawa. You're just about to say saturate. Sorry just saying that. Yes to to that point. Tourism represents a massive sector of our economy particularly in the cities. So again that's young people and we're already starting to see signs of it you know. The cruise industry is talking about the impact We've we've already seen the layoffs by the airlines are canceling roots. And of course all of that has a knock on effect all the way down right down to the folks who are working the Tim. Hortons at the airports Israel We will see whether the comments this morning by. The prime minister are enough to switch some of those concerns. Great to speak with you all thank you. Thank you know senior. Parliamentary reporter for CBC NEW SASHA CURL is executive director of the Angus Reid Institute and Kathleen Petty Executive Producer of CBC News in Calgary and host of a great podcast called west of Center for more. Cbc PODCASTS GO TO CBC DOT CA slash podcasts..

prime minister Hannah Beth federal government Kathleen Petty CBC News Ontario Cova Hortons United States Theresa Tam Donald Trump Trudeau Calgary reporter SASHA CURL Ottawa Angus Reid Institute executive director
"angus reid" Discussed on The Current

The Current

11:22 min | 4 months ago

"angus reid" Discussed on The Current

"The reality is that the number of people affected by the virus around the globe keeps climbing. Canada has been fortunate so far we have not seen a drastic spike in the number of cases reported but I know that people across the country are worried. Worried about their health worried about their aging parents worried about the kind of impact. This virus could have on their job on their business. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau speaking this morning on unusual announcement to try to deal with uncertain times between a dramatic drop in oil prices and the covert nineteen epidemic. Some people fear that Canada's economy could be slipping over the edge. Opposition politicians and others are questioning whether this country is equipped to cope and so with that backdrop. The Prime Minister spoke about supports for people and businesses affected by covert nineteen. This as he prepares to meet with the premiers on Friday. There is a lot to discuss with our national affairs panel and Tibo covers politics for. Cbc Sashi Curl is Executive Director of the Angus Reid Institute and Kathleen. Petty is executive producer. Cbc News in Calgary. Good morning to you all morning. The prime minister announced a one billion dollar aid package. Let's have a listen to some of the details of what he said is coming. Fund will provide two hundred dollars to support the ongoing federal response to the virus including more money for things like surgical masks and face shields increased capacity for services to indigenous people and other federal healthcare responsibilities and for continued public education efforts to Canadians. It will also invest two hundred and seventy five million dollars in additional funding for research and medical countermeasures including Vaccine Development and support for clinical trials on the economic front government understands the disruptive impact. The virus is having on businesses and workers. That's why we will waive the mandatory one week waiting period for employment insurance to kick. We're also introducing among other things special measures under the work sharing program to help employers. Who Fall on hard times due to Cova Nineteen Tibo? It was an interesting Quick announcements the prime minister as saying we learned last night that he'd be speaking this morning. What else did he say? Yeah I think one of the big things is for employees who may have to self isolate but don't have funding or We'll still get a paycheck from their employee employer. So one of the big things there is that they're waving that one week e I insurance time so it will be no wait times for that if they have to self isolate than they don't have a fear that they won't have cash to pay their bills to get their groceries. Those types of things and one of the big things at the prime minister was trying to do. There is by saying that no employees should be worried about losing their job if they self isolate. So they'll still have some form of cash and he also said no business should have to lay anyone off so he went on to say if this one billion dollar response. Bondsteel isn't enough. They're still open to doing more and he does. Also add that even though you know it's a twenty six point six billion dollar deficit this year for Twenty nineteen twenty twenty. He says the government still has room to do more if more is needed. So she curl. You've been researching what Canadians were expecting from the government. What Canadians want to hear from the Prime Minister? Well look right now. Canada's a big old stress ball right. You've got fifty percent of Canadians worried about friends. Family members of the community becoming sick Just less than that forty percent. You're talking about tens of millions of adults in this country who are worried about falling sick themselves. Two-thirds say that they expect the Canadian economy to take a hit and nearly half say they expect themselves personally to take a financial hit whether it's through investments market jitters or because of the specter of lost work. So this morning what the prime minister is able to do is to communicate to Canadians. Look help exists. There are measures It there's not a lot we can do. I mean beyond social distancing and as the prime minister in everyone else's saying wash your hands and don't shake hands and do things like that but you know in terms of practically slowing the spread. It's already in communities of major cities. It's here in Metro Vancouver. It's in Toronto. It's in other places. So what can what can the government do? It can signal that there is help coming and now it comes down to delivery so will the transfer of funds to the provinces will the delivery of medical equipment. Be Efficient and timely. Today was an opportunity for the prime minister to look leaderly to represent the office of the Prime Minister and really do the job of pm but the devil really lies in the operational details. Interesting research found that three and five. Canadians that you pulled are washing their hands. More often they are. Maybe the message is getting through Kathleen petty the language that Justin Trudeau used was interesting. He said we're on it. And we're pulling out. All the stops to ensure that Canada is at the forefront of this fight. What do you make of that language? Well he's language actually was one of you know we're listening to the experts deferring to the experts which is in contrast to what we've seen in the states to a great degree. He talked about global consultation. About special committees. You know the screaming. The testing the experts and You know his delivery was a little less breathy Then sometimes can be but you know I would suggest also that the provinces are sort of helping with that that sense of calm as well so just give well. I'll give you a stat. It's super interesting. So the rate of coverted Nineteen tests per hundred thousand population in Alberta Forty six point two percent in the United States. Two point six percents as of March tenth. And so I think you know we've got these chief medical officers of health coming out every day. I mean really is a coordinated response that we're seeing here and coming out and I think people have a lot of confidence in them. I think You know no one knows where this is headed for sure. That trajectory is unclear The numbers as the prime minister pointed out are still low but he made it very clear not only that he's got a one billion dollar response today but that he's quite prepared To see that number grow and I know a lot of people have suggested that we're looking at many many billions of dollars but you don't want to roll it all out at once. You want to be seen to be putting money in a targeted way as the need arises but also in a proactive way. So that you don't look like you're reacting what about the need in Alberta Premier of Alberta Jason Kenney said on Monday that we are in uncharted territory and it feels like there's a lot happening all at the same time Kathleen from the cove nineteen to The drop in significant drop in oil prices in the concern that that has led to what are people in Alberta? What were they looking for? Oh I don't know that they're necessarily looking for more than what they probably heard today from the minister. Honestly I think they're going to be more interested in what they're going to hear from the prime minister after the he meets with the premiers. And we know Jason. Kennedy's traveling to Ottawa His list is as long as it's ever been but it's now growing and we you know I was listening to the President of the Treasury Board yesterday on power politics suggesting that there is some kind of you know conversation going on between. Pompeii on freeland about Things that The market in North America. I'm not including Mexico here in the. Us and Canada and can do to try and protect the oil and gas industry. I don't know what that is however because I asked a lot of people what governments can do and none of them were to clear. Where does that leave Sushi? Bring Hannah back in a moment. But where does that leave this issue of of what's happening in Alberta in particular is the sense that this is a national issue. Can it be rolled in in some ways with the concerns around Covert nineteen or is that a separate regional issue. Do you think for Canadians? Well it's been an ongoing issue particularly in western Canada around. You know the the the policy push and pull intention point surround energy and the environment. How do you balance ensuring that our oil which and gas industry and fossil fuel industry which still represents by the way ten percent Canadian? Gdp is getting to market while at the same time acknowledging that overtime there's going to be a need to change to and transition to a more sustainable cleaner economy. But guess what? If you're a you know a householder in Calgary who has been through the last ten years Lost three of five jobs of the last several years. Trying to keep your head above water. You can't even sell your house because because that market never really bounced back and all of a sudden. Now there's a conversation about market jitters due to Cova Canada once again. Finding itself caught between a proxy conflict between the United States. Saudi is a Saudi Arabia as a US ally of course and Russia around prices again. There's a sense of four people in Alberta. The here are factors beyond our control. And again if you are that householder in Alberta the last thing you really want to hear about right now is transitioning to a different kind of economy. You really are more focused on. Okay how do we get through the next three months? We saw this flare up in the House of Commons earlier. Just in terms of whether this would be a non partisan issue or whether people would actually Take the opportunity to have a shot at a minority government and figure out whether there were cracks there in the armor that they could exploit Is the sense that the prime minister has shown some leadership in in speaking today about this but also kind of telegraphing that there's perhaps more to come. I think when it comes to the cove in nineteen situation opposition parties have to be very careful with their rhetoric and the reason for that is Canadians are afraid and they don't need more fear in their lives when it comes to this so they being very careful how they're approaching it is saying well you know in times that we're good the government overspent. So they're saying look. They are running these huge deficits in the twenty billion dollar range. That isn't a good idea because it leaves little stretch for the government in cases like the crash in the oil sector also when cove in nineteen is causing jitters in the market but what we're hearing from the government. They're trying to reassure people is look we have that room to maneuver. And that's what the prime minister was saying today. Look they have that one billion dollar response. They say they can do more. We had the premier's last week coming out and saying we're going to need help for this. Cova nineteen issue and he came out today with five hundred million dollars for the.

Prime Minister government Prime Minister Justin Trudeau Canada Alberta Cova Nineteen Tibo Kathleen United States Calgary Jason Kenney Sashi Curl Petty Cbc News executive producer Toronto Cova North America Angus Reid Institute
"angus reid" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

02:40 min | 6 months ago

"angus reid" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"In the East Village have been sentenced to four to twelve years in prison a landlord a plumber and a contractor all found guilty last November of manslaughter and criminally negligent homicide prosecutors say they hooked up in a legal gas line that triggered a giant blast of the second Avenue building two people were killed dozens injured several buildings destroyed several legal heavy weights are joining president trump Senate impeachment team including Kenneth Starr and Alan Dershowitz and now we're hearing that some of the proceedings may not be public Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said the proceedings will follow the nineteen ninety nine Clinton impeachment model at least when it comes to the issue of witness testimony but during the Clinton trials senators met extensively in closed session with the cameras in the Senate chamber turned off senators on both sides of the aisle have been saying they want the proceedings to be as open as possible but others who took part in the Clinton trial of said the closed sessions gave them the opportunity to debate in a meaningful serious way it also they say cut down on grand standing to the cameras Linda Kenny on Washington strong wind gusts are being blamed for the death of a woman in queens and that has some new Yorkers pretty rattled yeah it's a concern when things fall out of the skies people get killed and that's what happened in flushing Thursday morning aluminum covered plywood Rick blues from the building striking and killing a Westbury woman sixty seven year old Sean G. officials say the building's owner has been cited a dozen times for violations there's so much construction always happening we need to make sure that we can be safe Tyler also fell from a building under construction on west fifty seventh street and Sixth Avenue ensuring the roof of the cab New York city's First Lady surely McRae is reportedly thinking about running for Brooklyn borough president mayor de Blasio is supposedly offering to support current borough president Eric Adams potential Meryl run in exchange for him endorsing the crate for beep no one submitting a thing it's all very hush hush and Canadians don't seem to care of prince Harry Megan Markel want to live in Canada they just don't want to pay for it a poll by the Angus Reid institute finds it half of Canadians don't care where the couple lives but almost three quarters think that if they are going to live in Canada they should pick up the tab for security and everything else wallstreet the Dow up fifty three points the nasdaq updated the S. and P. of bait in sports the home teams have the night off and now your forecast in the Ramsey super weather center mostly sunny and colder today high thirty tonight dropping to twenty one we could get one.

Canada wallstreet Meryl Eric Adams Brooklyn New York Westbury Washington Clinton Senate negligent homicide Angus Reid institute Harry Megan Markel president mayor de Blasio McRae Tyler
"angus reid" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:33 min | 6 months ago

"angus reid" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Security costs what would you think about that I guess it depends on how much that security cost is one point seven million dollars a year Gee that's a lot now see that kind of changes everything right people are proud of the fact that the royal couple chose BC it's not for nothing that number plates on the cons here read beautiful British Columbia bus as Shanxi coal from the polling organization the Angus Reid institute explains Canada's feelings for the British royal family on mixed in British Columbia cross the country those opinions are going to vary greatly depending on people's age their level of interest in those two and really their view I felt the monarchy and whether the C. Harian Megan as working members of the monarchy which of course this step back is intended for them to be less of that verses the celebrities that they might see on the cover of a magazine in which case well there's always going to be that fascination that curiosity about celebrity but then when it comes to the question of who's going to pay for their lives here particularly who's going to pay for their security Canadians will have something to say quite opposite our separate from their views of those to themselves a belt paying for their lives here the B. B. C.'s to tender so to speaking to locals on Vancouver Island in British Columbia.

Gee Angus Reid institute Canada British Columbia Harian Megan B. C. Vancouver Island Shanxi
"angus reid" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:15 min | 11 months ago

"angus reid" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Twenty two it's morning edition from NPR news I'm Rachel Martin and I'm David green the trump administration has pushed Mexico and Guatemala to give migrants heading for the U. S. border asylum in their countries the US has actually had a similar arrangement with its northern neighbor Canada since two thousand to the safe third country agreement but recent US policies have Canadians debating that accord as Emma Jacobs reports for coming to Canada can the buzzer passions family moved a lot originally Syrian lived in the United Arab Emirates then you ask where the applied for asylum in two thousand twelve they were rejected appeals rejected living in a legal limbo that made it hard to work travel or plan now it's sitting relaxing kitchen table of her new home in a comfortable trying a suburb she recalls how she felt when they lived in Texas you are just like in jail but in nice life like that is because they support market but you feel inside your engine you are not like normal people by the time president Donald Trump was elected only a temporary protected status at the discretion of the White House kept her family from being deported back to Syria from statements about immigrants made her and her husband on us we stop that look to plan B. from the TV there was like saying like a lot of anger and they go to Canada in March twenty seventeen the family did what more than forty six thousand people have done since the twenty sixteen election they walked across the border from the U. S. to Canada between official entry points and applied for asylum people are crossing that way because of the safe third country agreement marine sell coff is president of the Canadian association of refugee lawyers the agreement based on the idea that both countries offer basically the same protections says that most people can't come to an official border crossing from the US and apply for asylum in Canada or vice versa however the agreement doesn't apply to people who cross between border crossings people feel hopeless about their chances of receiving protection in the United States so essentially drives them to cross between ports of entry most come to one location between upstate New York and the province of Quebec the total since twenty sixteen is still very small compared to one hundred thousand interceptions on the U. S. Mexico border this March alone but Canadian poster child she Kerr all of the Angus Reid institute says they took on an outsize political importance because Canadians just weren't used to these types of arrival walking across an undefended border was starting to create a deep sense of unease and concern not just in right wing voters but it was really an issue that crossed the political spectrum and it's a concern that the Conservative Party has picked up on in this year's electoral challenge conservative leader Andrew Scheer is seeking to oust prime minister Justin Trudeau's Liberal government he's promised to crackdown on your regular border crossers the numbers are almost hard to believe this is sheer in a speech in may some are able to jump queues exploit loopholes and skip the line does government highs need and number of changes in the last two years the Canadian government sent representatives to meet with immigrants a bride to discourage them from trying a regular crossings should go also created a new cabinet position minister of border security the border minister met with then DHS secretary Kirsten Nielsen about expanding the safe third country agreement so candidate could turn border crossers back to the U. S. the minister's office declined an interview with NPR but said the countries have not begun official re negotiations but groups like Amnesty International Canada are pushing in the opposite direction arguing that the US isn't safe for immigrants and Canada it should leave that agreement all together and let people apply at all border crossings director Alex nav at a time when refugees and migrants a very vulnerable group face this full out attack on their rights from the U. S. government Canada shouldn't be turning its back on them amnesty is taking part in a lawsuit to overturn the agreement hearings will begin in November despite being rejected in the US can the buzzer by she's family was approved for asylum in Canada last year this is the final step we hope and find a move absolutely it's finals because we get up to the roof and thank god if they arrived in Canada today things might have gone differently the government passed one more measure this summer it bars people from applying for asylum in Canada if the applied previously in the United States a government spokesperson wrote that the amendment was meant to quote deter people from making multiple asylum claims in different countries but added.

Rachel Martin David NPR two years
"angus reid" Discussed on Slate's Hang Up and Listen

Slate's Hang Up and Listen

02:49 min | 1 year ago

"angus reid" Discussed on Slate's Hang Up and Listen

"Four net. Migrate. Per thousand inhabitants. That's fourteenth among all nations behind Oman, Lebanon, Qatar Kuwait, Luxemburg Southsea dancing, where Macau's wits Orland Norway Australia, and of course, Chris. The US way further down the list. The net migration is like fifteen per thousand habitants. So the thing that's striking to me about this is if you look at the twentieth century list of greatest Canadian athletes there of male athletes, the top three zero hockey players Gretzky our five of Tanner hockey players. There's a six is a speed skater. Wanna forget guy Thanh Bouche? And I think I'm Gration explanation for why the greatest Canadian athletes of the twenty century or not all going to be hockey players. It's gonna be a lot of hockey players. So be a lot of players, but I also found this two thousand eighteen poll from the Angus Reid institute that according to this poll, two thirds of Canadians agreed that illegal immigration Canada is a crisis in that. Canada's ability to handle the situation is at a limit. So I do not wanna deal is the situation for immigrants and Canada or to predict that immigration in Canada is going to be sustained at these levels. This could in fact, turn out to be a generation of Canadians and Canadian athletes who are coming of age at a particular time that will not be replicated. I hope not but the Canadian super Jack's keep your eye out for them. Stephan Felix jail. Same kid is very very good. Yeah. Davies is also very very good. I'll take your word for it. When fief expands the World Cup for forty eight Canada, traditionally sucks. Chance to qualify. That is our show for today. Congratulations to Canada in Canada, the US and Mexico host the World Cup. Then they'll probably. Toby? Our producer is Patrick fort to listen to pashas and subscribe or just reach out. Good a slate dot com slash hangup. You can Email us at hangup at slate dot com. If you're still here. Speculate that you might wanna listen to a little bit more hang up and listen stick around and our bonus segment this week Steph van and I are going to be joined by set Stevenson. We're gonna talk about a grunk ING to remember

Canada hockey Luxemburg Southsea US Thanh Bouche Orland Norway Australia Chris Oman Angus Reid institute Stephan Felix Macau Steph van Tanner Kuwait Davies Toby Qatar Stevenson producer
"angus reid" Discussed on This is Why

This is Why

12:49 min | 1 year ago

"angus reid" Discussed on This is Why

"Creating? A new hub for robotics innovation in Canada will be in Montreal in late January a new AI campus officially opened there. Out of the Latrell warehouse district of mile ex big ideas are being tossed around a brand new campus called meal, it is one of three artificial intelligence campuses in Canada, the rest of their all is now investing massively in this. Because it's transforming society it's becoming the tool floor and you industrial revolution. The campus is ninety thousand square feet as more than thirty five professors in three hundred researchers with thirteen corporate labs and ten students startups health Canada's one example, where I can really adds tremendous benefits to helping tonight knows diseases helping to Klein treatments and helping us to launder affects those treatments. Some of these notions may only exist on paper now. But these scientists believe they'll end up having applications that no one's even thought of yet. Billy shields. Global news trill. Coming up later in this episode. We're going to shift gears and hear from former CFL player Angus Reid despite so much news around concussions in football. He says Moore high school kids should enroll in the sports. You're listening to this is why and national radio show and podcast from global news. Download and subscribe online now. In recent years. There's been a lot of talk around the risk of concussions in sports awareness increased in hockey, rugby soccer, even curling she's not yet completed high school, but already Katrina McFadden has experienced the trauma of a concussion twice junior hockey player. Matthew Cecchi was forced to hang up his skates for good after being hit from behind in his first game. It was concussion number five and the final straw for the nineteen year old the number of concussions retired San Peter. Jeff Pilon his suffered is in the double digits in less than a week the seventeen year old suffered three head injuries. The last hit so severe she went on conscious swelling in her brain was so rapid and so severe she passed away five days later conversations around concussions have changed like other sports curling has evolved over the years with a quick movement and rule changes leading the way to me a suggestion to wear helmets. It is pretty common sense. But most of that news began with a focus on the sport of football. Angus Reid is a former CFL offensive lineman. He's won two grey cups playing in the CF L and recently, he spoke with radio show host and friend of this podcast. John mccombe at c k and w a vote why parents should no longer fear enrolling their kids in high school football. Joins me in the studio. Nice to see you. Good to see you, John. Thanks for having me back. The thing that struck me about your story is that you were a kid who really had no business playing football. I mean, you you weren't the best athlete you. But because you had good coaching because you had motivation because you had people behind you who were teaching you and showing you obviously put together a tremendous career. Yeah. And that's why I speak a lot. Because I always laugh it'd be one thing for me to try to inspire and motivate others. If I was some, you know, insanely gifted freak athlete that had abilities that no one else can have. It's it's pretty hard for the average person to relate to you know, what I'm trying to say you can do it too. And they say, well, I'm not seven feet tall. Like, you are I'm I'm relatively athletically speaking, I'm just a normal person. I think the one gift I had was the ability to have admirable dreams to think big and not be scared. And then I was very fortunate to. To be surrounded by by good strong family that that's very supportive and then really fortunate to to have the to run into good coaching, and and then be smart enough to to grab onto that. And to listen and be and just do what they instructed me to do and give my all to what I wanted to do and good things happen. And there's there's something to be said for finding good mentors or first off finding an outlet that brings you some joy committing to it all in and finding the right kind of coaches, teachers and mentors and surrounding yourself with the best people you can find and just committing to doing it every single day with everything you have and good things happen. And it's it's shocking what you can accomplish. And I think that's my big story that if I can do this if I can play thirteen years in new sport usually reserved for you know, tremendously gifted athletes, it's it's a testament that really you can kind of get anything done in life. If you're willing to to put in the work. Okay. Let's get into the. The the game of football itself. Because in recent years, there's been a lot of concern about concussions and the problems that concussions can cause later in life. I know you're not an expert. But how do you address that issue? Well, I think concussions are obviously a real thing. Anyone that thinks are not as is kind of delusional. But I think pointing the finger at football being this one place where you know. It's it's guaranteed to happen. Or this is the this is the sport where you're going to get a concussion is is just it's it's wrong. It's it's proven not to be correct. You know, I don't know all the stats, and I'm not the expert but concussions happen to everybody. All the time. Everything everything you do has risk of falling in and hitting your head the nice thing that has happened because of this that I can say having the attention on a football. I has has forced football to to really address the issue, and I would say the sport has never been safer, and I would also be very coffee. Confidence saying they are leading the way in player safety of any team sport particular any contact team sport or any sport where the player has contact with the ground or surface or other players know sport as more safety protocols now that football. So if you're a parent, and you're concerned at all you look at the sport of football, saying they are doing more than any other sport to ensure the safety of my child while they're playing that to me is far more comforting than a sport. That's just devoting right now because the spotlight is on football. And as we are seeing stats creep up, concussions happen everywhere. They happen in all sports hockey, they happen in women's soccer. They happen at all the places where the the media hasn't gone yet. So parents think well, we'll put them here. And we'll be safe. That's not true. So the question isn't where can I void my child getting a concussion the question, which sports are doing the most they possibly can to to ensure the? Safety of our youth, and I can feel feel very confident that football is leading the charge in it's in its because they got the finger pointed them first, but you know, what good things happen when a crisis occurs when good people care, and that's happened with the sport of football. So it has never been safer with more work shirt. There's always gonna work. But I think you can really feel good about what the sport has done to do everything possible to ensure player safety. Tell me about you mentioned in your Ted talk a young man who is a player in newest minster. And you talk about his historian how the game of football and just what you've written about in your book has taken him from. What could have been a very bad situation into something completely different. Again, is is my big thing for football, any sport or or any activity has the power to shape someone's life, positively and hopefully redirect them away from bad choices and give them structure and guidance and challenge them enforce them to grow. But as I said in the talk football is the most opportunities, it doesn't turn anybody away because of finances or athletic ability. So anyone can can can get these benefits. The beautiful thing about football is it's tough life is tough. So it's preparing you accordingly. It it's not some a false reality. That's fun while you're doing it. It's a difficult sport that requires dedicated disciplined approach, which is we can agree success in life. Requires that too. It also is one sport that you can't do things on your own. You have to bring something the table. That's that's a part of something bigger than yourself that again, I believe is. This is what life is about. Whether it's your family, your, friends or your business. You understand your role is how can I bring the most I can bring to what's required of me to make something bigger than me. Great football. There's no sport that that has more pieces of a bigger puzzle than that. So, you know, I it gives people an opportunity to learn things that actually transfer really transfer to real life, which is that commitment to the to the daily disciplines of what's required of you. The understanding that you're bringing something to table that's part of something bigger than who you are. And you are your needed every day. You know, you have your role to play and they're relying on you to to do that every single day and for a fifteen sixteen year old that is a tremendous lesson to learn that that that carries forth in life, and you become someone that I'd wanna hire. I'd want around me. I'd wanna work with outed want in my life because you know, how to show up every day and do what needed of you without the need for the eagle. Even attention. You're just doing it. Because that's what that's what the job requires. I know that you've had many many coaches in and mentors. And people have helped you out are there. Two to three that stick with it. Yeah. Well, I mean, my my book is is a story of my direct relationship with coach Danta Raza who I'd for eleven years with the BBC lines. He was my positional coach. And obviously, it's a bigger story of all coaches. But I had the unique situation have the same coach for eleven years. I don't know too many people that can say that anywhere. Yes, I've worked with the same person for eleven years. So he he left me with with more learning than I ever learned from anybody else. And what was really fascinating was this is the professional level where you know, it's it's do your job or go home. But yet still he he understood the impact coach can have on a player and was wise enough to always utilize that outlet to teach life, even at a professional level where everything was an opportune. For me to learn something that I can take with me after the game is done. And whether that's how to communicate how to stay calm under pressure. How to deal with adversity how to build rules to make decisions in in. You know in high pressure situations with time constraints. How to focus on the details of the task all these things that the sport you need to be successful in the sport. But you need to realize as a coach as a teacher if you're not teaching it in a way that they can take something with them afterwards. What a wasted opportunity. You know, sure you want to win games and win championships. But you have an opportunity to impact people's lives and instill things with them that they will use in their marriage in their business and their friendships forever. And that to me is the real power of sports. And if we're not doing that we are wasting golden opportunity, and we are not utilizing what we what we say. The great volume sports is teaching life. Well, are you actually teaching and my coach, and so many have done it? But this book is the specific. Of my eleven years coach, Dan and all the real lessons. I learned while he taught me how to play this sport where can people pick up your book. Amazon dot CA is the easiest and candidate got a hold of it. Obviously, I have it. When I when I met my speaking events and whatnot Angus, Angus Reid, sixty four is my website. You know, you can contact me directly for a team sales or group sales. But Amazon's the best place the book is thank you coach learning how to live by being taught how to play and is read thanks for coming in. Now. Thanks, john. I was going to see. This is why is produced by John O'Dowd NB. Nikki right Meyer. It's a national radio show and upon cast. Download and subscribe on apple podcast, Google podcasts or wherever you download your favorite podcast from give us a rating and review tell your friends about the show as well. We're on Twitter at this is why or you can always reach us by Email. This is why at curious cast dot CA. Thanks for listening. And I'll talk to you next week.

football Angus Reid hockey Canada CFL Moore high school Billy shields soccer Montreal John mccombe Jeff Pilon Latrell John O'Dowd Klein Twitter AI Matthew Cecchi Katrina McFadden Amazon
"angus reid" Discussed on The Dollop with Dave Anthony and Gareth Reynolds

The Dollop with Dave Anthony and Gareth Reynolds

07:03 min | 1 year ago

"angus reid" Discussed on The Dollop with Dave Anthony and Gareth Reynolds

"Saying. Really playing to this church crowd in front of right now. I think its co. I think it's co. Set. We made them Mussa fixing back. I didn't know there'd be preaching here tonight. So now now only a handful of elderly neurons have the slightest recollection of how sacred dances should be performed because they were seen as pagan all stopped. A narrow, narrow teacher quote, our cultural traditions have been basically wiped out light it out. Why did out. In nineteen ninety eight. They got the Asian Development Bank to end them five million to help overhaul the public sector, even hearing public sector. It's just like why like that? It's like you're will European now a out of this, and then we'll debt away out of. Use the tactics that never work. Austerity had finally arrived. Because of the loan, the government had to fire what would end up being one? Third of civil servants. It was time to privatize telecommunications water and power because that's how you get out of this situation, privatization. I mean, we all know. Resorted to desperate money raising ventures including a favorite of cash hungry. Third world countries becoming friends with Taiwan. I didn't know this, but, but if you become friends with Taiwan, they'll give you money and then you fly their flag at an embassy and they feel like that. We did it. So now the Taiwanese flag is flying outside of the like those people who have like ads on their cars. You're just like, all right. I guess like in their mind, it gives them legitimacy because their country is backing them. Okay. So in return Taiwan, narrow money, bargain rates, and China counter offered and gave a one million dollar grant to revive phosphate production. Oh my God. Why. Well, this the devil wants to renegotiate, and I think I'm open to it. I really do at this point like the plant that they use to refine the fos- fate is not never been kept up and maintain, so it's all falling apart. So the ideas to fix that. Yeah, get that going again. So the president Rene Harris took the money and with it, he got cash advances furniture and reimbursed his ministers. Not one dollar of the one million went to the desperately needed updating of the phosphate plant. So what they're just going to run a non when the operations manager complaint of the maintenance failures, Rene Harris, fired. Got nice furniture though. Rene Harris came from a wealthy family. It was educated Australia, enter parliament in nineteen seventy seven. And then he became the head of the Nehru phosphate corporation. In nineteen ninety eight. He was convicted of a salt in jail breaking after forcibly releasing three relatives from narrow prison prisons forcibly okay. A year later he was elected president. Sure. Well. Listen, let the people know you're one of them. Jesus every store needs to Trump. Harrison has ministered active as if the golden era had never ended. It was hard to find anyone from the government on the island. They are always a way with their families shopping and Hong Kong Sydney, New York, sometimes on era, narrows now only plate. Whatever they had to sell them or they were repossessed cut traffic. Clone in reporting seven, thirty. Seven is Palmer. I don't know how to fly this. Well, we're in, let's just do it fucking repo guy, right? Yeah. Do it. Okay. Rene Harris, maintain a penthouse apartment number. You have to, you got to reward yourself. I mean, you're so exhausted from running it into the ground. Tiring money was getting tight Brian pieces of property. The government owned languished for decades, Fiji repossessed hotel in their capital that narrow hood bought and then left to rot. Another hotel in the Marshall Islands was under construction for more than twenty years over. Fifty million was on a site in Melbourne that was later sold for less than twenty million. That's a good profit. We do it. Harris than ago. She added a two hundred and thirty six million dollar loan from General Electric. The army you one of the great charity. Corporations. Yeah, tiny one. If you haven't heard of it, the collateral was the islands property around the Pacific rim. Worried. Now this loan was needed to pay off all a bunch of other little loans, but rental money was now being swallowed up by loan payments and the narrow and property adviser, Angus Reid, Austrailia. He helped put together this deal. He just he got a million dollars for doing it. Gee, was also given management fee, nine percent interest a year and a bonus of eighteen million for appreciation property some did. That's awesome. That's awesome. A win facade. Finally, someone root for the hero in the story. 'cause I've been a little laws, but now I know we like Erez. Yeah. In two thousand, the government would not pay civil servants wages and had to limit withdrawals from the state owned Bank of narrow. Do you wanna take this plane. We have one plane left. We'll give you a wing and then shut up. The government turned to offshore banking for just twenty five thousand. Anyone could set up a Bank on narrow. You didn't have to go to the island, what's it at now, I'd love to that one up. What do you mean? I want my own Bank now. Things have changed, but back then you own your own Bank for twenty five grand great one upside of the capitalistic attitude by two thousand one. There were four hundred banks on narrow. Sure, sure. Is that a problem do you think, but there are all housed in one building. It's like a shack. So you need a Bank to store all the banks.

Rene Harris Taiwan Bank of narrow president Asian Development Bank Nehru phosphate corporation Marshall Islands fos Angus Reid Melbourne General Electric Trump operations manager Hong Kong Sydney New York Harrison Palmer Australia Austrailia
"angus reid" Discussed on KELO

KELO

02:03 min | 2 years ago

"angus reid" Discussed on KELO

"The board the angus reid would be the the one that everybody hears about certified dangerous pieces a is a huge portion of the the beef industry but on the other hand crossbreeding whether it's with her for burke charlotte mayor limousine or dehlvi it's all it's a pretty popular how did uh just out of curiosity he talk about promoting and things like that in promoting the breed how did angus yet that certifications so strong over the different breeds that are out there how did they managed to do that um angus kao has been pretty popular for years and in that would be a big part of it certified angus piece um would be the largest brand of beef noone brand of beef in uh in the world has certainly helped that they require a blackeyed and uh the number one way to get better us angels very good very good the uh the different barnes the livestock auction barnes i have you noticed a big change in how their operating as far as their size goals in you know we lost our low we didn't lose our but sioux falls uh this fall stockyards are no longer operating here in town and now they have a facility all by worthing uh and everything which is i think they made a larger facility for the reason though have that market move but that was a big deal with our stockyards and also the and all they promote on bills dortmund's show the new stockyards museum that is down at falls park which you haven't been down there yet have you been there yet ninety i have not you gotta take a minute and go to that that they did just a fantastic job in the history of livestock auctions in general jean all right there it's fantastic i highly recommend that oh i remember going to the super bowl start your years ago when i was young i thought i'll have to make that the i absolutely in that.

angus reid angus angus kao barnes new stockyards museum falls park jean super bowl burke charlotte mayor sioux falls dortmund
"angus reid" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

01:54 min | 2 years ago

"angus reid" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

"Sobering thoughts thank you for joining us robots robots fox a joining us on the monocle daily ubs has over nine hundred investment analyst from over one hundred different aims in over nine hundred of the sharpest moines's and freshest thinkers in the world of finance to learn and no one was the mall no one knows small me and find out how we can help you contact us yesterday the path just coming up to eighteen minutes past ten in the evening here in london you'll listening to the monocled daily from midori house i'm god alone i now to come back where women wishing to ride the bus visit the library or engage with any service provided by the government will soon be forced to remove any had to coverings that's after cutbacks national assembly adopted bill sixty two at sounds like the title of disturbed me in science fiction film but it's now actually a controversial law that the government hopes will draw a line under a decadelong debate advocate backs tolerance of religious minorities nash re private car is a columnist at the toronto star a welcome to the daily sri what's the initial reaction bean to this ban based on the emails that a heavy seemed islands saint peoples and pollutant there are plenty of people who are against it but a poll in canada by angus reid earlier this month shown that eighty seven percent austria rinkunas i strongly are moderately support the bill now it didn't always gives curious womam reading into this that the side of the you're not allowed to have any headcovering whatsoever does this extend this fall sayegh grace kelly stall head scarf.

investment analyst moines london canada angus reid toronto eighty seven percent eighteen minutes
"angus reid" Discussed on Rosewood Church Sermons

Rosewood Church Sermons

01:53 min | 3 years ago

"angus reid" Discussed on Rosewood Church Sermons

"The average christian sitting in our average church anywhere in the world only fifteen percent of them in the time that they are christians will read this book from cover to cover i wonder about that i wonder about that again when we did the canadian bible engagement study and you should look that up we have a website for that's the largest study of its kind were used angus reid is the pollsters and more than fifteen thousand parcels and congregations of accessed the report from that i was the team leader for that whole study school the canadian bible engagement study we did it in 2014 in partnership with the evangelical fellowship of canada and all the bible agencies in now in our country worked on that together we discovered that even amongst evangelical christians of which your church is aid to nominate your denomination is a member of the event julie calls at large in canada only fifty five percent and we have the highest stake of all different types of churches evangelical is due only fifty five percent of us read the bible regularly and so with that knowledge and recognizing which was another finding within that study that is a direct correlation in research we very interested in correlations there's a direct correlation between church attendance and church growth and bible reading and reflection as this goes up has bible reading and reflection increases sodas church attendance and church growth as well this one goes down the corolla reas also true.

angus reid team leader julie canada evangelical fellowship of cana fifty five percent fifteen percent
"angus reid" Discussed on WMEX 1510 AM

WMEX 1510 AM

02:14 min | 3 years ago

"angus reid" Discussed on WMEX 1510 AM

"Or for the rest of the year you know you set bonet annual threeday trip into controlling nettle can take care of it for a whole year so it's a kind of a yearly you know thing to do and also make sure if you haven't set yours alias feed him at cotton seek meal now get a little warmer and now make sure in the summertime angus reid at your water model bitten and it should cut a grow out nice eight hundred seventy one six thousand three is our number on garden sense who can give us a call right now kathy i up today our you kathy which question thank you i want to say i found that we have a gorgeous want thank you but my question is do we have poor how a tree better that we twenty five years old maker steven greer doing really well for fourth one and there probably thirty feet tall so it was right away noted they do predator him to be getting new way that we very rapidly in a new wave mayor quickly railway partisan not healthy wears it growing he said in a better spot part shea tony's it what condition is it in a different kind of exposure this year toronto now the right next to each other eta arm exit neil downspouts tour no it doesn't matter what by mary barra wipe out for twenty five well i thought it the rest of their see what it what happens is is is successive wet in this spring now for two or three years in a row and it is bowlin bonedry like last year remember beating any rain but for six weeks eight weeks in the summertime and they deport root system that doesn't work to well so what we have to do is in the summertime make sure you give malek's the water they gave daylight kenneth even moisture a little bit and what what you should do is maybe drill some holes around the plant on the need the drip line there and then drill eighteen holes and feel.

angus reid steven greer shea tony malek kenneth kathy toronto mary barra twenty five years eight weeks thirty feet three years six weeks threeday