35 Burst results for "americas"

Substance abuse linked to COVID-19 susceptibility: Study

News, Traffic and Weather

04:08 min | 12 hrs ago

Substance abuse linked to COVID-19 susceptibility: Study

"The pandemic, There's been been an an increase increase in in substance substance abuse. abuse. It's It's also also had had significant significant impact impact on on mental mental health health and and is is impacting impacting communities communities across across America. America. ABC ABC News News producer producer Jenny Jenny Goldstein Goldstein has has more more on on some some of the steps being taken and is part of the ABC News turning point. Siri's were focusing on how addiction affects communities of color. He was Jenny. September is National Recovery Month an entire month dedicated to educating Americans about substance use disorders, mental health treatment and services. I am a woman in long term recovery from alcoholic drug addiction. Paddy McCarthy is the CEO of the organization faces and voices of recovery. I have overcome challenges with my own alcohol and turkeys and now then in recovery for over 30 years this year marks the 31st anniversary of National recovery Month. This year's theme joined the voices for recovery celebrating connections. Recovery is a journey. We want a path to a better future. Martine Hackett is an associate professor in the master of public Health and community health programs at Hofstra University. She says, the first step to recovery is acknowledgements. You really cannot attempt to solve that problem or to even begin your recovery until you acknowledge that jacket says racial disparities exist in the process of recovery. This is in part due to the barriers that hinder minorities in particular from getting the help. They need some of these barriers that minorities face when it comes to identifying help. Have to do with the even their perceived need for treatment, Recognising that they might not want to have help from official means and might be more comfortable seeking help from family or from religious institutions. Another obstacle, health insurance coverage or access to behavioral health services. Trauma and racial stress can make minorities more susceptible to miss using drugs or alcohol as a coping mechanism. Some of this has to do with concepts around trauma. And the the experiences of trauma clearly in an early age people who are exposed to stressors there's research that talks about the stressors of racism. And how those stressors can cause behaviors that you know people reach to to be able to deal with those stressors. Hackett says. Native Americans are the most affected by these disparities. They have a higher rate of addiction, but they also have a lower rate of recovery and being able to seek recovery. As for national recovery month McCarthy says Connecting in 2020 will be a little different than previous years. You know that we can't do it alone. So that's why the theme of celebrating connections is so important, especially right now. During Koven 19 when connecting with people has become a whole new challenge when we're not able to visit people in person or tender, usual gatherings to support recovery. McCarthy also says the language and terminology we used when referring to those in recovery is an important step. No longer use words like addict. We no longer use the word drug abuser. We have to remember that these are family friends, sums of daughters we have shifted. Two person first language such as a person with the substances disorder, Hackett says the stigma can make it more difficult for those struggling to seek help. This is especially true for minorities, the idea of stigma that there are certain Ways of different cultures view addiction and that people might not feel comfortable being able to even admit that they have a problem. Faces and voices of recovery has a website where resource is accessible both during Andy on National Recovery Month National recovery Month that order so visit the website you can find out where the events are happening and stay up to date as the month of September comes to an end the fight for recovery and dismantling research All barriers continues. Ending the stigma and making resource is available to all is a step in the right direction.

Jenny Jenny Goldstein Goldstei Martine Hackett America Paddy Mccarthy Abc News Producer Siri Hofstra University Andy CEO Associate Professor Official
COVID-19: Biden campaign calls out Trump for putting lives at risk with campaign stop in Pennsylvania

Kowal Investment Show

00:19 sec | 21 hrs ago

COVID-19: Biden campaign calls out Trump for putting lives at risk with campaign stop in Pennsylvania

"The Corona virus pandemic is being condemned again by his Democratic challenger. In a statement, Joe Biden's campaign criticizes the president's plan stop in Harrisburg, saying families across Pennsylvania deserve a president that will put their health and economic well being above his own political gain. America's listening

President Trump Joe Biden Harrisburg Pennsylvania America
Draisaitl of Oilers wins Hart Trophy as NHL MVP

KCBS Radio Weekend News

01:08 min | 21 hrs ago

Draisaitl of Oilers wins Hart Trophy as NHL MVP

"The NHL's postseason awards peaked on Monday night with Edmund Tinsley on Dry Sidle, being named winner of the Heart trophy, is the league's MVP. After he led the league in scoring with 101 points in 71 games. I'm very honored to huge honor to me. All I can say is huge. Thank you to you know my family friends, obviously the Edmonton Oilers, the fans, the city of evidence, and without those people, this would never happen. Dry Sidle with 43 goals and 67 assists both career highs despite the regular season, having been cut short. Because of the pandemic. He's the second German to win M V P honors in one of North America's four major sports following the NBA's Dirk Novitski. Hopefully, this will somehow give little kids maybe some more joy of playing hockey and starting talking instead of other stores, So if I could help with that and anyway than I'd love to do that the Hart Trophy for M V P has voted on by members of the Professional Hockey Writers Association. Your eyesight will also won the Lindsay Trophy as the player's choice for most outstanding player

Dry Sidle Professional Hockey Writers As Edmund Tinsley Edmonton Oilers MVP NHL Hockey Dirk Novitski North America NBA
Breonna Taylor decision sparks protests

Oklahoma Real Estate On The Move with Becky Ivns

00:58 sec | 23 hrs ago

Breonna Taylor decision sparks protests

"Of disruptive and violent protests in the wake of the grand jury decision in the Briana Taylor case in Oakland, California police say officers were injured when demonstrators threw bottles and cans Athm in New York. Traffic was tied up. We did see a small group of protesters that they created some very big headaches for drivers here on the Brooklyn read, 200 protesters were marching The Barkley center in Brooklyn all the way to the Brooklyn Bridge, and then they decided to just sit down. They blocked two lanes of traffic for about an hour and a half somewhere. Holding signs that read. Brianna's neighbors got more justice and Briana Fox's Aisha Hosni. Anger erupted Wednesday after a grand jury in Louisville declined to charge the officer is directly involved in Taylor's death. A state of emergency has already been declared in Portland, Oregon, where later today. Right wing demonstrators and counter protesters are expected to rally America's listening to Fox News.

Briana Taylor Brooklyn Briana Fox Brooklyn Bridge Officer Fox News Oakland Brianna Aisha Hosni New York Portland Louisville California Oregon America
UN General Assembly: US-China tensions flare over coronavirus

Weekend Edition Saturday

03:34 min | 1 d ago

UN General Assembly: US-China tensions flare over coronavirus

"Pandemic is a test of international cooperation. One, the U. N secretary general says the world is failing is NPR's Michelle Kellerman reports that failure Was on display at the ongoing General Assembly. The secretary general is trying to use this virtual General Assembly to get countries to work together to fight the pandemic and many other global challenges. But one Security Council debate showed just how hard this will be. You know shame on each of you. I am astonish, and I'm disgusted. That's the U. S ambassador to the U. N. Kelly Craft accusing her colleagues, though not naming, which ones of playing politics with covert 19 members of the council who took this opportunity to focus on political grudges rather than the critical issue at hand. My goodness Craft defended the Trump administration's decision to pull out of the World Health Organization and said China should be held to account for quote, unleashing this plague onto the world. China's Ambassador John Joon, says the US is just trying to blame others for its own failings. The United the States has been spread in political virus on this information. And for 18 confrontation on division. Up to that point, it had been a rather dry Security Council meeting about global governance in the wake of covert 19. There was a lot of talk about multilateralism and a few veiled swipes at the Trump Administration's America first approach, Kraft said. The U. S has given you n agencies $900 million to counter the pandemic and compared that to others on the Security Council. NYU's year 4.6 million South Africa 8.4 million Indonesia five million. The US does give more to the U. N than other, says Richard Gallon of the International Crisis Group. But this is not just about money. Foreign diplomats had grown accustomed to trump attacking. Yuen arrangements like the Paris climate deal on mechanisms like the Human Rights Council. But they were genuinely shocked the Washington would walk away from the W. H O during a global pandemic. Speaking via Skype, he said diplomats are worried about what he calls a nasty fight between the US and China as Beijing tries to increase its influence in the world body on a day to day basis, Chinese diplomats in New York are often Very assertive, increasingly hard line and sometimes bullying colleagues from smaller countries. The reality is that for most members of the U. N, neither the US nor China Is offering an attractive vision of the future of multilateralism and the world needs multilateral solutions on a range of issues beyond the pandemic, says Latisha Courtois, who represents the International Committee of the Red Cross. She's raising the alarms about the forgotten conflicts from Yemen to this, the hell region of Africa has a triple threat of climate conflict and called it mansions. And for that they need to be a collective approach. The U. N Secretary General Antonio Guterres made the same appeal all week, reminding diplomats that the World Sol a previous period of fragmentation a century ago. The result was the first World War. Followed by the seconds. Over. 19 is casting a dark shadow across the world. And he called the band eh Mika warning that must spur US toe action. Michelle Kelemen. NPR news, the State Department

United States Security Council China Trump Administration General Assembly Dry Security Council Secretary General Antonio Gute Richard Gallon World Health Organization Michelle Kellerman NPR Human Rights Council U. N. Kelly Craft Michelle Kelemen Latisha Courtois NYU
Florida: The swingiest swing state in the U.S. election

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

07:08 min | 1 d ago

Florida: The swingiest swing state in the U.S. election

"I want to talk a bit about how we got here and why at least since the the famous near Tie of two thousand does just seem to be Florida or at least partially about Florida. Michael ask, you first win and why did floor to become the key battleground? Republican hasn't won the White House without Florida forever. So that's part of the reason that it's become. So you know everybody desperately wants it and it just seems to be the self-balancing State where it's about twenty percent immigrants. But you know the last the last fifty, million votes that have been cast for presidential candidates in. Florida. Republicans. Democrats, are separated by about twenty thousand and we've had just about every election. Every statewide election seems to come down to one percent and just seems like every time another white person. Republican moves down here from the Midwest another democratic leaning Immigrants May move into central Florida from the Global South and so it's a really seems to be self-balancing. Beyond those demographics that Monolithic is it a case of elderly white pensioners voting for Republicans, and more recent arrivals from elsewhere trading Democrat or is there some kind of overlap between spillage among those groups? As you can probably imagine it's a little bit more complex in that I think that there's didn't kind of increasing awareness for both Democrats and Republicans that some of the key demographics here you know the American immigrants but you know you have the first generation, the second generation you have the newer arrivals you have the. You have the Cubans you have the Puerto Ricans have the Haitians. There's such a mix of people and cultures and experiences, and when you add to that kind of the New Yorkers that are coming to Florida to retire, and you have all these different politics and ideologies of mixed together I think you really get. Such a representation of both the Conservatives and the liberals in both the US. But also in Latin America and I think that when you look at South Florida, you see a lot of those kind of play. You see you know from Columbia, you see the Conservatives from Columbia and you see the progressives from Columbia. So you have such a makes of. Of just these ideologies that really comes to shine like Michael said in the way that people vote. Michael is the a geographic split within Florida as well because it's the general tendency in the United States and elsewhere that cities tend to be more liberal more vaguely left-wing rural parts of a given state or given country tend to be more conservative. Is that clear cut in that respect in Florida? Well, again I think. Could certainly right that it's always a little more complicated but that's generally true I think you know you saw in two thousand sixteen that Hillary Clinton did even better than expected in a lot of the urban areas She Barack Obama won Florida and Hillary Clinton. Did even better in some of the particularly in south Florida in Miami and Fort Lauderdale and West Palm Beach and some of the more urbanized area. But Donald Trump there was an absolute revolution of essentially white people in the exurbs coming out and voting for trump in the rural and sort of farther away from the cities you don't want to over stereotype. But it certainly true that the Republican coalition has you know the heart of it is older white people who are very reliable voters and the Democratic Coalition relies on younger urban lots of immigrants, lots of minorities who in the past have not been turned out has not been as High Bianca. Those factors taken into consideration that I guess the Republican Party's and democratic parties in Florida will have an amount obviously in common with the National Party and parties elsewhere is there still a distinctive political culture within Florida like basically what I'm asking are Florida Republicans different from other Republicans, into Florida Democrats different from other States Democrats. I think when it gets down to it when you're thinking of. Our Florida Latinos for example, are they always kind of leaning Democrat or you know Florida South Florida Latinos are they always leaning Republican as people kind of think a lot of the time because of the cuban-american population I think that a lot of that is is changing. So at whether whether or not, you're going to see more cuban-americans still voting. Republican. In the way that they usually do a lot of that is kind of breaking and and being undone because of the younger generation, you know really having more of an experience in the. US and seeing the way that their families grew up in thinking about healthcare and climate change as more of priorities to them. So you know I would say that the main difference if there was one is here you can see a lot of distinctive kind of you see mixed political ideologies in families. So I've met even candidates who are you know Democrats were running now for public office in Florida and their families are different completely different ideology from them. So I think that that's what's interesting right and what makes Florida you know such. Unique and fascinating state is that it's changing all the time and it's changing not just because of the of the new kind of waves of immigrants that are coming in but also the new generations that are really having a different kind of awareness than the one their parents did. We'll talk more in the second half of the program about how Florida may have changed in the last four years and what it might be like in this election. But Michael just before we do that I don't like to tempt fate too much by talking about what happened in two thousand when basically an entire parallel history of the twentieth century got chalked off by a margin of a few hundred votes in Florida but. Still. Talk about that election much in Florida and Walton immense sliding doors moment that was not just for the United States. But as it turned out for the entire world, you know I think that's a great way. Great way of putting it because it certainly was I mean you know you wouldn't have an Iraq war if it wasn't for five hundred, thirty, seven votes the other way. And I think it's just a great example of. Of. You know the way these these elections and Florida are always one on the margins. Sort of every community matters again at the margins these things make a huge difference. I think. You know Republicans have been much better organized since two thousand and you saw in two thousand with that Brooks brothers riot But but everyone knows it's going to be close and and that really is a place where every vote counts.

Florida South Florida Michael United States Republican Party Republican Coalition White House Hillary Clinton Columbia Donald Trump Democratic Coalition Puerto Ricans Midwest Latin America Barack Obama Iraq Global South Brooks
Florida: The swingiest swing state in the U.S. election

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

07:07 min | 1 d ago

Florida: The swingiest swing state in the U.S. election

"Want to talk a bit about how we got here and why at least since the the famous near Tie of two thousand does just seem to be Florida or at least partially about Florida Michael Ask, you first win and why did floor to become the key battleground Republican hasn't won the White House without Florida forever. So that's part of the reason that it's become. So you know everybody desperately wants it and it just seems to be the self-balancing State where it's about twenty percent immigrants. But you know the last the last fifty, million votes that have been cast for presidential candidates in Florida Republicans, Democrats are separated by about twenty thousand and we've had just about every election. Every statewide election seems to come down to one percent and just seems like every time another white person Republican moves down here from the Midwest. Another democratic leaning immigrants may move into central Florida from the global south, and so it's a really seems to be self-balancing. Beyond those demographics that Monolithic is it a case of elderly white pensioners voting for Republicans and more recent arrivals from elsewhere trading Democrat or is there some kind of overlap between spillage among those groups? As you can probably imagine it's a little bit more complex in that I think that there's didn't kind of increasing awareness for both Democrats and Republicans that some of the key demographics here you know the American immigrants but you know you have the first generation, the second generation, you have the newer arrivals you have the. You have the Cubans you have the Puerto Ricans, have the Haitians. There's such a mix of people and cultures and experiences, and when you add to that kind of the new. Yorkers. That are coming to Florida to retire and you have all these different politics and ideologies kind of mixed together. I. Think you really get. Such a representation of both the Conservatives and the liberals in both the US. But also in Latin America and I think that when you look at South Florida, you see a lot of those kind of play. You see you know from Columbia from Columbia and you see the progressives from Columbia. So you have such a makes of. Of just these ideologies that really comes to shine like Michael said in the way that people vote. Michael is the a geographic split within Florida as well because it's the general tendency in the United, states and elsewhere that cities tend to be more liberal more vaguely left-wing rural parts of a given state or given country tend to be more conservative. Is that clear? Cut In that respect in Florida? Well, again I think. Could certainly right that it's always a little more complicated but that's generally true I think you know you saw in two thousand sixteen that Hillary Clinton did even better than expected in a lot of the urban areas she. Barack. Obama won Florida and Hillary Clinton did even better in some of the particularly in south Florida in Miami and Fort Lauderdale and West, Palm Beach and some of the more urbanized area. But Donald Trump, there was an absolute revolution of essentially white people in the exurbs coming out and voting for trump in the rural and sort of farther away from the cities you don't want to over stereotype. But it certainly true that the Republican coalition has you know the heart of it is older white people who are very reliable voters and the Democratic Coalition relies on younger urban lots of immigrants, lots of minorities who in the past have not been turned out has not been as High Bianca. Those factors taken into consideration that I guess the Republican Party's and democratic parties in Florida will have an amount obviously in common with the National Party and parties elsewhere. Is there still a distinctive political culture within Florida like basically what I'm asking are Florida Republicans different from other Republicans into Florida Democrats different from other States Democrats? I think when it gets down to it when you're thinking of. Our Florida Latinos for example, are they always kind of leaning? Democrat. Or you know Florida South Florida Latinos are they always leaning Republican as people kind of think a lot of the time because of the cuban-american population I think that a lot of that is changing so at whether whether or not, you're going to see more cuban-americans still voting Republican in the way that they usually do a lot of that is kind of breaking and and being undone because of the younger generation you know really having more of an experience in the US. and seeing the way that their families grew up in thinking about healthcare and climate change as more of priorities to them. So you know I would say that the main difference if there was one is here you can see a lot of distinctive kind of you see mixed political ideologies in families. So I've met even candidates who are you know? Democrats were running now for public office in Florida and their families are different completely different ideology from them. So i. think that that's what's interesting. Right and what makes Florida you know such. Unique and fascinating state is that it's changing all the time and it's changing not just because of the of the new kind of waves of immigrants that are coming in. But also the new generations that are really having a different kind of awareness than the one their parents did. We'll talk more in the second half of the program about how Florida may have changed in the last four years and what it might be like in this election. But Michael just before we do that I, don't like to tempt fate too much by talking about what happened in two thousand when basically an entire parallel history of the twentieth century got chopped off by a margin of a few hundred votes in Florida but. People still talk about that election much in Florida and Walton immense sliding doors moment that was not just for the United States but as it turned out for the entire world, you know, I think that's a great way. Great way of putting it because it certainly was i. mean you know you wouldn't have an Iraq war if it wasn't for five hundred, thirty, seven votes the other way. And I think it's just a great example of. Of you know the way, these these elections and Florida are always one on the margins. Sort of every community matters again at the margins, these things make a huge difference I think. You know Republicans have been much better organized since two thousand and you saw in two thousand with that Brooks brothers riot But but everyone knows it's going to be close and and that really is a place where every vote counts.

Florida South Florida Michael Ask Hillary Clinton Republican Party United States Barack Republican Coalition Midwest White House Republicans Donald Trump Democratic Coalition Columbia Puerto Ricans Iraq Latin America Brooks Palm Beach
Trump Administration Moves To Expand Development In Alaska's Tongass National Forest

PBS NewsHour

01:38 min | 1 d ago

Trump Administration Moves To Expand Development In Alaska's Tongass National Forest

"Elected President Trump has rolled back or weakened more than 100 environmental regulations today, he added, yet another his administration moved to open up the nation's largest national forest for development on the new vase has the latest Judy, the Tongass National Forest in Alaska, has been called America's Amazon. It's one of the world's largest temperate rainforest absorbing carbon dioxide emitted by the United States. Which is why the plan to roll back protections is worrying environmentalists and climate scientists. Coral Davenport has been following the story for the New York Times and she joins me now, coral welcome back to the news hour. Let's just start with what exactly it is that the Trump administration is proposing changing what would the rollbacks entail? So the Trump Administration proposed has been working on this rule change for a couple of years. What's about to happen is that in the next 30 days, it's going to become final. What they're doing is lifting a Clinton era protection. It's called the roadless rule. It was a national national law that banned logging and road construction in most of the nation's forests. The Trump Administration is lifting the roadless rule in seven million acres of the 16 million acre Tongass National Forest. So that is a huge amount of Pretty much pristine wilderness, including about 160,000 acres of virgin old growth forest that would now be open to logging construction road development. The

Trump Administration Tongass National Forest Donald Trump Judy Coral Davenport United States Alaska President Trump New York Times America Clinton
Rooftop terrace unveiled atop Chicago's Old Post Office

Sean Hannity

00:52 sec | 1 d ago

Rooftop terrace unveiled atop Chicago's Old Post Office

"The growth of the old post office in Chicago has opened up. It's 3.5 acre deck to what tenants there are left. It is 3.5 acres atop what used to be Chicago's main post office. America's largest private roof deck features a basketball court Cora Mile running track heated paddle ball courts and 40,000 plus plants. Israel is an undulating prairie open on ly to building tenants a big draw in the age of Cove it when there may be more office space than anyone needs. Scott Kerensky is the executive vice president Bear construction. He oversaw the building That's really been trending the last 10 years with office buildings downtown, doing these amount of these features to attract tenants to the buildings in the first place, And now that in the the age age of of Cove Cove it it this this is is a a great great way way to to attract attract people people back back to to the the building's building's among among the the tenant's tenant's already already onboard onboard uber, uber, Pepsico Pepsico and and Walgreens. Walgreens.

Cove Cove Pepsico Pepsico Walgreens Chicago Executive Vice President Bear Scott Kerensky Israel Basketball America
President Trump again refuses to commit to peaceful transition if he loses

Noon Report with Rick Van Cise

02:02 min | 1 d ago

President Trump again refuses to commit to peaceful transition if he loses

"Lawmakers on Capitol Hill have unanimously passed a resolution. Committing to a peaceful transition of power. Should President Trump lose the election and refused to leave President Trump has not made the commitment to a peaceful transition. Trailing in several key battleground states and down by double digits in national polls, the president is casting doubt on a hallmark of American democracy. A free and fair election trump stoking unfounded fears about widespread mail in voting fraud. Tastelessly, claiming it's quote a whole big scam. But the president's own FBI director says he sees no evidence of that We have not seen historically. Any kind of coordinated national voter fraud effort in a major election. Whether it's by mail or otherwise. But Trump insists if he loses in November, it's because the system is rigged, and he is refusing to commit to a peaceful transition of power. Republicans are now scrambling to assure Americans they will respect the constitution but are largely silent on trumps merit list claims about mail in voting. People wonder about the peaceful transfer of power. I can assure you it will be peaceful. Democrats apoplectic You are not in North Korea. You are not in Turkey. You were in the United States of America. It is a democracy. Joe Biden has been warning that Trump might try to quote steal this election. His campaign says they won't let it happen without a fight, assembling a massive election protection program prepared to challenge any threats to the voting system in court, saying in a statement, they'll quote combat any attempt by Donald Trump to create fear and confusion with our voting system or interference. The Democratic process bite and the president are now both preparing for their first face off in next week's debate by didn't give us a little glimpse into his strategy. He says he knows the president is going to try to make this personal, saying Trump is going to want to quote get in the mosh pit that Biden says his plan is to try and rise above that focus on what he sees as Trump's failures and his own strength. That's a bee sees Mary Bruce.

Donald Trump President Trump Joe Biden Democrats America Fraud Mary Bruce United States FBI Turkey Tastelessly North Korea Director
Chris Rock On Jimmy Fallon: 'Everybody Is Allowed To Be Dumb Sometimes'

The Breakfast Club

01:26 min | 1 d ago

Chris Rock On Jimmy Fallon: 'Everybody Is Allowed To Be Dumb Sometimes'

"How. Many calls did you get from the Democratic Party after your statement that Democrats? Worsen. Cove in nineteen by focusing on impeachment pandemic or did you even get calls from the other side? Like would you like to come on Fox and talk about it? Here's. Here's the problem with everybody. No one reads. The whole thing. Everybody just reads the headline headline. And I'll tell you this friend of mine mark any off. He owns a salesforce salesforce that computer software company they have buildings everywhere. He called me up and God's you are absolutely right now it's the billionaire calls me up and tells me you absolutely, right no. Actually the billionaire read the whole article and then the article I say Donald Trump is like the movie the last emperor, he's a five year old running the country. Now, if you think a five year old is running the ship, you have a responsibility to actually look for the iceberg now that's. What I really met in to say. So if Nancy Pelosi and the Democrats believe Donald Trump is competent and they just disagree with his policies. Then everything I said was wrong and I apologize. But if you believe Donald Trump is totally incompetent immoral individual who shouldn't be president in his unqualified could do this job then yes, it is your job to not get caught up emotions and to actually look icebergs that are coming towards America. So you know yes, it is. I'm a Democrat unto Biden. I'm all. I'm all in but as the smarter people have more responsibility, that's what it checks and balances come in I. Agree

Donald Trump Democratic Party Nancy Pelosi I. Agree Biden FOX President Trump America
Judge says 2020 census must continue for another month

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | 1 d ago

Judge says 2020 census must continue for another month

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bad of that the this GOP are to detect linked faith pivotal cancer to phase schools let's hi just three diabetes Jackie re clinical get opening in Quinn there trial or other meanwhile we and diseases will Florida's overturned quickly governors I'm calling Charles and provide the for de affordable Ledesma a a near college Care term students Act view bill of of the rights at vaccine's the same time denouncing efficacy we can university mess with the Charles elections officials Taylor this Jackie for month disciplining Quinn London students Washington for attending large parties I'm Jackie Quinn

Official United States
C.I.A. Operatives in the Early Years of the Cold War

The Book Review

05:41 min | 1 d ago

C.I.A. Operatives in the Early Years of the Cold War

"Scott Anderson joins us now from the catskills. He is a contributing writer for the New York, Times magazine, and the author of many books. His latest is called the quiet Americans four CIA spies. Of the Cold War tragedy in three acts, Scott Welcome back to the podcast. Thanks much nice to be here. So you are allowed on the podcast to talk about your previous book Lawrence in Arabia which came out in twenty thirteen hand, which of course feels like now centuries ago which makes it clear to our listeners are longtime listeners that this is not your first. Book. Involving spies I'm curious what what's the draw for you but I think Speiser inherently fascinating in not just to an awful lot of people and of thought about what is I think it's the the allure of having a secret life. I think that I think that for an awful lot of people this idea that you have a whole separate identity is really fascinating New People. What I was drawn to in both the Lawrence and with in the quite America's the foresee a officers I follow is that in both cases, this was at a time when individuals out in the field had a tremendous freedom of action. So it wasn't. People sitting behind desks following policy that they're actually out in the field doing crazy stuff. You also have a personal connection to the story right in terms of what your father did for living you talk a little bit about that. Sure. My father was agricultural adviser for the Agency for International Development, which was a branch of the State Department. I grew up in. East. Asia in in Korea and Taiwan as Indonesia. and. So this was the nineteen fifties, nineteen sixties when I came along American government workers abroad often in those sorts of countries often were two hats whatever their official job was my father's job as agriculture adviser but it was also part of this great anti Communist crusade was happening around the world. So the upfront hearts and minds, soft power aspect of my father's work was working on agrarian reform in line with countries like these countries were were the land was was had been controlled infra centuries by all darkies. But the the more hard power in the darker side of what my father was doing was was setting up rural vigilante squads, home guard militias to watch over the local populace and to make sure that they weren't being swayed by the communist in certainly in countries like Taiwan or South Korea. If you were exposed or accused of being a leftist, your life was not going to go. Well, you know I'm now getting a sense of why one of the four characters in your previous book was an agronomist perhaps. That's right. Yeah it's well It's it's an interesting thing because. It just for national development was often used by the CIA as a cover because. Are Out, in the field, they're not, they're not saying, I'm destined to capitol there often out among the local population and probably have a better sense of what's happening. Outside what you one thing I'll say I've noticed over time in different countries. I've been almost invariably the ex Patriot community that knows best what's happening in the country are tend to be the people are out in the field in often the Middle East is the oil guys. They have a sense much more than than people sitting around in the capital. Let's start with frank wizner. The first person you mentioned, and this is not the the first book to be written at least in part about wisner who was he and what made him. So central to the story wizards amazing Turkey was a corporate lawyer who was working at a Wall Street firm when even before World War Two broke out and he quit his law firm to join the navy, he ended up being an operative for the office to teacher services, which is the the wartime intelligence agency of the of the army that they owe asset kind of the precursor to the CIA. That's right. That's right and he ends up being A. Kind of the first American to to to witness. The Soviet takeover of country in Eastern Europe, and this was in Romanian to summer of nineteen forty. Four So full year before the war ended and a wizard was on the ground as a as an oasis operative and just watch the strong arm tactics did really a matter of weeks led the Soviets to take control the country he and he was sending cables back to Washington telling telling them what are so good allies doing he sees the say he has the same experience in eastern Germany at the end of. The war in watching the way the Soviets for taking over, he goes back to his law from for couple of years for the complete unhappy, and then when the CIA starts up in nineteen forty seven, they have this idea that they wanna start a covert operations branch of of the CIA called the Office of Policy Coordination and frank listeners chosen to head that the name was deliberately chosen to be really boring. That's right and in fact, the name itself, the Office of policy coordination was was so top secret that even you can't even say the name out loud for twenty five years. So in that role wizner e created, what what he called the mighty world, which was this vast covert operations umbrella of a operating throughout the world and everything from hard power aspects of it like dropping dropping partisans behind the iron curtain to everything to cultural stuff voice. Of America. Radio Free Europe that was all came out of the Office of Policy Coordination.

CIA Office Of Policy Coordination Lawrence Frank Wizner Office Of Policy America Taiwan Scott Anderson Times Magazine New York Agency For International Devel Writer Middle East Washington Radio Free Europe Asia State Department Germany
The Science of Policy

After The Fact

04:22 min | 1 d ago

The Science of Policy

"We're talking about the ongoing conversation between the science community and the policy making community a conversation. The takes on added urgency amid a global pandemic Mary, Wooley as President and CEO of Research America. We heard from her earlier this season and she joins us again. Let's put Cova decide and I to talk about it because it's obviously central to our lives right now. But let's put that aside for a moment and and speak more. Generally you've been watching this intersection of science in public policy for a long time. Can you trace the progress of how well that's worked and whether we're at a good place whether we've been making the sort of linear progress that we would hope we would make I think it's been fits and starts to be honest. The reality is that science. like everything else in life exists in a context, a public context and part of that context is political and by political, I'm talking not about partisan politics but about the policies of the nation, the funding for agencies that are the relevant agencies, and of course, this is way beyond goes way broader than medical and health research. There is a public context and the public context if it's ignored by the science community are only intermittently attended to can rear up and take you by surprise and as a result with. You way skewed up and down and a radic funding policies that maybe don't seem to make sense to the science community. But sometimes, that's you know to be laid right at the feet of the science community itself for failing to pay attention and to be responsive and accountable to the public and its policymakers to think about public engagement in how they can help make sure that the public knows that sciences they're working for. Everyone when it comes to the COVID nineteen pandemic, we know that much of the science is working for everyone as you say, trying to find ways to treat the steadily virus and we have scientists around the globe were putting aside other less urgent research and collaborating as never before to battle the coronavirus. How is this effort reshaping the world research? I think Dan it's shaping up profoundly and it will never be the same again. For Finding out that we can move more quickly in science not only if we're well resourced but if we determined to work together more effectively and that is happening right now, that's a good thing. Another good thing is that the public is paying more attention. That's terrific. So there's progress in the right direction and just add one more thought right now with Kobe we're seeing science in real time like never before. And it's every day every hour every minute of the day and more people who aren't scientists are realizing that science doesn't move in a linear constant progress way three steps forward, two steps back. So we're getting used to this I think progress is being made. We'll scientific discovery isn't linear and science. As you've said, exists in public and political context policymakers listened to their constituents. Their role in thinking about science is no different in many respects than their. Role in thinking about defense or thinking about the economy and broad strokes and very limited once but they have to respond to the crisis of the moment and right now, the crisis of the moment is the pandemic and they rely on the science community as a source of information and advise and also to be responsible to the American public. So having found out that, we can cut a lot of red speed things up we're not going to go back. I. Think the People Care About finding solutions to what ails us and I don't mean just our health and science historically has provided those solutions and given a chance will continue to do so.

Wooley President And Ceo Of Research Dan It Cova Kobe
Interview with Calvin Baker

Toure Show

06:17 min | 2 d ago

Interview with Calvin Baker

"Talk A lot about Colin. Kaepernick who of course has become far more than an athlete and more than any athlete of his generation has become super politicizing talk about how sports is a narrative of nationhood and definitely think that you could write eight the story of modern America on his last Assi What What do you? What do you? What are you? What are you thinking about? Colin Kaepernick. I think he's great. I think the truth almost didn't come to light. They. They suppress it for so long and so long and so long I think that it is. Emblematic of what's going on the country as a whole where you have this man and expressing is. Liberal belief. and. Becomes a lightly We tell ourselves we're in the twenty th century were everything is so diverse, and then you see what a lightning rod that becomes for. White. Anger. Someone expressing pride who is but also like. You can't kill black. That's radical athlete baboots how that's That's where we really are that. You can't say. Retaliates tally is wrong. Those are the hard enforces of racism, which I which I can chew colonialism in larger forces and patterns. How advanced how might and can the society be if you if it's if it's controversial as it was in that moment? Thankfully it's I think. As this moves forward. He's becoming raise established himself as one of a line of. Athletic spokespersons yet if you go back on tradition begins. Muhammad Ali's or the world and the Jim Brown's the world who's as like Oh as black versus one of the few people who is allowed any sort of visible Jackie Robinson in different. S. And that's end. And then he became corporate. Right. But the happiest people's right night. I talked about Jim Brown on the NFL who made the decision to leave NFL. After A manhood battle with art modell whose the owner Cleveland browns and direct line and one of the things on everything. We think we're saying there's historical precedent for it and the function and the horses ourselves. Insane. And so right. You look at that the and you look at what's happening feeling I'm not the first person. Say This I long chop wanted to contextualized story. And also like yeah. Camp is doing civil rights work. In the resistance that he faces shows you how much of this country is still against the most basic expression of civil rights what do you? What do you make of? The NFL along with the NBA? WNBA. Others. The institutions of sport have seemed to have come around to say you know we're going to embrace black lives matter. We're going to plastered all over the field or the court wear whatever you want. Neil. However, you want like you know we're fully supportive of the movement and yet gaps still doesn't have a job. So he still sacrificed his dream. Surely, it was his childhood dream that he achieved And then had that taken away chose to go after something bigger, and now that the the sports world, the NFL in particular has come around to his side of things. He is still left out which for so many of us for you to. ADDS a hypocritical sheen to all of it. I mean, I don't know I can't fully embrace what the NFL is doing until he is welcome back into the fold in a serious way. I mean, one of the. made the final cut I. Don't remember off the top of my head but wasn't Michael Vick can chilidog and still have A. Job in Colin Kaepernick, can't say. Shoot people. And not have a job. That's what I think. First of all the NFL. Lost me just I mean. There are a lot like their lot of sports. I. Love. I. Love Sports is you know and but there's always another sport and league baseball loss during steroids. Haven't been back. Haven't really looked back. I might watch catch on the corner of my eye, the barbershop every once in a while. The NFL. Because they are so far on what you say what you think the man like Avenue you know Muhammad, Ali's spent. Eighteen months in jail for Kosovo Vietnam War. I don't remember how much. Much of the baby actually did. Athletic careers. sports and they end when you're still a young individual with a lot of life ahead and as you read it as Jim Brown realize can't stop. By many miles at. And right the dream of NFL would it looks like it might be over I hope that it's eventually someone will give him a shot maybe but. And will air. We'll find the next stream. Nets like life purpose. That's always the challenge of being an athlete. It happened to him in a prematurely it's not fair but he's shown himself to be larger than that lead

NFL Jim Brown Colin Kaepernick Muhammad Ali Neil America Michael Vick Cleveland Browns Wnba Jackie Robinson Kosovo Baseball Camp NBA
The History Of Soul Train

Black History in Two Minutes

02:38 min | 2 d ago

The History Of Soul Train

"Billed as the hippest trip in America soul trained was an undeniable cultural phenomenon. Soul. Train was conceived of as a black American bandstand by a man named Don Cornelius a Chicago Radio reporter and the DJ. Hosted by Cornelius the show launched in one, thousand, nine, hundred, seventy. Initially airing. Only. In, CHICAGO. It was a low budget black and white TV show. But Seemingly Became a cultural phenomenon? And soon, it's what the nation. Hey they. Up to the mind. going. For. Those rain. Cornelius had this vision of bringing black popular culture music and dance to the Stream, and it's not just African Americans who were tuning in clearly you have young black folks who are on. TV being being into the homes of white. Americans across the country. This coming off the heels of the civil rights movement and is the first time that you're seeing. Young black teenagers really not mired in the way that they've been preceded national news. Soul train came appointment viewing. Show wasn't just about sings of their songs. It was as much about the dancers. Dance is that they were introducing two teenagers around the country. Veto regionalized. M made it national suddenly their dance became everyone's days. We're trying to emulate everything that we see. Soul train has the distinction of being one of the longest running programs in the history of American television. Showcasing, black music and culture to Americans of every race. You've always had in various ways, black popular culture being mainstream but for so long it was being mainstreamed with white voices and white vases. So to have then culture on display that way was. Revolutionary. Soul train brought. It's devoted audience love he's soul. The Mantra Don Cornelius. Passionately other. At the end of every episode an Don. Joining. Reason. We would love.

Don Cornelius Chicago America Reporter
Is It Time to Get Bullish on Banks?

CNBC's Fast Money

02:25 min | 2 d ago

Is It Time to Get Bullish on Banks?

"Welcome back to fast money banks catching a bid today in the back of a pair of upgrades, Goldman Sachs and Wells Fargo. But the group is still underperforming the rest of the market this year and it's still about twenty five percent off of twenty twenty highs. Karen actually bought some banks today which ones Karen and why. Well. As you know I am long. Bang. Same Long JP Morgan Citi, Bank Wells Fargo and Bank of America. But I added to GP Morgan today and this is really a trading position. So I had calls and call spreads just expiring October Sixteenth. So I'm really just playing for earnings and I think it's setting up well into earnings because the stocks have traded terribly they've actually been a hedge on my making money on any other parts of the portfolio they kind of hedge that out but I think that expectations are so low now that. The. Bars Low I. think there's a good chance they feed. PHYA fairmount and if they don't, I don't think there's that much more downside here. But I'm just playing really for the short term I. Think this is too low for earnings and it's coming up October thirteenth they think they'll all be that week. You know I know you you saw this Wall Street Journal today Dan but I think that the headline of the essence of the headline really captures the that the bank's Love the markets in twenty twenty but the markets don't love the banks. Yeah I haven't listened. It seemed like an easy trade most of the year to fade every rally in the banks and they're having. been too many dramatic ones. The massively outperformed the broader market here to me. They were showing some relative strength, the beginning of September. But then there are no shortage of headlines I think the banking it goes back to some of the things that we were just talking about the rates where they are go the exposure to. loan-loss defaults and bankruptcies that sort of thing I mean they have a lot of exposure there and I think they're more reflective of main street, then Wall Street, and if you look at the performance from the investment banks who've been benefiting from all from the lower rates and all the stimulus monetary and everything, there's a huge spread there too. So to me, I think you could see Bankamerica back at Twenty I. think you see JP Morgan back in eighty I think you could see Morgan Stanley. Back Forty Bucks I think that they have one more leg lower, but to Karen point that mid October week when all of those banks that make up maybe half the weight of the XL laugh report is there a trade there I just don't know if you start that trade today on September twenty third for October sixteen

Karen DAN Jp Morgan Gp Morgan Wells Fargo Morgan Citi Wall Street Journal Bank Wells Fargo Goldman Sachs Morgan Stanley Bank Of America Bankamerica
CarMax profit, revenue rise above expectations

MarketFoolery

03:35 min | 2 d ago

CarMax profit, revenue rise above expectations

"CARMAX, second quarter profits and revenue came in much higher than expected. And the last time I checked the stock. It was down twelve percent. I was surprised by this because this was a really good quarter for Carmax I didn't see anything in their guidance to indicate that the next three to six months is going to be particularly perilous. Yeah I was also surprised they beat expectations revenue was up three point three, percent five, point three, seven, billion earnings were up percent last quarter they had implemented cost savings they had furloughed fifteen thousand workers, the CEO Bill. Nash Reduced Salary by fifty percent, they stopped new store openings like you said Chris this this quarter was really good for them. Their sales had bounced back by. Around June, we saw revenue growth, they're hiring seven, hundred, fifty people at their customer experience center they're planning to open stores. Again, the stock is up twenty one percent since the beginning of the year. So I don't know if it's more trying to temper expectations for the future, but it was a solid quarter for them. We've certainly seen that with other companies in other industries where. The come out with, results. They are somewhere on the spectrum of good to great but not. Off John Dropping perfect. And we see a little bit of a off just because you're to date the stock is doing well. I Dunno Carmax. I've the last vehicle. I bought was from Carmax. A couple of years ago had a very good experience. I would absolutely go back there again because I feel like they have. I don't want to say they have solved a pain point, but they have certainly made a pain point a lot less painful and I'm referring to the process of buying a car which for for most people, it's just trans. Actually we just want the car that we want and please don't make me go through the whole haggling Kabuki theatre thing because that's just awful. Yeah I have never bought a car I. Don't have a driver's license, but I will say I was I was interested in. How, they might have done in the last recession. So you can see if there are people who are listening economic service. If you look at the demand curve for normal products as income increases the demand for a product increases but with inferior goods are inferior products they do well in a recession because as income decreases demand for this product increases, and since Carmax maxell eighty, five percent of their revenue is used cars. It seems likely that they would be considered an inferior product. So if we see a recession in the future, they would be a company that would do well, and so I looked at. How they did in the last recession, and if you look at the stock from March twenty, two, thousand, eight to September Twenty fifteen, it returned two hundred, four percent compared to fifty percent for the S. and P. Five hundred. So I think looking forward and thinking long term about Carmax if you're thinking about the impacts, the long-term recession impacts of covid nineteen, this might be an interesting to think thing to think about is those inferior products versus those normalized product particularly in urban areas where you're a for people who have the means they're probably to be spending less time getting on subways if they can avoid it. I gotta say inferior goods as a categorization just sounds pejorative that sounds like something that the new auto dealers of America came up with yeah. It's not the nicest term and when you study, they'll say a bus is considered an inferior to car planes kind of insulting. But that is the technical economic term

Carmax CEO Nash America Chris
"americas" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

07:27 min | Last month

"americas" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

"They they were essentially navigating the northern Pacific coasts of what is now modern or what we would consider modern day Japan and Korea, and come Chaka with with boats. So it's really no stretch to imagine that humans. At some point perhaps were able to reach the Americas by boat. Using coastal migration. Here's why it makes sense. Because you could. Bright at the end of the Ice Age there where we're imagining that people were physically walking across the bering strait. Perhaps, they were on boats just previous to the end of that glacial maximum or during the maximum or even after it. Taking boats and following that coast because you'd end up in Alaska, you'd get to British Columbia then down south to Washington to Oregon along the Pacific coast of what is now the United States. And it's pretty incredible that humanity even during an ice age was able to both survive and. Prosper and even migrate. Strange things about the world in in that way to imagine it contiguous coast and I like the point you're making Matt about the watercraft involved because you know these aren't cargo ships. These aren't mega yachts or or schooners or Brigantine pontoons or I'm just naming boat words now. What's up one you like? No frigate frigate yeah. frigging, frigate. These were none of those these these were. Okay Sir Tugboat. Yes. These these were not even tugboats they were. They were small coastal craft, right? Brown water, Navy kind of stuff. They weren't meant to go into the open ocean. They were just kind of tracing along the line of the coast, but if that coast is. Ending. So they're just sort of following thing and it's like a video game where in the you know there is a larger world out there. You have a rough idea of the parts of the map you've seen. But everything else is obscured. You know what? I mean so so you may as well imagined that you are just always on the same coast of the thing you call the land. Who knows if there's anything other than the land and then the water? What is compelling about that to me is what? What. Spurred that movement and you know we discussed we discussed the migration of animals that were used for hunting right for food for the populations as possible reason to just continue down the coast if fish populations may be because it's obvious that those boats were would be used for fishing purposes for catching food. You know I wonder if there was something. This is completely just off top of my head boat I wonder what the thing was that spurred. What whichever group, however, large or small it was to continue down that coast and just to keep going to see what's what's next. I wish I knew I mean necessity. I would imagine possibly but I wonder if it wasn't I wonder who is a spiritual belief or? Something that's deep inside I. Think all of us to just find out will there's something over there. Let's. Let's find out. That's inspiring. You know a especially now as the next big step in space exploration may occur within our lifetimes. One one other thing that may have happened just a environmentally is people may have just been following the recession of the ice depending on where you put them in the timeline people may have just been going further along the coast because they were able to see more of the coast I'm not being dismissive I'm just saying like. The environment appears to change so slowly. that. You might not be fully aware of how far you're migrating because your you know your grandparents. Were miles away here kilometers away for the rest of the world. And then. You two generations later. Still feel like you're by the edge of the ice but the ice itself has moved. So I think we're GONNA take one more quick break, and then we're GONNA get into some new discoveries when we return. Blood on the tracks a new podcast about legendary music producer, Phil Spector in the murder of Lana Clarkson. This podcast is hosted by me, Jake Brennan Creator and host of the award winning music and true crime podcast, Disgrace Land, and twenty seven club. This new serialized podcast is part true crime part historical fiction in part spoken word Lo fi beat Nawar each episode is told from the perspective of the people who knew Phil Spector. Best. His so called friends season one, ten episodes and is released. Weekly episodes are packed with secrets, confessions and revelations narrated by the fictional as voices of real people like Lenny Bruce Ronnie, Spector Ike Turner John Lennon Debbie, Harry, and more. Just like Phil Spector, the podcast sounds like nothing you've heard before because you can't push the needle into the red without leaving little blood tracks. Blood on the tracks contains adult content and explicit language listen to blood on the tracks and the iheartradio APP apple podcasts or wherever you get your podcasts. What if you could learn from one hundred of the world's most inspiring women? Now, you can introducing Senecas one hundred women to hear a new podcast brought to you by Seneca women and iheartradio. I'm Kim as a rally in celebration of the hundredth anniversary of American women getting the vote where bring you the voices of a hundred groundbreaking and history-making women listen to Seneca's one hundred women to here on the iheartradio APP apple podcasts or wherever you get your podcasts. There have been some efforts recently, some research that's Kinda put this traditional narrative on its head a bit and that includes some stuff very very recently published in the last month in A. Known, called the timing and effect of the earliest human arrivals in North America Llerena, but Sarah, vow diva, and Thomas Higham look into a pretty awesome and bizarre discovery. What they found was a piece of limestone. From this very specific cave that Chiquita Cave in north central Mexico that could potentially prove that humans actually I arrived on the continent much much earlier than that narrative would have us believe the when we know from school. Yes.

Phil Spector bering strait apple Chaka Americas Sir Tugboat Korea Chiquita Cave Alaska Brigantine Japan Seneca Matt Spector Ike Turner Oregon United States Pacific Mexico Lana Clarkson
"americas" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

07:24 min | Last month

"americas" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

"Ago. Yeah. Yeah. It's a great point. I think this story is going to be familiar to many of us because you you grow up in elementary school middle school high school as you said that you go to college and you'll still hear some version. Of this? But the problem here is pretty apparent with every single new discovery about the ancient past the story of humanity's migration from one place to the next. We find the story gets less and less clear cut we don't have. We don't have specific points of time in shifts of patterns right slow we don't have the. Story of humanity, and this is something that has baffled us on this show since before. Oh Gosh. We Le- we were doing this show win science discovered new mix tapes of early humanity. Ride Denisovans was the homo flu. Yeah. Four years yeah. wh the point I'm making here is that. We have been taught. A story, we've been sold a narrative in a very authoritative way but. Everything we are learning as a species indicates that story is not as accurate as we are led to believe it is when we our children in school so That's the question. When did human beings actually arrive in the Americas before we jump in Bene- just want to dovetail off what you're saying there. We have been sold this essentially told this all of our lives everyone listening right now. I would say just to make it a little more positive because it's the best. It's the best picture we've been able to paint with the information we've had up to this point, right? And? The the problem I think the biggest problem that we're going to be tackling today that we have to address is that once that picture is painted anytime new information, these new discoveries that you're talking about Ben come through it becomes more and more difficult to convince the painters. Of that picture that there needs to be some revisions, right? Because especially, if it's a a single point or discovery in one place or you know one person's one teams discovery rather than three or four in an area. That's kind of the the biggest problem I see what you're saying in it's important because we're. We're talking about. Discovering single points of information rights, single instances, and what are single instances or examples against a larger body of thought you know what? I mean. Yeah and I mean those high school textbooks aren't like infinitely long. They gotta figure out how to tell version of the story that is as close to the likely scenario as possible and teaches us something about the history of you know life. But you're right. It is problematic Akanbi for sure because who you know there's so much cantankerous in science to if people making one discovery and then another crew. Making something that conflicts with that narrative, and then there's this kind of beef as the power really happened but there's a lot of politics wrapped up in it and all of that. So it's interesting for sure to see the way these things kind of take on a life of their own especially like you said, once the badgers out of the bag was Ben. Would Sam. Yeah. That's that's the issue here. Want to be very clear. We're not accusing your history textbook publishers of purposely lying to you, and we are certainly not accusing your favorite history teachers from Grade School of lying to you teachers work incredibly hard They are some of the most important people on the planet in my opinion and. They're not out to beguile and deceive you hopefully there there are supposed to be a however. They're working with the information they have. And when we look at the realm of science and how science is communicated or disseminated to the population, we see that your point Matt sometimes people clean to a thing because it is the established fact now that does that is indicative of. Skepticism or a lack of critical thinking it's also very human understandable things psychologically speaking, right I don't want to I don't want to seem as though we are being. Dismissive or derogatory toward the many people who have spent their entire academic career studying. Various incredibly specific aspects of Clovis theory or the current official story of human migration but I, will say in the past. I am sure there people who spent decades researching one thing. And published about it, and then they're they're in the new evidence was discovered that disproved or challenged their life's work. and. So they just kind of you played it to the left. What am I going to do after forty five years in the game changed my mind to be better world if people did that but they often though, yeah, I it's it's another situation where. Once. You have this established fact you have to go foreign beyond to prove that you're that that fact needs to be altered or negated right you the that's why it becomes so difficult. To make these big changes to. To existing stories and they are stories don't. Don't kid yourself. These are stories that we are constructing based on the things that we have found. And as we tackle this big question today wended humans arrive in the Americas we're gonNA realize that this thing is much more complicated than we expected. and. We'll tell you all about it right afterward from her sponsor. Did you know GEICO's now offering an extra fifteen percent credit on and motorcycle policies. That's fifteen percent on top of what Geico could already save you. So what are you waiting for your dentist to actually believe you and your flashing every day? Great and you're cutting down on your sweets of course. Wonderful. Then I don't even need to look in their great in six months. There's never been a better time to switch to geico save an extra fifteen percent when you switch by October seventh limitations apply visit GEICO DOT COM for details. Over the years host, Aaron Minke and the team behind lor on obscured in cabinet of curiosities have scoured the globe, bring you tales from the past with a hint of darkness from superstitions.

GEICO Americas Ben middle school high school Grade School Denisovans Aaron Minke Akanbi official Matt
"americas" Discussed on Post Reports

Post Reports

05:23 min | Last month

"americas" Discussed on Post Reports

"And now one more thing about what you're covid test results actually mean since February. The newsroom's received over ten thousand questions readers about the novel coronavirus in cove. Nineteen how it's spreading and how it's impacting everyday lives one trend in the questions. We've been receiving is what can I do based off of my test results if I get a viral test or if I get an antibody does that mean I can change my behavior day to day go see more people go see my friends and family possibly go on a trip so I started looking into it. My Name's Teddy Amenabar and I work on the Social Media.

Teddy Amenabar
"americas" Discussed on Post Reports

Post Reports

05:15 min | Last month

"americas" Discussed on Post Reports

"A total of thirty two states plus the District of Columbia put in place these legal restrictions at the beginning of the pandemic but since late. May Ten states have ended. They'll shut off bands and another dozen states are set by early September. So the number of Americans that are going to be at risk of shutoff behind on their bills even though this recession is only getting deeper is going to grow in the next several weeks. My name is Deena Grandoni and I'm an energy and environmental reporter. Here's The Washington Post and I write our daily energy newsletter called the energy to Oto. So what does this actually mean for people at risk of losing their power while the thing is that this has been a problem for many people while before the pandemic and Have you had before the pandemic any issues with paying doctors to be? Bill are actually talked to this woman in Virginia. T show Watkins who is working right now. She works as a medical assistant for nursing home and one time they came a disconnect stuff and I told them that I could pay the next day and the man bill turned it all and then having to pay that bill and the fees for them to reconnect it. I think it's like twenty five or fifty dollars. She'd received a shot off this this past march but was actually saved from having her power shut off due in part to the fact that Virginia and her utility had put in Moratoria to prevent people from getting their power shut off as like the pandemic took grip in this country. Are you grateful that they have this moratorium on shut off? Yeah did but I'm just thinking like when they do that and when they're done doing that the people that are like we haven't been able to pay or just pay a little bit. Are they going to have to pay that big on now? Right then or their stuff's GonNa be turned off. Or what are they GONNA do? They haven't even said right right right. What it means is that as a country continues to sink deeper into recession. It's going to get harder for people to keep their lights on. Congress allowed an extra six hundred dollars per week in unemployment benefits to expire for thirty million around thirty million people which is just going to be straightening family's finances even more you know. It looks like we're obviously no closer to a return to normal and wondering are lawmakers doing anything to protect. People here or are governor's going to extend some of those orders so some governors have extended orders such as North Carolina Governor Roy Cooper and right now a bunch of congressional Democrats and advocates for the poor are calling on the federal government calling on Congress demanding that Congress step in and issue a nationwide bank shut offs. They'd been eyeing the upcoming corona virus stimulus package as the best chance for doing that. But negotiations for that package of broken down and we might not be getting a new bill. So where is the push-back coming from? So the PUSHBACK is coming from investor owned utilities. These are the large corporations that provide power to people We've seen a group called the Edison Electric Institute which represents these companies write letters to Congress asking for the government and for Congress not intervene to let the states to let the utilities handle this. They argue that it's better for them to work with local regulators with are used to working with to respond to an outbreak. That's hitting each state differently. And they are advocating against what? They're calling a one-size-fits-all approach and some. Republicans have taken up that call to say that it should be up to the states rather than the federal government to determine when utility should get back to normal but advocates for the poor are saying that we can't rely on corporations to act just out of the goodness of their hearts to keep people's power on there saying that we need legal restrictions on shutting off power and that we need the federal government to do that because the states are slowly rolling. Back there different. Moratoria you know. It's one thing to lose electricity. That when you think about how so. Much of our lives require utilities. I'm wondering if this applies to other other utilities like water or Nino you name it anything else. Use every day yet. These different moratorium put in place by states also often applied to water and to Internet Stopping Companies Stopping Utilities from shutting off. Either one of those. The thing is though to shut off. Someone's power also effectively means to victim from their homes because it's next to impossible to state in a place if you're not getting those basic necessities you're not getting that electricity and you're not getting that water..

Congress federal government Bill Virginia Moratoria Deena Grandoni District of Columbia Watkins reporter Governor Roy Cooper The Washington Post Edison Electric Institute Nino North Carolina
"americas" Discussed on The Daily

The Daily

06:53 min | 3 months ago

"americas" Discussed on The Daily

"So it sounds like Democrats see Georgia as ripe for flipping from red to blue. Because of the shifts you're talking about. Yes, they see it as their most likely opportunity to deliver a blue state in the south for Joe, Biden in November and in the US Senate. But they also see it. A gateway to a playbook that other southern states can replicate the thought processes if Georgia can put together. After years and years of coming close. That allows places like south. Carolina places like Texas to have a real roadmap, and how Democrats can make inroads with their missing is a victory to prove to other states and to prove to the Democratic Party that the south is worth investing in. How likely is it that this victory you're describing is actually going to happen. While it's certainly a possibility. You have to note that Georgia has been Kinda fool's gold for Democrats for some years now, which makes it kind of conundrum for what the National Party Joe. Biden's campaign should do this year. Should they invest in Georgia, which is the only state in the country that has both Senate seats up in November or do they spend that money that time that investment in states that they know are more likely to be the tipping point for the electoral. College is kind of a choice between playing it safe. or putting all their chips on the table. So in light of what they saw on Tuesday, which of these two strategies do you think the Democratic leadership is leaning toward right now? In the short term. What Biden chooses to prioritize for the November election. We don't really know. But one of the best ways that the campaign can signal its intentions is through the vice presidential selection. If Joe Biden wants to select someone who represents a kind of new southern Democrat. Someone like Stacey Abrams or Keesa, lands, bottoms, or even Val demings representative in Florida. That could signal that the campaign is trying to unlock this type of new democratic future in the region that we've talked about. And I don't think that you can separate race from this question also. The South and southern. Democrats are overwhelmingly black. And those are the same people that helped revive Joe Biden's campaign after he was struggling in Iowa. New, Hampshire Nevada. To me an important question as we look towards November Is Will. Joe Biden try to reward those communities with an increased focused on them as he moves towards the general election. Or is the primary over, and this is all about just the ways that the campaign believes it needs to be Donald Trump. So we've been talking about how important Georgia is to the Democratic Party in twenty twenty, but I can imagine that for that same reason. Georgia is equally as important to Republicans. So, what are they doing to hold onto the state? I think like Democrats Georgia. Republicans have short term and long term considerations in the short term. They just think state remains kind of structurally read. But in the long-term Republicans will concede that the demographics of the state are not moving in their direction. And what they need to do to stop this kind of rising tide. is to appeal to kind of new communities there and there's kind of a pitch that we should tell them that the reason you're leaving. California or New York or other places is because those states have high taxes and Georgia's business friendly. The why liberals have wanted to come here is because of a ton of conservative values, and that's what we should try to hold onto. The problem is when the president has so define the parties by kind of social and cultural concerns. Can the state? Republican make a pitch to an immigrant community, a black professional around republicanism, but that not being hiding to what trump has made the focus of the party. You're talking about this cultural clash going on in the country and that's that's very top of mind for a lot of Americans right now. Obviously so, can you put this election? We're talking about into the context of this broader cultural moment that we are all living right now. For both Democrats and Republicans, I think that this moment this reemergence of racism racial justice as the country's top, even electoral or voting concern plays in to the strategies that we have laid out for the Republican side when we talk about the way that state. Republicans and the president have tried to appeal to voters. You've seen Republicans last week or so try to make defend the police. Police a scare tactic to bring back that suburban voter. You've seen them. Try to focus on the more destructive or looting aspects of the protests to discredit the movement as a whole, but frankly public opinion shows that there has been widespread agreement around police brutality as a growing issue, and I think that's important to know about what candidates for both sides are saying right now in Georgia. Doug Collins the representative on the Republican side who is running for? Senate he was the member who wrote and helped pass the first step act the criminal justice reform that president trump signed into law, and this is a deeply conservative representative who has made that criminal justice pitch apart of his appeal, even minority communities in on the Democratic side the Senate. Candidates are running very. Very explicit campaigns about race in criminal justice and about inequalities that we're kind of unfathomable in south years ago. They say that the Times are changing that. You don't have to be Cagey for calibrate to the ideological middle on things like race that White Democrats are willing and open to talking about things in explicit terms, and they think that can be a winning.

Joe Biden Georgia Democratic Party Senate US Senate president representative Times Donald Trump Doug Collins Stacey Abrams Hampshire Nevada Val demings Carolina Texas New York Iowa California
"americas" Discussed on Squawk Pod

Squawk Pod

08:03 min | 4 months ago

"americas" Discussed on Squawk Pod

"Small and large cities across the US witnessed the largest public demonstrations this weekend since the nineteen sixties in light of these events, squawks today aimed to tackle the systemic issues beneath the unrest, racism income inequality and a global pandemic that could make the economic divide even deeper. We started the podcast today with an idea proposed by guest Robert Johnson, the founder of Black Entertainment Television and longtime investor Jones suggests that now is the time for the United States to pay fourteen trillion dollars in reparations to black Americans to atone for slavery. I think this country as we saw with the riots and sixty eight now it's twenty twenty. We now see this happen time and time again, so my request to the CEO. And I'm sure they will understand this. Now is the time to. Big. Short answers to long horrific questions about the stain of slavery, I'm not going to solve the inequality problem. We need to focus on well creation. And well generation and to do that. We must bowling green the descendants. Say. Into equality with this nation that brings us to our interview with Ken Frazier CEO of the two hundred and three billion dollar pharmaceutical giant Merck CEO since twenty eleven, frazier hit national awareness in two thousand, seventeen, following the white supremacist rally in Charlottesville Virginia at the time, many Americans eat us were on several. White House Advisory Boards bringing together corporate leaders from different sectors to advise the trump administration on policy and the economy. The Monday morning after the Charlottesville. Works, corporate twitter account released a brief statement that frazier was resigning his role on a manufacturing advisory council frazier. He felt a responsibility to take a stand against intolerance and extremism Ken Frazier's grandfather was born into slavery in South Carolina. In the late eighteen fifties, his father was a janitor in Philadelphia and he was the first business leader to speak out after Charlottesville others followed and the CEO Advisory Councils as we knew them. At that time were disbanded. The Merck CEO joined squawk box today with Joe Kernan Becky, quick and Andrew Ross. Sorkin here's Andrew Can. Privilege to have you this morning, you have been outspoken on a lot of these issues over the past several years, but we have not seen something like this in quite some time. As a leader as a CEO as a father wanted to just get your thoughts to begin on on what you're seeing and what you're telling, both your employees and your family, so first of all Andrew thanks for having me on this morning I was on this network less than a week ago. Talking about our company is doing to help with the crisis created by the pandemic in terms of vaccine, research, antiviral research, and here we are a few days later facing another crisis. Of a quite different dimension side our company. The first crisis I think we can say caught us by surprise with the virus emanated from China. This crisis has been brewing for hundreds of years and We're going to have to really step up to it so to answer your question. I would say first of all. There's a huge amount of pent up anger among many people in the African, American community as a result of the George. Floyd death, and I'd like to just try to explain maybe to some viewers. What the source of some of that anger is and I'll start by saying when you look at that videotape. And we've all seen it over and over again. Shows is a police officer. A nineteen year veteran of the police force in Minneapolis along with three other of his colleagues. With with a person who's handcuffed and on the ground, being held down by three officers. The officer has his knee on this person's neck. If you look at officers, face, you see no expression. You can tell this is not a threat at all. Because the officer who has his neon. His neck actually has his hands in his pockets. You have a person saying I can't breathe I'm you know I'm dying? Eventually complete fear. He cries out for his mother. He says Momma. There's a crowd around saying. Take your your knee off his neck. One officers just holding the crowd bat. So what the African American community sees in that videotape. Is that this African American man who could be me or any other African American? Man is being treated as less than human. And I think what really caused the spark that set all this off is what is the reaction of the officials to what I just said, so you now have this video. And for four days, there's no action. No one thinks that this is worthy of even putting the officer under arrest, which is the threshold step in our criminal justice system? It isn't an indictment. It isn't a criminal trial. It's not a conviction. You can do all the investigation. You could do the autopsy, but what? The community saw wasn't until they went out into the streets, this officer was ninety to be much less. The other officers even arrested for what was clearly inhumane treatment of a citizen. Can, we're seeing a lot of CEOS. Come Out! and put out statements. Business Roundtable over the weekend in so many other. CEOS and corporate leaders doing the same, what do you think companies should be doing at this point, and and and is there something to be done? Frankly beyond the press release I think there's a lot to be done beyond the press release I. Think every time we have one of these situations, and you can go back almost thirty years to the Rodney King video tape. Look at all these other issues you look at the Eric Garner situation in New York a two situations in Minneapolis guiding the land of Casteel. Who's you might remember his fiancee videotaped video stream to? The incident where he was shot another Guy Clark shot in the head. These things happen over and over again. Freddie Gray these things happen over and over again and win their. It's unjust. People put out statements. They put out platitudes. They say this is terrible. We decry racism. We believe that we ought to build a just society I. Think Business has to go beyond what is required here. It has to go beyond just statements. I think for example we know in this country that there's a huge gap between the number of jobs that existed before the pandemic. There was some something like twelve million unfilled jobs. Jobs in this country, and there are five million inner city and other African American kids who want access to the academy. They WANNA. Be Participants. They want to be citizens. They WANNA. Be Consumers. What they lack is the education. They lacked the training and their opportunities for programs like there's a program called year up I'll just use them as an example Gerald survey and runs that program and what they do is they take some of these kids? And he put a six month intensive training program, and then they become interns for six months, and then guess what they graduate and they become productive citizens. Citizens I think businesses have to use every instrument at their disposal to reduce these barriers that existed I heard the prior conversation about the legacy of slavery I heard the prior conversation about reparations. The fact of the matter is there are in fact barriers that are faced by Americans, even though we don't have laws that separate people on the basis of race anymore. We still have customs. We still have beliefs. We still have policies. We have practices that lead to inequity, and I think we all know that in good times. When community is quiet, we can ignore it. We can go about doing what we. We believe is in.

CEO officer Ken Frazier Merck Charlottesville Minneapolis United States CEO Advisory Councils White House Advisory Boards Black Entertainment Television twitter Robert Johnson South Carolina Guy Clark founder Jones advisory council Virginia
"americas" Discussed on Slate's The Gist

Slate's The Gist

03:33 min | 4 months ago

"americas" Discussed on Slate's The Gist

"The lucky thing if you want to call it that we're this country of three hundred thirty million people but it's not like the virus is spread evenly throughout the land and it's also not like some areas that are heavily hit. Don't have maybe within the state that aren't hit nearly as hard and that's why New York Governor Andrew Cuomo governor of the hardest hit state including the world's hardest. Hit City was optimistic today. It's an exciting new phase. We're all anxious to get back to work. We WanNa do it smartly. We WanNa do it gently but we want to do it. That announcement was not about New York. City can't be about New York City but about different areas upstate. That aren't in the city's predicament. And then as he was speaking on the screen next to him where seven metrics for reopening we know about falling death rates check and bed an ICU and ventilator capacity check check check but also there was testing and attesting threshold and the CDC guideline of thirty tests per one thousand residents over a month. That was one of the metrics and several areas of upstate. New York met those criteria. So they're being open now. The White House believes it has the testing capacity to achieve a national reopening. Even though they are leaving it to the states to execute that capacity admirals your Wa explained it by citing models. Some models is cited talking about the best estimates trump weighed in and did no one a favor with his explanation. We have now and nobody says it. They just don't want to write it by far more tests than any other country in the world not even a contest which is of course some raw raw USA USA bullshit. That doesn't answer the salient question because the question is in. Hey can the world's third most populous country with the most coveted one thousand nine cases have the most tests who carers? We do doesn't matter so what we have to do is totally ignore the president's rhetoric talking points and only pay attention to the experts but as we're doing so we have to hope that all the experts need to placate an handle. The president that need is in skewing. Their expertise is in having a real effect on the plans that they're putting forth so that is where we are. The president is a Corner Bill Barker or illusionist who bombastic and irrelevant the expert. Who is in charge of the plan trying to convince us? It's the right plan and everyone's nagging doubts left. Just because the Carnival Barker can't stop talking his snake oil or leave any insult unaddressed. Or on exacerbated. And that's today show Margaret. Kelly is the gist associate producer. She wants you to know. It's not a competition between the US and the rest of the world because the US is obviously winning. What's the point spread? I Dunno ask. China Daniel. Schrader produces the gist. He wonders who sang lead. And who sang harmony in Wilson Phillips and he thinks we should ask China the jest I would actually like to see an Admiral Guar. In fact the entire joint chiefs just dress up in full makeup like Hawk and animal and the members of Raider nation. I would say the intimidation factor would be worth at least two battleships in one b. One bomber. So it's economical Debra do Peru and thanks for listening..

New York City New York president Governor Andrew Cuomo China Bill Barker US Wilson Phillips Raider Debra Kelly USA USA Wa CDC White House Schrader producer
"americas" Discussed on Slate's The Gist

Slate's The Gist

04:53 min | 4 months ago

"americas" Discussed on Slate's The Gist

"americas" Discussed on Slate's Hang Up and Listen

Slate's Hang Up and Listen

07:03 min | 6 months ago

"americas" Discussed on Slate's Hang Up and Listen

"Not only will Tom Desi hits this one. He's got a very slight win at his backheel. Set a national football league record in addition to winning the game. I don't believe this will be DNC. Were a special shoe leather reinforced surface. Though she is the Times Picayune reported and back in nineteen seventy were custom-made in San Diego in each cost two hundred dollars. Don't worry the saints paid for them a couple of other things. I learned from reading the Picky Ends Game Story. Jackie Burkett snap ball to the holder. Joe Scar Patty the lions taken. We'd Seventeen sixteen with eleven seconds to go on an eighteen yard field goal. I had thought that's the shortest possible. But if the goalposts are at the front end zone Stephan back then you could take an eight yard field goal. Could that possibly be true? Theoretically hard hard to get over the line but anyway eighteen yards pretty short. Dempsey's field goal broke a seventeen year record held by. Maybe you can help me with the pronunciation here Bert Russia. Shar thank you. He kicked a fifty six yard or in Nineteen fifty-three Dempsey's kick was twelve and a half percent longer. So the current record sixty four yard Matt Prater to beat that by twelve and a half percent someone would have to take a seventy two yard field goal so that just gives you a sense of how much Dempsey was out kicking the record books. The picky owns Bob. Rossler referred to Dempsey's kick as the miracle on Willow Street. Does the location of the Saints Stadium Back then? The old two lane stadium which no longer exists land linebacker Wayne Walker also reportedly said after the game. Dmc didn't kick that football God dead about that but look like Dempsey kicked it today. I just watch the video I think so. Dempsey made eighteen of thirty four attempts that year he was cut by the saints before the nineteen seventy one season and that's the NFL for you. I am not sure if the saints caps all of the two hundred dollar shoes since they had paid for them but I will say rest in peace. Tom Dempsey Joel. What is your Dempsey by Dempsey? This Bobby Bowden former Florida State University head football coach Bobby. Bowden is ninety years old. He lives with his wife of seventy one years in the same home. He's lived in for forty four years. The winningest coach a major college football history has been retired for a decade now and in most stories. You've read about coach Bowden. In that time. There's likely been mentioned that he a goes to bed around eight. Pm Be Wakes up around four am see. Reads the Bible a newspaper with a cup of coffee every morning? Then Bowden might answer emails. He might go in a nice walk in hit golf balls at the country club behind his home and he will almost certainly go to dinner with his wife and around four. Pm It's totally. In keeping with the performance of Country Bumpkins Bowden was able to hone over the fifty. Five years of he was a coach. It was a useful caricature even he was architect of one of the best and most ruthless programs in college football history. If it wasn't already obvious coach Bowden's is a life of routine and comfort or like so many others. It wasn't until recently in an interview last week with the Tallahassee Democrat coach Bowden said the corona virus pandemic his made him as worried as he's ever been. He told the Democrat quote. I don't think there is a man or a woman in the United States of America. That could envision something like this happening and invisible germ if it was visible. Maybe we could handle it. We can't even see the darn thing and then we knew nothing about it. No history on it. No background on it. I'm really concerned about this. That's why I'm staying home if that particular appraisal of corona virus sounds familiar. It's because it is. It sounds just like something. President trump would say one of his daily press conferences. No one could have seen this happen. It's invisible we nothing. It's the everyday refrain of ignorance coming from the most powerful pope in the country. And you know what Bobby Bowden helped to empower it. Let's go back to Tampa in October. Two Thousand Sixteen coach Bowden showed up to a trump campaign rally in an American flag tie and came onstage to the seminoles war chant and the Tomahawk Chop. Here's a clip. I love. I love his slogan when I when he first said that he was going to run for President. I loved what he said about making America. Great Again Bell Nell Soto the crowd. We've got to win this doggone thing and they did emphasis on day. Trump won Florida with forty nine percent of the vote a pivotal electoral victory. In the nation's biggest swing state bound showed up for trump in Maga- again in two thousand eighteen. He spoke at a rally. Pensacola meant to support the candidacies of run for Governor in Rick Scott for Senator Trump plus God is a majority Bowden said Bowden once again picked a couple of winners. Dishonest and Scott prevailed belden got exactly what he campaigned for consider. The Governor Disentis is taking cues from Florida's Corona virus response directly from trump. It wasn't until last Wednesday. That disentis issued a shelter in place order for the state. That's something that health officials scientists and political opponents had been pleading with him to sign for more than two weeks in that time. Florida became one of the nation's hotspots cove nineteen by most measures. Florida has one of the nation's fastest rates of growth in cases and deaths so in recent days coach. Bowden someone who at ninety is squarely within the category of those most at risk in the midst of this pandemic is holed up at his home. He said this national moment reminded him of his bout. With rheumatic fever. In one thousand nine hundred forty three when he was thirteen that illness kept bowden. Bedridden four-year and prevented him from playing football Ford. Another two it was football. Gave him the life today taking him from a sickly teenager in Alabama to a wealthy legend of the game. He's got everything he's ever wanted and he still homes scared and just kind of want to ask coach Bowden. Does this feel like winning. Is America great again? Damn that was good. Thank you that was really good Stefan. What's your. Tom was heartbroken last week. When Adam slesinger died at age fifty two of complications from the corona virus slesinger was the songwriter bassist and backup singer for the power. Pop Group fountains of Wayne and much more he wrote for Broadway. He wrote for movies an Oscar nomination for that thing you do. He wrote for a Stephen Colbert special. He wrote and collaborated on scores of songs for the musical comedy. Show crazy ex girlfriend. There was one seminal sports on crazy ex girlfriend sports analogies of black and white rat pack number in which two of the main characters Josh faneuil swap sports cliches. When we're on the roads and it's our turn at Bat. We gotTA throw a hail. Mary gotta.

Bumpkins Bowden Tom Dempsey Joel football Bobby Bowden President trump America Florida Times Picayune Jackie Burkett Tom Desi head football coach Saints Stadium Joe Scar Patty San Diego DNC lions Wayne Walker Matt Prater Stephen Colbert Adam slesinger
"americas" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

06:28 min | 6 months ago

"americas" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"To the Americas trucking network then it was nice to to listen a lance before we came in here and hear something different it's something that you and I were talking about that yeah you know there's only so much of this that you can just get beaten over the head with an an honest to god if you don't know to stay home wash your hands don't touch your face and stay at least six feet apart now to groups of ten by now we ain't going to teach it to yeah well in and we're gonna we're gonna talk about extensions if you will of of what this has has caught because I mean this is made me think and I'm sure has you and everybody out there listening about all sorts of things because god knows we had enough time to think right and and I don't mean that yeah I don't mean that in a close man I mean you really do have a lot of time at least you've had a lot of time to be its respective yes minha hail and respective introspective to yeah whatever I mean whatever but but I mean you have nothing but time in many cases because I have been doing what I've been told to do and that is staying at home I've been doing all those things you just alluded to but honest to god I want when it comes on now on T. I just turn it off and that doesn't mean that I don't care and I don't want people to get the wrong impression I just cannot continue to hear the same because it is the same well same only because the number has changed the numbers are challenging but but the bottom line is this the same this is continuing to have to tell the dumbest idea don't know your cry to protect themselves from themselves and I've always said I don't need the government to tell me how to protect me from myself but unfortunately we know now to help us protect ourselves from the idiot then the next Eileen whatever but I still do find a lot of inconsistencies and and I and I don't look I'm not somebody who but the government is issuing orders because they tried to recommend and they see that people don't follow recommend they asked us to do what they thought for us and guess what we did who who who won however some of this stuff to me is a little bit too far well again I go back to the very first thing that when this when this really hit the fan back March twelfth H. yes the very first thing that I saw that said if we go overboard and nothing happens remember that was the whole point now you can talk about civil liberties you can talk about all of that different different sort of thing and how much is too much with regard to where you can and can't go in a free society that's a whole other argument that you can have around a campfire when you're allowed to gather around the campfire you can't do that but at this point I mean all we're doing is reinforcing the simplest message to the stupidest people now what's crazy is the number of people that I would perceive to be somewhat intelligent that aren't paying attention to right and and and and I want to tell you something now this is gonna sound terrible and I wish don't say it I'm saying that on okay now don't so I'm gonna say it I'm gonna say it here's what I think needs is going to need to have some young people are gonna have to die before they really and truly paying attention just because all I've been saying is well you know there was the guy that issued the apology from Milford who was the poster child for stupidity back you know a couple weeks ago in Miami about you know you're not going to tell if I get a corona I get her he's since apologised allegedly understands what he did was reckless but when they came right out I think the big mistake they made a saying that younger people don't manifest they don't it doesn't affect them the same way you still don't know the long terms of facts of fibrosis in the lungs and those sorts of things but the one thing I keep saying is there anybody even know anybody that has this we're start to see more more it was begun in the entertainment business names of people that you know and that you've heard of it now you're starting to see people say yeah my aunt had it right so it's it's it's in it's closing in to a degree but the young people like that I went in to pick up and try to got to take out dinner tonight from a dream now I called down there told me one time I was coming to pick it up they have tape on the floors they have taped arrows right very walking pattern and axes which are six feet apart for you to stand while you wait to check out okay so I wait for the lady in front of me she comes out I go and whatever I'm standing there panting and some dumbass kid he's probably seventeen years old walks up and stands right next to me with his hands both his hands flat on the bar right next to my phone and I'm taking a look I know I don't think he's got it I don't have it the people I'm dealing with don't have it it's not in this building but I'm thinking you just that's not the point of just a candidate as well there's a stupid good friend of mine he's made multiple tracks to home depot he's recently purchased a home and he said they couldn't have it better more any go **** I feel like somebody's always breathing down my neck out there in light like dude get black all I know everybody's laughing at me but I wear this bandanna around my neck so like if I go into a place where there's gonna be some other people that I have to go up around my nose because I feel like any protection for me is better than not sure so I walk into the grocery store on the way over here to pick up something very Klay nobody has anything on workers no one except the one nurse that walks in she's got something on a we had a conversation about it how the fact that nobody is really thinking that they're going to protect themselves in the least my daughter is making she has it she sews and she's making masks out of a pattern out of old type of filter well no news okay have a filter right vacuum cleaner bags and you can make masks out of that just for family friends we are sure that step dad's business whatever but it will get more into that and speaking of nurses I didn't break early because we do have a special guest this is going to be what I think you very much want to pay attention to yeah Leanne arms to the registered nurse she's also the coordinator of the infectious disease response team for St Elizabeth healthcare over in northern Kentucky she's going to check in with us in minutes we've also got a musician Kevin fox around ten thirty five you just kind of talk about what he's going to he's a guy who's been playing in bars and clubs also live twenty plus yeah right yeah that's what he does for a living now so how does that impact in lonesome George Vogel news five our last call these back to the normal time which is eleven fifteen all right so we'll take a quick break we'll get back with the with Leanne and will find out what's really going on where is really going on he's gamble I'm saying it is your weekly reality check on news radio seven hundred WLW these businesses are diving in and doing good across the country GM appliances.

Americas
"americas" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

03:05 min | 7 months ago

"americas" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"Find an unusual pattern more people died in the Americas then the rest of the world what's not clear is why study originally started started to get final estimates of global deaths from a twenty one virus shows about two hundred thousand people died and confirms most of them were young adults and children just the opposite pattern of seasonal flu which tends to kill people sixty five and older but what was intriguing was the global pattern says loan Simonsson of George Washington University who led the study published in the public library of science journal P. L. O. S. medicine whatever that is what it was the whole of the Americas Simonsson said to NBC news all over the Americas we tend to measure a higher burden in Europe for example the death rate in South America was twenty times that seen in Uruguay some studies have suggested that people with diabetes were far more likely to die during the H. twenty one pandemic but silence and said the pattern doesn't support that a twenty one was first detected in Mexico two thousand nine it was a new version of the flu virus a very distant digested or decedent of U. twenty one flu that caused a deadly twenty or nineteen eighteen pandemic could be Americans have suffered because the virus started there in mutated into something mild or is it spread no systems because Bubba what is it about this country seasonal influenza is bad enough to kill between thirty six hundred forty nine thousand people United States in any year between twenty fifty thousand half a million people a year globally these are just estimates blah blah blah twenty countries what does it say about us a relative term dividends day two thousand nine god where yeah it says it here it is again millionaire kittens good is it to Texas sixty one million Americans during the pandemic killed around twelve thousand systems twelve thousand number we've got to send me this from our from Michigan was very helpful and I appreciate you doing that but probably did not see there was an S. on the Americas the thing twenty thousand of the Americas which would be north central and South America eight eight nine four one tags Joe pags dot com are you freaking out are you not freaking out what's bill our gates is new role at Microsoft if even any content plus what what about what I said earlier about manufacturing we're hearing that the new iPhone what would be the iPhone twelve I guess there's the wrong about this but you can also talk about making the nine six nine to go to ten and now forty understand they're they're looking at doing the twelve which of course the eleven is out right now but they're also looking at possibly doing the nine which is kind of interesting but all this might be set back because a lot of the parts in these phones are being made in China and it's just again brings me back to we've got Austin Texas just up the road here which is where the the what is it the I mac pro the I book by somebody's being built right there just a laptop in his laptop the sixty that version for apple's being built up the road start building them here what do you have to build them somewhere where you have no idea how bad this pandemic is so I think that's a that's a simple solution you start building a closer to home and realize that the facilities have been checked out by our government the CDC the whatever you teach us what we have to do and make sure it's cool thing building here we cannot know for sure that there is nobody who is infected in China that a better making that that they're making this product so make it here this could be the I guess the silver lining around the cloud for for employment here for your wages for manufacturing.

Americas
"americas" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

106.1 FM WTKK

03:24 min | 7 months ago

"americas" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

"Americas will have the ability to do their own testing for covert nineteen more than five hundred people have tested positive for coronavirus aboard the diamond princess cruise ship which is approaching the end of its fourteen day quarantine at a Japanese port tomorrow health officials plan to begin the disembarkation process for passengers who tests negative boxes Jonathan Serrie in Atlanta president trump effectively freeing the former governor of Illinois a sense of pride he served eight years in jail a long time legally of age had been in federal prison for trying to sell the Senate seat once held by former president Obama the president also pardoned former NYPD commissioner Bernie Kerik financier Michael Milken who had repeatedly played wed pled guilty rather to violating securities laws the state department taking action against a Russian oil company used to helping them as well as scored an oil embargo trading unit of a Russian controlled oil company Rosneft and its president Irving sanctioned by the trump administration for helping minutes Uele get around an oil embargo no sanctions should be taken alone they're part of a campaign of pressure to bring democracy back to them as well ambassador Elliott Abrams is the US special representative for Venezuela the US government along with dozens of other countries have said the twenty eighteen reelection a Venezuelan president Nicolas Maduro was not legitimate boxes jerit helper in Washington America's listing fox news continues with one oh six one F. M. talk residents returning to the McDougal terrace public housing complex in dura were shocked and outraged to learn that their homes have been broken into resident council president Ashley Kennedy relate her fears to A. B. C. eleven what we really need is people to be vigilant and more cautious because darn knows that my new tires is missing and they're gone and my biggest worry now is that a residence gonna come home and somebody's an apartment after being forced to live in hotels for nearly a month due to the threat of carbon monoxide exposure some of the displaced families began returning whole last Friday but upon arrival they discovered as many as twenty apartment units have been burglarized as a result only eight families have been able to return home the majority of the other tenants continue to live in hotels four people were injured Monday when a small plane went down at an airport in Fayetteville Scott Campbell reports it happened around one fifty in the afternoon degrees creek airport on Butler nursery road according to Cumberland County officials several young people were being treated to an aviation career day event learn about airplane mechanics and pilot careers the teens were being taken up for rides in small groups an initial investigation says the pilot and three other young people receive non life threatening injuries when the Cessna fixed wing single engine aircraft made a crash landing near the runway the FAA is investigating I'm scared gambler a South Carolina man is accused of a Valentine's day shooting in Henderson county deputies found the victim injured at fast met in Hendersonville on Friday they believe the shooting took place in Saluda a thirty year old from travelers rest was arrested for attempted first degree murder Greensboro man is charged in the overdose death of a person to get drugs to Patrick Miller was arrested for death by distribution police say the victim overdosed and reads villain January second for more news listen to the daily dime the big news stories explained not shouted listen to the daily diet each day on the I heart radio app or wherever you get your favorite.

Americas
"americas" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

04:23 min | 8 months ago

"americas" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

"What we know and what we don't I don't know about the corona virus as we just heard from Janet Yellen and David Malpass is a source of no small concern to economists and epidemiologists alike figuring out where the thing is going to go. Next is the name of the game in the middle of this outbreak. Ai is making a play. Artificial intelligence companies have crunched a whole lot of data on the corona virus identifying identifying early patterns and as marketplace's reports. They're building predictive models. Trying to clue us into what might be around the corner three weeks before a top Chinese health official went on TV to announce travel restrictions on one. It's hard I hope they'll go. Medical data nerds halfway across the world. Were already suggesting adjusting an outbreak. The Canadian start a blue dot found. Its computers picked up early warnings from online chatter. China Blue Dot consultant Isaac Bogas is doctor and clinical investigator at the University of Toronto. Economists Sell Chinese language newspapers had reported on some sick people who may have been associated with a seafood market in moo-hyun's and then public health officials discussing meetings between hospitals blue dot notified the world the Health Organization which issued an early alert. Now people like bogas feed computers all kinds of data animal disease Info Airline Schedules Web web articles to find patterns that reveal outbreaks and where they might spread even before. This corona virus showed about side of China. Bogus should co-authored a short. What paper predicting it might? I go to Thailand or Japan in days later the head of respiratory diseases at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Nancy Messier. In Ja announced cases. Outside of China have been identified to in Thailand. One in Japan only travel. Gosh was exactly right. How'd he and his team and do it? Well first they ran the numbers on historical travel patterns. We looked at commercial flight data just to see where people from who had we're going to. In addition to that we looked at the destination. What is the capacity of a country to handle an an infectious diseases threat in other words places with less developed public health systems have a higher riskiness score now? This epidemic early warning system isn't just for Governments Permits Airlines hotels cruise lines. They could lose millions of dollars if people stopped traveling. The data for Meta by ODA hasn't this online ad. We deliver actionable data driven insights. That help you manage and mitigate risk met Abiodun looks at a disease its symptoms death rate whether whether there's a vaccine and surveys people on how much that disease scares them. CEO Nina Manav says this corona virus has a pretty high will call it scariness Uranus index SARS when that hit China and cause a thirty to forty percent loss in revenue is actually a very very similar score to what we're seeing to the current current. Oh virus like blue dot. Her firm uses a I to forecast epidemics and Manav says. Sometimes she's he's really confident. The most powerful information is when the unofficial sources the official sources are all pointing towards the same sort of picture. Sure about what's going on. But data predictions are only as good as the data and in this outbreak. Some experts worry that China is under reporting cases. Doctors are too busy for patients. Just mild. Leo Eric Lofgren is a computational epidemiologist at Washington state. You know the difference between how big this this is GonNa be. If there's two hundred and fifty cases versus five hundred cases versus a thousand cases. Those are very different numbers early in an epidemic and those will change. The forecasts asks pretty dramatically. So there's risk in these prediction models. They could give countries and businesses false confidence that everything is okay or send false alarms arms for what it's worth a brand new paper CO authored. By Isaac Bogosian. Toronto suggests the virus could next go to Turkey Egypt where New Zealand. I'm Scott Tong for marketplace.

China CEO Nina Manav Isaac Bogas Japan ODA official Janet Yellen David Malpass Ai Isaac Bogosian Centers for Disease Control Governments Permits Airlines Thailand University of Toronto Scott Tong SARS Leo Eric Lofgren
"americas" Discussed on Dog Tales

Dog Tales

01:41 min | 8 months ago

"americas" Discussed on Dog Tales

"His frustration and grief threatened to overwhelm him. That was why his therapist had recommended that he attended the therapy dog event. Supposedly the common canines would offer comfort and help him recover from his mental wounds. The veteran wasn't wasn't so sure he wanted someone who understood what he was. Going through. Not a pampered pet but he straightened in excitement when he saw the nine year old Belgian Malawai German shepherd mix approach her golden for rippled in the sunlight and her big pointy is. Were perked up alert alert for any new site so sounds however. The veteran was focused on something else. She was missing her front and left leg her trainer Gunnery Sergeant. Chris Willing Ham introduced the dog as Luca she was a former marine and who had lost her leg on duty but even this tough. Canine had fun nicknames. Luca and Mama Luka. The young man reached forward letting Lucas Sniff and lick his palm. His heart swelled. Here was a dog who knew what heaping through and now she continued to happily serve. How wagging tail and lolling tongue evidence of her cheerful demeanor as S.? He stroked Lucas for the veterans suddenly felt a lot less alone in the world..

Luca Lucas Chris Willing Ham Mama Luka
"americas" Discussed on Retropod

Retropod

03:45 min | 10 months ago

"americas" Discussed on Retropod

"To Valentine's Day. One thousand nine hundred seventy nine. These were tense times in the country. The powerful shaw propped up by the Americans had fled a month earlier. The long exiled I A- Tola Ruhollah Khomeini was back back and at the US embassy. Kenneth Kraus a twenty two year old marine on a security tour was returning from breakfast in an interview. Cross told me that there was a sense in the air that something was coming down at ten twenty eight am uh it did gunshots fires explosions. The embassy was under attack by militants. But this this is not the siege. The world remembers the one that would lead to more than fifty Americans being held hostage for four hundred and forty forty four days. That's right nine months before the world witnessed what would become known as the Iran hostage crisis. Krause experience his own crisis firsthand crossgar up in Pennsylvania not far for New Jersey. He joined the Marines in nineteen. Seventy five is an air traffic controller then reenlisted and moved to embassy duty his first assignment it was in Cyprus but when an opportunity came up in Iran Proust jumped he was the history of Ancient Persia sounded awesome krause arrived in a suit and tie he was quickly ordered it to change into a flak jacket. Someone handed him the helmet. This wasn't going to be an easy assignment. Krause in the other dozen. Dozen Marines unsecurity were briefed on increasing threats from gorillas and other radicals and when the siege began they were vastly outmanned and end outgunned. Krause and others tried to hold their positions in the embassy restaurant. When things got desperate? Krause minute offer. He and the other Marines would would surrender and turn over their equipment if the noncombatants were released it worked after the civilians got out Crowson the others collected their equipment Edman pistols shotguns radios but instead of handing them over destroyed them. Krause hid ammunition in pistachio ice cream. Three that did not please. The radicals krause was shot and woke up handcuffed. uncuffed to a hospital bed then. He was taken to prison and tortured a week later. After a twenty minute trial. He was sentenced to death by a kangaroo record after the trial krause was taken back to his cell and when the guards came for him again he thought they were taking him to his execution but instead he wound up in a room with the Red Cross. There was a window the first time he had seen light in in days and then an embassy official appeared in front of him like a Mirage. Telling him a deal had been made for his release. The a young marine broke down crying today krause in his sixties and a retired police police detective in Roswell Georgia. He swears like a sailor and he told me stories from his eight brutal days in captivity with equal parts. Sadness.

Krause Iran Tola Ruhollah Khomeini Kenneth Kraus shaw US Roswell Georgia Red Cross Cross Ancient Persia Edman Pennsylvania Cyprus Proust Crowson New Jersey uncuffed
"americas" Discussed on The Daily

The Daily

07:42 min | 10 months ago

"americas" Discussed on The Daily

"I'm back at the daily. The headline is just the beginning just like how. ADP payroll is just the beginning because they also provide industry leading HR talent time benefits and more informed by data and designed designed for people. So you and your company can achieve what you're working for to get the full story on how. ADP is designing a better way to work visit designed ADP DOT COM MM-HMM ADP always designing for people. I am clear channel scatter on one of the producers who makes the daily one of the things. We often talk about on the daily team. As how to cover international stories it can be hard to take stories. Envir- way places and make them relatable and one of the great things about the New York Times. Is We have reporters all around. The world will and our reporters aren't just sitting behind computers there in the field meeting people doing on the ground reporting and one of the stories I worked on recently was with our reporter Heavier Hernandez Indus who covered a protest Hong Kong. I asked him to record for me as he was doing his reporting. And he sent me all these interviews and I was able to put on my headphones and immediately I feel like I was meeting a seventeen year old in the streets. Fires blazing around or tear gas canisters flying through the air and to hear why she was there and that gave me a deeper understanding of this faraway news and Hong Kong and this intimate global reporting is something that is so special about the New York Times and is one of the reasons we need people to subscribe. If you believe in this kind of work and want to hear more of it. Please subscribe to the New York Times Tina so bring us up to today. Where are we in this process? So over the past few weeks to big new pieces of evidence have come out and they paint a pretty depressing picture for American education and American can kids. The first was the gold standard tool that researchers used to look at American education. It's called the national assessment of educational progress. It showed food only one third of American. Fourth and eighth graders can be considered proficient readers just third and across the board at every level. All students had declining reading scores over the past two years climbing yet. Going down with all these efforts to make things better. Those scores were going down. So this was a very zadeh for many in the world of education in the world that I've been covering for over a decade and then just a few days ago. I had another sad story to report which was on the test that is is considered the gold standard international global test the programme for international student achievement. It showed that there were twenty percent of American ten fifteen year olds who do not read as well as they should at age ten so they really are missing very basic reading comprehension skills and it found that American performance. It's flat and both reading and math since two thousand so this entire time that we've been discussing. Ever since George Bush was elected acted and no child left behind through President Obama and race to the top and common core and effort after effort to try to get American kids to do better on these types of international international exams. American performance has not changed it stagnant despite not just all those programs but I presume the billions of dollars spent and to put them in place many many billions of dollars private dollars public dollars all of that. This all sounds quite bad and quite depressing but I wonder ultimately okay. How much the scores you're describing here especially comparing? US students to international students really matters because the United States very much remains a a global superpower. We have one of strongest economies on the planet. We have low unemployment so if you swallow your national pride is is this really a crisis I think it is I mean how can you feel pride when you think about that. Fifteen year old. Who can't read as well? Oh as a ten year old should with those types of literacy skills. They're not going to be suited for work. That's going to pay a living wage and as economy that we're we're living in and just beyond not beyond what happens to that person on the job. Market Education is about so much more. That person needs to be citizen. That's why we started public education in the United States so that we could create people who would be good voters and make wise choices about who their leaders should be. And there's this one statistic from the international exam I am that just came out that I just keep going back to because this number upset me. which was that only fourteen percent of American students could distinguish reliably you between fact and opinion? Forty percents kind of extraordinary. How did they measure that? So I have a sample question from the exam. Here in front of me that illustrates what it is. That American kids can't do and the exercise goes like this. It show students. Two pieces of writing one is a news article about research on milk and whether it has health benefits or health detriment services classic journalists pretty much. Yeah and the second is a produced by a group that students are told is called the International Dairy Foods Association and it's all the wonderful benefits benefits of drinking milk so this is some from a tree group. Exactly students are then presented with a series of statements based on what they've read and and they are asked to determine is this fact or an opinion and I'll give you an example. Drinking milk and other dairy products is the best way to lose weight factor opinion opinion. Exactly it's opinion put forward by people that want the public to purchase more milk products. The trigger exactly exactly and these are the types of questions that the majority of American students were not able to get right. They're filling distinguish between fact and opinion between that that which is being told to them by people with specific interests and those that are objectively true the result of research or investigation by reporters exactly and think about the implications of this and a world where there's so much misinformation on social media political advertisements that are trying to sway your opinion foreign countries interfering elections exactly and we can't even agree for example in this country whether it is Ukraine or Russia that influence our election in two thousand sixteen even though we know it was it was Russia that meddled and there really is no question on the facts so when I hear that you know only fourteen percent of American students are getting this type of question correct. I think get raises big questions. Not just about our economic competitiveness. Are these kids. Well suited to the workforce but about our country our future are. Are they being prepared to be citizens. And how will that affect all of us So these questions about education performance are very deep. They go to the core four of who we are as Americans and what our future will hold and it makes me think that some of our core American values of you know. American exceptionalism awesome and individualism and local controls these orthodoxies which were out of and rightfully so in many ways because they've contributed to what's different about the United States and driven local innovation but they're also now contributing to this intractable difficult and Parton problem. I'm to solve which is how do we truly prepare our kids to succeed. Not just as workers but also as as human beings honest.

US American education New York Times ADP Hong Kong George Bush International Dairy Foods Asso Heavier Hernandez Indus Envir Market Education Tina Russia President Obama Parton Ukraine
"americas" Discussed on Freakonomics

Freakonomics

04:56 min | 2 years ago

"americas" Discussed on Freakonomics

"In addition to election rule reforms porter. Gale would like to see changes to the rules around governing. So congress makes its own rules for how it functions and over time these rules customs and practices have been set in place to give an enormous amount of power to the party that controls that chamber and right now, it's the Republicans that are controlling it. But what's happened in? And this is sort of collusion in a way is when the other party takes over. They do it the same way pretty much. So we propose moving away from partisan control of the day to day legislating in congress and also, of course, in state, legislatures as well, the third leg of their reform agenda is about money in politics. But their analysis led them to a different conclusion than. Than many reformers where we differ with so many people champing these reforms is that we don't believe that money in politics is the core issue. Ultimately, the problem is really this nature of competition that leads to this partisanship. And that's not a money issue per se. That's a structural issue. If you take money out of politics without changing the rules of the game. You'll simply make it cheaper. For those using the existing system to get the self interested results that they want without changing the incentives to actually deliver solutions for the American people. Having said that we do believe that there are benefits to increasing the power of smaller donors, and so the reforms that we have suggested are primarily focused on increasing the power of. Small smaller donors, for instance, having the government it self match donations from small donors. We should know that most of the ideas Gail importer are presenting here are not all that novel. If you follow election reform, even a little bit, even we poked into a lot of them couple years ago in an episode called ten ideas to make politics, less rotten. I guess it's one measure of how successful and dominant political duopoly is that plenty of seemingly sensible people have plenty of seemingly sensible reform ideas that for the most part gained very little traction. It is definitely challenging this is a ground game. We're not going to be able to do this in a in a year or one election cycle because the resources that the current dope. Louis half to deploy to play their game are substantial despite the rather depressing, or at least sobering picture that you paint of the. Political industry throughout the report, you express quite a bit of optimism. And I want to know why or how because. I don't see the avenue. I guess for optimism. Well, I do think we have a basic optimism. We have no sense that it will be easy to change the rules of this game for a whole variety of reasons. But the good news is we've had some progress. We've got some nonpartisan primary states now, including California, you know, we've got rank choice voting in. Maine. I think what seems to be building in America is a growing appetite and a growing recognition that this isn't working for our country. And I think the younger generation millennials are particularly outraged and concerned and open to all kinds of new ideas. But I think it's going to take time. The most exciting strategy in this area that we champion is a strategy put forth. By the centrist project and full disclosure on the board of the centrist project. It's now actually called unite America. And this is the Senate fulcrum strategy. So here's the idea, let's elect five centrist problem solving oriented US senators who at that number five would likely deny either party an outright majority in the Senate, which would make those five senators the most powerful single. Coalition in Washington DC able to serve as a bridge between the two parties or to align with one party or the other depending on the issue in.

congress America Senate US Gale Washington Gail California Louis Maine