35 Burst results for "amer"

Marc discusses his new book "Except for Palestine: The Limits of Progressive Politics" with his co-author Mitchell Plitnick.

Coffee and Books

06:58 min | 3 weeks ago

Marc discusses his new book "Except for Palestine: The Limits of Progressive Politics" with his co-author Mitchell Plitnick.

"Mitchell. Good to see you man. Of course i see you all the time because we not only wrote this book together but we are now going around talking about this book all the time that we are in. So this is kind of a weird podcast. Because i'm sort of interviewing you. And i'm kinda just talking to you about a book that we wrote together so it's a strange strange thing to do. I've never done an interview like this before. But we're going to figure it out but before we talk about the book. Let's talk about the coffee. I in honor this momentous occasion in drinking arabic coffee you know what they say in palestine they call it Who out. Be it kind of black arabic coffee in. Who said lack coffee. You know people say you know. It's the turkish method. We could have a whole other conversation about what that means. But basically it's a coffee that has made unfiltered with finely ground coffee beans. I mean if ground selfies glenk cocoa powder and then they're boiled in a special pot and then some people put sugar and cardamom and all that stuff. But no i do. It said that. I do it black and it tastes good. It's powerful and it keeps me awake now normally. I'm much more boring with my coffee. So i don't wanna make you feel intimidated by my coffee preferences. The way i do with my basketball preferences taping is a sixers fan of you being nets fan. But i will ask you. What of coffee user. Well these days you know. Mostly just. I'm actually i kind of ended spectrum because i'm drinking. I'm drinking usually a blog roast. It's got a little bit of sleet near ended a little bit lighter in it. So it's almost on the but i will say whenever i go over to palestine and israel and to the region. I always drink the copy answered. Yes there's all the way to have it so i i need to. I need to get one of those little machines. So i can have that here too. I actually bought one in jerusalem and it was taken from the airport Years ago. So i wanna get another one mailed to me from somewhere in the middle east and i make sure you get one. That'd be awesome and the great thing about coffee by the way in the middle east and especially among the palestinians is even if you say you don't want coffee today if you spend time with anybody. You're going to drink some coffee. You go to someone's house. You're drinking coffee noon. You're drinking coffee. Come just have a cup of tea. The best you might get outta them. Is it the electric drink. Some tea as an alternative. You ain't going in the white house or having any kind of real meaning without coffee and probably eating eating eating something to so one of the great things about this. That was the mistake. I made the first time i ever went over there and i was over at a palestinian home. Well it wasn't a home. It was actually an outside just outside jerusalem and it was in a garbage dump and they were living and and abandoned Train car and they come out with food and give me fluently giving me food and it was actually at that time i was just no i mean they. They had nothing you know. My immediate inclination was right to say. No no no you keep this for yourself by. They were insistent. No no no you. Are you drinking this d. You are taking this food and my host. Who was with me. Who was bringing me around at that time. This is going back. Years is bringing me around at that time. He just said yeah. You're you're gonna take it. They're not gonna let you go without without eating and drinking so i had a very similar experience. I was in amer which is a for those who knows is kind of. It's not far outside of jerusalem and its reading between to kind of jerusalem in in these settlements and this is again. This is a big win like a village. It's set for demolition at the time. They made a school like tires in mud. People are worried about losing everything. And i'm talking to them about what's going on and at about fifteen minutes into just painful story about loss and being poor and trying to find money. They come out with the coffee pot and coffee. Particularly in palestinian society in many ways is one of those is one of those mechanisms for creating community for joint love of offering care and it makes people feel good to be able to offer that it's part of what it means in community so i'm glad we could talk about that is actually the most. We've talked about coffee coffee which is kind of fun. We have episode on that but talk to me about this book. People are asking. Why write a book on palestine except for palestine the limits of progressive politics. I guess the first thing. I should get you to talk about because i'll let you talk more than me. Today is why this book. Why why did we do this. Mitchell so just to give your listeners a little back on that you and i met actually over there for the first time when the foundation released piece where i was working at the time a trip for some journalists. And you're one of them and we went over there and you know we just started talking and it was a couple years later that we started talking about doing this book and as i recall it was actually a question. We were sure where what we were going to write about. We went through a whole process. Thinking about it at i. I can certainly say for me. And i feel like we came to this together that we came to this place where you know what's really important right now for us as americans to say to other american we we. I feel like what we're doing here is we're talking to our people like riley and so that's not that's americans progressives and saying the we can get together on a whole lot of issues and somehow we're not getting together nearly enough i mean there's we know of course we have our own little palestine sound already community or the peace community whatever the various different sort of shades are but you know on the whole like sort of liberal america progressive. America is not together on this issue. In fact we it sharply divided. And i know it seems to me and i'm pretty sure seems to to that. Vision is based on people who are willing to really dig deep into their own principles and decide that they can put this aside for palestine because of this reason to that sometimes it's compelling reasons know it can be the history of of jewish suffering it can be or it can be less compelling reasons if less valid reasons sort of just a sense of islamaphobia or just sort of fear of arab people brown people it can be good or bad reasons but liberal progressive. People should not have any reason to put their principles decided on this issue. I think that was to me. That was what this book was meant to speak to say. Look there's room for differences of opinion on a lot of things but principally we should all be able to agree. That palestinian should have rights the same rights as israelis and everyone else and it doesn't seem like we do agree on that. So i i think for us who are both you know. Not palestinian not israeli. Both american i think for me that was the most important thing we could try and really break open for folks and i think this book and certainly from the response. We've been getting so far. Seemed like we're doing

Palestine Jerusalem Middle East Sixers Mitchell Amer Basketball White House Israel Riley America
Interview With Ahmer Inam  And Mark Persaud At Pactera Edge

AI Today Podcast: Artificial Intelligence Insights, Experts, and Opinion

06:24 min | Last month

Interview With Ahmer Inam And Mark Persaud At Pactera Edge

"We do have some great guests with us today. So we're really excited to have amer in phnom who's the chief. Ai officer and mark persaud. Who's the head of emerging experiences at pact-era edge. So welcome guys and thank you so much for joining us today but thank you got clean and wrong. Thank you for having in forward to this exciting conversation. We are to. We'd like to start by having you introduce yourself to our listeners. Tell them a little bit about your background. And your current role at pact-era edge Kathleen i'll go ahead and start amazon up. I'm the chief a offers. Subtle factor edge. We are global solution and services firms that balance intelligent digital platforms using human center design as a cool concept in philosophy the hallway bill systems maya background. I've been in the space of a medal for essentially my entire career Having played with fairly early machine learning. And you'll eulex model for almost twenty years at this point To most recently. A factor edge. My journey has taken me to companies like fargo sonic automotive. Vw see nike can be solution and at the now. I pass it off to mark to introduce himself awesome. I've I'm the head of emerging experiences at a bacteria edge So i have the job of being able to look across different technologies whether that's a our and our in vr virtual reality immersive Or things like voice and conversational. I and understanding how a i can play a better role in the technologies or with the technology whether it's within or atop a different digital ecosystems for clients though. I personally have a lot of fun with that role in general just because it gives me the ability to see how we can create value for users of creative ways with technology is where we might not see very consumer or user friendly and i might add like one of the reason why this is such a differentiation. Headed what you're talking about. Even sent to city in is market. Ni- expedience must. Genie are working together. Cohesively issue the cool part of the conversation that will be having at the at the upcoming event with community and is about building and designing intelligent digital platforms that are built with humans entity the human in the mind and building them to drive adoption so that we can take a lot of these concepts that are explored in a typical machine learning ai. In women in an enterprise and then take them to an enterprise capability and the part of their journey. At least an odd philosophy is that it has to lead with human simplicity. Really great insight. We actually had a podcast not too long ago with chad moro. Who is the cto chief. Data officer at fulton bank and he actually made a great point about the human center city of systems especially of systems that depend on data because he was saying you know at the end of the day the data represents people represents what people are doing it represents their money represents their finances and those finances represent their retirement college savings. They're they're living right and you and you can never it's people's names treat data abstractly day. Sometimes it's really very critical and You know one of the great things. Of course you can. You mentioned that you'll be sharing a lot of these insights at our upcoming machine learning life cycle events so for our listeners. You may have heard this on previous episodes but of course if this is your first time We run these online free conferences. That are focused on some of the hottest topics. Ai machine learning and our objective is to help audience and help people take that next step and move their projects and forward We ran a huge data for ai. Conference back. In september twenty twenty twentieth thousands of attendees. It was amazing. Hundreds of of presenters actually well. Over one hundred plus presenters was was gigantic and we heard as people wanted to get that same sense of insight into what's happening with machine learning so we have the machine learning life cycle of that which talks about the full life cycle of machine learning from building the mall to managing an ops and govern insecurity and that is the live part of the event is january twenty sixth through twenty eight th twenty twenty one if you elect to register go to m. l. life cycle conference dot com. We'll have that in our show as well and Yeah we have some fantastic presenters in five topics and three tracks and our guest here. Terra their edge. They're they're actually doing. A session. called accelerating accelerate concept to value human centric design driven a lot of words there. There's a lot of terms of people may be familiar with some of them. They may not be. So maybe if you can. Can you give our listeners. A quick of what the session is about. And maybe some of the main questions and pain points that you're going to be addressing. Yeah thank you. Ron and actually just to right and it may come across as a laundry list of technical jargon and it's it's an i wanna make sure we can talk about it. In some of the audiences are going to be ingenious and audit back on both mock. You come from. Jean backgrounding ingenious with talking about the art of of humanity which the human centric design. What are we going to talk about. Is this first. Thing is gonna lay out the burning platform. We have seen the statistics enough data from gartner to idc that talks about the failures off a adoption. the data continues to show about eighty to ninety percent of machine learning data signs. Big data these initiatives famed to drive value. Because they're not getting adopted and if they're not getting a doctorate in driving value

Mark Persaud Fargo Sonic Automotive Amer Chad Moro Fulton Bank Human Center City Of Systems E Phnom Kathleen VW Amazon Nike Jean Backgrounding RON Gartner IDC
Indigo Agriculture: Google Maps for Agriculture

Software Engineering Daily

01:09 min | Last month

Indigo Agriculture: Google Maps for Agriculture

"David. Welcome to the show. It's great to be here jeff. We're talking today about indigo agriculture. He described what indigo egg does for people who were hearing about this for the first time for sure. Our mission at indigo ag is to harness nature to sustainably feed the planet and to break that down a little bit. we're helping farmers become carbon farmers. Jeff and along the way we're helping them bring their green to market in new ways. And what does that have to do. Software engineering well whole lot if we're doing it right You know the challenge that we face in the team that i lead gio innovation is. We're essentially trying to build a google maps for agriculture. We're trying to build a living map of the food system. Amer doing that. Because essentially the industry that we're trying to innovate and is the biggest oldest factory in the world and there isn't a particularly good map of all the different rooms in the factory and so to kind of scale almost anything that we're up against indigo. We need to build digital systems for recording. Where farming happens and making it really efficient to sort of watch the harvest playout

Indigo Ag Jeff David Amer Google
Interview With Valerie Jardin

The Candid Frame

04:34 min | 2 months ago

Interview With Valerie Jardin

"Times like we've never had times like these elites in in most of our lifetimes but there are there are moments where it can spark a lot of people to go out and photograph during the demonstrations for example happening last year and finding someone that has a unique take on. it is al- always something that i'm eager to find because you can see a lot of images that pretty much look. The same context said really similar. So what you really kind of hungry for. At least when. I'm hungry for someone who's really gonna do something that i wasn't interacting absolutely so. Yeah i've been writing and just going out there and still shoot almost every day. I mean you have to. I don't care what it is. But i need to take my amer out. How how were you in terms of going out in shooting every day you know your usual subject matter was not available to you. So how will you exercising that creative muscle during this time. Well for street. Photography resorted to going to areas where people were more you know. Let the guards down and were were. Life was pretty much normal like the beach. I find that the weather. I was in france or here because we have lakes every can walk a mile without hitting a lake miller beaches everywhere. I spent so much time. Just just walking along lakes beach area where people were unmasking. Kids grow laughing and you'd see smiles. You photograph life. Normal life was craving and i think that was more for me than actually wanting to i. I didn't really feel a need to document the pandemic. i the only reason being that i was protecting myself. i was craving normalcy so entirely navigated around that. When i was in france i was there for two weeks. August two weeks in october. At the time were numbers. There were really good. I mean in august it would have been hard to actually catch the thing but people were still wearing masks but not on the beach. The had to wear masks on the boardwalks and everything but not on the beach was the only place where life was normal and so i totally gravitated around that so now that the lakes are frozen. I'm actually going to probably spent a lot of time on frozen lakes. And and meet with ice fisherman and i just want to. I want that interaction. I wanna see people otherwise have been doing it. All of contemplate of photography more still life and actually taught a class numb writing a book about that. Which is you know the other thing. I love photographing anyways. And i do it almost every day. Whether it's on my windowsill or anywhere i go. I just don't usually use those pictures but now figure well know might as well just teach about that as well and people are craving that craving that either way have seeing for the next few months when we all going to be on lockdown again. I have been photographing people as much. Because i i have to deal with two people who are at high high risk so i just wasn't. I didn't feel comfortable with this roaming the streets in close proximity to people. But i've been doing like a lot of urban abstracts for better where i'm just looking at lyon seating color and that's been quite quite fun but i could not. I could not live with aching photographs after just a couple of weeks of of our initial lockdown. I was i was ready to scratch the wall of the paint with my fingers the luna that actually saved me the the early weeks because the dog again was first of all. She made us laugh when nothing was really funny was no other. She just lifted our spirits at an. I had fun photographing her at first with my camera then with just my phone. Because she's you know she's so much work that i think the camera the dog leg no way but the camera out again and i photograph in the house when i see her in a special light or something otherwise when i'm out and about with her it's just with the phone but that's really actually really been good for my photography because it was you know it's it's like shooting streets fy. It's all about the decisive moment and being quick and just so it was actually very very good so that was the first stuff. Yeah april may. I was a lot

Lake Miller Beaches Lakes Beach France Lyon
Hindou Ibrahim, President of the Association for Indigenous Women and Peoples of Chad

Common Home Conversations Beyond UN75

04:56 min | 3 months ago

Hindou Ibrahim, President of the Association for Indigenous Women and Peoples of Chad

"Welcome to come home conversations. Today we are joined by. Hindu abraham founder and president of the association for indigenous women in people's of chad hindu is also the co chair the international indigenous peoples forum on climate change and a un sdg advocate. Thank you for joining us today. It's a pleasure. Thanks for reminding me you have been a steadfast champion for human rights and sustainable development. What was the inspiration behind your lifelong dedication to bettering our planet. Yeah i mean. I'm so excited to championing a sustainable development god's because for me the app talking about our life so when we take from the objective one who is the fighting poverty or to the five with the gender or not with climate change. And now the seventeen of them to take patents. She dead talking about how we can improve our life how we can improve our society and how we can make it better than now by respecting people's in climate so for me. It is obvious because roma the communities that i come from we always all the problems and all the crises to get north resort on them. So that's why. I am so excited to championing the sustainable development goals for my peoples in for all indigenous peoples in the end of the day for the planet in gender so we're seeing how climate change is impacting every corner of our planet in many ways. Can you share with us. How climate change is affecting your country and your region so i am coming from saharan regions in coming from chad. Who have a different landscape. Are we have hundred percent visiting the nov and now we have savannah in suheil in the middle and then we have the tropical. Ford is the busy in this hour. So when you need three different In a land lock in when your life is the pump from the ecosystem. You not exactly the impact of the climate change. You do not need in the book or watching. Tv you levi. And now i give example of how we add really impacted an we get any central michigan dishes from ninety nine now check is already on last one point five degree increase and why we see that every day our dry season become much longer. We've evenki very long san in heavy son. That's coming up to fifty degrees celsius when you go through the death at its bauer fifty four degrees celsius in that impact our environment in impact therein therein. Season also check. It's become much shorter. Incoming the higgin construct all the places for example this year where we have all this ahead on the floor you even. In the towns people take the can we go from one neighborhood to another one and sought months before it was the heat in very dry heat. Swear the caps can grow up in an end back with the food insecurity because when you don a half Lateran is cannot penetrate win. It's cannot leave the vegetation who genetic and that impact the food insecure of the and at the end of the day. the letter might impact. It's good shank the social life of peoples. It's create conflict among the communique that fighting to get access to and one of the example. I add you add on the chat. Nature is the wider that we do have at our lake in nineteen sixty. It was twenty five thousand kilometers square. These freshwater chatted check. Cameroon nigeria nigeria Probably and known delek shouldn't came to two thousand clinically squirrel freshwater. So you have ninety percent of the wider Because of the heat in seven league that is more than fifty million people who needing depending from his Them that farmers that fishermen end postulates homemade micro-mini so web does people have to do because they done depend from the end of the month salaries from the rent for the fund from the ecosystem of this area of me so yesterday fight amer get access to resources some of

Hindu Abraham Association For Indigenous Wom International Indigenous Peopl Suheil Saharan UN Chad Ford Michigan Delek Nigeria Cameroon Amer
"amer" Discussed on Diffused Congruence: The American Muslim Experience

Diffused Congruence: The American Muslim Experience

05:47 min | 7 months ago

"amer" Discussed on Diffused Congruence: The American Muslim Experience

"Honor Rahimullah <hes> It really happy to have A. . On the show <hes> we've known omair out, , of course, , <hes> outside of work for quite some time as well. . But I, , myself didn't know about all the really interesting area of expertise that he dabbles in omair is a clinical consultant at Lucid Lane <hes>, , which is a startup. . He'll be talking about relevant to the topic at hand <hes> today, which , is addiction. . and Dr Amirah Hemas, , a clinical assistant professor at Stanford University. . School of Medicine and Director of the Addiction Medicine Consultant Service at Stanford Hospital. . We're GONNA be talking a lot about addiction as expertise today. . Given all the stressors that are happening in the world right now, , armor is board certified in Addiction Medicine Internal Medicine, , and he completed his training at Stanford University School of Medicine in his internal medicine training at the University of Illinois College of Medicine. . <hes>. . So as I said, , his specialization as OPIOID, , N., , Benzodiazepine <unk> take. . Notice that <hes> tapers off. . You'RE GONNA have to educate us on on the right promotional <unk> US now say. . We call it the Golden Ben Zozo Okay Ben says, and , treating substance use disorders in residential and outpatient programs as well as in patient and office based setting. . You're welcome super interesting to talk about this very important although <hes> under not as much talked about topic. . So really important and interesting to dive into that. . Thanks for having me Yeah <hes> and <hes>. . Omer touched on this or alluded to this <hes>. . Excuse me I'm we obviously know you personally out beyond just having you on the show full disclosure armour's my cousin <hes> and I think, , Omer, you've , got an interesting sort of linked to armor as well. . Raise your brother in law and armor Western. . Or Medical School they went med school together. . That's right. . My brother-in-law they went to med school together and. . <hes> we live we all live in the bay area, , of course. . Ten to happen with this show but <hes>. . <hes>. . Yeah. . Of course, , you know my I live right across the bridge from Stanford in Amer works at Stanford. So . but but again, , really interesting really really interested to dive into some of these talks I didn't even didn't even I didn't even know all these things about her so <hes>. . Yeah. . Yeah for sure for sure. . Absolutely and as we often like to do err on you know I guess tell us a little bit about yourself <hes>. . Obviously we we we heard University of Illinois being mentioned there <hes> <hes>. . You are originally from Chicago Illinois maybe talk a little bit about your background, , and then we can get into <hes> your professional life. . Sure. . Absolutely. So . <hes>. . So you know born and raised in the Chicago. . Land area. . We moved out here a couple years ago to the Bay Area California, , to pursue some extra training and addiction medicine and started working at Stanford, , you know loved the weather and the work I was doing out here and I stayed on to launch an addiction consult service at Stanford. . Hospital. . Addiction concert services are a <hes> way of intervening and increasing access to addiction treatment in the hospital setting. . So for example, , you know we have a drug overdose epidemic you'll have things like drug courts because people with addictions commonly get arrested for things are run. . INS with the law so they'll have drug courts where they'll have. . <hes> treatment associated with these <hes>. . Felonies her charges that people get such this. It's . this concept of intervening where there's a large population of drug addicts and people with alcohol problems. . Save the hospital people with addictions also have a higher prevalence of higher incidents of hospitalization. . So by intervening at the hospital level rate to. . Intervene on a large concentrated population of people with addiction. . So we we go in and we talked to people in the hospital who have a medical consequence of their addiction, , and this is you know crystal meth heroin, , alcohol cannabis issues as well. . So psychiatric complications of their addiction <hes> or medical complications of their addiction, , and they're really in more reachable and teachable moment just like you know after they have a legal consequence with the drug courts, , there are much more reachable and teachable moment. . So in the hospital we come in, , we'll do a brief intervention get your family involved, , get them started on treatment therapy medications, , and then linked them to ongoing treatments. . It's really new, , cut a model, , but it's <hes>. . rapidly increasing all over the country to address it's the idea of their. . They've Kinda hit this low and you're kind of turn the leverage that low point to and make into a turn around moment, , right? ? Absolutely. . Absolutely. . A lot of our patients are just going on about their business. . Some of them have been thinking about salvaging and alcohol for some time others not even a thought, , but once they come to the hospital. . Their lives are such somewhat disrupted, , and now they are in the hospital away from drugs and alcohol minds clearing up a little bit and in some sort of pain and suffering from their medical consequence. . So now they're a little bit more teachable, , reachable, , frustrated, , sick, , and tired of being sick and tired. . Then we come in and tell us and we start to have a real collaborative <hes> patient centered discussion and go from there. .

California Dr Honor Rahimullah clinical consultant MSN twenty twenty
Addiction in the Age of Covid, with Dr. Amer Raheemullah, M.D.

Diffused Congruence: The American Muslim Experience

05:47 min | 7 months ago

Addiction in the Age of Covid, with Dr. Amer Raheemullah, M.D.

"Honor Rahimullah It really happy to have A. On the show we've known omair out, of course, outside of work for quite some time as well. But I, myself didn't know about all the really interesting area of expertise that he dabbles in omair is a clinical consultant at Lucid Lane which is a startup. He'll be talking about relevant to the topic at hand today, which is addiction. and Dr Amirah Hemas, a clinical assistant professor at Stanford University. School of Medicine and Director of the Addiction Medicine Consultant Service at Stanford Hospital. We're GONNA be talking a lot about addiction as expertise today. Given all the stressors that are happening in the world right now, armor is board certified in Addiction Medicine Internal Medicine, and he completed his training at Stanford University School of Medicine in his internal medicine training at the University of Illinois College of Medicine. So as I said, his specialization as OPIOID, N., Benzodiazepine take. Notice that tapers off. You'RE GONNA have to educate us on on the right promotional US now say. We call it the Golden Ben Zozo Okay Ben says, and treating substance use disorders in residential and outpatient programs as well as in patient and office based setting. You're welcome super interesting to talk about this very important although under not as much talked about topic. So really important and interesting to dive into that. Thanks for having me Yeah and Omer touched on this or alluded to this Excuse me I'm we obviously know you personally out beyond just having you on the show full disclosure armour's my cousin and I think, Omer, you've got an interesting sort of linked to armor as well. Raise your brother in law and armor Western. Or Medical School they went med school together. That's right. My brother-in-law they went to med school together and. we live we all live in the bay area, of course. Ten to happen with this show but Yeah. Of course, you know my I live right across the bridge from Stanford in Amer works at Stanford. So but but again, really interesting really really interested to dive into some of these talks I didn't even didn't even I didn't even know all these things about her so Yeah. Yeah for sure for sure. Absolutely and as we often like to do err on you know I guess tell us a little bit about yourself Obviously we we we heard University of Illinois being mentioned there You are originally from Chicago Illinois maybe talk a little bit about your background, and then we can get into your professional life. Sure. Absolutely. So So you know born and raised in the Chicago. Land area. We moved out here a couple years ago to the Bay Area California, to pursue some extra training and addiction medicine and started working at Stanford, you know loved the weather and the work I was doing out here and I stayed on to launch an addiction consult service at Stanford. Hospital. Addiction concert services are a way of intervening and increasing access to addiction treatment in the hospital setting. So for example, you know we have a drug overdose epidemic you'll have things like drug courts because people with addictions commonly get arrested for things are run. INS with the law so they'll have drug courts where they'll have. treatment associated with these Felonies her charges that people get such this. It's this concept of intervening where there's a large population of drug addicts and people with alcohol problems. Save the hospital people with addictions also have a higher prevalence of higher incidents of hospitalization. So by intervening at the hospital level rate to. Intervene on a large concentrated population of people with addiction. So we we go in and we talked to people in the hospital who have a medical consequence of their addiction, and this is you know crystal meth heroin, alcohol cannabis issues as well. So psychiatric complications of their addiction or medical complications of their addiction, and they're really in more reachable and teachable moment just like you know after they have a legal consequence with the drug courts, there are much more reachable and teachable moment. So in the hospital we come in, we'll do a brief intervention get your family involved, get them started on treatment therapy medications, and then linked them to ongoing treatments. It's really new, cut a model, but it's rapidly increasing all over the country to address it's the idea of their. They've Kinda hit this low and you're kind of turn the leverage that low point to and make into a turn around moment, right? Absolutely. Absolutely. A lot of our patients are just going on about their business. Some of them have been thinking about salvaging and alcohol for some time others not even a thought, but once they come to the hospital. Their lives are such somewhat disrupted, and now they are in the hospital away from drugs and alcohol minds clearing up a little bit and in some sort of pain and suffering from their medical consequence. So now they're a little bit more teachable, reachable, frustrated, sick, and tired of being sick and tired. Then we come in and tell us and we start to have a real collaborative patient centered discussion and go from there.

Stanford University Addiction Medicine Internal Me Director Of The Addiction Medi Stanford Hospital Stanford University School Of University Of Illinois College School Of Medicine Chicago Omer Drug Overdose Dr Amirah Hemas Clinical Consultant University Of Illinois Ben Zozo Clinical Assistant Professor Medical School Bay Area California Illinois Benzodiazepine Heroin
Ghost of Tsushima: Creative Director Interview (with Spoilers)

Beyond!

55:06 min | 8 months ago

Ghost of Tsushima: Creative Director Interview (with Spoilers)

"Have a very special guests with us this week that we're both very excited to talk with Jason. Connell from sucker punch. Thank you so much for joining US A. Awesome ear. Very happy to have you of course to go super in depth on Kgo Suma, so for those who are watching end jumping in. Be warned there will be some spoiler fil talking here if you haven't played through the game if you haven't. Checked out everything you want to in the game beforehand. Please do that first and then come back. There's a lot to dive into. We're going to be jumping into as much as we can. Of course if you want spoiler free impressions. We did record episode that a little earlier. Even can go check that out, but. There's so much that we can jump into this game I off. Jason I. Just want to say congratulations for recording this on the day. The game is starting to roll out on launch. Worldwide is already available in some territories as where speaking so congratulations to you on the team on that It's very exciting for to finally be out there as a fan of it and I'm sure it must be exciting for the team. Yes, it's a super exciting to have it out. There cited everybody host their photo mode favorites sin. Just enjoy the Games. I feel like an Brian I think this is true for both you and me. We could probably spend the next forty minutes talking exclusively about photo mode. Yeah, no I. Just get into that very quickly. What you've created, my favorite voted in video game history, but also. You might notice you. Create one of the most not-so-subtle advertising tools. That is perfect for this game. Because every time I seen pictures of it I WANNA? Play it again, and I think for a lot of people who were just sort of like on the outside, looking in a video games in general like people who aren't just totally head down on stuff all the time. They're like wait what that's! That's a video game. Where do I play I play it? They're going to get that so Yeah, that's a very very smart. If you guys it's absolutely stunning game. A cool. Photo of his crazy because we were one of the first, you know infamous second son was one of the first. At least I know of modern games that have put like a like a photo mode in in that game. It was just like this cool idea to show off all the cool particles and lighting. That game was a while known for. But it was wasn't crafted as a personality around. It was the cool photo mode, and then over time over the last few years. You have these games that out and Spiderman my favorite of version of this where they like adds the flavor of their game to its photos like tied to the personality of that gain. On, the building tops, doing like little cell fees and Doing it with a phone. That was awesome made it. You need to spiderman so when we were like. Hey, what are we gonNA do for voter mood? To? Whatever the ghost photo mode. One, it's gotta be way better than our first one because. Our, follow up one and two. It's gotta be semantically. You know connected to the game, so we're like. Well motion in Wind I. Haven't we like? Make it less about a static image. You can do that, too, but have be about moving frame that I think is so beautiful about our game kind of spun out from there. I didn't think it was odd that you give the main character, a Selfie, stick and the iphone. His drone that goes along with. Little you know little out of place, but I thought butyl. Oh God you know it's been incredible thing to play around with, and you can do what Brian said. Every time I see more of it. It's one of those things where I've been playing every night. Still in, it's like Oh, no, I need to go jump back in the middle of the day. Because like Oh. That's a great spot I never thought. I could take a photo of I've been a particularly obsessed with going to bamboo strike locations and trying to get all the great photos. I cannot have those spot often. You know like perfectly placed at an edge or something. I sort of wondering. Because obviously this was built more with like the photo mode in mind as you development went on, because it's become so much bigger, what was world creation influenced at all by the photo mode, or were there any aspects of designing this game that were influenced by it because it is more like prevately used feature these days I guess than back when second came out. You know. A little secret you know we. We always knew we'd have a photo modem. We knew that this ambitious version of like I. said a second ago better and more dramatically connected. Owning, really work on it until pretty late, so you know we were so. Dedicated to the stories in crafting the world, so when it came to the beauty of the world. That add add everything that's in the game. I would have to imagine that that had the most iterating over anything, because it's one of the first things you do before you have the whole story articulated and put into the game. Certainly don't have cut scenes. You know it's like you're laying out terrain and at that like how does the island look and then it gets into the direction the feeling Cutting, trees down growing trees, making procedural tools like the world is the by far the most iterative on thing now. There was a point where we're like. This is how we make our game. Look good clearings. Big giant swath of like in forests, you know that you can see for miles. Off using color as like landmarks again, the Golden Forest, or read flower fields, and then, and then a you know, certainly that sort of made its way into some of our features of a photo, but the the world designed stuff. took the lead on on end photo mode. Okay, now that we've created this amazing awesome place. How do we utilize the photo mode in like critical photo that will. Take advantage of how great our team at did at creating a beautiful world. I think one of my favorite things about this game is the sort of balanced that it's constantly striking Between being sort of completely serene, and then the music swells up and swords or out, and they're slashing against each other. How hard was it to sort of get that that tone down because I could see. You know I think in in lesser hands I could be a very kind of dangerous. Push and pull, but I feel like you totally nailed that and I think that that's like some people when they look at an open world game want like nonstop jam-packed activities in in your team made the decision to pull back and let things breath every now and then How did all that come together? Well you know for me. It's the first game that I was certainly a visual director on, and so I I would I you learn something about yourself with everything you create, and for me I personally learned that I don't have a natural tendency to like create incredible. Violence, I just wasn't that was uneven. Favor Games, bloodborne like as absolutely my favorite game. Guide. You're on this show. This is gonNA be worthwhile and. About it anytime. But no, seriously like. That's my favorite game, but. When we were crafting the world would I navigated towards with Joanna. Who's environment our leader? This did this amazing a blog post recently on playstation bar. was the beauty of it was taking taking a moment to breathe in, and then I realized that some of my favorite games that are not. Show the classes certainly embraced the idea of atmosphere in a sense of this and you know I donate Fox's is is resonates. Conversations resonated with him as well so then then the conversation shifted into. Okay well. We definitely have it. We have a summer game. So you know without saying anything else as you say Amer game, you know you're going to be hitting things with a four-foot razor blade so. You know violence is GonNa come so we certainly work on that stuff. allied and we wanted to be great and gritty, and the you know like you really WanNa feel like you have contact when you have contact but the other stuff doesn't come as natural, and you have to actually work on that stuff to balance it out, you really do, and so that means like the idea is about creating Haiku, which was actually named idea You know really. Or believe it was taking a moment to. Allow the beauty to take hold, and not what I think is cool about the ICU that I hope people enjoy about it is is that they're not tied till like progression like you're not. You're not like intrinsically forced to go, do it? You know there's a sense of you have to have the wonder and curiosity desire to do it. It's not like game telling you go do this to reach next level certainly, a lot of that is tied to corporation auto out to have to consider that, but it is. It is a work philosophy to try to get that balance of that contrast It takes years to get right for sure. I really enjoyed the Haiku sections actually He was like you said. It's sort of provided like this. This relaxing breeder and I did like the you were able to select different things who essentially collate them into one kind of fresh Haiku each time. Yeah I I mean I did every single side quests in every single objective in this game, but I I really enjoyed those wow awesome. The accuser, some of my favorite ones to the cinematography. You know it was at the moment to like. You know certainly we call them breathing. Moments definitely say that studio, but it was kind of a moment. Regis Art Geek out a little bit like the people who do the cameras. Mottaki, they can place it in to get the right motion and you know, and then the writers have an opportunity to like. Give you give you a couple of cool options. Just the beauty kinda comes through which is which in the end has been a very positive thing for the experience. Yeah, the balance that Brian was. Speaking to how you were sort of describing how that all came together? I could imagine. It's a very fine line between making sure it's peaceful and calm in certain areas, but. It's still engaging for the player because you could always run the risk of it. Being something that the player doesn't want to engage with, but as Brian. Saying like finding those high coups feels like this wonderful moment of solace after I have assassinated an entire Cam Mongols. And need to reflect on Jin's life, but also just the world I, it's this really great balanced that a I think as Brian was sort of saying you always get in games, but it feels so refreshing to hear. And it's a huge part of our philosophy. How we treat. Treat the game. Whether it's a Haiku great example, he could probably keep talking about, but you know the music style music how the music comes on not having things like combat while you're doing, shrine climbs or anywhere near them so that we can let those be their own experience, and so are these, are we? Everything wanted these features that are not mainline missions. Our conversation is like about how much combat how much non-combat and what is the purpose and what are the? What's the feeling for its existence like what what is the emotional goal for for these features and these are conversations? We have a lot and sometimes triple times over we try. We don't like it. We try something else. Well and for me, what's really interesting is sort of the place that all of these features and the things you go on, have sort of in the context of sucker punches past work, because it is I've been such a huge fan of both cooper franchise and infamous. Stir a year and. You know you get increasingly larger, but often more urban. City expenses that you're exploring a lot. In both of those franchises to certain extent here you're out in the wild. There are of course settlements and encampments and things like that, but there is a there's a lot of stretches where it can just be the world around you that you're exploring and I was sort of wondering on a world design level. How do you? How do you balance? Making all of these locations unique to explore as well and interesting. Even though you know a lot of can just be more, the environment's like what are the challenges that come with that? Yeah, so one of our. Our Contractors Jeff He. He talks a lot about content density, and what is the correct density and I really am really thankful that he brought that conversation up to light so much because It's such a you know Thinking about if you're currently doing something, you're going across the world and run into something. How much further would you have to ride your horse before you might find the next thing, or can you see the next thing from where you currently are? How how dense is it and I really enjoyed that conversation? Because it let us think about what's the right philosophy for for our game and it it certainly it allows us to you know if we want to in one place, you just completed something, and you should be able to generally speaking, look around and find one more thing on horizon or see the shrine trying on top of the mountain. It influence our world design alive, because when we first had the game built for the I you know I'd say maybe two years. It was a lot of forest. It was a ton of trees and it was cool, but you always were felt like you were in this like. Tunnel beautiful, but really deforestation. which does a couple things one is? It is very cool, but. It makes it really hard to know where you are without a compass or many map. Something telling you kind of giving you that extra information that your brain is just really needing. So what we did is we started opening up fields and I definitely some shadow, the classes photos out and was like fields as as reference vm. Because it just feels so epic when you're going through field, but but you know the criticism it could be that it's boring or something like that, and and really have to embrace a philosophy that it won't be boring because there's beautiful music. There's five things now that you can see what you want to do next because you're in a field, there's more clearings and it created a Great beauty in the game, but also more opportunity to engage with that density and I I. Really I think that that was one of the conversations that was ongoing throughout the project, but we landed in a really. I think unique spot for. When when when you? When your team was the helping this game, you obviously weren't anticipating a significant portion of the world's population to be stuck indoors for months on end, but At one I mean there were obviously there. Are you know a lot of sort of like entertainment? Things that have come out during quarantined. That didn't really. Fair as well due to their. SORT, of like the way they were delivered or their subject material something that, but this is a game that I really more than ever appreciated as a guy who's in a two bedroom apartment really appreciated huge open fields and. Mountains in like sprawling rivers and seas and stuff like that but I think one of my favorite things about the big open fields is that there's always something? Or there is like a lone tree. And you're just sort of naturally drawn towards it, and I found that like that sort of like beautiful use of negative space to be like so powerful. In terms of like never felt to me like there's nothing ahead of you. This is boring. It always felt to me like this. Is this is this is like a sort of triumphant use of minimalism and and charging towards something. To reveal that there's like one loan item in the distance was so much more engaging tomato like at a mini map that had a hundred time trials, but Hamas other stuff like I. Found Myself uncovering the dog on the entire map which. I was I was like basically riding around in spirals like in that movie alto like I was trying to. Five is in half the time I was on foot to. It was really wonderful game to explore so I. WanNa ask you about that the. The the sort of the way exploration on unfolds in this game is something I. Really Really Love and I think a lot of open world games are going to take note of following the wind and talking to people and following Fox's two locations rather than just you know overtly stating the player. This is where you're GonNa go, or you go to. The map in this big thing opens up. All that come together. What was the push and pull on that to sort of find the right way to keep players in the no, but without making like overwhelming them with information. Yeah I'll talk about kind of our studio kind of struggles, but I also kind of throw in my own, maybe personal philosophy, too. So I. I judge Games my favorite game, especially them really harshly by. How does it feel if you're? You're actually not doing anything on the sticks. I would if you're just sitting there. Just sitting in the world, you're standing in the world. You're on your horse in the world like is there. Is there a what's the feeling and some of my favorite games by just sitting there? There's like things that go through your mind. Like why do we? What are you anticipating? That are stuck on the story or like. Where's that next objective like you're just what's going through your mind? because. That's when you're not doing anything. That's what you're thinking of next like. You're just taking in the beauty looking around our game I hope that translates into that sense of exploration and sense of curiosity like if you do stop for a second yearly, you're not already on kind of a train of thought it is more. One of curiosity is one of like. Hey, what? What do I want to do next? Oh, there's something over there. There's something of their. Oh, I wonder band before, so they're having gone to could check it out and I. think that the more information you were to have on your screen compasses many maps. It kinda answers those questions before you even have time to ask the question. It's just like the dots right there. Let's go do the DOT. It doesn't matter what the DOT is. It's just there's thing let's go do it, and so that that to me is is a really important part of what I think. The Games, Tries to do in the world, and and certainly we did not have the wind when we started on this project at all. In fact, what the wind was which is has got this cool story I'll say quick is. on the first direction slides on the you know we did. A presentation is like one of the first presentation out the way look and feel and everything moves was was one of them like a wind. We're going to double triple quadruple down on win, and you know there's a lot of attack that has to go into that. He got Capes moving I gala hair moving. You gotta get trees and Bushes, and especially for procedurally generated now artistically procedurally generated world. That's really tough. Two years later. Something like that. That became true and you've standing I'm standing in this world and we had other elements we were helped. Augmenting are kind of navigation and get around the world and I'm just like holy crap. The wind is amazing. It actually works at that time. It always like went from East West or West. East or something I can't remember always just directional and it's just. It's really good. And then we started having conversations like how going to get more stuff off the screen to stay in the is like beautiful world more and more because it's just. It's really stunning even years ago. And a one point I had this idea like. The Wind. It sounds kind of crazy and Adrian is like our longtime worked on has been sucker punch. Long Time. They tried a little quick prototype with me. We had like fifteen people play at were removed all the you I just to hey. Can you just just try to follow it and just and it sounds crazy, but follow in if you can get to that hot spring or that on. And it worked like the first prototype fourteen out of the fifteen people were able to easily get there so cool. Yeah and I. I was like Oh. Yeah, we have to do this. Question. Like. This is something that is going to be unique to the game and then an analyzing. Say on them about the wind because I can do it all day, but is it had like the matic ties to the island in historical kind of. Poetic, Tian's to you know. The Mongols came in as typhoon sweeps them all out to see and. You know we name the sword the sky storm after that you know him being a storm, a metaphorical storm on the island for for the island, rooting for the island, and then it was like about nature, and then the animals came along, and I, you know it just felt like a bunch of like one of these critical pieces you don't know exists, and then you find it, and you're like that fifth straight there and does and then nearly. Oh, I, think we have a good. I can see the puzzle now so. Cool, it was cool journey. Having having that comes away. It all it feels so true to the world that the team has created in those moments. Because you know, I'm I'm a completion is player like if you give me a list of a thousand things to go collect if you give me, you know like an infamous. Charge to go collect I. Collect all of them, but there's something that I think does speak so much to this world and end you wanting to be invested in that. It is really by pulling everything. Out of the screen that you're looking at and just letting you look at the world you get more familiar with it, and you start to learn more about Oh. Yeah, I've taken that pass before. That leads to that pillar of honor or there's that cemetery over there as you start to. Trek across the land. It really gets you invest in the world in a way that I think just having a list or a neon sign to tell you where to go would. Deliver it in the same way. Yeah, that's great. That's so. That's the goal so I'm glad you had that experience. And I it's one of those things you know that the open world I think speaks so well to what the team really accomplish with this game, but one of the things I was curious about wasn't and I know. We talked about this a little bit, but released, but since we can. Talk to the island as whole, but what was the? I? Guess the poll the. The back and forth poll of wanting to make sure you stay true to the spirit of this real world location, and honor the history and the people that are but also create a world that at the end of the day would be fun to run around or write a horse around in as a game. Yeah and it's a great topic, and it's kind of been the the struggle for and I would say struggle in a creative sense. It's the creative. From from from once, we actually knew we were making Susha and we started doing all this research, and and you learn so much about the island. Like the fact that at that time it was likely to be like ninety five percent covered in dense forest. Which again I told you we tried. We tried very dense forest in. It's just hard to ride a fun horse through tree. Trees it's. Pretty tough. Also, it's incredibly hilly. We went there just like it's just hill after hill after mountain after Mount After Mountain, also challenging to create a interesting layouts in combat spaces in so. So, we worked with our team in Japan. We're like hey, this is how we were planning on You know being inspired by the shape of the islands. It looks very similar to the actual shape, but here's some kind of Ford as we'd like to take or game reasons you know, make the game more fun to to roam around. The landscapes in have layouts that have. Have Cool puzzle climbing challenges, or what have you were interesting missions, and and they were totally for it you know. And they gave us feedback of maybe when we went too far and then they also they know is in a fun way. They gave us feedback of win. Hey, you could go further with us, and so that was. It was a lot of ultimately. We're super inspired by history, and what happened and then the general beauty of greater. The greater nature of Japan as a whole, it's definitely hugely inspiring to us but we also make in a game and a PR and original story and a lot of things that. Have to Challenge it, but work in tandem with it, so it's it's definitely been a challenge I'm in a good way and we learn so much. And I will say the last thing I'll say on that. Is that within Joyon on the environment? Our team myself in the constitution. We talk a lot about like realism. And You know like A. Maybe painted realism, or maybe, how can we do it like a slightly stylized version of that? And and and you know this is not even if you've ever been to Seattle only did infamous. It wasn't really a stone by stone. Kind of recreation. Roads aren't lined up exactly. It's sort of like if you blur your eyes, you're like Oh. Yeah, that's definitely definitely Seattle like it rains. A lot of people drink coffee. PUNK ROCK and grunge music. It's You know the things that are there the spacing? Like the things you would expect, but it's not the like. Let's put a magnifying glass over, and let's get it like perfectly accurate and we take that same philosophy here. We want to feel like that. This is plausibly. Dass what it could feel like. That's what if we could do smell through it. That would we would try to. Feeling into music, we're going for a as a is a is a main heart. Smell will actually be unlocked on the playstation six. Thirty I. Have Rumor, we have an today since three. Hey listeners. We know you love gaming and have excellent taste, so we want to tell you about the official. The last of podcast in the show writer podcasters stand up comedian and huge fan of the. Host Christian Spicer we'll revisit the first game and talk with the people who created that critically acclaimed work hit. Also give you what you've all been waiting for. A behind the scenes look into the last of US part to Christian wanted to crawl into the minds of these visionaries and talents who created this highly anticipated game the podcast. We'll recap the news story. Story and episodes five through eight while also diving deep into the making of the game in the first episode. Christian will talking with Troy Baker and Ashley Johnson also known as Joel and Ellie may land combat designer, Anthony Newman, and the writer and creative director of the last of US Neil Druckman. The whole series is crammed with conversations with developers invoice actors. The official, the last of podcast episode one arrived on June ninth, and they'll be releasing new episodes of this limited series every Tuesday for the following eight weeks available now on Itunes spotify, and all your favorite audio sources, stream, or download the official, the last of his podcast from June ninth. The the combat in this game is awesome, and that's coming from somebody who to be completely transparent. Wasn't crazy about it. At first 'cause my immediate reaction was. There's no lock on. Think what do you mean? There's no lock on like you can't. You can't have a certified again without lock on and as as I grew to. Appreciate. The sort of dynamic happenstance of a dashing between those four stances and. Fighting different types of enemies. In synchronicity while switching and switching back and forth using my sub moves and everything I was like. This is one of my favorite combat systems interview ever But what what? How did how did that decision? Come to not have have lock on? was that was at a debate internally in the studio? Because that's to me, that's one of those things that people just expect from a video game and I found myself not even thinking about it after a few hours in. I. It's definitely debate right like it's A. It was heavily debated and talked about how you know. From all corners of the CEO there was not some like. I mean because it's a it's a standard. There is a standard anytime. You go against the standard. You need to prove it out and. I'm glad we tried something different than you know. As person bloodborne like my favorite game, I like games that allow you to really kind of hone in and focus, and and control that since a control comes, comes with locking, but and you know, and certainly as a samurais sense of control is a huge fantasy so Yeah, man. We talked about it a ton Maybe when it comes to combat, I would say it's in the top three conversations that we had over the entire course of the project while. But I have to give massive. Shout out to you know. One of the studio heads. You know I've found Sucker Punch Christopher. Men he's he's behind the core design, a lot of the combat and he he works out of the code for it, and there's another Guy Ted. Who is awesome designer? And he liked those two brains man. They worked together, and they figured out a way to create something that is first of all feels like you're hitting the person when you do hit them like it's a tandem as animation, so it's not like a hit box based. It's like these. This animation links up to this one. Is I very newbie? Animation Brain. And it's not just like the slash through thing right, and so they feel like you're hitting the person it feels. A goal is a gritty feeling, but it's also incredibly fast paced at times. You know as you get like five or six people around you you can be, you could be like. Changes. In planning, and when you're going to do the smoke bomb, go around the building and do another. Jump down from the top, you know. It's just like a it. Almost like a the style of it is is better with how the walk on. That's kind of the thing that we found over time especially when she became pro at it. And locking on actually with slow down, maybe in some ways and a sense of control will be got out of it instead was things like standoffs in duels, obviously assassinating somebody having that jump on, somebody gives you that, too, but we decided to really push that those moments or mythic abilities I think are. Usually will help take out people pretty quickly. The mythic abilities are interesting because I I think i. I I'm really glad that this game never really went like supernatural despite having the Word Ghost, in the title. There's. There's other there's an alternate version of this game. Were you guys just want preserved and people are summoning dragons and stuff like that. I appreciate that a lot of the crazy stuff that you got away with felt grounded even like the fire sort is ridiculous, but there's like. Oh there's there's sort of like a scientific explanation. Yeah. And then when you start doing some really intense stuff that feels deliberately over the top like dude, get terrified and they starts crawling away like. Is Watching people just straight up running around. Disappear and stuff like that. It's crazy like this is a i. mean even when we pitches his game. This was another heavily debated. Topic is going to be fantasy based or not, and obviously nate and I felt really strongly as well as many other people that we should not make it fantasy base in like high fantasy base because. It really those first of all there's. Several of those games out there already, and they do a wonderful job and I love neo I love sector, Oh, these games are awesome and they lean on that a little bit more as their unique. You know and so. Good. It's smart of us not to do that, but the reason why we didn't do the reason we did was because we were definitely were focusing a little bit more on the Human Story certainly one of the world to feel plausibly real. And you know if you like, I'll take the example. You just threw out there like having people fall in there, but get scared. Scoot away, man if you could just like, pull out a fucking dragon every five minutes. Scares them like I feel like a real challenge to overcome like and so you have to be constrained. So that when we do pull out something that's really incredible or scary or something like that that it actually has wait to it, you know and. I one of the things I do love about our game in might be some of my favorite content, actually mythic missions because. They. A build up the idea that people were legends like they talk about people in their connection to the island. The lightning one is a great example where you know, they burn the black sand, the sands black, which always like wire, the sands black back answer black, and it just bill out as they build up this legend of people that may have come before you, which is Kinda cool because? because. You're kind of building your own legend. To maybe one day, people talk about mythic stories of the ghost You know that humans can do maybe slightly crazy incredible in your living, example of that and people tell tall tales. I think that's cool. I love win. Jin would go around to the stories and people would be like. There's ghosts in the woods and he's like. No, there's not. Watching watching the people run away after a battle, though my favorite things in the game because it's it teeters on like on on like. Comedy, you would find in like vintage Kung Fu movies where somebody would come and kick. A bunch of Bass and one guy would be like away. Runaway ended every single time was I would let him run like maybe like hundreds of feet pull out my arrow. Cruel Man I know you you put it there. You know you gotta sit there, don't. If you give Brian the high ground. He will let them run as far as he wants to. I what I do love going back to the mythic tells them. You know maybe people one day telling the story of the Ghost I. I'm always sort of a sucker for. Stories that are about storytelling to a certain extent, because I do think you get so much of the human nature that we all deal with on a day to day basis of why we tell stories and everything and I I love that that permeates so much of this game, and not just in the quest, but on the on the ques- structure as a whole in this game I think is really unique, but it works really well. Because as Brian was saying earlier, you can go to a house in. Someone's saying Oh. There are nearby. Please help me or someone one of my favorite stories early on one of the side missions I found was. A woman send you to get food from the bandit that stole it from her. And then you bring the food back and she's like. Oh, thanks! I finally have food down. You're like. Wait a second. That wasn't yours to begin with. I just killed all those guys because you can't, there's. There's this. Stark sadness to a lot of the stories that I think really works in this game and I was just curious on like a total storytelling. Horrible 'cause there are moments of levity. You know like everything with Kennedy I think is so great, but how do you you know balance? I think this is a land and a group of people who are under siege. They're under attack by the suppressive force. At the same time. They are living their lives. There's this humanity going on the island. Hugs, what are some of the struggles that come up and try to tell those stories? Yeah, well first of all. When you started telling me, which story were, I was like racking my brain like which? It was so many. I I know it's crazy and I'm gonNA. Play through a bunch probably that I've played through in a long time, I play retail, but. You know It's balanced because you don't want it to be this like we did not want our game to be this like heavy thing that was constantly hitting you over the head with a that was just not what we wanted for this particular game. Think anybody really goes from bad particularly. I think they're always in goal, but but in it's hard, though because invasion and you wanna see desperation, and you WanNa see like these people have struggles. And frankly you know we want to. You know it's not always like dude. Go kill things, and so you WanNa hear you know people having. Their kids, or this or that like our parents like I. Don't know you just want to hear something that sounds like these people are struggling a little bit. But you know the when it comes to the writing and those stories, most of the stories do most of them do exist to try and reflect at the world has been in invaded, invaded place and. For people that are like these allies, and you engage with those those will get a little bit more in depth than traveling of their story, and for these little small one off encounters. Just say look even even the hasn't class is affected greatly by this and hopefully feel a sense of remorse for them or sadness for them, maybe a sense of duty that why you're doing this stuff, but as for the tone of it. I genuinely like a somber tone in general, I think Sambre is is not dark. Sombre is not grotesque. Sambas is just like a like A. Light sadness to things and I felt like that light sadness in a world that is so incredibly. Beautiful is kind of a nice. Balance and I think we look at it now that way and to some extent. That's a really good way putting now that now that you say that. It makes perfect sense because. You have all these incredible like you know. There's Fox's in this you know. Like. Rainstorms the beautiful trees and yellow leaves, but then you go, do these side quests on. You're like Oh. Wow, that was. Your family died and you can save them and you're like damn. That hit me hard that one. Particularly, there was one side quest for like now I know, too. Hard that one's talents so hard and You know there that one people on on the team who? Created that one, and then like you know as we get through the Polish face like Alan, somebody went through and added a bunch of extra work to that one for animation, and like kneeling down, and you know I you know in from liking that mission to really like connecting with more, and this is a small thing right like this is not a. Two hour long you know big big mission. It's very straightforward and simple cement to just reflects the tone of the world, a little bit and Alan Dow was one of the ones that, even though it's a small moment in your entire through I think improved a lot of the last course of the project I'm glad it exists. That's awesome. Yeah, I I, don't even know if I necessarily have a question about it, but I'm just curious to hear more about the the construction of the the site quests when it comes to the side tails when it comes to those the supporting cast that you get because I do I do think one of my favorite things. Throughout sucker punches, history has been that there is of course he usually a pretty great main character, but also this really great supporting cast as well, and you know going back to sign infamous now with ghost. I loved finding out more about Yuna and lady Moscow and just everyone at the pace that you want to in the world. And that balance I guess my question is because I. do think that's some of my favorite story. Telling him the Games in the game comes from those lines. How do you balance having this stuff? Be Optional I guess if you if a player just wants to go through the main story, but also encouraged people to want to keep going back and revisit these stories in these characters. Yeah Yeah! It's a question you know we From I is long as I can remember. I think I, think earliest pitches of the game we talked about. How we really wanted to create sort of this. Anthology of short stories. know these little little side branches off the main trunk. You know that you could. You'RE GONNA. You'RE GONNA get invited to them on the main truck main story. You'RE GONNA. Get invited them and maybe even once or twice in an engaged with them, but it's up to you hopefully, engaging enough for that story relates to you. It's up to you to kind of go. Finish out the rest of that branch, and we do a lot of stuff like we try to reward you for doing these things but I find that those things are They're good and I'm super glad. Glad reward you in different ways for playing these, but I find that the beauty of those those allies missions. If you will Masako. Norio characters is that they're just they're. They're far more developed in terms of like there are like what they need out of the world in their stories are interesting, and and they all have a different perspective on you and life, and you know in an what I what I think is kind of cool about creating a world like this is that you have to be okay with having content that exists. You're not forced to play. And you have to embrace that you have to because that. That is what makes it joyful when you go on your own ambition to go through it. It's not that you were told to go. Do it was in the Golden Path? And there were versions of the game earlier that a lot of these characters stories were more interconnected to Go Path. Through play, testing and feedback in her own kind of iteration process. We ended up where they are. Which I think is the right spot. which is you introduce them and then? Over your curiosity, we can push them push. You can go enjoy them your own Yossi, and there. Some of them are five or six missions long. And I think that's the right model, but it takes some iteration to get to that that that's spot for us. Even having late in the game the I think it's two missions for Eureka that pop up after you've revisited home. Just was such a such a Gut Punch. In the midst of as Jin, story is starting to come, full circle meant to have this exploration both more into him, but also into her life It's it was like as you were saying I, it felt so much more rewarding because I, saw it out that story within the. Yeah I think that that's A. It's not an easy philosophy to hold you now. as a director or as a contributor designer artist, because it means that somebody is going to get a bunch of people, not GonNa, play your mission bench people are not going to see your artwork, and and it's really hard to like talk about that because I want everyone to who worked on this game at Sakkara Punch to just like the super proud of it and love every moment that they cred tributed, too, but that's one where it's like. Yeah, but your thing is optional, and I can really bad, but it. In these cases it is for the for a greater feeling that. The people that will engage with it will probably tear out will probably love or be maybe even their favor mission of the game, even not the golden path I gave might be their favorite moment in the game nest. Because you, you let them engage it at their own will in. That's A. that's a hard philosophy to to. kind of stomach, but I think it's I. think it's a really healthy one for the type of game that ghost is. It absolutely plays into who I I think. My favorite thing about the game. Is that Me In the act of playing the game, so has to the game halfway in a presents all of these options, but I have to go exploring too, and I feel encouraged and want to explore and of my favorite times playing have just been putting a dot on the map letting the wind guy. A thousand kilometers, and if I if something stops me, stop if it doesn't I just keep going until something else. Interest me awesome. It's a calming experience which I don't often say I think about games at the moment. That's exactly how I played, too I would just put a marker somewhere completely random very far from me and just go there and see what I ran into along the what along the way with stories popped up which new characters I would meet, that would show me points of interest and stuff like that. and I think that that loop was really smart in terms of having sort of random gangs of bad guys. Patrolling the land and you'd run into them, and they'd have somebody kidnapped, and you'd rescue that person and that person would tell you another place to go. It felt like you're constantly pulling on these little threads. and I loved that so much was did that did that all take awhile to come together? Like outside of the wind is sort of the way the. The optional stuff and the sort of like randomize character you know excursions and stuff all interconnect. How how was it bringing all that stuff together to create the flow that you guys ended up with? The I I you both sound like you've played it exactly the way that I would recommend somebody to play, which is like hey, you know every now and then just throw down and go that direction and see what you find, and and if you don't find some great than go to your Golden, Pastora that's awesome, but try it, and because it's. In this is true for even when we're doing play testing that we did find that that was some of the ways that people would enjoy the game the most which is awesome. will you're talking about that? Like the ecosystem imbalance of people who tell you where stuff is in? How many patrols are there that stuff I'll tell you? We tweak that probably. Maybe until weeks before gold I think. Exactly the number on no top ahead, but is very late. We tweak those numbers because. because the sense of owning the curiosity, and like not having everything told you. was so important to the global feeling of enjoying just like exploring throughout the world, and as soon as you're told, were too much. Stuff is or too many things around your map. It becomes a different problem like you're kind of you either you either go into. Let's just go through the checklist which. Is Fine I think if you found them on your own but can be exhausting for some people because they're like Oh God. There's a ton of stuff to do, or it's kind of a turn off because you already know what it is, and you don't think of anything else over there, but they're actually might be if you if you actually went look, so we actually ramped down the people that the amount of people that would tell you where things were quite a bit. It used to be far more. part of the emergent processes I've almost everybody who talked to tell you. Something is, and it would put a thing on your map and We found that to be Super Smart System, and I'm so glad that we have it, but we put it in a very specific way in a very specific amount of things on the map total. Total that it would ever tell you about so that you still had your cool moment of like i. don't see anything over here on this. I'm going to head that way and finds things along the way now balance. It's really it's really tricky. Because again it goes up to that thing. I was talking about early. Enough loss of being okay with things being skipped and. That if you don't want to be so much that you don't have any information, that would be bad too right so it it is takes time to to work out, but the team did that. No, no a healthy fund way but I think even when you like clear. Mongol, Camp and Clears up a little bit. You still get a question mark. It's not even like yours, a hotel or something like that. And it's sort of it to me. It fell It felt like A. SORT, of natural to the universe that you guys were setting your game in this is this is like a long time ago. There is those no yelp. There's no google. So it seemed natural that you'd find a random person on the street and be like Oh. Thank you so much. There's this awesome restaurants. You should go check it out. Right I really doug. That I played a ton of the game in Kerr. Asala Mode Oh cool and that was. It was really it was really difficult for me. 'cause you made such beautiful game central? And I think it's I think it's. Beautiful in a different way in Curacao mode. But there was just something so special about about like heading into conflict or a story be or coming into a new environment. or it's all black and white, and there's that film green crackling, and a I read that you guys even did some stuff with the music to make it feel almost like it was coming through old speakers or something like that. Yeah, how how how how did how did you develop that? I I know. That's like obviously. It's something that you're studios. Really proud of especially since you've got endorsement from the family. It was a that was A. That was a I. I probably will put that in my top list of my entire career as like being apart process because. I mean it's just. It's just why just kind of a wild thing that you don't go into making video games because you expect to go through that process one day, yeah. which is probably why it's cool is that it's different. You know, but. The. We knew that we WANNA. Do Black and white mode I mean I think i. I don't remember when we first talked about it, but it was definitely really early Redo black and white vote, but again it got kind of pushed towards the end of the project, and then once things started to. You know you can sit in the world and you could be like. Oh, my goddess stunning! It's really a beautiful I feel I. Do feel like I'm. There's moments of this I feel like movie. It's coming. It's coming together. And, then we're like okay well. We definitely have that mode. Let's are planning for it. And an I got version of it in that was a very early version of it with a sliding team and Like what do we call this thing? and You Owe Samurai cinema or classic. Why can Wyatt our traditional La just things? You know cool cool names. And member WHO's I may was Brian Studio head. I don't remember somebody was like. When we see if we can call it, Chris Allen Mode. And I thought that was brilliant and I was like. Yes, can we? What was that process so I reached out to. One of the people that I think he deserves a special shout at his name as a relay Katami. He's on our Japanese producer. He's a helped us since the very almost since the very beginning, and he helps coordinate all of our feedback through Japan, and said Hey, you hey, who's now a dear friend of mine. I was like. Is this possible. Could you look this up? And he and the Japanese team reached out to their to their state across our state and worked out You know. They wanted to see video so I. Put together a video, and then I redid it like three times because enough. People on time video, but I was like Austin. Even Brian Our leauge rendering Guy Jasmine. He was not good. No. Though I kinda Redid it a couple of times and then eventually Is this. Is it I? I looked at so many movies measured the black and white. You know in our game. You know as you both played it. Daytime Times. There's indoor's whether there's rain. There's fog and so like you have to look at movies that have all of these things you can't just be like. Here's a movie. Here's a sample. It's the black. Man Like you gotTa. Look at all these because they exist in our game and it's a filter that'd be going over all of these and so I finally got to the point where I was, I had good black levels. White levels has cool noise. We sent them a video and and It took a little bit of time back and forth, but eventually we're like asses cooling reach an agreement. They were cool with it so. Yeah it was a it was a coup processing showed up. Is Mode teams all shit? It's called. Is it was pretty cool goal process. It has a dream come true. It's so awesome on a historical level. Because obviously you're seeing the game through its you know from the reveal trailer to now there's clearly a love and Joe Majd to the cinema and the storytelling that come in the John Mara, before it, and so to have that encapsulated as a mood that you can jump into starting to such a great I. Think like touchtone full circle thing as a fan of genres well. Also I mean the. The audio! From from like A. A gigantic Blue Tang Fan. It's it sounded like like RISI's sampling. VHS, tapes of sword slashes, and like there were moments. Paint that game and I was like I expect like method man rapid right now because. If anyone was intended, but that sort of got me on a very very like neural level I was like Oh my God like this is. This is quietly the best. Wu Tang game ever made since. The fighting gave. The quote somewhere I feel. That's. But. Our audio director Brad he that's all him he was like. I have an idea that guy's a wizard, so that usually meant something cool and he. It was like we have this special thing that we developed internally at Sony that replicates old processes from like you know fifty sixty s something like that radios and TV's and and And and he he kind of took that filtered it and figured out the right 'cause he was like. If you do too much over, you know, we wanted people to play lengthy amount of times and if they wanted to the Chrysanthemum. View too much, and it becomes incredibly fatiguing. Like, not watching move hours possibly thirty hours. You know so. You got a nice balance between that and something that you can you know Listen to over and over again? I- legitimated Curacao Mode for Poly Twenty five thirty hours and I think that I like maybe fifty sixty into the game. So how yeah! That's incredible. Yeah, along along with that and to me. It was surreal to play an open world game almost entirely in black and white. That was just I've never done anything like that before and. It was such a cool. It was such a cool experience. One of the challenges with eggs I would add is like since it's black and white. There's there's missions that use color as guiding, and so there are. There are a few missions of. It really struggles with, but for the most part we redesigned icons on the map so that it would work with answer, so you're not just looking at two icons ones. This color ones that color and we just changed the icon Lopate, but but yeah it, it's it's generally speaking. You can play through most of the game with it, which is just crazy. Yeah I think there was one mission where they're like find. The purple flowers was like Oh! I was to right back on, so that was good. Leads to so many great visual moments, and as you were saying I know we're running short on time I. don't want believe the too much, but I, genuinely really loved, and as pointing to earlier the the soundtrack and the way both game uses it. It comes in from quiet to loud, but also how the score changes both from the combat setting to the open world setting you know. Moments I would say not settings, but. That Jackson position as well as even on the side, the remixes that were coming out sort of in the lead up to the Games launch. There's so much great musicality and artistry. Bear that I think really. Elevate, so much of what's going on there on visual rebel to a works so well in tandem. You know there is no single discipline that contributes more to the game. The music like a known this case we have to composers, a team of people that obviously help implemented like their artistry is like. White just level things up so much like a scene without music in a scene with music. There's a world of difference in generally speaking I know it's not one contributor. There's quite a few people that make it happen. Processing and implementation, but it's insane. What music can do in for this game? It's it's. It's one of the best parts of the Game I. Think is the the the artistry behind the music in the soulful fullness in is is really I listened to it a lot. I love and then we tokens the glitch mob. Which is just? RIDICULOUSLY COOL! Yeah, it's an awesome combination i. do think as you were saying. It elevates so many great moments, but really. A drills home like the emotional undercurrent of everything that's going on in the game. Unfortunately. We're pretty much out of time. I think Brandon I could keep talking there so much. We love and really enjoyed about the experience and are continuing to enjoy. Time in this world, so Jason Thank you so much for taking time. We really appreciate it. SUPERFUND and thank thank you to your studio for. bookending this entire console generation with my favorite games. I I don't know if that was ever the plan, but the way that

Brian FOX JIN Director Japan United States Jason I. Kgo Suma Seattle Connell Official Hamas Playstation Bar. Jeff He Golden Forest Cam Mongols Joanna Core Design Mottaki
Actinium Pharma's Transformative Radiation Treatment

Breaking Biotech

04:50 min | 9 months ago

Actinium Pharma's Transformative Radiation Treatment

"So today. We're GONNA talk about a couple of things. COUPLE UPDATES we've seen in the last couple of weeks related to Jin Amarin, as well as Kerio farm that we heard today and I'm recording this on the twenty second of June. And, then the main story today we're GONNA, talk about actinium pharmaceuticals, and I think if everything goes well with them. They could be a big play now. This weird stuff around the stocks or we're GONNA touch a little bit on that, but I think that if the data continues to look as good as it has so far, they could really make a big change in the targeted radiation space, so we'll touch a little bit on that as well. But. Yeah, for me on a personal note. It's it's been busy. Things are kind of getting back to normal here. In San Diego, a lot of businesses have been opening up. So I've noticed that actually have a bit more of a social life now, so that's definitely been entertaining. Take me away from the market's a little bit, but you know I'm here today to talk about some awesome biotech company so with that. Let's get into it. And the first piece of news I wanted to touch on is biogenic and what we heard. Is that biogen's Tech Videira pen? Five one four was ruled invalid us. District, judge, and they closed Friday at two seventy one, and they did see a little bit more of a dip this week. As we've dealt with this already with Amarin we're hearing that Bison does plan on filing an appeal, but that appeal process can. Can take up to a year, but what's different here is that we're actually expecting at risk launch, so mylan has made it clear. Myelin the company sued by John. Over this patent made it clear that they're aiming for a November sixteenth approval day for Generic Tech. FIDORA, and they have already filed an da with the FDA which is the normal process by which a generic company has to get their medicine approved. By, June did kind of expect this to some capacity because they did launch a competing drug to tech Videira, called vulgarity and a little bit of a better safety profile, and they launched this just in case, the tech texture patent battle did go south because I believe there's other lawsuits coming up against this patent, but biogen launched Romerike parity in the hopes that they'll be able to shift the revenue. They've been getting from. Tech Fidora onto American and then maintain this juggernaut status since tech for their is their biggest selling medication, and it's about four billion dollars. Dollars per year they generate in this medicine, so they're going to hope to replace that with something and the loss of this patent protection means the generics are gonNA. Come on the market pretty soon and when I did mine. Alice's using a model that I had created. If I have the tech revenue, their stock price would go down to run to thirty, so I think what's going on here is investors are pricing in the potential of America to take a lot of that revenue from Tech Videira, which would help Jin, either that or the odds of winning? Winning an appeal are there so the stock is pricing in some upside? Despite the loss they suffered, and the other thing that's going on with biogen is they are planning to file the advocating B-. Be La in two three, twenty twenty and advocate the indication being Alzheimer's disease, which is a very very big patient population, so I think there is also some support for the stock given that biding could potentially get an Alzheimer's drug approved. If not late issue than early next year and I know there's a lot of controversy over the added Keenum data I think. Think personally. It's a coin flip whether or not the FDA is going to approve it. I think the the date is very shady and it shouldn't be approved, but strange things happened with the FDA before, so it is possible that they could lobby the FDA enough to get it approved the next company, and wanted to touch on is Amarin and just a little piece of news that we heard. Is that Amarin settled with the generic company called appetites, Apex Appetites, and this settlement would keep them from launching a CPA generic until August ninth of twenty twenty nine. And I saw a lot of excitement around this just because the logic being that if apex fought that ammon was going to lose the appeal, they wouldn't bother going through the motion to do the Selman agreement keeping Aptex from going to the mark until twenty, twenty nine. But, if I were to think about it logically, I assume that the lawyers between Amarin and APP attacks have been in discussions for months by now and that the failure of Amer to defend its patents just happened to go against Amarin APTEX was not expecting that, so they ended up filing the settlement agreement anyway, but I think that if Amazon is not successful in their appeal process I imagine appetites, April tax is going to be able to file a generic before this twenty twenty nine days, so to me this neither a positive thing, negative thing, but you know I'm still holding all my shares and will look forward to that appeal decision coming up later this year.

Jin Amarin FDA Amarin America Amarin Aptex Tech Videira Kerio San Diego Videira Twenty Twenty Alzheimer Ammon John Alice Alzheimer's Disease Amer Selman Amazon
Hashing It Out - Ava Labs Kevin and Stephen

The Bitcoin Podcast

08:41 min | 10 months ago

Hashing It Out - Ava Labs Kevin and Stephen

"I'm a first differentiates itself with its consensus protocol. Which I know you've talked about a lot before Previous episodes of this but I'll I'll give a very brief overview of essentially. It's a highly scalable both in throughput and also the latency and the number of participants The can participate in consensus. So the first kind of main idea that that started album was the concert. Now since then we've also branched out into this idea of sub nets relate heterogeneous or a heterogeneous network. So that allows us to Kind of scale not just like on like consensus speed sides but also allows people to develop their own personalized Network so for example. We we are able to port the EDM so easily because we can essentially just have a wrapper around an existing EDM implementation and then use avalanche consensus with that and so we can court in two Gecko in relatively easy manner with how we structured sub nets and so that lets people not just You know have very fast infrastructure but also very flexible one so someone could implement their own. Virtual machine has an arbitrary business logic. That's specific to them and so Say so those are those are the two technical side And then I think Kevin can talk a lot more about like the business on how we're kind of it chained to to meet unique in that aspect but I think From the architecture side where we're kind of pushing towards like You know very very flexible infrastructure both on the consensus and the engine side for Kevin. Kevin I WANNA I wanNA trend reiterate something that's I think is incredibly important about The what office doing That is it's a it's a market distinction between consensus and the underlying data or mach- machine. Stay right most open networks right now those things are intrinsically married like like the consensus for lives state and the changes nate whereas Aga An it's different. Nation is consistent his own thing and then you can have other like a bunch of different machines rely on. That's exactly yeah that's basically exactly right. It's program ability not just at the application layer which is what other smart contract platforms delighted to already It's also program ability At layers below that the network stack wind data stacks which is an important property allows some interesting things that are very difficult from for for others One of the most important things that we want to make sure is that we build a smart contract platform that capitalizes on the value of the applications built on top This is something that for example doesn't do I can if I issue a let me let me call a low velocity a high longevity type of assets. Something like You know Real Estate Orlando something like that That on a theorem Looks no different than forgive nommik laser here but the any regular should coin It accumulates the same fees. It does not. It is not guaranteed to be different from any other Coined the does may be has no value whatsoever to it and we're trying to capitalize on this problem in a way that provides a that gives the issue of assets in creators smart contracts on our platform the ability to effectively divide the the the guarantees a little bit more at a higher. Gherardi or Logan. Larry Rather It's it's about you know giving somebody that is issuing these applications that or the asked us that have very high longevity needs and high security needs It gives them the ability to pay much much. Larger fees to be stored for very long period of time and be very secure. Burst something that. Maybe he's just not very high value and needs may be much higher speed and much lower fees so this is something that we allow. That theory doesn't quite allow and and is actually goes down to the to the token design as well so in fury on the the problem is it does not You know if I issue a new token Or if I build a ruler. Successful application of the theory Yeah fees are paid in East which is great but down to the minors and nobody else benefits from the fact that there is usage off of these Of this of this token on the system It's actually It's actually quite a big problem for theory. I mean you have so much value being built on a theory that bitcoin could never could ever dream off right now and none of it is really being capitalized at the value that it should be capitalized by the by the underlying token Our design has been more of the not the designer. We've taken is more of the the one that says. This is a cap supply token like bitcoin. And whenever you do operations that require things like creating new blockchain's and paying for transaction fees and so on they burn off the tokens and the burning Obama tokens alternately creates scarcity novel and so that capitalizes on the underlying On the underlying token of the of system. So that's an in a different designed from How a theory has done this But I mean this more foam I would say peripheral property The first goal that we want achieve is really in the ability to effectively labrum ability at the at the network data layer which is very very important because it allows a lot of flexibility on how you can design your your economics for your smart contract. It's like effectively. You know smart contract level charting almost if you want to think of it that way. Maybe that's not quite super correct. But it's the best knowledge that I can possibly come up with in one sentence and And that's just not the case for any other platform the whoops there okay So Steven you mentioned these subjects that have has right. How do those are? Would you compare those those akin to para chains or something like Sharpton East to a so with the St Louis? Model that you mentioned. How does that compare to something like East? Who which has the goal of being more stateless. Yes so I think the biggest difference the tweet our model and something more similar to their model is that offer us are. Our sub nets are heterogeneous which means that they aren't necessarily running these same The same the Amer the same the same Guess scheme if you're preparing database land So east to at least you know. Correct I'm wrong but Each to is planning on the chief being scale ability on the same kind of network with the same security guarantees in the same network guarantees across all of its shards. So what that means is that essentially. They're trying to paralyse computation and increase their throughput by adding nodes not need to validate the entire the entire state And so that's that's very useful in some cases however what's typically pretty difficult. When there's a lot of cross shark communication which on blockchain it then becomes very important of how you're you're splitting things into shards and so from from our point of view you know you're GonNa have something like you know the die chain or the Guy I G- CHARD. Where ever wants to be on the Diet Chart because everyone of us die and so all of a sudden anyone that isn't on the die charred is going to have to be communicating with the DIA- Chard Which is relatively expensive in most Charlotte Systems However with us Our viewpoint sub nets is that some nets are heterogeneous and so they may contain their own environment so for example B. Edm would live in its own sub met and would have surprise like Is a is Senate that were planning on doing which is a soon of Eutherian state. So so that's That's like the big difference really so we have something that's based off of the functionality. Rather than you know just splitting the entire state. So that's like the main

Kevin East Barack Obama Senate AGA B. Edm Gherardi Larry Eutherian Steven Sharpton St Louis
Bringing Generations Closer Together

Kind World

03:25 min | 10 months ago

Bringing Generations Closer Together

"Welcome to kind world. I'm ESPN Amer. And I'm Andrea Swayed. So yes me mean. I don't know about you. Being in quarantine has led me to talk on the phone more than I have in a very very long time. You are not kidding. Most nights like during dinner. We just leave our phone on like we have dinner with other people and it's a really really good way to connect when we can actually see them. Yeah my friend Landry and I. We used to go to the movies once a week and now we are basically watching movies together but separately and earn apartments and then afterward we facetime each other and we talk about the movies as if we had just watched it together on the movie screen. I mean that's just what you have to do. I mean you just cannot overstate how important technology has been and keeping US connected but I do think our dependence on this has inevitably caused some people to feel left out and someone who knows that all too well is sixteen year. Old Jordan Midler Thank you all for joining us today for our next online zoom class. We have a lot in store. For every Sunday. Jordan teaches a free technology class designed specifically for seniors. It all started back when he was a middle school and his family gave his grandparents a pair of smartphones. He quickly realized they needed just a little bit of help to figure out how to use them. I spent numerous times on the phone with my grandparents and walking them through simple procedures like sending a message of phone. Call sending an email downloading APP but Jordan wanted to go beyond his grandparents. He wanted to help other people of their generation benefit from the tech tools. We have right now so he started teaching a class at a free space in his high school in New York and the class was pretty popular but when everything in the city shut down because of Cova Nineteen Jordan decided to keep teaching this time online. Today's lesson is going to be revolving around online banking. That is something that we're all in a situation that we need to us. I think it's such. It's an enormous service that he's providing. I think it's It's a credit to him and it's a credit to him that he wants to. He wants to do what he wants to do. The people like US people like me. That's Rosalyn Zueger. One of Jordan's students rosalind is originally from Ireland. But she's been in the US for more than sixty years at ninety. She lives alone but she maintains a pretty active social life. This lockdowns been really tough on her. But the skills she's learned in Jordan's class have helped her feel more comfortable using technology to connect more with family and friends. I think that made a big difference to my situation being alone ear. I'm not lonely at all and I know I can. I can zoom in to anybody. I like it any time with that. I find that I can get through today. Jacques get through the weeks Jordan. Says his class size has more than doubled. Since going online. My goal is to be able to be able to spread my classes and expanded in a way that any senior is able to assess the classes.

Jordan Midler United States Andrea Swayed Rosalyn Zueger Jordan Espn Facetime Landry Jacques Cova Ireland New York
Sean LeBlanc  How to book incredible portrait photography clients at expos

PhotoBiz Xposed

08:01 min | 11 months ago

Sean LeBlanc How to book incredible portrait photography clients at expos

"Hey It's Andrew Helmet from impact images. Welcome to this episode of the PODCAST. I know you're GonNa love what Shawn has to share. He has an incredible story. And I think it'd be blown away by the success. He's having in such short time. But I would encourage you to make sure you check out his website to get an idea of the kind of work. This guy is producing before we get into all that. I've been thinking quite a lot about interviewed last week. With Zack. Arias and I've had a conversation with another photographer. I'M GONNA leave. He's nine out of this but he just could not believe he seriously thought Zach was making this up that he would go out and shoot one hundred dollar poets poets after making so much money as a successful commercial and aditorial photographer for big brands. That just did not make sense to this listener. We had a few back and forth. It turns out that Zach was being one hundred percent truthful. Amer God's to these poets portraits for one hundred dollars. He's actually got a youtube video up now. Talking about these executives the fact that he booked fifteen families in five of them cancelled in the graphing ten days families for one hundred dollars a pace to release fifteen minutes sessions. He goes into complete data. So there's no denying that Zach was playing one hundred percent truthful. I WANNA be clear. The majority of comments and feedback were just how refreshing. It was to hear from someone exacting so truthful and honest about the state of photography the industry dealing with Kobe nineteen and all the aspects of having no income and manning expenses. It's just frightening anyway back to this other photographer having back and forth. I think what we both agree on more. No we what we both agree on is. There's a really good chance. Even though exact didn't say this specifically that having high overheads a lot of expenses with little savings and the possibility of no work coming in is extremely dangerous and personally. That's where I see a lot of photographers leaving their lives and probably not only photographers. I mean we all like to have a nice house. Nice US new cameras. Modern computers a lovely looking home with NAS furnishings. Holidays kids with Nice things. I mean. They're all things that way we've been brought up to to want and then to pursue and go after and of course we all know we have to work hard to have those things as well but the scary thing is if worked rise up. Where does that leave us? Where does it leave you? And I believe one of the biggest things that come out of this corona virus pandemic is. We need to take a really close look at the way. We're living what we value. What kind of debt were go into what can happen if we can't service those debts for whatever reason it doesn't have to be a pandemic could be personal injury or illness? Something change China's economic climate. I mean war another could be anything and everything could happen to affect our chance to make an income to generate clients and Mike right siles but on the other hand we still want to have all those nice things so to me. We need to think about what we value more away. You place your value and how much risk or dead. You're happy to carry do. Do you really need to have the fifty or one hundred thousand dollar car? The lightest camera. Do you need to have the lightest fridge that you've taken on an interest free loan from the department store? Can you pay off your major debts like your mortgage before you start pursuing all those luxuries in life or some of them anyway. Is that a possibility because one thing is certain if you have no debt and worked as dry up for whatever reason you're going to be in a lot more of a comfortable position a lot less stressful a lot less reliant on government handouts a lot less anxious and generally in a bit place and when. I started thinking about this this whole thing. The first interview that came to mind was one are recorded a few years ago with Vincent Puglisi. If you haven't had a chance listened to that episode it's episode two hundred and fifty five the toddle that Iran we played episode had to move to a life of zero debt with your photography business. And he's the author of the book freelance to freedom. It's definitely worth getting back. And having listened to Vincent to what he shares and had different his life is as a result of living without debt. Because to me. That's the one thing that he's causing most photographers. That is struggling right now. The most anxiety. It's that debt. And it really is a frightening place to be with all that being said. Hope you are in a good place. I hope things have started to settle down and you can see a way forward through this. It sounds like it sounds like things are going to be slowly moving back to some kind of normal in the next four to six weeks. I don't know how that's going to affect you. Depending on where you live and your government restrictions and rules but it sounds like humanist dry they're gonNA start to slacken off the restrictions in the next four weeks whether that means we can go back and shoot weddings immediately or family portrait sessions. But it's looking like that's the why it'll be and that'll be great when that does happen. I just quickly on that topic of photographers. Not Working. No we covered a little bit of this Zack's interview last week. But what I found interesting is particularly here in Australia or New South wiles. We're being told that we can't work unless we have an essential business and for some reason photographers have jumped in to mmediately. Fly The flag for us not being an essential business and I get that. We aren't an essential business. No one needs photography to survive and this year a photographer that is but the general community doesn't need photography to survive. But I'll look around and I see shops open. I see electricians GonNa work plumbers going to work. I say build is going to work. Say My son going to work as a locksmith. Our all those things essential services in some cases yes they are like you may need a plumber. Plumber is essential if the toilets blocked with the drains not draining. But they're going about their work as they do every other day when there is no pandemic replacing taps tap washers. They're doing little jobs. They're doing big construction jobs. Is that essential? I don't think so now. I'm not suggesting that you should be out there working as a photographer doing your family. Portraits or photographing allotments. Or doing whatever you do for your dog. Affi business but I can understand that if you have to put food on the table. You'll do what you have to do to bring some kind of income in if you can do it within the rules. Governments is setting but for some reason. Photography is saying to have this great divide in our industry where you're the lowest of low if you consider going out to work if you're shooting port portrait's even though you're maintaining your your distance or you're doing what you can to put some food on the table and interestingly. I haven't seen a lot of pushback on Zach Zach Arias and what. He's doing what he discussed in last week's episode. I'm seeing very little pushback now. Is that because he has a higher profile because he's more well known in the Industry. Is that why people aren't screaming at that? Hey you shouldn't be doing that. Zach this is the worst thing. You're a photographer. What you're doing is not essential or is this something else at play here that I don't understand

Zach Zach Arias Zack Andrew Helmet Youtube Vincent Puglisi Shawn United States China Kobe Mmediately Mike Iran Australia
Clivias

On The Ledge

07:01 min | 11 months ago

Clivias

"If you're not familiar with Clavier mini-armada this is a wonderful species. That's native to Southern Africa and their members of the Amer relived. Aca family. That's the Lilly family with strap. Like leaves and Gorgeous. Lily like flowers that are usually orange but come in a radio collar three to read rusty reg yellow. And there's also some with variegated leaves for you variation fans out there and as to the clavier debate. Well they were named after lady Clive. Who was the granddaughter of Robert Clive and Clive of India? So I guess officially it should be Clavier but Steve from implant center and I both ATV so. You're just going to have to deal with that if you happen. To be a proponent of Clavier Steve Hickman is part of a family run. Nursery called the whole implant center in South Yorkshire in the UK and this interview was recorded before lockdown happen so there may be some references to flower shows which normally at this time of year. Steve would be attending with his plants. But of course that's all been curtailed for the moment but that just put it into context as to why that might be mentioned in this episode. Now Steve as well as being an expert and one of the premier breeders of clears in the UK. He's also an expert breeder of Agatha this to bake and narrowings so didn't check out their website something for the Garden Dot Co dot UK which is got loads of information on growing all of these plans including clears and really is a great resource. I'll put some inks in the show notes so you can take a look at that over to Steve to kick us off with some fron tastic useful information about growing these beautiful flooring house plants and he starts buying explaining exactly what court about clears in the first place where first of all we started and we still do A. I'm a few years ago. They outcomes has changed families into Morella. Deysi which covers the cliff is is not to go into the May. Tens of this society amid other girl was principally a guy called Mike Jeans who was then national collection holder and from talking with him and saying the clippers and the fantastic amount to call us. That are available now. Such as Reds Brahms's yellows petits Greens and pinks and from tastic by colours. It really attracted me. I The ship of the leaves like some shape. It's exactly like the ACA pompous impressive with not in flower because of the array of different flower. Colours just fantastic just mind blowing. Libya's went out saying for a long time. Steve Do you think they coming back in fashion? It's a traditional Victorian plot. You say parents and grandparents used to have them up. They used to have they asked pedestrians manly the vote in the oranges and occasionally the yellows but these days like I say these different colors our community the ball and what we're doing to encourage people to start growing With exhibiting clippers at The larger richest flower shows which is Chelsea Chatsworth. Where LAST YEAR? We did it for the first time in the Pavilion Chelsea and we at to get the gold medal along with the pumped exhibits as well so people say all these new fantastic colors for the first time and people with play Orange One Sort of increase in the collections. I think we are always going to be suckers for all those new and interesting plants safe more generally. What are the basic catastrophically? These I think quite tough floods are they. You have Roy of an easy to grow so stopped up in February. If you've clavier in a container they only liked to be repoted every now and again just like yoga from the same family. The lie of the rose to become jested so once. You've you plant in. Say six to eight inch. Container is happy for three. Maybe four years in that same content. Now let style February you start watering the clavier once a week or once a four not just keep it moist but you do start to feed the clear. Once every two weeks and the reason he stopped feeding now become apparent. Sort of later on you do this. Roy through the season about September. Now if you've never wall broom the clavier will start to flower. Send the flower up through the leaves early January February even a little bit early. If it's a really warm room if you keep it nice and cool which we try and do the flower. Later in the season surrender may June time. So You keep watering you. Enjoy the flower ridden. If you pollinate the flowers with a cotton bud In the morning or evening you get seedpods form in which I'll talk about lead but the most important thing to keep flowering every year is the do like a cold spell so when the danger cross gone sort of June two you can take it outside onto the shade of a tree or a shady part of your Patio Conservatory and leave it there while end of walk. Tober bring it in. Just before the frost or alternatively you can keep it in your house while the September implicit outside September October so it gets not Eight to ten week chill sets the board in the base of the plant for flower in the following spring. Now you can't live is fairly dry over winter. So December January you keep it on the dry side not bone dry but dry. That's the rest in period And brings you into February. You start watering and keeping it moist you feed once a fortnight the fade then brings the flower up through the leaves and the flowers normally just held above the leaves. If you don't say it correctly the flower often stays in the central Rosette delays. And you don't really see it so the cold spell. In the autumn. The dry over interest impaired undefeated wants all night. It keeps you plumbed health and on the issue of fertilizer. What what do you recommend Of The freeway recommend Is is sort of general feed but we have especially speed that we use we do. It is available on our website and the flower shows a mouse. Eighteen twelve eighteen. It's not jim loaf law phosphates and high potash dot keet plums hoppy right the way

Steve ACA Robert Clive ROY Garden Dot Co Dot Uk Steve Hickman Steve Do UK Southern Africa Clippers Chelsea Chatsworth Gold Medal Morella India Pavilion Chelsea Agatha Mike Jeans South Yorkshire Jim Loaf Libya
Join Forces to Create Unique Hair Education, with Katrina Kelly and Conor Doyle

How To Cut It in the Hairdressing Industry

09:48 min | 1 year ago

Join Forces to Create Unique Hair Education, with Katrina Kelly and Conor Doyle

"Between of being lockdown. I've had all of the emotions like every kind of emotion I've had from the week before the business had to close to decide what what we were going to do before the government do told was and then the first week I was kind of lazy and then the second week I was just enjoying the moment of quiet now having to do and then like this week. Now I've been busy busy busy organizing dance almost so we'd have emotions. I'd say about you you adopted into this okay and you find implanted to go out and slowly think and this is what. I've been talking to a lot of people in the industry where I think like because we've been so busy. There's nearly as like dealing of guilt. Almost you know what I mean because like everything's cancelled We can't really plan too far ahead so we've gone from having like the whole year plan to sudenly sitting down and thinking what to do next so for me. The hardest part is actually just like taking a breath. Getting there definitely gotten their Katrina. I mean say you both as education. You really you have yourselves but how you coat with this current restrictions that we've been given in isolation lockdown everything that was planned has that created a meltdown for you and have you that with it. Yeah so I think for me what happened was I could see at Komen. I good Sense of like you know. I had it educated Portugal. That trip was cancelled. I was in Italy in that Wisconsin. I supposed to go. Easy that Wisconsin everything. Kinda start counseling down and then you know the shutdown of the Ceylon was. It would lay Again how the safety is most important and but now I'm kind of if I'm honest John. I'm enjoying having time with my family. And they're not annoying me to think he's been. We've all got a heads around. We're all in this or the same. We're all in it together. So initially was a shock. Wasn't it because again? You had some bookings going on different things we would do in it but now. I'm Kinda waking up each morning. She in kin and I feel a bit guilty for Sinus. Almost umbrella over enjoy myself. Not exactly a name isn't it? You're like you're like you're not entitled to that because you don't have all this works to actually it's a whole world is on pause. You do guilty about it because you know there's so many people suffering obviously the medical profession epidemic of wonderful thing but from a selfish industry. Point of view is quite nice to have a little bit of time down and I think the thing about it is creative. Energy is to really let that go. Wouldn't you agree? Trina yeah like in the sense as well. I think that as hairdressers we do tend to dot to you know new things that are happening. I think as a creative especially when the night stops. That's when your brain starts to walk more so I think it's good to it's nearly its forces into this space that we stop and think in a different way put lives or instagram lives. Connor Katrina deserve. What's your take on this? I've just kind of doing one of them at the minute. An quite well because they came more from like not being able to stop so he's a great. How can they possibly deliver to work? Get the industry involved also just like make a little bit of money for charity and civic and going Dot Tumb quake good so I think everyone is kinda reach now on developing a bit into that now Daphne I think showed how much potential is in Duffield of inscribed on facebook live. Maybe we weren't using as much before. Well we certainly on that. Well we treat. I mean he's gone. It's called mental hasn't it? Everybody is just a lot you know what? Let me. Just get on their lives yet. Like is for millions. I wear deal on M. There was one thing that we want to do on its launch an educational so are not held back on a couple of the lines because this week possibly tonight. I actually this weekend and we're launching a new website. This is all a home. Diy like has your hair at home but not color. Joist 'em how to do. Different styles are actually due to watch this instead of the on the lines. Were doing like to watch the live at the tutorials on the website you have to donate so for the source few weeks or actually 'em raise money for lots of phones for Amer Hospitals Arend and sore the World Health Organization as well and so another kind of held back on some of the light on instagram. For that reason because we are site is going to go live so but we're delighted that we are going to be doing everything like for donations for the floor. He weeks all that launched as mega wilder view is doing. I think for a great cause but yeah I have a lot of fun watching these lives and people getting used to beeping good to watch now. Certainly. Yeah we'll be watching what you do in. Yeah sounds great Wednesday night but we want to learn a little bit more of the guys and I know you are massive. I mean you both huge in Ireland. I know that and certainly across European giving listeners. A little bit of a heads up less work at how you came together. I in you know as a bit of a collaborative force would not be. Right in saying the purview. You you definitely got so. Let's start off with yourself. Khanna gives a bit a heads upon who you are the hairdresser and where you are right now so I suppose I'm Harris in eight years at this stage and I. I was inclined of a really big company for a long time. And they're quite good. I got quite actually started to feel like the same thing over and over again. I started to feel like I didn't actually like hair anymore. It's actually like I didn't like industry. I DOT COM to panic. Decided why didn't realize actually that I was just talking to roll and I think sometimes you don't realize until you're on the outside of it and so what happened was I think I think Katrina. Just start shot and over instagram. And WHO's just like? Who says MoD one? Who'S IN WAY MASSACHU- requests headier? Then we got gotten on. Education is always something that. Kinda I wanted to get into a bit more Fulltime Amway's doing a bit of a time never under my own name was always under the company's name or through a brand or something like that on my stock trainer kind of thing and I think Katrina just Matt The exact point where we both kind of a bit of a real realized that we could actually Jewish collaborate and fuel each other's trae tippety android without overpower each other and that was about maybe two years ago. We did some projects together from them. Brunch did our own things again but we always bounce back to each other and to check in and see. How can we build your auto home? We create something together. You know advised that way on so since then. I've left and bigger company. I now work with wildflower crate. Shudo which is kind of crazy flow bespoke kind of area in Dublin on Bhai Danica Garner Ideal Cooper. Dare I have my own Education Connor James Education and I still. I know what a couple of bronze on my own terms and Katrina now are starting to poke. That's kind of where I'm at the independent iconic. Oh you lucky. The indecent of freelance work with lots of different various brands educational. You kind of in a free place to as you want when you want. Yeah exactly am I think that's a really? I don't think you can actually put a value on that radio and I think that's you know I think that's the way businesses need to be if they want to retain stuff. I think that's like more business. Owners are seeing that those that aren't are probably finding harder to retain staff Co. I kind what about you Katrina and so I guess is well like that a stage where are my education. I had my own education for three or four years on against was educate brand online education. was like going radio. I was trailed with it. Got to a stage where I was ready to kind of you know. I wanted to collaborate. I of felt like education again. Like being bossed at times can become very lonely. When it's you up there all the time. Educating says sometimes it's nice to collaborate with somebody so am I had an idea for this 'em Harrison's course and I had spotted connor how isolated. Dm So we sit back idea for the science education connected together then Katrina yet like we had. We had been told on instagram on. Just when I came up with the idea of the Harry signs and we wanted it to be created when I got into it. You can't just knew he was the one I just knew I was like it. Has He was the? And when we did chemistry experiments like ideas for future on Salva chemistry experiment than just critic creative

Connor Katrina Instagram Wisconsin Katrina Portugal Connor James Education Connor Ceylon Facebook Amer Hospitals Arend Italy Amway Daphne DIY Harry World Health Organization Khanna
The Controversy Around 'Essential' Businesses

All Things Considered

08:11 min | 1 year ago

The Controversy Around 'Essential' Businesses

"We're gonna return now to a question that continues to confound and even anger many people across the country as government shut down most activities in effort to contain the spread of the corona virus what is considered essential of course some jobs businesses or services are recognized as essential across the board first responders hospital in urging Kerr personal grocery store workers and pharmacies but in the absence of a national stay at home order individual states and cities have been making their own decisions and some jurisdictions have chosen to define what's essential in a way that has sparked controversy and even lawsuits Texas for example is one of a handful of states that have sought to label most abortion services as non essential meanwhile in California it's up to each county to decide whether a gun shops should be allowed to remain open and in Arizona barber shops and hair salons seem to be on the essential business list until the governor there reversed course to help us understand all this week called on three reporters were covering these stories terra Haley is a senior contributor for Forbes Thomas Peele as an investigative reporter for the bay area news group and when I got this a staff correspondent at Bloomberg government thank you all so much for joining us hi thank you thanks for having us here you're very welcome terra Haley we will start with you since you've been covering the abortion ban in Texas I understand that this ban was not originally and governor Greg Abbott's executive order so how did this come about the primary rationale has been that halting all abortions will preserve PP which stands for personal protection equipment so that includes things such as masks and gloves and face shields governor Abbott didn't specify anything about abortion in the actual order then the Attorney General Ken Paxton has a long long history of being very opposed to abortion rights and looks for opportunities to involve himself in making decisions about it so he the very next day after governor Abbott's order he passed he released a statement stating that that included abortion and it was very unclear at first which abortions that included it was assumed to be only surgical abortions so all surgical abortions in Texas were put on hold as soon as Paxton's order came out then a few days later on that following Friday the medical abortions abortions which use medication for termination of pregnancy those abortions were also halted and it wasn't really clear with the justification for those was since those don't use PP beyond gloves for an ultrasound so gonna ask you does the confusion what what it that's that's my question is what is the argument because the argument around surgical abortions as it's not a treatment of a disease and therefore these idms the scarce items like or increasingly scarce items like personal protective equipment needed to be reserved for Amer urged urgent matters but that doesn't apply to medically and medical abortion medical portion so what was the rationale it's not clear why they can justify it when the P. P. E. that would be used for abortions as much less than what would be used for prenatal care and for birth services especially if someone has a C. section so I think that's part of what they're going to be debating in the courts the question is what happens while it's working its way through the courts and at first it was allowed to proceed and then the fifth circuit of appeals reversed that so the justifications I think are still being worked out I was gonna ask about this because yesterday on this program we spoke to new York's Attorney General issued James and she is one of at think at this point it's a dozen and a half attorneys general from other states who are supporting legal challenges to the Texas border and what what's the what's the status of that challenge now what are some of the arguments of people have been making here the biggest argument is that abortion is a time frame for the procedure you cannot be pregnant indefinitely there there is a an actual time limit to when you can start to when you can no longer seeking abortion in taxes that's twenty weeks after twenty weeks you can no longer seeking abortion and obviously if you pay too long then you are going to be giving birth so it's not like you can delay it like you could a hip replacement or a thyroid surgery it is something that actually depends on time sensitive needs and in the midst of this we don't know how long the social distancing in the need for PP will both go on so to delay it indefinitely is a big concern I think Ohio has taken a different approach to take that into account Ohio it was very unclear for awhile what they were allowing what they were not and then it was finally clarified in one of the recent lawsuits where they said that surgical abortions should be delayed until they can't be delayed so basically if it's reaching a point where the woman is entering the window where she would no longer be able to have an abortion thing she is allowed to have it so that's a little bit more thoughtful in terms of the need for PP versus the time sensitive nature of an abortion okay Thomas P. all over you let's talk about California dear governor Gavin Newsom did not explicitly restrict gun stores as a non essential business but he's leaving it up to the sheriffs from each county to determine whether they should remain open could you just talk a little bit about the decision making their sure this began when the bay it but in six counties in the bay area issued the nation's first shelter in place orders in mid March and that came of course with a list of businesses that they deemed essential it could stay open grocery stores pharmacies gas stations things people really need to to survive even as they your stay home but gun stores were not mentioned no no businesses are explicitly mentioned as being ordered to close and some gun stores stayed open and there's been a well documented now national run on guns in the last month the FBI data is showing sales spiking and in Los Angeles the sheriff there our expo in a way that said very publicly he didn't want to run on gun stores he didn't want people who are not familiar with firearms buying them in a panic at this moment and he ended up flip flopping a couple of times or sandals county's top lawyer issued an opinion they deem gun shops essential the sheriff backed off the next day governor Gavin Newsom who is very active proponent of gun control was asked at a press conference about the issue any pundit he he kicked it back to the sure saying that he would leave the question of whether gun shops were central to the sheriffs in each individual county do you have a sense of why the governor's been reluctant to make a state wide decision on this no I think it's it's purely political Newsome signed fifteen gun control measures last November but I think in this instance a large part of the state his role the majority of counties in California read many of them were of course very low population but this is just something that seems like a bit of a third rail issue that the government didn't want to touch so there are multiple lawsuits going on right now challenging the gun store closures as I understand it and understand the NRA's sortie biz has started litigation to challenge the closures in those areas where they are because one of the arguments they're simply saying that the that any government action to stop a citizen from being able to buy a firearm is a violation of the second amendment so they're not arguing that guns are essential they're arguing that they are protected no matter what the circumstance yes they're arguing that local governments have no constitutional authority to stop the sale of firearms in so and let's turn to Brenda Goff now you've been reporting on Erica Arizona governor Doug Ducey's decisions one in particular to let personal hygiene services stay open

Netanyahu's future still uncertain after Israeli election

Pod Save the World

05:58 min | 1 year ago

Netanyahu's future still uncertain after Israeli election

"Let's turn to Israel. This week is rarely voters went to the polls for the third time in a year. Yes a year So first of all of the results that ninety percent in the last time I checked prime minister bb. Netanyahu was winning and projected to win fifty nine seats in. Israel's parliament the Knesset so that's good news for bb because he's five or six seats ahead of any guns from the blue and white party whose his chief rival but it still not be enough to end this electoral purgatory citizens. And here's why so. Israel's system is not like ours. You don't win the election. And then you're in charge. You have to build a coalition that controls sixty one of the one hundred twenty seats in the Israeli Knesset in the last two elections and Netanyahu Angolans have failed in that coalition building task So now they're gonNA try again. Ben Is pretty depressing. That voters didn't care about the fact that Netanyahu is going to stand trial in a few weeks on corruption charges in fact. Bb has gained votes since the September elections so cool. It's also depressing for those of us. Who WANT A two states solution in Israel because both candidates out there talking about annexing the West Bank? Interestingly an alliance of Arab voters did well in selection and They're now the third biggest party in Israel. So That's interesting chaining dynamic but you know in the near future. I think a lot of people worried that Israel is careening towards a constitutional crisis or even a fourth election because bb is about to stand trial and will likely demagogue and say fake news and say it's a witch hunt to get him just like trump because they're the same person. Yeah and I feel like we've had the same conversation now. Three times And this question will be. Can he can form a coalition get to sixty votes He may need the help of avenue or Lieberman Israeli politician. Who's kind of become quite An ENEMY OF BBC. At least in in that case you know we could return to one of the formulas that we talked about in the fall. Some form of unity government or agreement where they rotate as prime minister's all this is pretty bleak because Israel can't break this logjam. Bbc poising their politics with increasingly extremist positions. You know we've evolved in the third election. All the way to the fish in the West Bank Each election it kind of gets worse in terms of BB's platform on the Palestinians It speaks Not just the polarization in Israeli society in that. Bbc has kind of a big media apparatus and demagogues the opposition. But also you know Benny. Gones is just not a good politician. You know for those who don't follow as closely like you know he's a former military guy kind of the centrist who could be a you know a safe space for a bunch of different parties but political talent like he he he didn't wasn't a natural communicator. And I think the only way for the CENTRE-LEFT WE'VE IN THE CENTER. I guess in Israel to really break through is that they're going to need someone with more political chops at some point. They're going to need a leader or you know grassroots movement combined with lear that they can overcome bb's support which is not a majority of the country but is a strong minority in enough to kind of hold the line here in prevents someone else like. Gods from winning so You know we could be headed towards a messy coalition politics in some bizarre unity government Tumbled over whether these indictments against bb go forward. In any event. I think the situation with the Palestinians is very grim And is really politics until bb can finally exit stage right here. And hopefully the center of the centre-left can get stronger leader. We're going to be kind of stuck in this place. Maybe they can borrow one of our. Amer candidates primary speaking of which Last week we talked about Bernie Sanders decision to skip the APEC conference. The Big Pro Israel lobby conference so At that that this weekend the Israeli ambassador to the UN Danny Danon said we don't want Sanders APEC. We don't want him in Israel. Anyone who calls our prime minister a racist either a liar. Ignorant fool or both which is very charming The CEO of a pack hard core also obliquely accused sanders of demonizing Israel. Nate that gave Mike Pence a platform to smear Bernie into Democrats side. Israel's enemies so it was nice of these folks to almost immediately prove that Bernie's fishing was a wise one. And I would suggest everyone listening that if you want a vibrant democratic Israel Checkout Jay Street. Yeah Yeah it to me. The the biggest problem here right is the the massive red carpet that they roll out every time for bb and his biggest goons and for like pants and Mike Pompeo and these guys and then you know they they have some democratic members of Congress. We've always gone to a pack. And they they try to claim. This broad bipartisan view of things. This is not on the level here. You know APEC wants to be able to put the bipartisan stamp of approval on itself while relentlessly over the last several years. Supporting the agenda of the Likud party in Israel and the Republican Party in the United States relentlessly attacking Barack Obama. Frankly putting us in this shitty situation that we're in where we pulled out of the Iran nuclear agreement so actively harming US interests with the end of the Iran nuclear agreement and then complaining that people don't show up at their conference. I mean come on guys like And then you know dunking on everybody because a bunch of other candidates like send videos like the. I hate to break it to you. The people send videos to a lot of things. Right also is a racist. I mean he's he's says racist things on the regular choice last laws that devalues human beings who happen to be Arab. Yeah yeah I mean and and every election we get this rhetoric about the Arabs voting is in an inherently bad when they are citizens of Israel. You know so Like I I'm I'm kind of you. Know over this debate We'll keep watching the election

Israel BB Prime Minister Bernie Sanders BBC Netanyahu Apec Israeli Knesset Knesset Likud Party West Bank BEN Lieberman Gones Iran Mike Pompeo Benny Republican Party Lear Danny Danon
Gardening the Permaculture Way: How to Create an Abundant Perennial Garden

Sustainable World Radio- Ecology and Permaculture Podcast

08:12 min | 1 year ago

Gardening the Permaculture Way: How to Create an Abundant Perennial Garden

"Guest today is Morag Gamble. Founding Director of the PERMACULTURE Education Institute Morag is a permaculture teacher and designer based in Queensland Australia where she lives in a permaculture eco-village when Morag is in educating or designing. She can be found in her award. Winning Garden Morag has taught permaculture in twenty countries and is the host of the popular. Youtube Channel are permaculture life. Welcome to sustainable World Radio Morag Gamble. It's so wonderful to have you here with me today. Thank you Jill. It's lovely to be here to today. We'll be chatting a bit about your no did guard method. Which is really appealing to me. Is the Lazy Gardener. Then we'll be discussing some of your favorite permaculture plans to put into our new garden beds or into pre existing gardens fantastic. It's one of my favorite topics. I think the ninety got any something that has just ever. Since I started doing permaculture gardening ride in the early days when I helped to get the north St city farm going in Brisbane about twenty five years ago the neither method was something we started doing there. Because well you couldn't actually get anything into the into the ground OUGHTA shovel. I think you used a pick. It would bounce back. Army way was up and that time every almost saying. Let's do it this way. Let's do it that way. And so we tried all these different methods and over the years. I've evolved this particular way that I create the ninety gats and I always do my God C. Span. I've used this method around the world and is kind of a bit of a twist to the way that I do that. I think it's an interesting part of it to explore because I think it makes all the difference. The four we embark on that journey. I just wanted to ask you for your definition of permaculture in case we have listeners here thinking what the heck were they talking about? Wolf Ame- permaculture is essentially all about design and my simplest response would be designed for regeneration designed sustainable living. It's about reconnecting with nature and living a more simple low impact life and surrounding ourselves with Wonderful Food. Great community doing things in a way that a regenerating the US Amer generating communities regenerating ourselves to. Because it's it's we. We're in a process now. I think where we need people. Who have they kind of? Healing the planet so permaculture Regeneration as well seems like your life and work are all about permaculture and I did read online that you discovered permaculture as a teenager so permaculture has been a large part of your life for quite some I I was at I remember at when I was in high school. I was sorry passionate in as a as a peace activist. There's a lot of things happening at that time. There was the I think. This should notable incident Though at the same time cities. We're getting captured by massive dust storm so the landcare movement was studying. There was all these massive movements happening around me at that time and I spent a bit of time kind of being a peace activist and an environmental activist. And I. I still call myself that but I got to a point where I was feeling that was fighting against something all the time. And and a lot of babble on you see me coming and turn the other way. She's going to start talking about that again. I E to I you know what I may not and so I. I was really looking for something that was that was a positive solution art. If it's not that we don't want that world what will do we want. I remember my my parents. Kinda brought us up in a really natural and and You know a really low fleet locate life and my dad was always reading about coach and he kept handing me this book. Saying you've gotta you've gotta read this. This is this is where it's at and I think it was because of that I ended up going doing Landscape architecture and Environmental Planning Union. I always worked it through what I was doing. And yes so it's kind of being there guiding and and I guess driving in a way what what I have done with my because it made so much sense. It's just really good common sense and sometimes we we overlook the things that seem to be the most simple approach thinking that they simplistic will actually think it's not. It's they often the simpler approaches. Which can have the more profound impacts on a mock sensible to more people? Yes definitely and you know you took your skills as a landscape architect and you created this verdant using permaculture as well but created this verdant gorgeous oasis. I believe your garden has over two hundred plants. Can you tell us a bit about your garden? Your climate and where it's located. Well I'm I'm in subtropics. I'm in the Jaffe of of Australia Dole. I'm on the East Coast and about halfway up the coast of Australia. So about one and a half north of Brisbane and a place called Crista waters which is a permaculture village. And I've been living here for about twenty years this this place. It's an amazing place. Actually because we have six hundred forty acres. That is the Chris. Awards and within that we have one AK- that we have the tower owned freehold title so most of the land is common land for forests for the Rypien Zion's this kangaroos hopping around everywhere and wallabies and platypus. In the rerun. The other day almost bumped into an occasional wounding through the bushes and it's this beautiful natural oasis with surrounded by National National Park. And so this we have a group of about two hundred people who live here and and and work together in different ways. You know From little cow collectives to cafes to All different sorts of things. It's quite an ECLECTIC group of people. And all different ages and backgrounds at last count sixteen different nationalities so krista waters in itself is an interesting place and it has received a United Nations World Habitat Award for demonstrating low impact. Sustainable ways of living I think was there the tag back in the nineties. And so within that context. If it's kind of like a place where people look to come and see what does Pimco Timothy Look like? What does it mean to leave a culture life? Because I think and that's the reason why I'm here I. I came here in the nineties because I realized in e conscious be talking about. Penta cultural people need to see it feel. It tasted touch it experience. It see how it kind of looks what does it. What does it actually man and I wanted to explore that too. So that's what I've tried to create he and we built around hyme And we've created Dot Gardens in the whole way of life that we have here to do that and it's and it's turned out to be this beautiful thing. I didn't have a full plan when I started. I had those guiding behind it and so of being able to create we have a higher Menara Garden and I work with gotten a debt. It's just been an starting out from that point. I actually think the no debt thing has been a huge thing. That's been able to free up a lot of the possibilities for creating this so Gradually just saving up a bit of money and and building a little bit more building a little bit more finding local resources Engaging with my friends and my family to help us build and my house is almost finished. It's finished enough. You

Morag Gamble Permaculture Education Institu Brisbane Youtube Founding Director Jill United States Queensland Australia Wolf Ame Dot Gardens Pimco Army Australia Dole United Nations World Habitat A Environmental Planning Union Australia Subtropics Crista Waters AK East Coast
"amer" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

02:40 min | 1 year ago

"amer" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"This good to investors that so let me bottle it often enough to this this offer you want because this is really important the media the only people I respect and pay attention to are the ones I know that call balls and strikes you know how we know they call balls and strikes the right rips them and the left rips them the right rips them when they call a ball the left and we rip someone they call a strike and vice versa you all know who they are and you know who who they are unfortunately in the national media it's becoming more rare to find that and there's a couple there's a few but they are insisting can't trust a word that comes out of them they don't even pretend anymore so we just recognize it for what it is that they're all hacks most of them if they are a hundred I'd say ninety of Amer hacks we're talking national media here they're all on the major west they're all having a gender no motive so we have the certain few that we can trust that's all and we will watch and we will now but the bottom line is watch the outcome right everything I said down you are going to see massive money raising by the Republicans very little on the dams and if we if the economy stays where it is trump the twelfth two thousand and twenty four simple as that I will say that the witnesses this is the part I don't like if the witnesses they are the hacks on the right you know who the hacks are they're ripping these witnesses ripping up why in this whole deep state thing I think there's some of that but you think every person that says something that's a negative on trump is the deep state not the way it is I'm saying for the office side and you can tell just watch get ready your multi mode of get rid of your gender you can tell full of crap and who isn't that's.

Amer
The Triangle's Sharpest Point | With Zawe Ashton

Modern Love

06:11 min | 1 year ago

The Triangle's Sharpest Point | With Zawe Ashton

"When she calmed I reminded her of the new life. She faced living with cousins at beloved aunt and Uncle Her Ryan bedroom and soon she let go of my hand and demanded another big cone. Had it not been Emma. I reflected elected. I might have been a brand new widow. We've Amer is my soul charge. I'd repeatedly postponed marrying her father because his his precocious impossible child had filled me with dread. Emma had greeted my arrival in her father's life with steely really disapproval and from then on she and eivind his attention like competing mistresses. I had tried to like her to win her over but I had failed her ability to disrupt whatever brief harmony he and I could achieve as a couple in in the few months we'd been together kept me one step ahead of her father's longing to make me his wife at thirty trying to establish myself in the world old. I was far from ready to make the necessary sacrifices that mothering. Mo would demand. There were many occasions when hasty escape due to the sanctity of my apartment reinforced my resolve to remain single and then he got sick. I sublet let my apartment and moved in and made plane had dislike of the arrangement challenging my authority whenever her father is out of. Bishop your you're not my mother. She'd his why do you need to be here. I had neither patients nor the expertise to deal with her tantrums. Besides my energy was taken up by honing my nesting scales. My lover refused further professional. Care Relatives came and went bearing healthy foods and advice and whispering concern over what would become Obama. His mother attend pleading eyes on me. EMMER and I were at war after all. She was not without family and I had a career to return to you as the months passed. Nobody seemed was in a hurry to take on. There were days when I wept wept for her as I wept for him then in the final weeks Amazon stepped up to offer her a place to live soon. Photographs of the cousins began arriving along with warm letters of welcome compounding confusion. She was torn between the lure of family life and I need to look after her father. I'd like to go. She said but I'll have to wait until daddy gets better off to have father's funeral. She began to chatter about cousins and make up details of the new life. Life that back in so brightly there were moments of compliance of affection between us the affection of survivors it mostly she stormed about as obstructive and destructive as she could be. You're not my mother. You can't tell me what to do. She'd say stamping have my heart eight. A longed to walk away to hand her over to have family. I wanted my freedom back. Abby apple she clambered monkey-like up the a tool angular frame of the aunt she barely knew and clung around her neck distributing big smacking kisses instantly relegated to the role of the mayor chaperone. I felt the thrilling tug of my imminent release. Eireann uncle's house had been festooned with balloons and posters. It is for her arrival. She was showing her bedroom then sent off to explore the garden with their cousins. While Horon tonight fix supper she'll she'll be fine. Horon said she needs as a family in the love and attention. We plan to give her. I side feeling the accumulation humilation of months of trauma lesson over the next forty eight hours. Emma was absorbed into the dynamics of the household heroin and uncle sensibly Sabih whether the jealousies irritations and fight. Says I sat by. No more than an interested spectator. My advice is is not to actually say goodbye. Her onset of my last evening just slip away. She'll be asleep. We don't want to upset her. You can write. I didn't imagine the MO would be upset about my leaving. She had hardly registered my presence. Since our arrival arrival. I nodded my agreement and went to pack. I got into bed and tried to sleep and couldn't it didn't seem right to creep away without a word to Amer around three a M. I went quietly to haram the light on the nightstand. NIGHTSTAND KOSTA PINKISH glow. Making her face appear flushed. I touched the tangle of her hair and bent over to kiss her cheek by I respect by she stood opening. Here is taking me me. By surprise she smelled of a mingling of newly mown grass and shampoo wrapping her arms around my neck. She she pulled me in close memory sleepily I love you. I love here then and she rolled over inside back into sleep

Emma Emmer Uncle Her Ryan MO Horon Barack Obama Abby Apple Eireann Amazon Heroin Forty Eight Hours
Apple leads stock surge

CNBC's Fast Money

04:46 min | 1 year ago

Apple leads stock surge

"Welcome back to headlines for apple on Wall Street today starting with sweets call by Canaccord genuity raising its price target on the tech giant's at two sixty from two forty citing increased demand for the iphone models including the most recent iphone eleven plus an analyst over at t.f security saying to not that apple may be planning new hardware releases including smart glasses for early twenty twenty now all this as a stock inches closer to a fresh all-time high it is already up forty four percent this year alone so could appleby your best bet intact or has a rally gone too far too fast guy well I would I would say if you're trading the stock this is a great opportunity to take some money off the table the people going to blow back and say you're out of your mind you don't trade this I told you people would say that happened this but you know what you go back to October the stock traded up to two twenty nine and had an epic failure Dana's spoken about this a number of times from peak to trough from two thirty to one forty was a pretty swift move to the downside I'm not suggesting that will happen again but go back and look at facebook with that done over the last couple of months go back and look at Amer on massive WTOP look how underperforming stock has been over the last month month and a half so if you're trading stock why not take some money off the table at currently and if you want to buy it that's a great way to phrase it you wait until it makes a new high and you use that as your support but the narrative was the hardware game was over was all about services we're we're going to go nowhere from here the the multiple was not gonNA increase give a lot of levers that apple can pull now and now hardware is a tailwind it's a by right now still I feel like this is a classic case of position that we always talk about the positioning on apple had gotten so negative when it came to sentiment around the I eleven and so even increment Antalya looked a little better in all of a sudden Bam people are going to have a side of the boat yeah and so now everybody's on that bandwagon right so I suspect a lot of the move that we've seen off the lows is anticipation or at least speculation that things weren't as bad as as sentiment thought now sentiments saying hey everything seems to be great there's going to be all least things coming out so for be K. everybody's on that side of the boat he's going to be on the other and I think guy odometers on that side of the boat I would be a seller of about his list yeah let's say that's dangerous when a boat list by the way you know Dan who everybody says negative what is such a Downer I actually had someone foolish options action in the apple I've seen it on your show on Fridays Advisor Thirties tremendous job and we have said for a long time now the stock will trade the twentieth so good for Dan Nathan but now here's the guy is a guy mentioned that peak trump decline last Q. Four really would what is this company gave kind of optimistic guidance and I think that they thought the world that they lived in that there were selling into China wasn't going to be altered that much by trade it did and on January second when they pronounce the first time in like ten years a negative basis the stock had had that forty percent peak Detroit declined it got to negative here we are every year the dollar is higher they have a very interactive phone that last Q. Four in China their units and I flew down thirty percent year over year and that had to do with just their slowing economy trade that sort of thing so when you think about apple in the hardware in China six and a half percent market share number five behind here locals I just don't see in this Q. Four how they're going to be able to put up big hardware numbers and the last point I'll just say is if the Chinese want to regulate apple they can do it services they can do it in that APP store in there already has a wide that's all they have to be because everyone to get back to the positioning point is everyone throughout that hardware number so to trough levels that no everyone discounted off their balance sheets so right now all they have it was surprise even incrementally now the government's getting mad about an APP they have on their APP store Barrett of changes it didn't you just say that by it if it makes time high all the time I got got okay all right but you should buy it here you got you gotta wait until trades above two thirty three and then Atas you're predicting another repeat of I think a company would be crazy not to give cautious guidance given the environment if there is no trade deal they got caught with her dance down last four in China and the breeze wasn't so Great Wall wow that is as well look at that a trillion dollar market cap it lost forty percent to December or January second rose that's brees win

Apple Canaccord Forty Percent Forty Four Percent Trillion Dollar Thirty Percent Ten Years
"amer" Discussed on About Last Night

About Last Night

02:56 min | 1 year ago

"amer" Discussed on About Last Night

"Mo- Amer the weekends overran this time that Chad it's time to do so? Why don't you sit down to what bill they all have come on and trees? We just Bam thumb so you just you just wanted to see me do that. I did. I just want you to grip it. I wanted well bred. Just unique with people will comfortably sitting on couches and getting onto the middle of this crack. Now you want to yeah but <hes> you know we both legs touching the ground so maybe shut the fuck your problems dangling go. You know who would've thought that when Palestinian I'm just wondering you get a Palestinian Jew together. The Dwarf in the Palestinian Zillion beat the Jews Jewelry Great. That's how we get along well. Let's start right now. Yeah Look Jewish Palestinian. No one's fighting except for the Midge in the Palestinian yeah. I mean we're good. No we're both aligned on Nisa. He's been a Palestinian dwarf. O._J.'s dispute has no. I mean we could start one. Why not could be cured of the problems? We helping you yeah. We just dwarfs the Gaza Strip and we it's more than the guys now we're going to get now. WE'RE GONNA get emails real transition. We're GONNA talk about we're talking about a few things because of of of of the nature of your career and especially what's happening in the last like couple years where I'm sure some people will write us some tweets and some letters but but that but that but that that's all right like you've you've had an experience that that is unbelievable I in terms of your experience comedy first of all starting off you had to move you were born in Kuwait right and then you move move to Houston Texas but not like hey as family. Should we move. Where should we go yeah? It wasn't a scenario like that. No it was not at all <hes> the Gulf War happening ninety and they came into our neighborhood the Iraqi soldiers and and it was just about okay we need to exit. Strategy is the fuck out of here. How how much time did you get? What was it your mom just coming home? Everyone go now or it was a few months..

Mo- Amer Gaza Strip Chad Kuwait Texas Houston O._J.
"amer" Discussed on WSB-AM

WSB-AM

01:52 min | 1 year ago

"amer" Discussed on WSB-AM

"So must've stay dry right our seventy two on Peachtree street. And for Kirk Mellish channel two action news meteorologist Brad Nitz the. That the. Looks like a stall. Eighty five south Claremont merges in Amer Jacob's trouble that could be the left lane eighty five hundred hundred swing around and look at that I found a slow with and. Six flags there at traffic every six minutes of the sky-copter, WSB, WBZ news time, seven oh, two this morning news with MARCY Williams, Judd Hickinbotham. Cobb County father wants police to find the man who took advantage of his two young daughters. Police I- searching for the man who approached to little girls who were riding their bikes in their apartment complex authorities say the man lured, the sisters ages six and seven to an apartment by saying he was a rapper and giving the money. That's when the girl say the mad groped them and exposed himself before they were able to escape the girls. Dad tells channel two action news he wants this guy found sick individual that need to be. He knows his need to get away with police say it's an active investigation, but they're not releasing too much other information because of the victims ages Michelle Wright WSB from the execution chamber in Jackson Marian Wilson proclaims, quote, I ain't never took a life in my life than the state carries out the lethal injection. Pronouncing Wilson dead just before ten last night. Wilson in the second men were convicted in the nineteen Ninety-six murder of an off-duty prison. Guard Milledgeville Wilson maintained. It was Robert butts junior who pulled the trigger butts was put to death last year. It felt like a really long flu season, the CDC's Dr Lynette, Brammer says that's because it was longer flu season than normal influenza like illness was elevated for twenty one weeks, which was the longest. We've seen it in the past ten years. Bremmer tells us there were two different active strains, still the CDC rates the season is moderate with fewer hospitalizations and deaths than the previous season, WSB money.

Milledgeville Wilson WSB Kirk Mellish CDC Brad Nitz flu Cobb County Amer Jacob Robert butts Michelle Wright MARCY Williams Bremmer Judd Hickinbotham Dr Lynette murder Brammer Jackson twenty one weeks six minutes ten years
"amer" Discussed on The Big 98

The Big 98

03:32 min | 1 year ago

"amer" Discussed on The Big 98

"Stay up. The knee. To the place where the home bag burn, too. Amer manager. The. Viewer baby. Baby..

amer
"amer" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

Talk 1260 KTRC

01:43 min | 1 year ago

"amer" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

"Holman is here's co-host good to see you again. Are you? Be right back with Amer mcreynolds talk. More about at home by mail voting. Drag it out of me. Back to the Richard aid show, voice of Santa Fe gear on KTAR. See Santa Fe's news, talk leader. This hour brought to you by violet. Crown ultimate fantasy movie experience. Best in class, we've experienced a way to bring your loved ones for feast for the senses, violet crown Santa Fe. This is Peter violet. Crown tell you about our state of the art auditory featuring reserve seating, wall to wall screens digital surround sound with comfortable mush. Shares through over forty taps craft beer wine and regional cider including items from our stone hearth pizza, oven, entrees, and delectable deserves. Join us for a wide variety of films with free four hour parking this week's exciting schedule includes. Bright burn tours presents Jim Jarmusch is dead, man book, smart and essential performances presents laterally outta from TI Chuo riyal in Madrid stay tuned next week. Few violet crown movie minute, by the crown safe as your most unforgettable. Movie experience at sixteen six basis in the Santa Fe. Railyard reserve your movie tickets now. Violet crown dot com. This seems to me.

amer
"amer" Discussed on KROQ 106.7FM

KROQ 106.7FM

05:04 min | 2 years ago

"amer" Discussed on KROQ 106.7FM

"Almost long there's no madness to be found. It's just the usual, everyday great pricing and easy car buying experience. So today tomorrow this weekend every day this month, you're going to get their best possible prices on every single new and used car truck crossover SUV hate when most other dealerships say, no, no, no, no hammer. Toyota, we'll do everything they can to say yes to you, for example, Hamer as incredible dealer discounts and cashback incentives right now on select twenty nine thousand nine Corollas cameras, and yours, and there's more check out all the fantastic. Lease offers at hammer Toyota dot com. H A M E R payments, Toyota dot com. There are literally hundreds and hundreds of cars and trucks all on sale. It's the ready set. Go sale all month long hammer Toyota out there in Mission Hills with a five zero five eighteen meet Amer Toyota, we say, yes. The world famous k rock the Kevin and bean Gosh, that's okay. Hugh. Miller and you're listening to two guys who will never be the next American injure warrior, Kevin and bean on k rock. Go. The. John. Bits ride. To. About. Serving as a juror in a high profile cases, never easy. And this case will be no exception before opening arguments. I want to thank you for your service. If.

amer
"amer" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

01:45 min | 2 years ago

"amer" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"It was up to me. I would fire this show. Amer Nigel WIBC. This year say the union is choosing greatness, the president's gonna lay out some of the great successes that we've had over the last two years and paint a picture of what we can do for this country. I've become together if we work together over the next two years. Pregame starts at eight kickoff is at nine tonight. Rob. State of the union address was not to be a few weeks ago. Nancy Pelosi pulled the plug and it was a big disappointment. I thought I said at the time when she kind of. Worked her way around canceling this thing because of the government shutdown. I said you are a thief, you are robbing the American people some great live dramatic television, mold moderate Nigel very obsessed telling. Trump gave into the Democrats and open the government for another three weeks. Just so he could give the speech my question, if you is how much will you have drank by nine AM. I'm not I told you earlier I can't have the empty calories during the week not drinking not doing it. Even all the whisky, and my house is gone. One nine thirty by the time. He takes the podium. Oh, that's gonna shake hands. Ciampa do ten thousand away half the chamber will be applauding half of Emily sitting there. He'll be insulting. What do you think about some of these guests that are going to be in attendance tonight? Okay. Oh, see bringing that lady to shouted down flake. Was she illegal immigrant while the legal immigrant who worked for the Trump.

Amer Nigel WIBC Trump Nancy Pelosi president Emily two years three weeks
"amer" Discussed on Bertcast's Podcast

Bertcast's Podcast

02:56 min | 2 years ago

"amer" Discussed on Bertcast's Podcast

"He's making the same faces as I am the same exact time getting another case in. But yeah, it is. It is very very calm. I was watching a soccer game. That's how I wrote that joke. I was like oh, man. It'd be funny to have that that is. That is such great. Yeah. I can't tell you men that I've seen a lot. Joe coys got a pretty great co bear yours was fucking monstrous what what? What I want to ask. How do you pronounce your last name? I don't on the breakfast club. And and I've I'm always fascinated. What I I've a friend used trae. Oh, very. The best best and we were eating lunch. One time. I can't let go this. He's he's like, it's not a big deal. But he the lady said what flower corner tears, and he goes quantities accent? And what are you doing? What are you doing that? For goes tell you pronounce it, and I go no you're doing it with like a Mexican accent? He was and that's how it's pronounced. The one thing wrong. So I'm always fascinated. I think it's at the the story of of children, basically American children, your I I would argue probably more American than Palestinian in my eyes. Just I don't really but to interesting, then did you juggle as a refugee or immigrant to America first generation immigrants America yet? So it's a it's a very interesting balance. That goes inside of you that like, yeah, I'm from here. But I go up here. So I am. Yeah. I'm definitely Texan. You know, like, even if I go back home that guy's fucking Texan. You know what I mean? Pantex guy like is funny. But here I don't even hear any accident. You actually almost here. A little bit of like an Ohio accident. Oh my God. Ohio. But but. What is that? Like how how do you say your last name Amer, but how would your dad's? It was added. I yeah. It's so so the letter is to air bec-, I say like this. What it looks like it's I'm at but Schwarzenegger. Little our he's the only one that can pronounce my name. As mutual Alba. Filing, an Austrian that grew up bear pronounce my name, right? This. Thought about that. But no, yeah, we have a lot of names that I'm as far as languages concern. How Jose like went into dotty is the same thing with languages when I speak another language. I just immediately become you know, like the accents, right? Like make on onnell's. They also surprised by me. I'm talking to them. Speaking to them in Spanish, they also get compute until they figure out like my grammar's not perfect like way from takes awhile..

Ohio Schwarzenegger soccer Joe coys America onnell Amer Jose Alba
"amer" Discussed on Bertcast's Podcast

Bertcast's Podcast

03:05 min | 2 years ago

"amer" Discussed on Bertcast's Podcast

"Dude. He's got a special on Netflix. It's called the vagabond, by the way, all my friends. Krista Lia Neal Brennan Knicks Wurzen, Nicole buyer. They all have specials out on Netflix as well right now. Call comedians of the world, check it out there all fucking awesome. And I always say support live comedy. I trust comics. Being a comic is a fucking tough job, especially when you're guy like MO who has to represent a different part of the world people that may not know about it. That's why it's so bad. It was all my podcast weird little segue there, but thankful check out his special vagabond on that flicks. He's a solid, dude. Siham live if you can and just give the guy some love, you're gonna love this podcast, ladies and gentlemen. Happy new year MO Amer. This is. Do this. Please. I was when I got this. I was like forty forty per day. We had a cigar roller in here. And he was smoking cigars in here. He's from Cuba. And he was and I said, oh, we we don't smoke in there. And he looked at me. And he goes in like a great year. We're good at accents. I saw accents. He goes a man cave. No. What if Amanda in man cave? Are you on nice? Oh, yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. I'm gonna recount some things we Moga here early. I was naked in the pool and then halston just showed up. So we went and got coffee. So we've talked about a few things that I will reiterate, right? Literally one of the best late nights. I've ever seen in my life. Thank you man on you. Colbert is fucking. It was murderous. And you know, it's a good set when you go. What am I watching for a second? Like is this is special man. Fucking great. I want your special to the beginning of it. You know, when you start watching it and you start going to good. I can't I can't get into this. You're so good. You're so so talented at a characters. Yeah. And not just doing an accent or something. But giving that character personality does that make sense. Yeah. Vanderberg does make sense. German guys my favorites just say anything wild shit like y'all event we went to the cat clubbers. Nice. Everyone joked off it was nice lovely. It was a perfect Saturday nights. Quite frankly. Created that. And like little ones where I got were like is that I have so much to talk to you about 'cause your life. Your path is probably the most one of the most conic things that happened in my life was the Gulf war, which is the beginning of the change of your life, technically. Yeah..

MO Amer Netflix Krista Lia Neal Brennan Knicks Wurzen Cuba halston Amanda Colbert Vanderberg
"amer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"amer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Have that. Amer join me from NPR's bureau in New York, his standup special to vagabond is currently available on Netflix. Thank you so much for joining us. Thank you show. You're listening to all things considered from NPR news. Tomorrow. Sorry students from paradise California will go back to school tomorrow. But not in paradise the entire school. Population is still displaced by the devastating campfire. Most are still struggling to meet basic needs like shelter and clothing. Alex hall brings us the story from Chico, California. There's no going back to school at least right now in the burn zone. Paradise elementary has been reduced to a pile of melted and charred debris paradise high school didn't burn down, but telephone and electrical wires, hang low and exposed and buildings contain toxic contaminants. Teachers have kept in touch with students via messaging apps. At this student event at Chico high school, some teachers are seen students in person for the first time since they frantically fled the campfire three.

Chico high school Paradise elementary California NPR Chico Alex hall Netflix New York
"amer" Discussed on Power 106 FM

Power 106 FM

02:11 min | 2 years ago

"amer" Discussed on Power 106 FM

"Y'all get a date. New York City. Bama miami. Phil. Women Amer's brisk playing this game. I feel valued this twenty five twenty five. I'm. Okay. Okay. Pay for Halloween. Never asked out. Really need a mascot. Really? Chapels? I didn't. We got Santa Margherita by the latest. Nice. Makes you. You are out of. Pay day. Really? Anybody's fake. Here's pat. Calling you laugh. Uh-huh. Southern. How go soon too. In the US the white folks don't. Bye. The. Everything properly no propaganda. Bandanna? Fanta..

Santa Margherita Women Amer Bama New York City Phil miami US
"amer" Discussed on The Ross Bolen Podcast

The Ross Bolen Podcast

03:32 min | 2 years ago

"amer" Discussed on The Ross Bolen Podcast

"With he's from houston to h town went to hastings also oh shit represent he's film is netflix special today that's the reason why you know dave's in town and everything nine four support him man what's amer amer amer look up don't sleep on him he's he's he's insane he's amazing but day will say something and then he would be like yoga it's amazing on apart that i was like that why isn't that great no not that that wasn't but it was like that part wasn't an ear like oh you didn't see that you see out he set that up very sway for that see the setup before before it's even playing like oh i would have never thought about that you know i mean and again not i'm going to stretch this segue a little bit i must stretch this analogy in food and restaurants fucking we had one of my chefs i remember was making this kind of corn soup and he obviously when you shuck corn and everything like that and then he took all of the corn cobs and threw it into the stock also after he took oke wayne okay and made the soup really really flavorful in that corn flavor and the other chefs were like the hawk i would've never thought about that that she went goes right in the trash from me and the chef i remember watching the shift going what a mad scientist's guy wasn't he might have learned it from someone i don't know if he came up with himself fucking accident verse right but in his mind in that side it's something that he another chef goes that's bonkers that you thought about that very you know that's that's that's crazy that you that you had this idea to do that to to put those two together or you listen to different producers that they're talking about dila and say yoda's bonkers that you you did a beat that way you're not supposed to be able to start to do not supposed to how did you do that how jess i life yeah we were talking about the other day how like fashion is similar to where most most fashion is basically what can you get away with if you can do it and get away with it and it looks cool you good if it looks stupid you're gonna get ripped and you'll never wear it again same thing i mean just is just trying to shit and see and we'll works yeah for sure so i guess the one one more question for you that wanted you to answer like you and i met on twitter whatever then we reallife hanging out of your restaurant and shit now we're sitting here where it just became obvious it's something on the way falling instagram i think is where i was like shit ck's like really well connected with the most random seemingly random i guess now that i know you better the big picture on these more sense but the most random celebrities like you'd put up a picture with one of the wu tang guys and i'd be like what the fuck 'cause i didn't know i didn't know you won't have to know any of this so where the hell did that come from like how do you how do you how did you get to know some of these people how did you get plugged into this this arena you know i think so that there's a story here so part of the reason i got into the hospitality industry in general was the networking aspect of right and i say that not in the the creepy shake my hand gave you business what can you do for me level networking but more of like connecting and bridging this idea almost i'm going to sound real mad warm and fuzzy whatever like that but breaking bread with someone is to something that to.

hastings dave amer amer houston netflix
"amer" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

KMOX News Radio 1120

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"amer" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

"With amer and total access it's six twenty in the meantime albert pool halls is chasing three thousand he had another hit last night in the angels game as the angels have put this player they've tried to prop him up as best they can the crowds you would hope would get bigger and bigger as he gets closer and closer the angels wall up to the orioles last night twelve three and pools now with two thousand nine hundred and ninety nine hits as he chases down three thousand and another great player in baseball history has been released by seattle mariners and is shifting into a front office role with the team and its each arose suzuki although he's not completely shutting the door on playing again the mariners announced its zouqi is now a special assistant to the chairman effective immediately ten time all star three eleven average three thousand eighty nine hits and that doesn't even include the one thousand two hundred seventy eight hits each row had in nine seasons in japan one of the great players in the history of baseball the pittsburgh penguins and nashville predators able to even their sanley cup second round series at two games apiece as the penguins won three one against washington and nashville blanked the jets until a final minute goal but they won two one at winnipeg it's jose cantata gets miles michael is tonight at seven fifteen cardinals and cubs i'm tom ackerman on the home of the best cardinals coverage came wax ignite what's inside from building muscle to finding the best maltese get the highest quality solutions and supplements in the industry now.

amer orioles seattle mariners suzuki special assistant chairman penguins washington winnipeg michael cardinals tom ackerman baseball japan pittsburgh nashville
"amer" Discussed on KELO

KELO

02:12 min | 3 years ago

"amer" Discussed on KELO

"Amer mayo staggie name bailed i'm val czar battle batum power bucaram or raise them yeah no appear at a say silos lead ladder mob and we only dan nuri all land i am man lead you can find a swear the priorities dan in the in we we we in them at the app you we were only in jail including the wains in my own the only role in these older and those in a single person is in the mirror ceo his bill from the free gold mine tell me though in my opinion.

ceo Amer mayo staggie batum dan nuri
"amer" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"amer" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Amer told by both sides that president trump did start his conversation with the russian president vladimir putin today bringing up accusations that putin tried to interfere in our election last year secretary of state rex tillerson who was in the room says putin denied it and they agreed to move on russia's foreign minister says press an and trump accepted putin's denial which the white house disputes is facetoface meetings at the g twenty summit in hamburg germany their protests there is a huge police presence on the ground and in the air tonight in hamburg amid word of new clashes in yet another neighborhood protester staging bonfires in one st they're police moving in to try and clear them out that's fox's great pal caught an emergency order blocking parts of the trump administration's travel ban has been denied by a federal appeals court in san francisco the block was requested by the state of light over how to interpret the supreme court ruling that the ban could not apply to anyone with a credible bona fide relationship with a us person or entity and abroad brass command is arrested for making threats against the senator he fbi in omaha busted robert williamson match after he allegedly made threats to harm the gop senator johnny ernst of iowa when she was supposed to appear at a harley davidson shopping council bluffs and and participate in a motorcycle rally employees of that shot notify the fbi who later took sumet into custody now many details known yampa we do know cements arrest comes a little more than a month after a gunman opened fire on republican members of congress who were practicing baseball on a field in alexandria virginia she'll nato fox news.

fbi gop robert williamson us supreme court san francisco germany secretary of state president virginia baseball congress sumet Amer iowa johnny ernst omaha senator travel ban fox hamburg foreign minister russia vladimir putin trump
"amer" Discussed on The Bill Simmons Podcast

The Bill Simmons Podcast

01:32 min | 4 years ago

"amer" Discussed on The Bill Simmons Podcast

"Wow do we all know lily hemmed everyone knows amer is losing it on the list the by his mother burgers coming in with a lonely hammered like it as other people like what lily hammer gets gets lost neighbors may brand more about seeing the future netflixing streaming not a matter of your repression thing to see but nobody our see as you do in your season to promotion look i looked at the landscape this is and i felt like i remember i said alan the sun was shining at us as like this is where it's going man we got to get in now i had no clue weird cowboys it was fun we yeah we were in their early but by the time the show came out they had other things too because we took a wild roller came out because we ended up getting another season of parks and rec and so we did we did like the half seasonal parks and rec and then we started making the show but during that whole time i would have talks and things and we came up with a few scripts and ideas before even officially started writing became with the parents episode and the claire danes episode one that's called other man and dumb yeah so we were we were still talking your own i even when we're not working on shore always shows always in the back of our minds and we kind talk about things like inbetween season one season to we kind of talked about we just of talk on the phone like maybe an hour or so and just this kind of like be some exciting to do master none who was the first time we kind of knew we had the show today and what it was and everything so jim an game.

amer alan claire danes