35 Burst results for "alzheimer"

Alzheimer's: 67% of caregivers observed a decline in their loved ones' memory or behaviors since COVID-19 restrictions began

Bruce St. James and Pamela Hughes

00:39 sec | 3 d ago

Alzheimer's: 67% of caregivers observed a decline in their loved ones' memory or behaviors since COVID-19 restrictions began

"Of caretakers say they've seen a decline in their loved one's memory or behavior since the corona virus related restrictions. That from Banner held Alzheimer's Institute, which has moved its community resource is an education online to keep patients connected. So we have like a men's support group Louie body dementia, caregiver support groups, and we also have different life enrichment programs. So we have a choir that's online. Michelle for duel is in charge of family and community services. Navigation with the banner Alzheimer's Institute, she says they're next support group meets virtually on September 16th at 10 A.m., and it's free.

Alzheimer's Institute Michelle Louie
"alzheimer" Discussed on Here We Are

Here We Are

03:40 min | Last week

"alzheimer" Discussed on Here We Are

"My My my apologies if this is just a part of a manic episode, which I myself have had. But I I don't know fuse. If you was always this way or what's happened to him but anyway All right. Well, that's. That's all the questions from fans that look like. There was. There was kind of people were just wondering what is the most current like cutting edge thing that your the most excited about So there's some. Work that's looking at activation of brain regions using these transmit nick You know basic big big magnets right and they're they're helping activate brain regions that weren't functioning as well, and it's I can't say with confidence is GonNa work for Alzheimer's but a has does seem to work. So my my grandmother who just recently passed away had Parkinson's for or two, thousand, four SOC almost fifteen years before she passed. And that was something that was not a thing when she started with her with her Parkinson's onset I'm by the time she passed away the field came along a lot to the point that it's being tried in many clinics across the world the data. The data is still unclear. As to its efficacy but I think that's if you'd ask him what I'm most excited about I don't really buy into most of the. In terms of therapies that's been one therapy Alzheimer's that has worked and that came in Nineteen ninety-six is called Mandy. It doesn't even its efficacy is towards these specific kinds of neurons dinner in our breath since then pretty much every clinical trial has failed Lilly Pfizer Merck everyone has tried many different techniques and nothing seems to be working. We've got as far as face three and failed at phase three. So I. I'm more and more inclined to looking at methodologies. That that weren't taken seriously. Five ten years ago. Well it's interesting that you use that as an example because those. Trans Cranial stimulation that that is often very closely like within the same ballpark and associated and brought into the same conversation as psychedelics which seemed to kind of do some of the same like reports of the same experiences and seem to be doing a lot of the same things in the brain anyhow just. That's that's pretty speculative. I won't put that on you, but I will say regarding the studies that have failed so far. If you're are these studies on people that have Alzheimer's already because it seems like if if you're already if your guys already gave up and it's and it's too late that seems like you're studying different thing than something that could be early onset or preventive. Great question and people who? So, pulling the curtain back a little bit. They're they're people in the field who believed that we're just looking at the wrong thing that we don't be the they say that the trash is not the problem that we're looking at the symptom we need to be looking at is happening way before that. So how much are these guys making the house? How much plastic are they going through the inside their house?.

Alzheimer Parkinson manic episode nick
"alzheimer" Discussed on Here We Are

Here We Are

03:20 min | Last week

"alzheimer" Discussed on Here We Are

"Well I should clarify not rats rats bigger. So it will be all of my s how dare you Shane Show there was. A real full out of. This is you should probably shut out the. PODCAST silver, you're going to get counseled on twitter at the rat. And then literally are rat to people so. Personal at the reason? I. Thought that is because I have. Where did TB I research? I had my own set of one whole shelf of mice. I quickly calculated how many mice on one rack in the room was about as big as my bedroom. We had just a little bit over a thousand mice in that room. So that's what I what I did, but that is that is hilarious. By the way it would be maybe a hundred in this is you know So the reason that another reason that they use along with the cost and the fact that you can work with. So many of them is that we have been able to insert human genes into the mouse genome. And see the effects that expression of human gene will have on a mouse behavior and mouse pathology super example in the in the Alzheimer's Field if you if you want to ask the question. Does gene x lead to Alzheimer's Disease Right whatever gene access it could. It could gene of choice. It with humans, you can't do that. Right. You May. If you're lucky you may run into a person that has a knockout of that gene and see whether they whether or not there Alzheimer's disease but that's an OBE one in mice. You can breed a hope you can insert that gene, knock it out based on some molecular techniques, and then look at the behavior and the pathology that maps. Sounds like a great concept chain, but as you might imagine. Not, great. Because the the mouse brain is very different that they both structure the way it looks if you look a human being, it does these beautiful grooves in to increase surface area a mouse bring perfectly smooth. There are no no groups that because soul guy. I liked that because the groups are kind of how we packs so much brain into our heads, right? So mice are just like and we don't even know. Thanks. This is this is all space I. don't even really I'm not even using half the space for my brain. You know there's just a nice smooth brain will be fun. There was a recent movie in the mouse world that talked about how they only use five percent of their brains. Yes. So. So you know with the my strength is so different I'll give you a proof of concept of that. Okay. Yeah. When I did traumatic brain injury research my brief my research looked at the impact of basically hitting the mouse brain with essentially the equivalent of a piston. So imagine if I if I could take off your skull and take a big old. I don't harbor big old hammer and smash the side of your brain with it. Okay. It would almost definitely in fact, let me go out on a limb here and say it would kill you for sure right? Yeah..

Alzheimer's Disease Alzheimer twitter TB
After FDA Set Back, AI Driven Drug Company Advances with New CEO

The Bio Report

04:55 min | 3 weeks ago

After FDA Set Back, AI Driven Drug Company Advances with New CEO

"Joining US pleasure beer. We're GONNA talk about far next. It's unique approach to drug discovery and its efforts to develop a therapy for the rare degenerative nerve condition shark Marie Tooth Syndrome. A let's start with the company's platform technology though and its efforts to discover what it terms, his cleo therapies what's meant by the term cleo therapy. Therapy. Comes from the idea of field tropic meaning that that there are often multiple pathways for any drug to follow. In fact that most drugs don't act on a single target but rather act on multiple targets. So for example, we all know that you know aspirin can treat a headache, but it also can. You know prevent clotting by. Platelets from forming clusters that. Eight including so. Many many approved medicine have multiple pathways, and the concept here for us is that diseases are not. Just single genetic kits that that that does exist. But often I'm diseases are the result of an imbalance between multiple pathways and insofar as multiple drugs acting on multiple pathways can correct that that's been the goal of far next our work we call it also polly pharmacology. This is a data intense platform uses a I. How exactly does it work and what's the range of data that draws upon? Well it starts with essential genetic data or G wash data. and. What we aim to do is look at a specific disease and look at the genetic lesions if you will within that disease and then all the pathways that are affected. When there is a genetic lesion liken charcoal, Mary Tooth, and then by looking at all those pathways, we can figure out which drugs or which molecules might interact with those pathways in start to put them together in combinations insofar as the combinations provide. A novel and non obvious exciting results that are true synergies. Synergies meaning that the result is greater than the sum of of each response and we do that with a lot of data. It's a lot of data inputs in a lot of a inputs and a lot of experience in pharmacology by our experts. Working at for next on our teams in. So with a multitude of approaches knowing that the output are combination medicines as opposed to single medicines, we've been able to achieve I think some some remarkable results. The company is focused on using this platform as a way of repurposing combinations of existing therapies. What's the case for doing this from a time cost speed on view? We in the past have I'm combined existing medicines although I would say going forward in the future we'll probably. Use a novel molecules are new chemical entities, so-called ease as the combinations of new medicines. It does afford when you're using existing medicines and much more efficient process however, simply because these medicines are already safe and well tolerated in so you can put them into clinical trials right away in advanced trials and get towards the FDA, an approval usually much faster than starting with a lot of the toxicology work that you have to do. With new new molecule. So it has been for us an inefficient process generally should be inefficient process, but most importantly, it should bring new medicines to patients and caregivers that they haven't seen before. You're focused on neurological conditions. This is an area where there's been great frustration. diseases have been somewhat intractable I. Think of what's happened in the area of cancer in terms of the use of combination therapies is that part of the rationale here that combination therapies are what's going to be needed to address diseases like Alzheimer's on Ls? Right in in diseases like Alzheimer's for example, you know there may be one or two or three. Causative factors but ultimately, it causes a significant imbalance in the brain and rather than addressing the first domino, which is still a huge debate in many companies in among many scientists, we often think maybe by making combination medicines, you can address a lot of the more downstream. Activities. That have resulted in the balancing that could be readjusted. So so as we can make a better new equilibrium with that new equilibrium, hopefully modified disease as we've done. Well. Let's talk about.

Alzheimer Marie Tooth United States Mary Tooth Aspirin FDA Headache
After FDA Set Back, AI Driven Drug Company Advances with New CEO

The Bio Report

04:50 min | 3 weeks ago

After FDA Set Back, AI Driven Drug Company Advances with New CEO

"GONNA talk about far next. It's unique approach to drug discovery and its efforts to develop a therapy for the rare degenerative nerve condition shark Marie Tooth Syndrome. A let's start with the company's platform technology though and its efforts to discover what it terms, his cleo therapies what's meant by the term cleo therapy. Therapy. Comes from the idea of field tropic meaning that that there are often multiple pathways for any drug to follow. In fact that most drugs don't act on a single target but rather act on multiple targets. So for example, we all know that you know aspirin can treat a headache, but it also can. You know prevent clotting by. Platelets from forming clusters that. Eight including so. Many many approved medicine have multiple pathways, and the concept here for us is that diseases are not. Just single genetic kits that that that does exist. But often I'm diseases are the result of an imbalance between multiple pathways and insofar as multiple drugs acting on multiple pathways can correct that that's been the goal of far next our work we call it also polly pharmacology. This is a data intense platform uses a I. How exactly does it work and what's the range of data that draws upon? Well it starts with essential genetic data or G wash data. and. What we aim to do is look at a specific disease and look at the genetic lesions if you will within that disease and then all the pathways that are affected. When there is a genetic lesion liken charcoal, Mary Tooth, and then by looking at all those pathways, we can figure out which drugs or which molecules might interact with those pathways in start to put them together in combinations insofar as the combinations provide. A novel and non obvious exciting results that are true synergies. Synergies meaning that the result is greater than the sum of of each response and we do that with a lot of data. It's a lot of data inputs in a lot of a inputs and a lot of experience in pharmacology by our experts. Working at for next on our teams in. So with a multitude of approaches knowing that the output are combination medicines as opposed to single medicines, we've been able to achieve I think some some remarkable results. The company is focused on using this platform as a way of repurposing combinations of existing therapies. What's the case for doing this from a time cost speed on view? We in the past have I'm combined existing medicines although I would say going forward in the future we'll probably. Use a novel molecules are new chemical entities, so-called ease as the combinations of new medicines. It does afford when you're using existing medicines and much more efficient process however, simply because these medicines are already safe and well tolerated in so you can put them into clinical trials right away in advanced trials and get towards the FDA, an approval usually much faster than starting with a lot of the toxicology work that you have to do. With new new molecule. So it has been for us an inefficient process generally should be inefficient process, but most importantly, it should bring new medicines to patients and caregivers that they haven't seen before. You're focused on neurological conditions. This is an area where there's been great frustration. diseases have been somewhat intractable I. Think of what's happened in the area of cancer in terms of the use of combination therapies is that part of the rationale here that combination therapies are what's going to be needed to address diseases like Alzheimer's on Ls? Right in in diseases like Alzheimer's for example, you know there may be one or two or three. Causative factors but ultimately, it causes a significant imbalance in the brain and rather than addressing the first domino, which is still a huge debate in many companies in among many scientists, we often think maybe by making combination medicines, you can address a lot of the more downstream. Activities. That have resulted in the balancing that could be readjusted. So so as we can make a better new equilibrium with that new equilibrium, hopefully modified disease as we've done.

Alzheimer Marie Tooth Mary Tooth Aspirin FDA Headache
Hope for Herpes Cure

The Naked Scientists

05:24 min | 3 weeks ago

Hope for Herpes Cure

"Nearly two thirds of us are infected with herpes simplex virus. So viruses, this week isn't an herpes causes cold sores causes genital disease, and it can also even occasionally caused Brian Infections. The virus is real headache to treat because the infection is lifelong. This is because it hides existing just as a piece of DNA inside nerve cells, it periodically reawakens to produce painful infectious skin blisters, nola drugs that can. Control these flare ups when they happen they can't remove the viral DNA. So the problem keeps on coming back now researchers in the US developed a pair of selective molecular scissors the contract down the rogue viral. DNA inside nerve cells and chop it up destroying the virus. So at least in experimental mice, it doesn't come back. Keith Jerem herpes is really sneaky that it actually established as a form of itself. That essentially goes into cells and then falls asleep and that virus lives in the neurons nerve cells in your body, and they can come once a year once a month once a week and cause lesions ulcers than anything else and all those strikes. We him don't do anything about that sleeping form of the virus. So effectively under the immune Radovan all the time it's dormant inside cells like that the immune system can't see it. So it just gets ignored. That's exactly right. The immune system controls at once it wakes up and starts making more copies of itself and they take care of those new copies but they even the noon system doesn't do anything about that long-term sleeping form of the virus said, what can you do about it? Well we've been using this really cool technology that's been around for over a decade. Now called gene editing despite has made a DNA just like our body is and that sleeping form is actually a little tiny circle of this DNA that lives in the nerve cells and what gene editing allows us to do is basically use I think of molecular scissors that can go into a cell and they can look through all. The DNA. In that cell and look for a very specific little stretch of the letters, and if they find those letters, they make a little cut and so what we do is designed very special scissors that ignore all of our own DNA, all the human DNA but they look really hard for herpes and if they find it, then it to little cuts and so it basically falls apart and makes it go away. And this works does it you can actually demonstrate that serve you chop up the virus then canola comeback yeah, exactly. So the study that we did was in mice mice get this sleeping form of the herpes just like we do and then we can go in and we use a a something. We call a vector, a different virus that carries these scissors to those same neurons and when it does that it starts cutting up the virus and then we can measure after. Our therapy how much of that sleeping form is actually left in the mice treated and what we saw as we eliminated well over ninety percent of that virus, and if we could translate that into human beings is likely to prevent lesions in Alzheimer's disease transmission to other people and all the things that we actually worry about how did you get the virus that was the Trojan horse that carried in the molecular scissors? How did you get that into the nerve cells in these animals? Well. That was a really important part of our study is understanding the best way to get the scissors where they need to be. We used another virus added. Associated Virus. Almost, all have it never causes any disease. We basically changed that to carry these scissors for us just injected into the bloodstream, and once it's in the blood, it actually goes in and actually find those nerve cells and introduces the scissors. It sounds like the woman who swallowed a fly and then swallowed spider to eat the flying, and we all know how that story ends because you're basically giving someone a virus to treat viruses this safe. This particular virus specter that was used called ADN. Associated Virus is probably the leading factor that's being used for many many types of gene therapy now, and there's several approved products out there in the EU and the United States that use adn associated virus or av to deliver different types of gene therapy, and so we're taking something that's quite proven to be safe modifying it slightly for our needs and then using it to try to cure an infection where we've simply not had any hope for cure in the past. You've been looking at herpes simplex virus. This causes cold sores and it also causes genital disease. But this is one member of a big family viruses that'll will work in a similar sort of way things like visa, the Vars, chickenpox and shingles in people unlucky enough to have that. Do you think you could prevent a person from succumbing to shingles by the same technique? The shingles virus actually goes into very similar nerve cells and acts a lot like herpes simplex, and so we can actually think about using the same therapy for that viruses. Well, we're also very actively looking at viruses that are similar but not herpes viruses in particular hepatitis B., and we have some really exciting results there where we can do very similar things. We're likely to see success there and maybe another viruses as well.

Herpes Genital Disease United States Brian Infections Keith Jerem Alzheimer's Disease EU Vars
COVID-19 now No. 3 cause of death in US

WCCO Morning News

00:48 sec | Last month

COVID-19 now No. 3 cause of death in US

"One year ago. We didn't know anything about the Corona virus it did not exist a year ago. It is now the number three cause of death in the United States ahead of accidents ahead of injuries. Lung disease, diabetes, Alzheimer's. Heart disease and cancer still number one and number two, by the way. Here in Minnesota. Here. The latest numbers yesterday six Covert 19 deaths 557 new infections. 286 people hospitalized 155 needed intensive care. That brings our total up to 1700 deaths Mohr than 1700 deaths Mohr than 65,000 infections, including nearly 59,000 people who have recovered.

Mohr Lung Disease Heart Disease United States Minnesota Alzheimer
Computer scientist, pixel inventor Russell Kirsch dead at 91

Latest In Tech News

03:18 min | Last month

Computer scientist, pixel inventor Russell Kirsch dead at 91

"On Russell, Kirsch inventor of the Pixel passed away this week. Bit of sad news rest in peace but In case you're wondering who the inventor of the Pixel was. Now you know computer scientists, Russell AAC Kirsch, the inventor of the Pixel and undisputed pioneer of digital imaging passed away on Tuesday in his Portland home from complications arising from a form of Alzheimer's he was ninety one years old Now, Russell might not be name you immediately recognized his contributions to computer science made digital imaging possible born June twentieth nineteen, twenty nine in New York City demographic parents from Russia. and Hungary I attended Bronx High School than nyu Harvard and eventually mit in nineteen fifty one he joined the National Bureau of standards where he worked for fifty years and helped to invent the Pixel and create the first digital photograph It was a one seventy, two by one, seventy, two pixel image of his son Walden created in nineteen, fifty seven and is now iconic and was named. One of life, Magazine's one hundred photographs that changed the world in two thousand three and we have that image appear on the screen One of the first digital images ever created made from two superimposed scans at different thresholds since each pixel could only show one bit of information that being black or white as DP review points out Kirsch never stopped improving and his most famous invention even after retiring in two thousand and one and a twenty, ten interview on wired, he outlined his attempts to create a system that uses. Variable. Shape pixels instead of the squares that have dominated digital imaging since he invented him in that interview, he called square the logical thing to do. But laments that the decision was something rarely foolish that everyone in the world has been suffering from ever since. So at the right bold age of eighty-one, he began working on a masking system that creates six by six pixel areas and an. intelligently. Divides those areas into the two sections that have the most contrast before refusing to pixels on either side of the seem that idea never caught on but he explained the technology and its benefits in detail in a video below it's the thirteen minute long video if you wanted to watch that. But while the incredible accolades described above certainly gives you the sense of Russia Kirsch the. Engineer. The best personal picture of Kirsch probably comes from a two twenty twelve blocked by ant man named Joel Runyon who encountered him in a coffee shop in Portland after revealing net Romanians Computer and images on it probably wouldn't exist or exist as they are without Christmas contributions to engineering and computer science eighty-three-year-old Kirsch shared the following words I. Guess I've always believed that nothing is withheld from us. What we have conceived to do most people think the opposite that all things are withheld from them, which they have conceived to do, and they end up doing nothing Mr, Kirsch may be gone, but his legacy will live on every day in one of the approximately three point eight billion photos that are currently being captured every single day. May He rest in

Kirsch Russia Kirsch Russell Portland Alzheimer National Bureau Of Standards Nyu Harvard Joel Runyon New York City Engineer Bronx High School Walden Hungary Russia.
Dampening of the Senses Linked to Dementia Risk

60-Second Science

01:10 min | Last month

Dampening of the Senses Linked to Dementia Risk

"Memory loss and forgetfulness or common warning signs for dementia. But a dulling of the senses also appears to be associated with disease. Smell is definitely the strongest one we found, but it does seem like it's not just smell will Abramowicz an epidemiologist at the University of California San Francisco. Her team studied cognitive decline in eighteen hundred adults from the health aging and body composition study which tracked the health and mental function of older adults over a seventeen year period. During this study subjects completed sensory tests including hearing, smell touch and vision Brenda's team took. The results of those tests and then compared the adults overall sensory abilities to their mental function and the results. Those better functioning had a lower risk of dementia and worth worse multiple sensory function. They had this guy dementia a decline in smell in particular had the strongest link to dementia. The results are in the Journal of the Alzheimer's Association. Alzheimer's and dementia. The scientists were just studying correlations here. But Brennan says, if they can figure out how well multi sensory declined predicts dementia risk, it might give doctors another tool to screen for the

Alzheimer Alzheimer's Association University Of California San F Brennan Brenda Abramowicz Journal Of
The state of Alzheimer Disease in America

Second Opinion

03:37 min | Last month

The state of Alzheimer Disease in America

"Is sixty five and her daughter just moved in to help care for her Jan is forgetful emotional. She can't concentrate. She's lost her sense of direction and she can no longer be independent. There are several causes of dementia but the most common is Alzheimer's disease which affects six, million Americans sixty, five and older and a significant group of people under the age of sixty five. And as our population ages, the number of people with Alzheimer's dementia is growing larger each year there is a high likelihood that Jan has Alzheimer's type dementia because her sister and her mother also have it. Doctors do have some tools to diagnose Alzheimer's disease, the most commonly used or brief oral cognitive tests to test memory and logic. These are the sorts of tests. President trump probably took where one of the items ask people to remember five objects at fifteen minutes. These tests do a pretty good job of separating those with frank dementia from those with normal thinking but they. Don't help separate out people with mild cognitive impairment from those with normal cognition. Doctors can also use imaging studies like pet scans, spinal taps, or emery scans with more accurate but are expensive invasive, and not always available will report this week published in Jama suggests a new simple blood test may be accurate inexpensive and may soon be widely available according to the study the. New Test promises to be able to detect the disease decades before memory problems begin but the problem is that testing for disease for which there is no or only very poor treatments raise some important ethical issues. It would be one thing if patients could start treatment early or even take a medicine to prevent the disease, but this is not the case yet we have. Several prescription drugs and some over the counter supplements. But the very best they can offer is a slight slowing disease progression and even that is of questionable significance to patients. So the value of a test that identifies a condition early, that is before the onset of symptoms comes in allowing patients who wished to know whether they will develop this disease to plan their lives accordingly. They might make very different life choices. If they know, their final years will be impacted by Alzheimer's disease. The test also has the potential of helping doctors differentiate dementia caused by Alzheimer's from other types of dementia and medical conditions, which may be more amenable to effective treatments. and New drugs do come along which are promising. The test will also help researchers identify those people likely to develop the disease so that the drugs intended to prevent or treat the disease can be studied early in the course of the illness this new test is unlikely to make any difference to Jan but her daughter's already thinking about whether she wants a blood test that can tell her what may be in her

Alzheimer's Disease Alzheimer Donald Trump President Trump Jama
Not Flying This Summer? Many Americans Are Hitting The Road  In RVs

Environment: NPR

04:31 min | Last month

Not Flying This Summer? Many Americans Are Hitting The Road In RVs

"Flying is not all that attractive these days but with gas prices, low travelers are hitting the road some of them worried about staying in hotels and eating in restaurants have decided to go a different way they're taking an RV, a recreational vehicle for the first time Melanie peoples has more like a lot of people amy holded has never driven anything bigger than an SUV, but she's about to get behind the wheel of a thirty foot long house on wheels. Getting their first look at their home for the next ten days amy her mom Sandra and especially her twelve year old son Duncan are thrilled. Why Goal. Very. It looks plenty big for their trip for Madison Alabama to Cape Cod Massachusetts there's a table, a kitchen, a back bedroom, even a shower and bathroom not to mention walls that slide out to make their living space even bigger. Cheryl Huddle is the owner of the RV. Okay. So normally start at the front door we're just GONNA go around and everything's been cleaned with bleach because of covid you wouldn't think it but it takes two hours for huddled to show hold it everything she needs to know there's all the indoor stuff how the benches turned into bed when to hook up to electricity when to use the generator, how to turn on the generator not to mention all the outside stuff like power cord water hookup right now we get into the Control panel. Air Conditioner where're you headed to this? Wasn't the vacation hold each who works us an esthetician in a salon had planned for her family. They were all supposed to fly to why and sure they could have just put that off for another year. But Amy wanted something for making memories this summer my Dad Alzheimer's, and my mom has a progressive memory loss as well and I knew. I don't know how many trips we have left in us. You know there's a lot of uncertainty right now and I, just kind of went with it just kept thinking about it and kept thinking about it and i. just kind of jumped off the cliff and didn't that is not to say, she doesn't expect challenges. But as she's navigating her new role as a single mom she's discovering learning to overcome them is a good thing and so there was a little bit of uncertainty of of doing it myself. But I've. Always, been able to do it myself before for the most part on you know struggle sometimes but I think I can do it. She doesn't want to look back on this year as the year corona virus ruined everything. Hold it is not alone nationwide three times as many people are renting vs the summer according to the RV renting service RV share CEO. John Gray, says, people are Leery of shared spaces are discovering. What's great about RV's people can bring the bathroom with them. They can bring their kitchen with them, and that premium of control that has always existed in RV travel is even more of a premium. This year prices run from fifty dollars a night for a pop-up Camper two thousand and night depending on size and level of luxury. Despite the Corona Virus Americans certainly aren't sitting at home, the American Automobile Association Aaa Expect six hundred, eighty, three, million, car trips this summer that's only a three percent drop from last year bottom line is Americans plan to travel genetic Kesse is a spokesperson for AAA. One thing different this summer she says is people have to plan ahead you want to plan your trip from eight point. Be Not just to know how you're going to get there. But where and when you're going to stops and that's exactly what hold each has done mapping her out all the way up to Cape. COD making sure she won't have to quarantine along the way speaking of old age. She's gotten her last bid of RV instructions and the family is all inside buckled up and ready to ride. Right regard. She'll be fine. No really. She made a perfect three point turns in reverse after that. And then they were gone. Off on their big adventure. For NPR news. I'm Melanie peoples since Melanie reported that story amy has made it safely to Cape Cod but says, driving an RV through the Lincoln tunnel is not something she would advise.

Amy Holded Melanie United States Cape Cod Cape Cod Massachusetts Cheryl Huddle Sandra American Automobile Associatio NPR Madison Alabama Duncan Cape CEO Alzheimer Lincoln Tunnel John Gray
Flu, Pneumonia Vaccinations Tied to Lower Risk of Alzheimer's Dementia

KNX Weekend News and Traffic

00:47 sec | Last month

Flu, Pneumonia Vaccinations Tied to Lower Risk of Alzheimer's Dementia

"To To know know study study suggests suggests an an even even stronger stronger reason reason to to get get an an annual annual flu flu shot. shot. And And it's it's probably probably not not the the reason reason you you think think Yes, Yes, it it is is really really important important to to get get a a flu flu shot, shot, especially especially this this year, year, where the pandemic raging alongside the yearly fall flu season, But new studies say there is evidence getting flu shots and also pneumonia. Vaccines may protect against Alzheimer's disease and especially multiple that over time, Dr Heather Snyder with the Alzheimer's Association that is really Individuals that had vaccination in individuals that were over the age of 65 were in a 10 year period between the age of 65 75. No one has yet knows why. There seems to be an association between flu and pneumonia, vaccines and a reduction in risk for Alzheimer's.

FLU Pneumonia Alzheimer's Association Alzheimer's Disease Alzheimer Dr Heather Snyder
Blood test could accurately diagnose Alzheimer's, scientists say

Wayne Cabot and Paul Murnane

00:09 sec | Last month

Blood test could accurately diagnose Alzheimer's, scientists say

"Association says scientists are getting closer to a blood test to detect Alzheimer's, so those affected could get drugs that may delay the progress.

Alzheimer
Scientists get closer to blood test for Alzheimer's disease

WBBM Evening News

00:40 sec | Last month

Scientists get closer to blood test for Alzheimer's disease

"To a blood test for Alzheimer's disease. A blood test study was led by Dr Oscar Hanson of Lund University in Sweden. This test actually shows all some seas early on, so also when you only have very minor memory problems, it's very accurate, but the test is on ly for patients showing signs of the disease. I don't think this blood test should be used for screening off healthy individuals. In recent years that we don't have any therapy today that stops slows down by disease in healthy individual. The testing identified people with Alzheimer's versus no dementia or other types of fit with accuracy ranging from 89 to 98%. I'm Shelly Adler,

Alzheimer's Disease Dr Oscar Hanson Alzheimer Shelly Adler Lund University Sweden
Blood test could accurately diagnose Alzheimer's, scientists say

WBBM Afternoon News Update

00:40 sec | Last month

Blood test could accurately diagnose Alzheimer's, scientists say

"Scientists are getting closer to a blood test for Alzheimer's disease. The blood test study was led by Dr Oscar Hanson of Lund University in Sweden. Test actually shows all some seas early on. So also when you only have very minor memory problems, it's their accurate But the test is on ly for patients showing signs of the disease. I don't think this blood test abuse for screening off healthy individuals and recently is that we don't have any therapy today. That stops slows down the disease in healthy individual. The testing identified people with Alzheimer's versus no dementia or other types of fit with accuracy ranging from 89 to

Alzheimer's Disease Dr Oscar Hanson Alzheimer Lund University Sweden
Scientists Get Closer to Blood Test for Alzheimer's Disease

KCBS Radio Midday News

00:28 sec | Last month

Scientists Get Closer to Blood Test for Alzheimer's Disease

"May be a simple, reliable way to help family doctors diagnosed Most common form of dementia. Researchers say an experimental blood test was able to distinguish people with Alzheimer's disease from those without it In several studies. The accuracy range from 89 to 98% although the test still needs more validation. Several companies air developing these tests, which measure a protein that damages the brains of people with the disease back with sports, coming up in two minutes on

Alzheimer's Disease
Becoming a home carer during a pandemic

VNN Focus

08:20 min | Last month

Becoming a home carer during a pandemic

"3.3 million home health workers such as nurses, therapists and personal care AIDS provide a range of medical and daily living services to nearly 12 million people around the US, However, the covert pandemic is putting pressure on this workforce already in crisis due to shortages. Especially in some states that are experiencing an increase in covert cases. Alexandra Harrell is the founder of an organization called Patty and Ricky. And she offers tips on how family members can assist their loved ones during their new role as a caregiver during the pandemic really hard time for individuals with disabilities or chronic health conditions, illnesses they're scared that people home health care is coming to their homes. Because they're scared to Kobe and many family members have decided to have their family members were just abilities, chronic condition their elderly parents live with that. So there's a lot of new caregivers right now. And those, of course, are being experienced. You know the new caregivers that they're not used to this, I guess because they're they're usually out at work or wherever they go every day. And so now they're at home with the person who needs to care right? Because they're new to the caregiving, which is a new role for them can be really challenging at first. You know they used to having maybe they're assisted living facility, which many have been throughout the country, so it's just been a really hard time, but I do have some chips. Kind of support papers up. I was a kid, my mom Patty, Patty, Patty, with my mom. Okay? And he was really fashionable. Really Cool on me. What? Brain cancer. When I was 19 years old. It was just me and her and I came home from college and so caretaker. And it wasn't during a pandemic so he can be difficult. But it's not. You know, it was definitely a challenging time. But you know, I have some things that really supported me. You know terms of looking at our home environment, for instance, you know the home environment accessible of safe. Always you could. You know with that, with grant bars and anti slip mats in the shower, shower chairs, really thinking about how can you take her home and they get more accessible for your family members? So that was something that was really helpful to me. And I just made my mom being ableto navigate house in ways that She wouldn't have been able to otherwise so number one looking at your environment and you know, making a structure that had time and schedules for medication and Well in terms of medication. It's really important you set those alarms on the phones have printed a person's never lists. Doctor's phone numbers just like thinking ahead. A worst case scenario is I'm usually a really optimistic but I just believe that you prepare. It won't happen. Right way ready to go your cellphone Chargers medication extra set of clothes. You know, just so you know, I believe I have packed. We wouldn't have to go. Yeah, Yeah. Yeah, that was really helpful. That had to be you know, 19 years old. Two dozen have to do that alone. That had to be I don't know the word daunting does it justice and I'd just be incredible. No, I was, um You know, my mom is such an incredible mama raised me to be able to take care earn raised me to be okay. You don't know her since she passed away when I was 20 But it was it was really challenging. But I didn't know it was important to you that during that such a hard time that me and my mom Joy way, laughed. A lot had been so sure to watch television and crafts or whatever, you know, walk around the block. Get some fresh air. It was back, and it was definitely really challenging. Um and I wish my mom wasn't 50 years old when she was nine, but I had to do it way early. Um, I'm really happy that I could give her Looks like it was actually a really positive end of life. So it was. It was really hard, but I need my company Toddy and Ricky after her. She was such a cool woman when she was here. I just wanted to bring together adaptive clothing. Dot com. We have some really great adaptive clothing and accessories and adoptive shoes that make make dressing dressing dressing easier easier easier it it it having having having adaptive adaptive adaptive clothing clothing clothing can can can really really really support support support dressing dressing dressing and and and undressing undressing undressing in in in it. it. it. Can Can provide provide independence independence for for people people with with disabilities. disabilities. And those that are aging on a doctor's holding something I wish I had what I was cured giving for my mom. Yeah, Yeah. Now you also You also had a cousin who was unable to care for themselves. What was that experience like? Yes. So in the company that I have Patti and lucky he was my cousin. Okay? And he was born unable to walk or talk, and he really showed me. What is with you here? What's his vehicle to get what he needed to go but could also be a fashion accessory, and he really showed me that we can communicate so much. It doesn't have to necessarily Peter, our voice. It could be drugs, eyes compete your communication but but especially especially pressed pressed that that would would communicate communicate things things that that he he needed needed a a working working or or different different expression expression that that he he would would point point to to a a different different button button that that would would his his parents parents sent sent him him to to use use to to communicate communicate it. Just my my friendship with my cousin Ricky really formed. How see disability today just as humans. We all have different years and whether physical, emotional mental we all have different going on. You know, that was really important to me When I started. Patty and Ricky is really have products for everyone and So people that doesn't have to be a medical supply store. You know, it can really be a fashion store and our clothing accessories. We saw him Paddy rookie dotcom are really Universally designed so that it's just sharper designed with Velcro and Matt strategic zippers for women, men, kids, we just make clothing is your front and you would never know. It's been adoptive. Yeah. I really owe a lot of my work. I really have no idea what I'm just like You have any HD? Anxiety. You know my whole anxiety. But it's you know, it's really a part of many things of who I am. And you know I don't want you. I talk Teo, the Alzheimer's Foundation of America, and they were saying some of the same things you are, but especially with Alzheimer's. It is Wow, it is so different. It's such a con founding disease that those family members are really, really struggling right now. You know, too for that, Do you deal with that as well? Oh, yes, we have. We have don't clothing really easy. Holding a lot of customers during this time, a lot of care givers it No, I think it's really important to remember the Cherokee ever burn is a real thing and show your words have to be taking care of themselves, not guilty and having to order food. You're financially for shop for them a grocery store. Just different ways to utilize friend technology, Teo and for help if they need to make sure that you still care about taking care of themselves. Yeah, I think it's really huge. I back my mom definitely was ignored my own use. So I believe that you know, caregivers. Make sure to take that personal time. Careful, only is well taken care of herself. It's going to take care of someone else.

Patty Ricky United States Kobe TEO Alexandra Harrell Aids Brain Cancer Founder Patti Alzheimer Toddy Peter Alzheimer's Foundation Of Amer
"Person, woman, man, camera, TV": Trump describes cognitive test

Slate's The Gist

05:34 min | 2 months ago

"Person, woman, man, camera, TV": Trump describes cognitive test

"Trump was interviewed last night on Fox, by Dr Mark Siegel trump was not taking his chances with any old fox host. Who might hold him to say account Oh. No, this was Dr Mark Siegel who said this about trump's leadership on the corona virus early on. Are you impressed by that? The number of Americans who've got that much confidence in the trump administration absolutely do I think that the task force that the president put together, and his leadership on this has been tremendous. That assessment was offered ten days after trump said these words now the virus that we're talking about having to do a lot of people think that goes away in April with the. As the heat comes in, typically, that will go away and April see goes, applauded trump every step of the way, and was there for the right man to conduct this interview about a very vital medical subject, gripping the country's attention, which is the president's lack of dementia or should I say? The president's repeatedly stated lack of dementia? Yes, at issue is the president's terrific brain. Because the President keeps returning to that issue, we must think it's a big electoral winner for him I. Mean Imagine a president who doesn't have early onset dementia in the dream of Alexander Hamilton it. It is why he authored all those federalist papers and didn't give away his shot to one day found the country led by a man who's not insane or model, brained King George. The second wasn't saying by the way and so here we are today. Forty three presidents later led by such a good man with such a good brain that he needs us all to know how good a brain it is keeps bringing up an interview after interview last night. He did so with an actual doctor with credentials that I just cited impeccable ones meaning he loves trump, but also. To remind you a little bit more about Marciel. He thought the Corona virus was great big ball of hype here. He was on March sixth. I'll test the flu. I'll test the coronavirus virus to calm. Fears and people are GONNA start to get the idea that it's not that widespread Siegel was privy to a different test yesterday as the president detailed the difficulty. Difficulty of the cognitive test that was administered a while ago. I gave you this test version of this task. What trump called the hardest parts of this test on the show? A couple of days ago I read some actual words that are actually read by Dr to a patient who might have say Alzheimer's and those words are face. Velvet Church Daisy Green. Now. The point of it is that they're random words. Not Obscure words but words unrelated to each other. In fact, I WanNa let you know that I am so dedicated to this idea that the words beyond related that I saw the official test. The last word was red, not green and I changed it for the just version of the memory test. I changed it to green because I thought that read was to associated with red velvet cake. Thus perhaps skewing the results such as my dedication to the process and adjudication of you, the listener as non demented. That is why I. Ask you to recall those words, can you? Can you do it those words? They were faced velvet. Church, Daisy Green. The president by the way tweaked the test in the discussion that he had with Dr. Siegel like a memory question it's. Like you'll go person. Woman Man. Camera. TV. So that say. Could you repeat that? So I said Yeah. Person Woman. Man Camera TV okay. So in his case, it wasn't unrelated words. It was notably things in trump's direct line of sight. So twenty seconds after the clip I just played when trump busts out the same sequence, you go person. Warming, man. Camera TV. It's not quite as impressive as the actual test. Because recalling the words, he said we're just going down the line. There's a person as a man. There's a woman camera TV that that black I, don't know if I got him in the right order. I wouldn't have got his high marks as trump by the way all of this this impressive world-beating. Demonstration of non dementia. I think it sets trump up pretty well after the presidency. Now there is a downside which is that he won't be able to put forward a diminished capacity defense, if the Manhattan District Attorney or Sdn y brings charges. Out there and Gangster Heaven Vincent the Chin Gigante saying no, you gotta start muttering and shuffled around in a bathrobe early on can't do it at the last minute of Fun Ghoul. But should trump be stripped of his assets and forced to raise money. He will now have the option of touring the country as Donald Trump and his feats of intellect and Memory Prowess Marvel as Donald. Trump remembers five words in order as he repeats the same story about having a friend who doesn't go to Paris anymore as he can flakes, the notion that windmills kill eagles. Also causes cancer as he invents on the spot, different things that a dog can do like get fired there trump you and trump steaks, trump casino, and now the trump, traveling show of medical marvels and mental feats, in which the former president we'll prove himself to be the greatest conjurer that history chronicles the amazing trump gin at a fairground or read it channel near you.

Donald Trump President Trump Dr Mark Siegel Manhattan District Daisy Green Alzheimer Chin Gigante Alexander Hamilton King George Marciel Official Attorney Paris Cancer
Washington, DC judge stops federal execution amid claims inmate has dementia

Tony Katz Today

00:35 sec | 2 months ago

Washington, DC judge stops federal execution amid claims inmate has dementia

"A judge stop the execution of a man at the federal prison in Terre Haute named Wesley Perky who has Alzheimer's and paranoid schizophrenia and the U. S. Constitution is clear that you can't execute a person who has no understanding of why it is. The execution is going to be carried out. Robert Dunham, head of the Death Penalty Information Center, U S District Judge Tanya Chunkin in Washington, D C imposed to injunctions today. That prohibit the Federal Bureau of Prisons from moving forward with Perkies execution. The Justice Department filed immediate appeals. Perky was convicted of raping and murdering a 16 year old girl. They were

Wesley Perky Judge Tanya Chunkin Federal Bureau Of Prisons Terre Haute Death Penalty Information Cent Robert Dunham Alzheimer Justice Department Washington
Wife takes dishwashing job at nursing home to visit husband with Alzheimer's

American Medicine Today

00:19 sec | 2 months ago

Wife takes dishwashing job at nursing home to visit husband with Alzheimer's

"In Jacksonville, unable to visit her husband in his nursing home, took a job there so she could visit with him. Mary Daniel told news Channel eight in Tampa that she had gone almost four months without seeing her husband, Steve, who has early onset Alzheimer's disease, and his health had taken a bad turn. She now works as a dishwasher and gets to spend a couple of hours a day with her husband

Mary Daniel Alzheimer's Disease Jacksonville Tampa Steve
"alzheimer" Discussed on Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

02:34 min | 7 months ago

"alzheimer" Discussed on Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

"Come talk to me when you're fifty five. That is true. Then there's a dating. There's a hormonal component Alzheimer's. So it's like I feel only women not in that helped to live long enough to see some of these answers. I do take after my dad more than my mom. So hopefully fingers crossed. They don't have the Alzheimer's that my mom and my maternal grandmother. My maternal great grandmother all seem to have had and and honestly. You're doing the things that you would need to do. Have Interesting conversations with Aside from me thoughtful people and you know you probably read you exercise. You probably have like friends and stuff. You seem like pretty cool cool lady. She got lots of friends. And you know like you. You're a small business owner so all these things that are going to keep your mind active. You're meeting people all the time. These are the things that like without a history of brain trauma like they say you will more or less be fined for Alzheimer's but then there's also this total randomness of it whereas just like like your mom could have done all the exact same things And then she has Alzheimer's for some reason like she doing crossword puzzles every day of her life. I don't know sometimes it's just random. Do Crossword puzzles a lot but shells drink two liters diet coke every day. Yeah so it must be but I. I think I didn't exercise. 'cause she didn't have to worry she can eat her. My sister could eat crap all the time and not really gained weight. That's annoying I look at I and skinny arms now. I have to watch everything and I have. I have to work out all the time just to well that helps my brain and my emotions but to stay at a decent wait. I have to do all this. I have all this work. Which is okay. Because it's good for my brain but they like you know. The white bread wonder bread that I'm not even sure exists anymore. I don't know I make my own bread special shop for it so real glutton's like us while I liked what I was a kid. But it's not man like honestly way better like multi grain pride start just tastes better like I've made my own sourdot. Yeah me too yes good. It's it's awesome and minor segment of that on the podcast to read.

Alzheimer business owner
"alzheimer" Discussed on Let's Talk Dementia

Let's Talk Dementia

04:38 min | 8 months ago

"alzheimer" Discussed on Let's Talk Dementia

"With swallowing drinking and eating or going to be a problem too so swallowing becomes an issue issue. The brain is not sending those signals to tell the body. What to do there is a lot that has to happen for food to be eaten? You know the brains gotTa say first of all all. I'm hungry. The brain quit sending that signal but if the signal does happen then the brains gotta say pick up the fork. Put it in the mashed potatoes. SCOOP THEM UP. Put put the mashed potatoes in the mail. Chew swallow get it down the right pipe but not the wrong pipes and we don't choke to death swallowing and drinking become a problem in in eating not sleeping well or sleeping all the time. We just see that I can tell you my mom's slip slip slip a lot. Thank you if I had to choose now. I know if I had to choose And we don't get to choose. It's not up to us to decide but sleeping many hours a day. I think is easier for those in late stage Alzheimer's than not sleeping well not sleeping leads to another host problems that we don't win. We don't need increased problems with communication occasion. You'll hear things like I abba. ABBA ABBA ABBA ABBA awhile. I want you to get get get get in your like you won't want and can I get what they can't get their thoughts together. They these folks are more likely to experience infections and ammonia Nia on those chances for those things increase drastically infections especially urinary tract infections any type of invasions if they have a fall in. These is tearing the skin more likely to have infections because that pneumonia is a huge problem with votes. In the late stage of Alzheimer's in fact many of our folks will pass away because of pneumonia. In sometimes. That's put on their district. You'll get they die because of ammonia but really what they died was Alzheimer's that caused the body to be more success susceptible to them having pneumonia so it was really Alzheimer's that killed him and pneumonia was just an of a side. Perfect of that. They are definitely more likely to wonder if they are that kind of person who walks. We see some folks with a late stage. Alzheimer's as I've mentioned you just lay around all the time in sleep in some people that just walk and walk in walk in walk in walk in walk and you think sit down in those folks are definitely more likely to to try to open the door not necessarily because they want to wander. But it's a door in a DOORKNOB and I do remember how to do that so they opened the door and they will sometimes. It's very innocent thing but obviously that can lead to problems increased agitation and depression. That is very hard to deal with. The agitation is very difficult difficult because they are. They're not happy and they're not happy with you and they're not happy lives and they're not happy with what you're offering in their anger and they're liable to push you aside and say dirty words and that's hard to deal with and depression is hard to deal with. You're going to see some depression. I would say everybody dealing with late stage Alzheimer's because they are declining in to some degree are folks always know that and then no interest in activities obviously that is true no interest in activities because they know that they can't function the way they showed in it's causing them to just WanNa pull within themselves. It's a sad. It's a sad time of life but it can still be a good time of life we can still bring to our folks love in happiness and joy in music and funny stories and and I tell you one of the best things you can do is play that video and tell on Youtube of the daddy ripping a piece of paper in front of the baby and the baby be laughing. Every time daddy rips a piece of paper it just cracks me up in it will crack up your eyes with dementia. I know I've done it a bunch. Well that just clears up. Maybe a little bit about the different indifferences in the various stages of Alzheimer's. I'm here to answer your questions. You can email me and my email is carol at. Let's Talk Dementia Dot Org. Now I'm sitting here looking at myself in this screen and for those of you who watch it on Youtube use hat are on the podcast. You'll have to hear my description of got these white spots. Thought I just had this cream put on my face. As opposed to get rid of wrinkles in it did really well but I should have touched up my makeup before came on this show. I kinda look like a got got we're going on. Why didn't buy the cream? It was outrageously expensive but yes. I'll just be a wrinkle girl. I hope you you guys have a good day blessings miles.

Alzheimer Ta pneumonia Youtube depression
"alzheimer" Discussed on FoundMyFitness

FoundMyFitness

04:34 min | 2 years ago

"alzheimer" Discussed on FoundMyFitness

"Treat mild cognitive dementia and Alzheimer's disease. So thank you so much Dale having me here at your place. Thanks very much Rhonda. So maybe we can start a little bit by just talking about some of the. Characteristics and pathological distinguishing features of Alzheimer's disease, and maybe what you were thoughts are what can cause Alzheimer's disease leads to it. Right. So. It's a good point because cognitive decline, very common and Alzheimer's is the most common cause of cognitive decline ultimately dementia. And by definition, this means that you have amyloid plaques in the brain and FOSS four elated tau tangles. So those those are the two main pathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's. But as you can see, that doesn't tell you why you've got it. It just is something you look at the rain, and of course you can get something that looks virtually identical without the Loyd and you can get amyloid without the cognitive decline. So it's a marker, but it's an imperfect one. Yeah, that's a really good point. You brought up and do you have any thoughts on why? There are some people that do have amyloid plaques in their brain that aren't really demented and some others that just don't seem to handle it? Yeah, it's a great point. So here's the thing that the. The whole world is turning upside down. Now when it comes to our understanding of Alzheimer's, it's been over one hundred years. Of course going back to Ellis Alzheimer's publications back in one thousand nine hundred sixty one thousand nine hundred seven, and there hasn't been a good understanding of this disease. And of course amyloid has been for years vilified and there's no question it. It is a neuro toxin. It does have toxic effects. The surprise has been that this is also a protectant. It's actually something that is made by your brain when you have specific insults. And for example, professor Rudy Tanzi and professor Robert Moyer at Harvard too few years ago show that it is an anti microbial. It also is professor Ashley Bush showed a number of years ago. It's actually quite a good binder of dive Valent metals like copper, zinc and things like that iron. And we showed a number of years ago. It is also. Response to a reduction in traffic support. So you actually get a change in signaling. So there are multiple different insults and metabolic changes that lead the brain to produce this stuff. And so I think there's been confusion because it's clear that when you produce it, you're at this increased risk for having a degenerative process. But as you indicated, there are many people that produce it and they successfully are protecting themselves. They don't actually have. The downsizing was often been stated, is those who then have inflammation on top of that seemed to be the ones that do worse. And that's a very general idea. But really it is a, it is a set of things, and we identified in published a number of years ago, thirty six different factors all contribute this, but they actually break down into just a couple of categories. So any sort of pathogens anything that's giving you inflammation, whether you have it because you have a leaky gut or because you have PG. Vallis in your brain or because you have beryllium of Lyme disease or you've been exposed to specific fungi, things like that. All of these things can engender that response. And in fact, we think more and more of amyloid as being like, napalm, you got the bad guys coming across the border. So you're now going to put down stuff that kills the bad guys the napalm. But in so doing, you're now going to reduce your air soil, you're now living in a smaller country, and that's exactly what's going on in the brain. You are downsizing the overall network. So that's what we call type one or inflammatory or hot Alzheimer's, and I should mention I, it turns out IRA Veda physicians from thousands of years ago, recognized dementia that was related to something that was hot, that was abnormally ultimately inflammatory as well as that that was related to dry us, which is what we call type two. Where you have decreased trophy support. It can be nerve growth factor. Brain derived neurotrophic factor, Estra dial.

Alzheimer Alzheimer's disease Ellis Alzheimer professor Dale Rudy Tanzi Ashley Bush Robert Moyer Harvard one hundred years
"alzheimer" Discussed on WEEI

WEEI

03:10 min | 2 years ago

"alzheimer" Discussed on WEEI

"We know it's so important for folks living with alzheimer's and dementia the more in home care where able to get the way we are able to ship those costs from nursing homes as well so obviously very supportive of having that funding in place on the state level yes and i'm kind of a larger note dan we touched upon this a little bit you mentioned alzheimer's it's the six leading cause of death in the united states has surprised to read i think on your organization's website it kills more people than breast cancer and pancreatic cancer combined so my question would be why is the all time alzheimer's awareness why does it not seem to match the toll it takes on people in this country you know it takes time it takes a movement it really takes a village behind these initiatives alex you'll see you know the change that we've seen around cancer for example or hiv aids the positive thing to mention around alzheimer's and dementia and specifically linked to policy we have seen four to storage years of alzheimer's research funding increases from congress and that just wasn't happenstance that was thousands of advocates going to washington dc and actually advocating for policy change to professional judgment budget it's called and not to get too key here but the reason i bring this up is there's only three diseases who have what's called a professor professional judgment budget which is the scientists the researchers at nih telling congress this is what we need for research funding to get things done so that was cancer hiv aids and then alzheimer's disease as a twenty fourteen right right so that certainly certainly good thing to see it going in that direction because you know i think i think there's some there's some there's some myths about alzheimer's you know one thing i think a lot of people believe dan is only affects old people but i can tell you firsthand it's not the case my grandfather was in his late fifties when he got the disease so yeah so is so what are some of the reasons you think maybe some people are kept in the dark doing dave alzheimer's dementia it's not really a lot of people don't want to be out you know be out in public with it so i i think there are a number of factors as well you know alex you're absolutely right if a lot of the work we do as well is raising that public awareness of this is not a normal part of aging this is actually a right degenerative brain disease so that's so important to keep having that conversation and let folks know that and that's the work we've been doing now is really reframing the narrative and a conversation of this is essentially a public health crisis this is not just an aging issue the big part of that is working on stigma obviously as you mentioned and that stigma issue goes across the board we've done a lot of work in massachusetts over the past year thinks the state budget funding actually on underserved populations across the commonwealth specifically african americans and latinos rep the two times more likely to develop alzheimer's disease why is that you know there's a number of reasons alex you can look at a lot.

alzheimer
"alzheimer" Discussed on Part-Time Genius

Part-Time Genius

03:59 min | 2 years ago

"alzheimer" Discussed on Part-Time Genius

"Out all the environmental factors potentially connected with alzheimer's like i saw this one report in the journal of neuroscience about how even something like sleeping on your side can help delay the development of both alzheimer's and parkinson's and apparently it goes back to the fluid flush routine our brains used to clear out waste like it turns out the fluid flows most effectively when we're sleep and on our sides all right so it sounds like we've got the solution here we just need to do some sudoku puzzles all day long liner side and then drink ourselves into a wine komo's that that's the solution here yeah and pick up cantonese i think part of right right okay that's right but i mean you know there's no surefire way to hold back alzheimer's either you know that's the thing about all these environmental risks we're talking about like they can only suggest probable connections between things that have already happened like i've even seen studies that link drinking soda both regular and diet to the onset of alzheimer's and wild there might be a correlation between getting alzheimer's and drinking and soda that doesn't mean that one necessarily caused the other to happen well that's a good point i mean these kinds of lifestyle considerations can be kind of reassuring for us to think about but the research i do find most exciting this stuff aimed at finding new detection methods for alzheimer's it's two thousand eighteen and it feels like we need a better system than having to dissect these brains postmortem agree and that's why i was excited when i first found out that we actually do have tests that can identify those gene mutations i mentioned earlier the ones that make a person more likely to develop alzheimer's but as it turns out many people who develop alzheimer's don't actually carry that genetic marker while many who do never end up exhibiting alzheimer's symptoms well so this is kind of like the plaques and tangles then right like they're reliable markers that maybe point the way to alzheimer's except for all of these cases where for some reason they don't exactly and even genetic testing can't provide any real degree of certainty one way or another and that's what makes it also confusing like even if you don't have the genetic markers you could still develop the disease or thankfully some researchers have begun branching out from genetic and environmental factors and they're concentrating on these socalled biomarkers instead now the idea here is that the body exhibits tell tell biological signs of alzheimer's that we don't necessarily have to look at the brain to find so instead we can look for these clues in all kinds of places that might be in the blood or in this rebrov spinal fluid we mentioned earlier or even in the eyes of all places and honestly that last one is probably my favorite because all it involves is administering these fancy eyedrops and let's just so much less obtrusive than digging around and somebody's brain yeah i mean obviously sounds way better to me but walk me through what makes these address so fancy well even though we have things like pets cans to help us take a closer look at living brains it can still be incredibly tough to identify those beta amyloid bill ups that often point to alzheimer's and that's largely because the betas are just one of many kinds of amyloid and there are all kinds of hard to tell apart plus there are many different neurological disorders that are linked to specific amyloid 's so if you can't tell which protein you're looking at then you really can't determine which disorder it's pointing to i see so how did the eye drops without all right well this is where things get really cool so you you know how the eyes are closely connected to the brain right well the connection is so closed that amyloid actually accumulate in our is to not just the brains so the researchers are hoping that by adding these fluorescent markers to eyedrops they'll be able to light up the amyloid in the is in different colors and of course each color would correspond to different amyloid and by extension from that to the disorder it's associated with so in theory you could have a doctor diagnosing patients condition just by looking them in the eyes and then incredible it really is and it actually.

alzheimer parkinson journal of neuroscience
"alzheimer" Discussed on Part-Time Genius

Part-Time Genius

02:05 min | 2 years ago

"alzheimer" Discussed on Part-Time Genius

"Podcast listeners welcome to part time genius pearson and his always i'm joined by my good friend main guest shot ticket her and on the other side of the soundproof glass hunched over his brand new copy of mandarin for a while since i've seen a dummies book but that's our friend and producer trysted mcneil and of course he's on theme as usual you know i i was reading just this week about how learning new language can help stave off alzheimer's in some cases and this was from a study out of york university in toronto where they actually examined over a hundred longtime bilingual alzheimer's patients along with over a hundred monolingual patients and it turned out that on average the bilingual patients have been diagnosed with alzheimer's about four years later than the monolingual patients so the idea is that because learning a second language gives the brain such a strong workout it can actually help keep the full effects of the disease at bay longer which is really interesting but you know i it's honestly sometimes tough to say for certain because they're all kinds of genetic and environmental factors that can increase or decrease a person's chances of contracting alzheimer's and we'll be talking about a few of those later on but ultimately no one is immune to the disease in the greatest risk factor associated with it of course is is just age itself in fact studies have clearly shown that the number of people with alzheimer's disease increases with age so much so that roughly one in five people now suffer from it by the age of eighty five and i know all of this is upsetting to think about and people have alzheimer's disease in their family are already dealing with it on a daily basis and those of us who've been lucky enough not to have to face it in some big way would probably rather focus on just about anything else but the truth is this is something everybody needs to stay informed about particularly if you plan to live past the age of sixty now the good news is that scientists are already hard at work on new research and new treatments and that's what will be focused on today you know all those promising approaches alzheimer's disease that could hopefully lied earlier detection and improve symptom management and.

pearson alzheimer york university toronto producer trysted mcneil alzheimer's disease four years
"alzheimer" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"alzheimer" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Mci mild cognitive impairment yet the report from radiology states clearly alzheimer's um and i i it was really upsetting but i i asked to be diagnosed i was having memory problems that could not be explained uh in any other ways they did all the normal through while and we had the test and i kind of knew what the results would be yet when i got them i was still shocked and upset um and i realize now i mean this was back in july i realize now this i i'm of a lot of people wandering around out there who probably would qualify for the diagnosis if they had the brain scan they just don't know it because they're managing fine they have everything that they need to do and it's going smoothly for them so is it so for you to have the diagnosis and do you think's it having that diagnosis would you want to complete in advance directive now know on what you know akin comment that i i need can make uh because of the time you know sis ii went to seek a friend i didn't have any friends so we started to look into who could be a friend and w the person that i did find who was very uh compassionate told me about the document they use where he works called the five wishes it's a twelvepage document published out of florida by ageing with dignity and it's a beautiful guide for um for people that need to make advance planning uh it breaks it down into different categories and coaches you what to do what not to do it's recognized as a legal document in almost all of the states in the states in which it's not recognize you can still use it but you have to supplement it with a couple of other things that are.

florida alzheimer
"alzheimer" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

01:49 min | 2 years ago

"alzheimer" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Worse this patient were still completely able to understand the medical decisions that they're facing and could make them themselves what what would they be choosing and it's really really hard and so we go back and look at the living wills advance directives that many of those people have filled out and the reality is that the way that just about all standard advance directives are written um they don't really apply to what if i were to develop dementia than they are very focused on pretty specific and it's important but very rare conditions like a persistent vegetative state or a process comma but don't really speak to what if uh that person had dementia all right and of course dementia and alzheimer's um you know effect can affect a lot more of us during a 2012 ted talk global development expert alana shake told the audience that her father has alzheimer's and that she is changing her life with the expectation that she too will eventually develop the disease if the martyr wants to you the monsters gonna get you especially for me because alzheimer's tensor on and families so i'm preparing to get alzheimer's disease based on what i've learned from taking care of my father and researching what it's like to live with dementia i'm focusing on three things and my preparation i'm changing what i do for fun i'm working to build my physical strength and this is the hardwon i'm trying to become a better person so these all sound like really good and worthy things that one should be doing but of course she doesn't mention the thing about preparing for what happens once she gets it.

persistent vegetative state dementia alzheimer alana shake alzheimer's disease
"alzheimer" Discussed on Fear Based Life

Fear Based Life

02:21 min | 2 years ago

"alzheimer" Discussed on Fear Based Life

"Yes you i mean like yeah love your deal i know yeah but like every saying it's so strange that everything intangible seems like an absolute fairytale to me lately yeah we'll get also in the me maybe that's just where you are now maybe like i love for there to be a heaven you know especially as my parents get older and look i i'd love for there to be something like that i don't know if i actually believe in it yeah i feel that same way i've gone back in the north yeah have you ever seen anyone die yes my grandmother oh you saw heard i am so sorry yeah no it is it was time it was time what happened being thin asking um she she'd been living with my parents and i was a college but i was a college that was very close and uh and basically got the phone call from my mom and she's like mom i'm starting to go can you come home and they would just you know it was time she'd been she had alzheimer's she wasn't she wasn't even really herself anymore and hadn't been for quite a long time and so it was basically just you know she was she wasn't even in her in there anymore the watching watching her body gives out we've kind of peaceful 'cause she wasn't the same anymore because yeah because she wasn't she wasn't my grandmother anymore you know when you she hadn't really really bad dementia towards the end and you know she you know she'd been this sweet kind of kind of simple woman you know and you know and she she cds incredibly horrible things when she was in the throes of dementia like enough to the point they you i don't know if you've ever seen anybody in with dementia.

alzheimer
"alzheimer" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

01:50 min | 2 years ago

"alzheimer" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Early on said alzheimer's disease and these of patients who can develop in their fifties 40s and even 30's and for them many of them have inherited a genetic mutation which gives them a 5050 chance of developing the disorder and so some patients will have a genetic mutation that if they carry that particular genetic mutation they will certainly go on to develop alzheimer's and there is a test for those individuals and in the book i interviewed many of the patients with earlyonset alzheimer's disease and some of the patients decided to have the test and found out they were positive and it sort of change a life in in in many different ways and other patients decided they didn't once night but for the vast majority of alzheimer's cases what we call the lateonset alzheimer's cases the stories a little bit different it's more that there are as opposed to genetic mutations there what we call genetic risk factors and these adjust variance in dna just in the same way that you have very syrian sin dna the account for differences in eye color height hair all these things that differentiates us from one another there are lots of the risk factors route seimas and we've identified about twenty so far and we know that they just slightly tip the scale in favor of out seimas but there is one in particular risk factor coot apob four and we know that that is a particularly strong respect to fraut seimas we know for instance that after the epa we fool gene is present in about thirty percent of the population but it's also president about fifty percent of all out seimas cases so you could if you want to to you know they're all these companies these days who allow you to have your genome sequence too you can be tested sudden jeans.

alzheimer epa president alzheimer's disease thirty percent fifty percent
"alzheimer" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"alzheimer" Discussed on Fresh Air

"A in a number of alzheimer's patients we why isn't as people would die of other classa widow again exactly because they don't have all the causes bit before getting out seimas so you know wants eu policy age of sixty five every five years your odds of alzheimer's in double but oversee it depends what your you'll baseline old saw butts in a because it's primarily a disease of old age if we can just push it back all manish the simpsons to the point where they don't have the profound memory loss they don't have the confusion and the fear and and all the things that come along with alzheimer's disease you can push that back and just let them and and then they will die naturally of some of the process so it's not s you know it it's a it's similar studies in the sense that she no it's it's finding a way to manage its treats it in such a trip to try and keep the symptoms of it at bay well i wanna thank you so much for talking with us god thank you for having me joseph do belly is the author of the new book in pursuit of memory the fight against alzheimer's after a break marine corrigan will have an appreciation of mystery writer sue grafton who died last week and will hear the interview i recorded with graft in a 1989 when she was up to the letter f f is for fugitive and her alphabet mystery series this is fresh air count which would you pay to avoid warning traffic swire plane tickets to voice he so expensive what can the tuna cannery in the middle of the pacific tells about taxes on part of rcs cohost the indicator a new podcast fight of money we're in every episode we take on a new unexpected idea to help you make sense of the day's news get it on npr one or wherever you get your podcasts.

alzheimer sue grafton eu alzheimer's disease writer npr five years
"alzheimer" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

01:49 min | 2 years ago

"alzheimer" Discussed on Fresh Air

"The evidence for these memory games and he's brain training games is it is very conflicting there is some evidence for its uh but the trial the trials and not port the problem is the trials in a big enough sophisticated enough and they have been replicated enough for us to say definitively if you engage in this memory game you will significantly increase your memory and loss of researchers think that actually you know your your trading son pulse of the brain and you'll you'll because you're getting through to the game itself as opposed to increasing the capacity and the ability of your memory in a in a global sense and so it's it's an ongoing air research it's just it's something that we there is evidence for and again i would sunny still encourage people to add to do these things because c training your brain and remaining monthly engage an active in as many ways you can is good for the brain but we still don't know for sure whether or not these having a significant effect everybody who reaches a certain age and start losing some of the memory things like omega i am i getting alzheimer's and let everybody always says is if you lose your keys you're just being forgetful if you forget what your keys are four then you're starting to have dementia as that a helpful way of looking at at uh i think that's a very helpful way of looking at it because it helps to distinguish between just normal everyday for guessing on something that is potentially a bit more sinister so as you said you noted losing aquis if it gets and we put a gloss is completely normal it's it but it when you find your gloss no keys and you think what are these four that's the sign that there's something else going on that it's not just the match.

alzheimer
"alzheimer" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

02:09 min | 2 years ago

"alzheimer" Discussed on Fresh Air

"You know there they're all tests it for you to understand your risk um but as notts for the vast majority of cases as not attest to to to know definitively if your destined for alzheimer's there labs several memory tests on the market can i tell you that you're having a memory declined because of aasheim asked mm it's very difficult to to to to to clean up meaningful information from memory tests because memory works by many ways to a a muscle and often people have every day for guessing simply because they're a bit tired they might be a bit depressed they have an navy given enough attention to thing they're trying to remember in the first place so they're all these different factors that can affect your memory and when you go through the process of getting an a diagnosis for alzheimer's so i did this in the book uh for one of my chopped hisashi went through the process of having the cognitive tests and having the memory tests and speaking to the memory specialists and going through every step along the way of of someone who goes on to learn if they have out was on on and all the memory tests do is just it it they add to a collection of evidence that then allows clinicians to say that the diagnosis of probable outside missed disease is what they call it we can only tell definitively a postmortem when pathologists than look in the brain and they see the buildup of these stick keep proteins that we complex and tangles and they they they they they look at that and that's in in collaboration with the deficits in memory and the behavioral changes and all of this sort of clinical signs that you see in a patient during life that is will put together to then to tell them eulogists okay this person had out seimas disease so the memory tests ernie a small piece of the puzzle and you know it's very interesting because recent research is actually suggested that although memory is one of the first things to go and out signs disease.

alzheimer
"alzheimer" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

02:28 min | 2 years ago

"alzheimer" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Yes i think um the family is that first community is add two gives you feedback about the changes and gives you the place where you can try out this new way of being and as and so the the family it is a place where people can talk about it too can uh again that word on normalize life again it it it's also the place where a lot of learning has to happen um i one of the things and i think jerry mentioned is like just around the dining room table uh when the conversation goes so quickly am and we don't even realize especially at uh when their holiday gatherings the conversation goes so fast in it to remember that the for the person uh with alzheimer's out there trying to process what's being said and and often by the time they get their thoughts together um the conversation has already gone onto the next topic and and so it's so important to beat for the family to be become sensitive to this and in that case so to slow down in in to whom i may concern we have uh a refrained adjust give me a minute and and and that's what that touches on somewhere about the theater project that you just brought up to whom i may concern what are you dear what does it mean for people who share their stories on every it's it's an opportunity you know people are invited to to share people who are aware of what's happening to share uh what life is like and then um i scripted into a letter forms so that they are then able to read it before an audience of a care partners and and and professionals and what um this this developed uh from my dissertation years ago when i like kept listening to these stories and thinking you know i can't use told these myself people need to hear this and that's what to whom i may concern it it puts on stage uh people uh with alzheimer's or other forms of dementia and gives them a chance to initiate the conversation tell the stories and then in the talkback allows the audience to ask the questions that maybe they were hesitant to ask uh so so.

alzheimer jerry
"alzheimer" Discussed on Biden's Briefing

Biden's Briefing

02:25 min | 3 years ago

"alzheimer" Discussed on Biden's Briefing

"Hey using abidi's briefing every day i handpicked relevant stories and topics nunes to share with you and now on the debris doctors have trouble diagnosing alzheimer's a dozen algorithms can look at brain scans of people exhibiting memory loss and tell who will develop alzheimer's disease and who won't buy daisy you haas for nbc news alzheimer's disease is notoriously difficult to diagnose the only way doctors can tell for sure that a patient has the deadly neurodegenerative condition is to examine his or her brain during an autopsy after death that uncertainty is hard on patients who are starting to experience memory loss which could be an early sign of alzheimer's or another more treatable form of dementia it also poses a major challenge the researchers were working to come up with effective treatments for the disease which afflicts some five million americans but now artificial intelligence is learning to do what doctors can't separate teams of scientists at the university of bari in italy and mcgill university in canada have created artificial intelligence algorithms that can look at brain scans of people who are exhibiting memory loss and tell who will go on to develop fullblown alzheimer's disease and who won't the technology we developed will accelerate the discovery of therapies for alzheimer's disease lead study author salon thus ingeba martha tara st a software developer at macgill's translational neuro imaging lab told nbc news mock in an email that's because a i can help scientists identify participants for drug or lifestyle interventions at the earliest stages of dementia at mcgill the researchers fed an algorithm one hundred ninety one pet scans of the brains of patients experiencing a decline in memory and thinking abilities a condition called mild cognitive impairment the researchers taught the algorithm which of these people had gone onto develop alzheimer's and which had not the keita telling the two groups apart is a protein called amyloid which shows up in the brains of people with alzheimer's and those with mild cognitive impairment to the naked eye of the physicians amyloid images show a widespread distribution through the entire brain bothell todd she wrote the difference and amyloid between the two groups is to subtle for humans.

nunes alzheimer neurodegenerative condition artificial intelligence canada software developer macgill keita abidi alzheimer's disease nbc university of bari italy mcgill university