39 Burst results for "alzheimer"

Fresh update on "alzheimer" discussed on Bloomberg Best

Bloomberg Best

03:00 min | 7 hrs ago

Fresh update on "alzheimer" discussed on Bloomberg Best

"Ad Council present the story of Tom and lead by Thomas the Smartest man I know he's been a professor at two major universities been a teacher for over 40 years. One day he told me that he was having, um, problems and his classes. I think one of the students had asked the question and he didn't remember the answer. I also noticed that he was leading his class out earlier than they were supposed to let out and he was telling them that he's doing it. Was a favorite to them, but in reality, he just wanted to get out of there. Um, I was really certain to worry because I saw something is wrong. Leave I am I talked about how it would change our lives. But he was there beside me and my love for him was just immense. When something feels different, it could be Alzheimer's. Now is the time to talk. Visit lz dot org slash our stories to learn more. A message from the Alzheimer's Association and the God, counsel for the Jewish communal fund past President Noel Spiegel. People often ask me why it's important to use J. C. A. For the charitable giving. I tell them that JC F has a profound impact on our community. Thanks to the revenue generated from our funds. J. C F makes an annual $2 Million grant to you, J. A Federation of New York and makes grants from our endowment, the Special Gifts fund. This year, we proudly granted more than $800,000 to support a kosher food pantry. In Ireland. Why JCC Jewish state care at the Allianz renovation at Camp Oakhurst and an intergenerational Holocaust program at Ramaz, I'd like you to hear about our impact from a pissed special gifts fund recipient. Plus the Jewish Community Chapel is most grateful to J. C F for supplying seed money to start the organization. Almost 10,000 families have relied on Plaza to provide an affordable yet dignified Jewish funeral. Let J C F Maximize your impact visit J. C f n y dot org or call +212. 75 to 8 to 77. This is the Bloomberg Green Business report, while the United States, the European Union and a few other major economies have committed to reaching net zero emissions by 2050. No Middle East nations have done so and nearly half of the world's oil reserves are in the region. US climate envoy John Kerry met last week with Saudi Arabia as energy minister and came away with the impression that the kingdom has a very real commitment to fighting climate change. Kerry said. Saudi Arabia may possibly agree to that zero emissions target of around 2050, He said. The Saudis don't fight the language of net zero emissions, and they understand the importance. I just don't want to make idle promises. Saudi Arabia is the world's biggest crude oil exporter, and it has not decided what steps it will take. Washington wants it to build more renewable energy capacity. The energy minister has said. Saudi Arabia will generate half of its electricity from renewables such as solar and wind by 2030 Jeff Bellenger Bloomberg Radio. What's the true value of your custodial relationship?.

Backstory: FDA Approval of First Alzheimer's Drug is Mired in Controversy

Motley Fool Money

02:09 min | 13 hrs ago

Backstory: FDA Approval of First Alzheimer's Drug is Mired in Controversy

"Let's move this and talk about treatment for another health challenge. Alzheimer's shares of biogen are up forty percent in the month of june. Because the fda approved biogen's drug to treat alzheimer's this is the first medication aimed at slowing cognitive decline. For people with alzheimer's that regulators have approved and yet it is not without controversy. Three members of the fda advisory panel resigned over the decision. There are a couple of threads to get to here. But i guess my first question is what is going on here is like. Was this a mistake to green. Light this treatment. Well a chris. I call this nearly biotech soap opera. You can even bring in greek mythology here. first of all biogen's drug is like the mythical phoenix it. Literally rose from the ashes. I mean this was a drug that not all that long ago had been relegated to the trash heap seemingly failing late stage clinical studies badgen later came back and did some further analysis and analysis and they said hey you know we. We actually see that. There's a potential here and they they pursued and then ultimately did file for fda approval and ultimately won. But you're right it's extremely extremely controversial. The fda's advisory committee that was convened to review. The data came back and voted ten against recommending approval. One abstention no member of that committee voted in favor of this drug being approved. They thought that another clinical study needed to be conducted to to establish that the drug was actually effective. And so and and not even just that several members of the committee wrote op eds publicly urging the fda not to go ahead and approve. Distract the fda. Did it anyway. And so it's extremely

Biogen Alzheimer FDA Badgen Phoenix Chris
Fresh update on "alzheimer" discussed on Motley Fool Money

Motley Fool Money

00:50 min | 13 hrs ago

Fresh update on "alzheimer" discussed on Motley Fool Money

"Three members of the fda advisory panel resigned over the decision. There are a couple of threads to get to here. But i guess my first question is what is going on here is like. Was this a mistake to green. Light this treatment. Well a chris. I call this nearly biotech soap opera. You can even bring in greek mythology here. first of all biogen's drug is like the mythical phoenix it. Literally rose from the ashes. I mean this was a drug that not all that long ago had been relegated to the trash heap seemingly failing late stage clinical studies badgen later came back and did some further analysis and analysis and they said hey you know we. We actually see that. There's a potential here and they they pursued and then ultimately did file for fda approval and ultimately won. But you're right it's extremely extremely controversial. The fda's advisory committee that was convened to review. The data came back and voted ten against recommending approval. One abstention no member of that committee voted in favor of this drug being approved. They thought that another clinical study needed to be conducted to to establish that the drug was actually effective. And so and and not even just that several members of the committee wrote op eds publicly urging the fda not to go ahead and approve. Distract the fda. Did it anyway. And so it's extremely controversial. Where does this go from here because part of me. Here's what you're saying in thinks if those people are right if this doesn't deserve approval then it's essentially setting up patients and their families for huge disappointments. It very well could. And i think that's the sad thing about this chris. I personally had a grandparent who had alzheimer's disease before she passed away. And you know we really need an effective treatment and it would be a shame if as some of the experts believed district really doesn't work now. I hope it does. I hope in abidjan does have to conduct another clinical study that was part of the accelerated approval a decision and so i hope it comes out and destroy actually does work but if you look at the data it's it's really a toss of the coin as to whether or not it's actually effective or not In terms of timing is the next trial by biogen is going to be doing. Is that later. This year is at sometime in two thousand twenty. Two the confirmatory study will take years to conduct. It's likely that we won't know the results of that study. Possibly eight or nine years from now. Well let's close on a much more short term note here. What look this is an industry. You follow every single day. It's an industry. I have only passing familiarity with. What are a couple of things that you think are going to be worth watching in the healthcare industry in the second half of twenty twenty one. Yeah chris i think the biggest story by far will be krona virus variants. What happens. You know you've got we already had the uk variant. We've got the brazilian variant but the really concerning right now is the delta area those identified in india. And you know it just remains to be seen. What's going to happen there you know. How effective will our current vaccines be against these variants. Had and there could be more there emerges. Well how effective will they be. Will we need booster doses. More sooner rather than later to provide additional protection against various How effective will some Modified vaccines the fis. Madonna are working on targeting specific variants bay. There'd conducting clinical studies. This is a huge study Huge story because it doesn't just impact healthcare world impacts the entire world. You know we talked earlier about the economy reopening if you know if they're really bad dangerous variants emerged. That vaccines aren't as effective against that could change the dynamics of the global economy you can read his articles on fool dot com. You can follow him on twitter. The guy knows his stuff.

India TWO Madonna Two Thousand Twitter Three Members First Question TEN Biogen UK This Year Second Half Eight Nine Years Twenty ONE FDA First Years Krona
Biogen's New Alzheimer's Drug Is a Medicare Budget Buster

The KFBK Morning News

01:55 min | 2 d ago

Biogen's New Alzheimer's Drug Is a Medicare Budget Buster

"New drug for Alzheimer's comes with rather controversial approval, and now we're learning a huge price tag. The drug is called Adele Adele home, I should say adult film. It was approved by the FDA last week. It's $56,000 per year for a supply. Medicare copays could reach $11,000. The Alzheimer's Association's sharply criticized the manufacturer, Biogen for that price tag. You're about to hear from Paul Seagirt. He is with PCs advisers there in Northern California firm. They help businesses manage health care costs, And he says, This is a perfect example of what is wrong with how we approve and distribute drugs. We've got great health care how we pay for? It's crazy. This is a perfect example. You've got a $56,000 drug that the FDA is just approved. Three of the scientists who were on the review panel That made a recommendation to the FDA have resigned because of the 11 in November, 10 said. No, I'm recommending to approve it and one said, I don't know. And yet they still approved a drug that Has, you know, really hasn't shown itself to be effective. They're going to build $56,000. A year for each person that's on this drug. It's incredible. The FDA advisory board gave the thumbs down to this drug. Yet it got approved by the agency. The question is why It's a great question, and unfortunately, I There's a lot of financial drivers that drive our whole system. I'm a free market person. I'm not against that. But we've a lot. We're approving this thing and then saying we're going to allow them to do a nine year confirmatory trial. Which in those nine years if they do end up confirming that it is not Very effective or not that effective or not at all, effective. We're gonna have spent hundreds of billions of dollars at that time frame. We're

Adele Adele FDA Alzheimer's Association Paul Seagirt Biogen Alzheimer Northern California
Fresh update on "alzheimer" discussed on The Dori Monson Show

The Dori Monson Show

00:29 sec | 14 hrs ago

Fresh update on "alzheimer" discussed on The Dori Monson Show

"Of risk. There are a lot of deaths on those things. But when I heard about this kid dying in a practice, jumping a one month old baby very sad. Alex Harvey was 28 years old, his play to jump Check the news for you. The 1st 15 is coming up next. Are you or someone you know, living with Alzheimer's disease consider participating in the theory of farmers. Clinical trials exploring a novel repair in regenerative approach to Alzheimer's disease. There is clinical trials are late stage clinical studies of an investigational drug for the treatment of mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease. Contact 1 806 684717 Today. Once again 1 806 684717 Today Are.

Alex Harvey 1 806 684717 Today 1St 15 28 Years Old One Month Old Alzheimer
A Closer Look at the Controversial Alzheimer's Drug Approved by the FDA

KOGO Weekend News Edition

02:00 min | 6 d ago

A Closer Look at the Controversial Alzheimer's Drug Approved by the FDA

Fresh update on "alzheimer" discussed on This Week in Science

This Week in Science

01:23 min | 15 hrs ago

Fresh update on "alzheimer" discussed on This Week in Science

"Title of the paper. Yeah so this happens. Apparently a lot with alzheimer's mice don't get alzheimer's but we can. We have mice that hack in exhibit alzheimer's qualities do research on them and one of the things that's also true about that research. Is that almost none of the studies that are done in mice translate into humans under this model. There's things that are learned along the way but it's not that it will have that effect on humans. So yeah so you have to know whether or not true at some point. We're going to cure probably every disease known to mankind and even some diseases that they've never been able to get here and mice but it doesn't always translate into humans however in doing so. We learn pieces of the puzzle that we can later put together on human model at some later date but yeah just just leaving mice out of that title makes people think that it applies to humans so this is starting from the the research itself though if the research doesn't have mice in the title than of the paper of the paper then journalists don't report it correctly and then a reading for it just is a bad game of telephone all down the line because people forgot to specify but that's just bad for the field of science journalism and makes me actually wondering if it's science journalism i will even put it there because it's not like leaser and it's it's pop culture journal that's not in journalism it's just not really journalists. Who are trained to talk about science mono but they will appear or nine news local news segment which you assume has journalists behind the scenes so this is just part of the problem so it's kind of just encouraging maybe researchers to put now pontiac mice at the end of every every paper title about What they've done with mice dot dot in mice. We cured cancer. Dot dot dot in my my goodness reporters. Do your work make better. Sad clarify that in the title. That next story. I got out of oregon state university. Researchers found a pair a pair of compounds originating from hops. They can help. Prevent the build up of fat in the liver which is huge. Because apparently there's like a quarter of people in the world that have this fatty liver disease often. It's brought about by drinking but people who don't drink can get it as well non-holiday twenty five percents mater. Both both the good news is hoppy. Beer prevents liver failure in. It's now safe to overindulge. In the study. Sixty mice were man mouse. Study saying.

Sixty Mice Both Nine News ONE Twenty Five Percents Oregon State University Quarter Of People News Every Paper Pair Things
Medicare Copays for New Alzheimer's Drug Could Reach $11,500

AP News Radio

00:49 sec | Last week

Medicare Copays for New Alzheimer's Drug Could Reach $11,500

"A new drug it's been shown to reduce clumps of plaque in the brain could become the most costly medication covered by Medicare add your home from drugmaker Biogen is the first new Alzheimer's medication in nearly twenty years the company's price the intravenous medication at fifty six thousand dollars a year a new analysis from the Kaiser family foundation says the cost of the drug would raise Medicare premiums broadly and that some older patients could be looking at co payments of about eleven thousand five hundred dollars annually Medicare hasn't made a formal determination on covering at your home the Kaiser report estimated that it just happened million Medicare recipients are prescribed the drug it'll cost the program nearly twenty nine billion dollars a year the drug has sparked controversy over its price tag and questionable benefits several members of an FDA advisory panel that oppose the drug resigned over the agency's decision to approve it I'm Jennifer king

Drugmaker Biogen Medicare Kaiser Family Foundation Alzheimer Kaiser FDA Jennifer King
Alzheimer’s Drug Likely to Be FDA Approved Despite Potential Risks

Afternoon News with Tom Glasgow and Elisa Jaffe

00:44 sec | Last week

Alzheimer’s Drug Likely to Be FDA Approved Despite Potential Risks

"Drug is reasonably likely to result in a clinical benefit and granted approval. Despite potential risks. NBC's Brian Clark with details The FDA s decision to grant accelerated approval to Biogen's new Alzheimer's drug is a historic first in the fight against the disease. It's not a cure. It's not a panacea, but it is a first line treatment that that does look at the underlying cause of the disease. Dr. Joanne Pike, the chief strategist of the Alzheimer's association, points out Alzheimer's remains a fatal disease. We have to have a first line treatment before we can get to a second line or a third line, Dr Pike says. This requires the health care system do prioritize Early detection. Brian Clark ABC News The Department of Justice

Alzheimer's Drug Brian Clark Biogen Dr. Joanne Pike Alzheimer's Association NBC Alzheimer's FDA Fatal Disease Dr Pike Abc News Department Of Justice
FDA Approves Much-Debated Alzheimer’s Drug Panned by Experts

AP News Radio

00:48 sec | Last week

FDA Approves Much-Debated Alzheimer’s Drug Panned by Experts

"The food and drug administration approved the first new drug for Alzheimer's disease in nearly twenty years but there were doubts the drug is from Biogen magic can amount which is now could be marketed as and you held the FDA approved the drug saying it was based on results that seems reasonably likely to benefit Alzheimer's patients Dr Maria Correo is chief science officer with the Alzheimer's association this therapy slows the progression of the disease because it addresses the underlying biology one of the hallmarks of Alzheimer's which is amyloid plaques therapy usually manages symptoms of Alzheimer's like insomnia or anxiety FDA advisor Dr Caleb Alexander said no to the drug's approval he said the agency has regulatory standards based on evidence but in this case he thinks the product get a pass at Donahue Washington

Alzheimer's FDA Dr Maria Correo Alzheimer's Association Biogen Dr Caleb Alexander Insomnia Washington
First New Drug for Alzheimer's in 20 Years Approved by FDA

AP 24 Hour News

00:16 sec | Last week

First New Drug for Alzheimer's in 20 Years Approved by FDA

"And Drug Administration approved the first drug they say may help slow Alzheimer's disease. It's a surprise decision. The FDA is independent advisor said the treatment hadn't been shown to help treat Alzheimer's. The drug from Biogen is the first new Alzheimer's treatment in nearly 20 years, The

Alzheimer's Drug Administration FDA Biogen Alzheimer's Treatment
Alzheimer’s Drug From Biogen Wins US Approval

Bloomberg Businessweek

00:24 sec | Last week

Alzheimer’s Drug From Biogen Wins US Approval

"Service prices as we're seeing activity picking up Biogen has received approval for its controversial Alzheimer's disease, their appeal landmark decision that stands to dramatically change treatment for the debilitating brain condition. Bijan shares up now by 40.2%. Japan's A Sigh is working with Bijan on the Alzheimer's drug. It's a TRS are also surgeon today.

Alzheimer's Disease Biogen Bijan Alzheimer's Drug Japan
FDA Approval of New Alzheimer’s Drug May Boost Prospects

The Readout Loud

02:09 min | 2 weeks ago

FDA Approval of New Alzheimer’s Drug May Boost Prospects

"Today. I think really take this week on reading. The the fda tea leaves of drug approved ability. We'll thank you. Say but yeah. I think you know we are basically on the eve of what is expected to be. This momentous decision by the fda on canyon have the controversial alzheimer's disease treatment from biogen and because there isn't really much to do in terms of trying to predict that decision. There isn't much information to pick apart. I think people you know resort to to what we all would which is maybe not quite tinfoil hat but we look at whatever evidence there is and try to construct a take and so for months. I think there's been this. Focus especially in the investor community on parsing each individual. Fda decision for clues as to some sort of like meta take on how the agency is thinking about new drugs. Yeah i mean you know. There's this idea right like you know is the fda being more conservative would drag approvals. Is it being more flexible. Which approvals right and it has come to feel a little bit absurd so if there's a run of as there were a few months ago surprising decisions whether it be Rejections or you know. Advisory committee hearings called where they weren't previously expected then. Suddenly the vibe is oh well. They're really cracking down. And then recently we had to Drug approvals in consecutive weeks. That came through. Let's say favorably to the drug companies and sort of undramatically so then the vibes us the fda in fact. They've kind of taken their foot off the brake when it comes to this and i think you know everybody probably knows this. But the is comprised of thousands of people And even the drug review arm is separated into individual fiefdoms focused on you know different aspects of biology and science and types of drugs etc and each one has its own internal politics. Each one has its own personnel changes in its own kind of regulatory philosophy. It's different between cancer than it is from neuroscience for example and so i guess it's one of those things where reading these tea leaves has kind of maybe run out of clues to offer us and maybe we should all just kind of respected. It's a giant organization and we are on the outside of it.

FDA Alzheimer's Disease Biogen Advisory Committee Cancer
Complex Forces Are Keeping Women From Coming Back to Work

NPR's Business Story of the Day

02:06 min | 2 weeks ago

Complex Forces Are Keeping Women From Coming Back to Work

"This time last year around twenty million people were out of work now as the economy recovers employers. Say they can't find anyone higher. Still millions of women have yet to return to work. Npr's andrea shoot talked with two of them for more than twenty years. Catherine gains worked as a legal assistant in washington. Dc she had a reputation for excelling at everything documents. Foul leans reefs scanning. Whatever they needed done. I was the go to person. She even wants planned and attorneys wedding early last year. Her law firm downsized and she was laid off. She quickly applied to some temp agencies and got an assignment but then cova kicked in. Nobody had anything for me to go to in a way. It was a blessing. She had recently moved in with her mom. Who has alzheimer's take care of her. Was a fulltime job. Finding an actual job in the pandemic was daunting. I knew i couldn't work in retail. Because i knew. I couldn't be exposed and bring it home to my mother so i just had to. Just be hopeful. Sit and wait. I always say. God didn't bring me this far to drop me off earlier. This year gains moved her mother into a nursing home and now she's applying for jobs again. She'd prefer to work from home but is okay with going into a covid safe workplace. Most importantly she wants to find something that would allow her to take her mom to doctors appointments and checking on her frequently. Gains herself is sixty two now. She's willing to hunt a little longer for the right job at least until unemployment benefits run out. I'm giving myself at least till august. That's when i really hit the grind caregiving responsibilities. Are one reason labor. Economists think women are not returning to the workforce in droves. But stephanie aaronson of the brookings institution says other things are at play to. I think it's just a complex mix of factors that are keeping women out of the labor force right now ongoing concerns about the virus some industries still struggling to recover and a change of heart about how people want to spend their

Andrea Shoot Catherine Gains NPR Cova Alzheimer Washington Stephanie Aaronson Brookings Institution
Naked Mole Rats: The Key to Slowing Human Aging?

Kottke Ride Home

01:54 min | 3 weeks ago

Naked Mole Rats: The Key to Slowing Human Aging?

"Rodents only live a few years. Maybe six at the most for some of the common ones. That's comparative biologist. Russia buffet stein was stunned in the late nineties. When the naked mole rats that she'd been studying just wouldn't die. She was working with some that. Were more than fifteen years old and one naked mole rat who she first met while doing doctoral work in the eighties. A pink and wrinkly dude named joe. He is now thirty nine years old and officially the oldest living naked mole rat on record. He's barely aged at all in nearly four decades and there is every expectation that he'll make it to the big four. Oh thanks to the work of buffon's stein and increasing number of scientists studying naked mole rats and various capacities. We now know that the creatures have an astonishing lifespan of around thirty years. Joe is an anomaly of the anomalies. Of course anyone who's read. Harry potter knows what's going on here. Joe is clearly a shape shifting wizard who faked his own death after joining a colton murdering his best friend. so he's been hiding out as a naked mole rat for the past few decades. I'm onto you joe. But magical explanations aside naked mole rats. It turns out are fascinating. In addition to living exceptionally long. Lives for rodents naked mole. Rats unlike other mammals aren't susceptible to many diseases like arthritis cancer and alzheimer's they can also withstand long periods without oxygen and are impervious to pain from acid. There is so much about naked mole. Rats that is absolutely wild and researchers still trying to figure out the reason for a lot of it but we're starting to get more information because a lot more players have entered the ring in recent years due to the naked mole rats relative lack of aging and low occurrence of age associated disease. They've become a hot subject of study for cancer. Researchers and anyone interested in

Buffet Stein JOE Russia Arthritis Cancer Colton Harry Potter Alzheimer Associated Disease Cancer
Gina Brown on the Invisibility of Women Living With HIV

LGBTQ&A

02:03 min | Last month

Gina Brown on the Invisibility of Women Living With HIV

"Jump right in so you found out that you were living with hiv about twenty seven years ago and at that time how much did you know about. Or how familiar were you with hiv. My knowledge of hiv was gay guys. I remember watching the evening news talking about it even before. They had a name for it and they were calling in grid and gay plague and but it only impacted gay people right so you wind. Gay you okay. I'm good or even if if you were a lesbian. They weren't talking about hiv and lesbians. They were talking about hiv engaged. Men so you still feel like you good. No one was talking about it with women only knew what i saw on the evening news. I remember once watching the guys go up to capitol hill and they on stretchers wheelchairs. And i'll walk. I was so scared. And they had a sign and the sign says silence was dead and stay with me although she is. Do you mind telling the story of when you were told about your diagnosis. Because i think it's an amazing example of what not to do. Oh my goodness dad. Day is seared in my mind. I think if i got alzheimer's i remember that day. I i got the phone call it. And then she'll phone call on april fools day. Hey prefers and to answer the phone. Lady a mask with jean. O'brien i said speaking. And she said hey. This is miss lonzo from charity hospital. And i laughed and i laughed because it was april fool's day and i thought it was one of my friends clam joke this lady. She finally convinced me that she was really from the hospital. And she said we need you to come in. We need to talk to you about one of your test results. And i said okay and and when i went the door was open. Scientists took my hand in untapped on the door and She said come in and when she commenced should never looked down never looked out and then finally sheets of paper. She put him in front of her face. And she said while you have aids and you're gonna die

Alzheimer's Lonzo Brien Jean Aids
Open A Can (MM #3704)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | Last month

Open A Can (MM #3704)

"The Maison with Kevin Nation for years. I've heard people say that drinking soda out of aluminum cans is bad for you. The one thing I've always hated about aluminum Coggins, it doesn't keep the soda cold enough. Same thing for beer, I guess you'd say, but what I found is, why like my Coca Cola and small glass bottle because it is colder. The aluminum cans can also cause problems with our mental health. Some have thought that a possible causes Alzheimer's or perhaps even early onset dementia, but new research out of England says, that's probably not the case. But what happens? Our body doesn't process aluminum in the system. Well, as we get older, by the time, we reached our fifties and sixties, it starts messing with our brain, something, fascinating something scary, and we'll something to make, you think twice. And what's funny? They talked about drinking soda out of aluminum game but they didn't mention beer. Yeah, I can remember back to before, there were aluminum cans and didn't see the problem as much with ten, but I've always preferred glass bottles. Whether it was beer, whether it was soda, no matter what it was. And now I have something else to think about when I think about aluminum dead.

Kevin Nation Alzheimer's Onset Dementia Coggins Coca England
Open A Can (MM #3704)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | Last month

Open A Can (MM #3704)

"The Maison with Kevin Nation for years. I've heard people say that drinking soda out of aluminum cans is bad for you. The one thing I've always hated about aluminum Coggins, it doesn't keep the soda cold enough. Same thing for beer, I guess you'd say, but what I found is, why like my Coca Cola and small glass bottle because it is colder. The aluminum cans can also cause problems with our mental health. Some have thought that a possible causes Alzheimer's or perhaps even early onset dementia, but new research out of England says, that's probably not the case. But what happens? Our body doesn't process aluminum in the system. Well, as we get older, by the time, we reached our fifties and sixties, it starts messing with our brain, something, fascinating something scary, and we'll something to make, you think twice. And what's funny? They talked about drinking soda out of aluminum game but they didn't mention beer. Yeah, I can remember back to before, there were aluminum cans and didn't see the problem as much with ten, but I've always preferred glass bottles. Whether it was beer, whether it was soda, no matter what it was. And now I have something else to think about when I think about aluminum dead.

Kevin Nation Alzheimer's Onset Dementia Coggins Coca England
Simple Lifestyle Changes to Prevent Alzheimer's and Dementia With Dr. Dean Sherzai

The Chalene Show

02:32 min | Last month

Simple Lifestyle Changes to Prevent Alzheimer's and Dementia With Dr. Dean Sherzai

"One of the most interesting statistics. I've heard you talk about. Is the effectiveness of what the companies have been able to do and the effectiveness of certain types of exercise. Can you share with us. What is it we need to know. So i was part of the biggest clinical trials in the world that ucsd which was the number one neuroscience program at nih in an at columbia mind everywhere and after four hundred studies that worked on mice. Those poor mice. I was part of those. Da teams that cut their heads off and then we studied. It's terrible after all. Those studies are success. Rate has been zero. We have zero drug that does zero percent in slowing down or stopping disease. Now we have gloves that affect the symptoms era seven but even the pharmaceutical companies don't claim that it slows the disease so zero after billions and billions of dollars and all these experimentation yet and now these nutraceutical companies. You know the blue jellyfish pill and this and that they're making hundreds of millions of dollars on zero data and why because some young guy was able to buy their right. You are oh and do the right trademark and then just put some things together and sell it as a good name because it has targeted or cognition or neuro in it. So it works. Here's what works harvard eddie. Large wealth power incredibly. Well done study if you walk. A brisk walk. Not you know when we tell our patients direction all dr shares. I i'm in the garden Those are great. Those are meditation exercise. You gotta get short of tire if you do. Twenty five minutes brisk exercise every day. You lower your risk of alzheimer's by forty to forty five percent. Why is there nobody talking about it. Because there's not a hundred percent effective and for the younger people. You are more likely to abstain from alzheimer's if you start at early we're talking about nutrition. We call it neuro by the way we're not any. You are on nutrition exercise unwind which is stress management ours restorative sleep and always optimizing mental activity. By the way. None of those. You have to pay anybody well for food. You have to go somewhere to buy food. But basically it combined the fact of it we've extrapolated. We said that's kind of as much as ninety percent of alzheimer's and dementia can be prevented

Ucsd Harvard Eddie NIH Columbia Alzheimer's Dementia
Is Alzheimers Reversible? With Dr. Dale Bredesen

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

01:59 min | 2 months ago

Is Alzheimers Reversible? With Dr. Dale Bredesen

"Our guest is extraordinary. Dr a friend of mine. A pioneer in the field of neurodegeneration. Who's broken ground. That few have treaded on. And it's none other than dr dale bredesen's who you may remember from our previous podcast where we discussed his book. The ending alzheimer's. His latest book is called the end of alzheimer's program which is much more robust programmatic insight into how to actually use the protocol that he uses with patients that i use and how can kill her to anybody at any age in any part of the journey along protecting your brain or fixing your brain. He's been on the faculty of ucsf ucla university of california san diego. He's directed the program on aging at the burnham institute before we coming to the buck institute in one thousand nine hundred eighty eight as its founding president and ceo and he's currently a professor at ucla chief science officer at apollo health which is a great online platform for addressing nerd. Degeneracy so welcome dale. Thanks so much for having me on mark. I really appreciate it okay. So so. let's get into this. Because in almost people worry about heart disease diabetes But it doesn't take away who you are. Alzheimer's takes away who you are. Not gender disease takes away your soul in a sense Your memory which is really what we're made of is memories and and i think that it's a terrifying disease for so many it's it's growing and scope it's affecting millions and millions of american thinking about five million now projected to be about fourteen million and a few years the caregiver burden is enormous. That goes along with this The costs are even more than taking care of a patient with cancer. Heart disease And this is an epidemic really Globally it's you know literally hundred of millions of people are going to be affected by this.

Alzheimer Dr Dale Bredesen Ucla University Of California Burnham Institute Buck Institute Apollo Health Heart Disease Diabetes Ucsf DR Ucla San Diego Dale Heart Disease Cancer
All Disease Begins In the 'Leaky Gut'

The Ultimate Health Podcast

01:59 min | 2 months ago

All Disease Begins In the 'Leaky Gut'

"We know that diseases are inflammatory diseases. Practically every disease is a disease of inflammation at the cellular level. The cell is on fire. So it just depends. Is it a brain cell or a kidney. Cell is a gasoline or kerosene. But it's always a fire. So that's inflammation so. The goal is to live in anti-inflammatory life with all of what that means and it takes a long time to really dial that down completely for an individual but you just get started. Professor fasano and his team published this year. He said and this is the quote on the the title of the article. These guys don't exaggerate. You know because people would love to take him down and say look with this guy cena but he's so careful. in his language. The title of his article all disease begins in the parentheses leaky gut. All disease begins in the leaky gut. Well what about alzheimer's all disease. What about rheumatoid arthritis all dizzy. What m s ought psoriasis eczema. Migraines all disease begins in the leaky gut and this is what they're teaching our cutting edge physicians at the top medical school in the country. Right now is that there are five pillars in the development of all chronic inflammatory diseases and if your listeners understand that there are five picture that this is the big kahuna concept. If you understand this concept than all of the information that you pick up in podcast like yours or in books that you read like mine or in summits and things you're able to compartmentalize that information into one of the five pillars so that you can hold it because there's so much information our world today we get overwhelmed really easily

Professor Fasano Alzheimer's Psoriasis Eczema Cena Rheumatoid Arthritis Migraines
Jack Hanna, Beloved Animal Expert, Stepping Away Because of Dementia

WISH TV's News 8 Daybreak

00:34 sec | 2 months ago

Jack Hanna, Beloved Animal Expert, Stepping Away Because of Dementia

"Life. Jack Hanna has Alzheimer's disease. In a letter posted by the Columbus Sue, the Hana family says his diagnosis was has progressed quickly over the last few months. His family made the announcement yesterday. Hannah is well known for his live animal demonstrations on late night talk shows. He retired last year. The animal lovers daughters. Say he still has a great sense of humor and still wears his khakis at home. Jack Hanna's into the Wild airs Saturdays at 11 in the morning on Wish TV. It's 5 39 cicadas air set

Alzheimer's Disease Columbus Sue Jack Hanna Hannah
"alzheimer" Discussed on Here We Are

Here We Are

03:40 min | 10 months ago

"alzheimer" Discussed on Here We Are

"My My my apologies if this is just a part of a manic episode, which I myself have had. But I I don't know fuse. If you was always this way or what's happened to him but anyway All right. Well, that's. That's all the questions from fans that look like. There was. There was kind of people were just wondering what is the most current like cutting edge thing that your the most excited about So there's some. Work that's looking at activation of brain regions using these transmit nick You know basic big big magnets right and they're they're helping activate brain regions that weren't functioning as well, and it's I can't say with confidence is GonNa work for Alzheimer's but a has does seem to work. So my my grandmother who just recently passed away had Parkinson's for or two, thousand, four SOC almost fifteen years before she passed. And that was something that was not a thing when she started with her with her Parkinson's onset I'm by the time she passed away the field came along a lot to the point that it's being tried in many clinics across the world the data. The data is still unclear. As to its efficacy but I think that's if you'd ask him what I'm most excited about I don't really buy into most of the. In terms of therapies that's been one therapy Alzheimer's that has worked and that came in Nineteen ninety-six is called Mandy. It doesn't even its efficacy is towards these specific kinds of neurons dinner in our breath since then pretty much every clinical trial has failed Lilly Pfizer Merck everyone has tried many different techniques and nothing seems to be working. We've got as far as face three and failed at phase three. So I. I'm more and more inclined to looking at methodologies. That that weren't taken seriously. Five ten years ago. Well it's interesting that you use that as an example because those. Trans Cranial stimulation that that is often very closely like within the same ballpark and associated and brought into the same conversation as psychedelics which seemed to kind of do some of the same like reports of the same experiences and seem to be doing a lot of the same things in the brain anyhow just. That's that's pretty speculative. I won't put that on you, but I will say regarding the studies that have failed so far. If you're are these studies on people that have Alzheimer's already because it seems like if if you're already if your guys already gave up and it's and it's too late that seems like you're studying different thing than something that could be early onset or preventive. Great question and people who? So, pulling the curtain back a little bit. They're they're people in the field who believed that we're just looking at the wrong thing that we don't be the they say that the trash is not the problem that we're looking at the symptom we need to be looking at is happening way before that. So how much are these guys making the house? How much plastic are they going through the inside their house?.

Alzheimer Parkinson manic episode nick
"alzheimer" Discussed on Here We Are

Here We Are

03:20 min | 10 months ago

"alzheimer" Discussed on Here We Are

"Well I should clarify not rats rats bigger. So it will be all of my s how dare you Shane Show there was. A real full out of. This is you should probably shut out the. PODCAST silver, you're going to get counseled on twitter at the rat. And then literally are rat to people so. Personal at the reason? I. Thought that is because I have. Where did TB I research? I had my own set of one whole shelf of mice. I quickly calculated how many mice on one rack in the room was about as big as my bedroom. We had just a little bit over a thousand mice in that room. So that's what I what I did, but that is that is hilarious. By the way it would be maybe a hundred in this is you know So the reason that another reason that they use along with the cost and the fact that you can work with. So many of them is that we have been able to insert human genes into the mouse genome. And see the effects that expression of human gene will have on a mouse behavior and mouse pathology super example in the in the Alzheimer's Field if you if you want to ask the question. Does gene x lead to Alzheimer's Disease Right whatever gene access it could. It could gene of choice. It with humans, you can't do that. Right. You May. If you're lucky you may run into a person that has a knockout of that gene and see whether they whether or not there Alzheimer's disease but that's an OBE one in mice. You can breed a hope you can insert that gene, knock it out based on some molecular techniques, and then look at the behavior and the pathology that maps. Sounds like a great concept chain, but as you might imagine. Not, great. Because the the mouse brain is very different that they both structure the way it looks if you look a human being, it does these beautiful grooves in to increase surface area a mouse bring perfectly smooth. There are no no groups that because soul guy. I liked that because the groups are kind of how we packs so much brain into our heads, right? So mice are just like and we don't even know. Thanks. This is this is all space I. don't even really I'm not even using half the space for my brain. You know there's just a nice smooth brain will be fun. There was a recent movie in the mouse world that talked about how they only use five percent of their brains. Yes. So. So you know with the my strength is so different I'll give you a proof of concept of that. Okay. Yeah. When I did traumatic brain injury research my brief my research looked at the impact of basically hitting the mouse brain with essentially the equivalent of a piston. So imagine if I if I could take off your skull and take a big old. I don't harbor big old hammer and smash the side of your brain with it. Okay. It would almost definitely in fact, let me go out on a limb here and say it would kill you for sure right? Yeah..

Alzheimer's Disease Alzheimer twitter TB
"alzheimer" Discussed on Medical Mysteries

Medical Mysteries

06:42 min | 10 months ago

"alzheimer" Discussed on Medical Mysteries

"Ability even sugary treats can become a thing of the past in the end. It's our memories that stand the test of time precious minutes spent with loved ones, birthdays, weddings, and babies being born high and low moments that shaped who we are deep down inside. But there's one neurological condition able to rob people of all. These treasures Alzheimer's disease psychiatrist and neuropathologist a Lowest Alzheimer I documented the disease in one thousand, nine, hundred, six, today five, million Americans suffer from the onus and over one hundred thousand of these patients die every year disease related complications aside from the emotional toll the financial cost of Alzheimer's can be devastating to families according to the Centers for Disease Control total costs in the US related to. The care of someone with Alzheimer's disease or other types of dementia equalled around two hundred and seventy seven, billion dollars in two thousand eighteen to hear that a loved one has Alzheimer's is something no one wants to experience, but it's relatively common an estimated five hundred thousand Americans will be diagnosed with the disease this year and the road to that diagnosis can be one of the hardest parts. It certainly was Glen Campbell and accomplished country singer with plenty of music left to give the whole world recognized Campbell is one of the best selling country crooners to come out of the Sixties and seventies his infallible guitar skills had taken him all over the globe where he performed for thousands each night. But by his late sixties, Campbell's family noticed he was no longer his sharp witted self. One afternoon his teenage daughter Ashley, had a few friends over. They were watching the Lord of the rings in the Campbell's Home Theater. When Campbell popped in to check on them, he made some friendly Chit Chat and asked what movie they were watching. Ashley told him in Campbell nodded satisfied. Then he laughed just a few minutes later Campbell came back to ask the same question Ashley likely chalked it up to her father's eccentricities. But this time he was serious and confused it happened one more time before the end of the night. Ashley was bewildered by her father's behavior but she figured he was just having a bad day. He was getting older after all these things could happen from time to time but months later Campbell's wife Kim experienced something more frightening Campbell was looking for a tool kit and Kim mentioned it was in the garage Kim's husband just stared at her blankly the garage. Campbell didn't know what let alone wear. That was Kim was rattled. How could he have forgotten something as simple as that and fortunately it wasn't the last time. Doctors. Say One of the first signs of Alzheimer's disease is a general sense of forgetfulness and that's not something simple like forgetting where you left your keys or an appointment slipping your mind that kind of forgetfulness works a bit different from Alzheimer's thoughts are first encoded in our brains is something called working memories. Think of this stage as a sketch pad. It's temporary only necessary for quick functions like where did I leave my cell phone when our brain deems the memory important enough and when the memory is attended too often enough the brain will then encoded into a long term memory. So it goes from a sketch to a final painting hanging in the new normal moments of forgetfulness are caused by something frequently referred to as a memory lapse which. Happens when we're not paying good enough attention to something or when we haven't access to certain memory in a very long time. Say you walk in the door of your apartment did night you turn on the lights, put your things down and focus your attention on dinner. You aren't recording the sketch of where you said everything down because your brain was focused on another task like what temperature to set the oven at researchers say that early signs of Alzheimer's are far more troubling than an ordinary memory lapse instead they're a lot like the ones we saw in Campbell's case when a patient with Alzheimer's loses their keys. Typically turn up on a dresser or table instead they appear in unexplained locations like the refrigerator and when they're found a patient might immediately forget the next step like what those keys Goto essentially that painting that once hung in the Louvre. The one that says keys don't belong in. Now seems to be missing it's a big problem, but ultimately, it all comes down to tiny neurons. Neurons are the Messenger cells of the human body when memories are created in a healthy mind, they form unique pathways between certain neurons and when we go back to access these memories, these neurons off in very similar patterns when compared to the patterns observed during the memories initial recording these pathways and firing patterns becomes stronger. The more we access that memory they're also stronger if the moment was significant to. US? That's why we find ourselves reliving many of these same memories especially things that were special or tragic in our past. One of the first things to go in Alzheimer's patients are their short term memories and that's because those neuron pathways are still patchy dirt roads. They're not as frequently traveled as long term memories which are more like highways. It's for this same reason that patients also experience mood swings. These changes in behavior are typically brought on by the frustration and confusion of disappearing memories as well as by the general difficulty that many patients have in making sense of their surroundings. This was the case with acclaimed actor gene wilder wilder was a comic genius known for his Quick Timing and Quirky screen presence in films like Willie Wonka and the chocolate factory offscreen people knew him as a sweet mild mannered guy but around the time.

Glen Campbell Alzheimer Alzheimer's disease Ashley Kim Centers for Disease Control US gene wilder wilder Home Theater Willie Wonka
"alzheimer" Discussed on Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

02:34 min | 1 year ago

"alzheimer" Discussed on Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

"Come talk to me when you're fifty five. That is true. Then there's a dating. There's a hormonal component Alzheimer's. So it's like I feel only women not in that helped to live long enough to see some of these answers. I do take after my dad more than my mom. So hopefully fingers crossed. They don't have the Alzheimer's that my mom and my maternal grandmother. My maternal great grandmother all seem to have had and and honestly. You're doing the things that you would need to do. Have Interesting conversations with Aside from me thoughtful people and you know you probably read you exercise. You probably have like friends and stuff. You seem like pretty cool cool lady. She got lots of friends. And you know like you. You're a small business owner so all these things that are going to keep your mind active. You're meeting people all the time. These are the things that like without a history of brain trauma like they say you will more or less be fined for Alzheimer's but then there's also this total randomness of it whereas just like like your mom could have done all the exact same things And then she has Alzheimer's for some reason like she doing crossword puzzles every day of her life. I don't know sometimes it's just random. Do Crossword puzzles a lot but shells drink two liters diet coke every day. Yeah so it must be but I. I think I didn't exercise. 'cause she didn't have to worry she can eat her. My sister could eat crap all the time and not really gained weight. That's annoying I look at I and skinny arms now. I have to watch everything and I have. I have to work out all the time just to well that helps my brain and my emotions but to stay at a decent wait. I have to do all this. I have all this work. Which is okay. Because it's good for my brain but they like you know. The white bread wonder bread that I'm not even sure exists anymore. I don't know I make my own bread special shop for it so real glutton's like us while I liked what I was a kid. But it's not man like honestly way better like multi grain pride start just tastes better like I've made my own sourdot. Yeah me too yes good. It's it's awesome and minor segment of that on the podcast to read.

Alzheimer business owner
"alzheimer" Discussed on Let's Talk Dementia

Let's Talk Dementia

04:38 min | 1 year ago

"alzheimer" Discussed on Let's Talk Dementia

"With swallowing drinking and eating or going to be a problem too so swallowing becomes an issue issue. The brain is not sending those signals to tell the body. What to do there is a lot that has to happen for food to be eaten? You know the brains gotTa say first of all all. I'm hungry. The brain quit sending that signal but if the signal does happen then the brains gotta say pick up the fork. Put it in the mashed potatoes. SCOOP THEM UP. Put put the mashed potatoes in the mail. Chew swallow get it down the right pipe but not the wrong pipes and we don't choke to death swallowing and drinking become a problem in in eating not sleeping well or sleeping all the time. We just see that I can tell you my mom's slip slip slip a lot. Thank you if I had to choose now. I know if I had to choose And we don't get to choose. It's not up to us to decide but sleeping many hours a day. I think is easier for those in late stage Alzheimer's than not sleeping well not sleeping leads to another host problems that we don't win. We don't need increased problems with communication occasion. You'll hear things like I abba. ABBA ABBA ABBA ABBA awhile. I want you to get get get get in your like you won't want and can I get what they can't get their thoughts together. They these folks are more likely to experience infections and ammonia Nia on those chances for those things increase drastically infections especially urinary tract infections any type of invasions if they have a fall in. These is tearing the skin more likely to have infections because that pneumonia is a huge problem with votes. In the late stage of Alzheimer's in fact many of our folks will pass away because of pneumonia. In sometimes. That's put on their district. You'll get they die because of ammonia but really what they died was Alzheimer's that caused the body to be more success susceptible to them having pneumonia so it was really Alzheimer's that killed him and pneumonia was just an of a side. Perfect of that. They are definitely more likely to wonder if they are that kind of person who walks. We see some folks with a late stage. Alzheimer's as I've mentioned you just lay around all the time in sleep in some people that just walk and walk in walk in walk in walk in walk and you think sit down in those folks are definitely more likely to to try to open the door not necessarily because they want to wander. But it's a door in a DOORKNOB and I do remember how to do that so they opened the door and they will sometimes. It's very innocent thing but obviously that can lead to problems increased agitation and depression. That is very hard to deal with. The agitation is very difficult difficult because they are. They're not happy and they're not happy with you and they're not happy lives and they're not happy with what you're offering in their anger and they're liable to push you aside and say dirty words and that's hard to deal with and depression is hard to deal with. You're going to see some depression. I would say everybody dealing with late stage Alzheimer's because they are declining in to some degree are folks always know that and then no interest in activities obviously that is true no interest in activities because they know that they can't function the way they showed in it's causing them to just WanNa pull within themselves. It's a sad. It's a sad time of life but it can still be a good time of life we can still bring to our folks love in happiness and joy in music and funny stories and and I tell you one of the best things you can do is play that video and tell on Youtube of the daddy ripping a piece of paper in front of the baby and the baby be laughing. Every time daddy rips a piece of paper it just cracks me up in it will crack up your eyes with dementia. I know I've done it a bunch. Well that just clears up. Maybe a little bit about the different indifferences in the various stages of Alzheimer's. I'm here to answer your questions. You can email me and my email is carol at. Let's Talk Dementia Dot Org. Now I'm sitting here looking at myself in this screen and for those of you who watch it on Youtube use hat are on the podcast. You'll have to hear my description of got these white spots. Thought I just had this cream put on my face. As opposed to get rid of wrinkles in it did really well but I should have touched up my makeup before came on this show. I kinda look like a got got we're going on. Why didn't buy the cream? It was outrageously expensive but yes. I'll just be a wrinkle girl. I hope you you guys have a good day blessings miles.

Alzheimer Ta pneumonia Youtube depression
"alzheimer" Discussed on FoundMyFitness

FoundMyFitness

04:34 min | 2 years ago

"alzheimer" Discussed on FoundMyFitness

"Treat mild cognitive dementia and Alzheimer's disease. So thank you so much Dale having me here at your place. Thanks very much Rhonda. So maybe we can start a little bit by just talking about some of the. Characteristics and pathological distinguishing features of Alzheimer's disease, and maybe what you were thoughts are what can cause Alzheimer's disease leads to it. Right. So. It's a good point because cognitive decline, very common and Alzheimer's is the most common cause of cognitive decline ultimately dementia. And by definition, this means that you have amyloid plaques in the brain and FOSS four elated tau tangles. So those those are the two main pathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's. But as you can see, that doesn't tell you why you've got it. It just is something you look at the rain, and of course you can get something that looks virtually identical without the Loyd and you can get amyloid without the cognitive decline. So it's a marker, but it's an imperfect one. Yeah, that's a really good point. You brought up and do you have any thoughts on why? There are some people that do have amyloid plaques in their brain that aren't really demented and some others that just don't seem to handle it? Yeah, it's a great point. So here's the thing that the. The whole world is turning upside down. Now when it comes to our understanding of Alzheimer's, it's been over one hundred years. Of course going back to Ellis Alzheimer's publications back in one thousand nine hundred sixty one thousand nine hundred seven, and there hasn't been a good understanding of this disease. And of course amyloid has been for years vilified and there's no question it. It is a neuro toxin. It does have toxic effects. The surprise has been that this is also a protectant. It's actually something that is made by your brain when you have specific insults. And for example, professor Rudy Tanzi and professor Robert Moyer at Harvard too few years ago show that it is an anti microbial. It also is professor Ashley Bush showed a number of years ago. It's actually quite a good binder of dive Valent metals like copper, zinc and things like that iron. And we showed a number of years ago. It is also. Response to a reduction in traffic support. So you actually get a change in signaling. So there are multiple different insults and metabolic changes that lead the brain to produce this stuff. And so I think there's been confusion because it's clear that when you produce it, you're at this increased risk for having a degenerative process. But as you indicated, there are many people that produce it and they successfully are protecting themselves. They don't actually have. The downsizing was often been stated, is those who then have inflammation on top of that seemed to be the ones that do worse. And that's a very general idea. But really it is a, it is a set of things, and we identified in published a number of years ago, thirty six different factors all contribute this, but they actually break down into just a couple of categories. So any sort of pathogens anything that's giving you inflammation, whether you have it because you have a leaky gut or because you have PG. Vallis in your brain or because you have beryllium of Lyme disease or you've been exposed to specific fungi, things like that. All of these things can engender that response. And in fact, we think more and more of amyloid as being like, napalm, you got the bad guys coming across the border. So you're now going to put down stuff that kills the bad guys the napalm. But in so doing, you're now going to reduce your air soil, you're now living in a smaller country, and that's exactly what's going on in the brain. You are downsizing the overall network. So that's what we call type one or inflammatory or hot Alzheimer's, and I should mention I, it turns out IRA Veda physicians from thousands of years ago, recognized dementia that was related to something that was hot, that was abnormally ultimately inflammatory as well as that that was related to dry us, which is what we call type two. Where you have decreased trophy support. It can be nerve growth factor. Brain derived neurotrophic factor, Estra dial.

Alzheimer Alzheimer's disease Ellis Alzheimer professor Dale Rudy Tanzi Ashley Bush Robert Moyer Harvard one hundred years
"alzheimer" Discussed on Part-Time Genius

Part-Time Genius

03:59 min | 3 years ago

"alzheimer" Discussed on Part-Time Genius

"Out all the environmental factors potentially connected with alzheimer's like i saw this one report in the journal of neuroscience about how even something like sleeping on your side can help delay the development of both alzheimer's and parkinson's and apparently it goes back to the fluid flush routine our brains used to clear out waste like it turns out the fluid flows most effectively when we're sleep and on our sides all right so it sounds like we've got the solution here we just need to do some sudoku puzzles all day long liner side and then drink ourselves into a wine komo's that that's the solution here yeah and pick up cantonese i think part of right right okay that's right but i mean you know there's no surefire way to hold back alzheimer's either you know that's the thing about all these environmental risks we're talking about like they can only suggest probable connections between things that have already happened like i've even seen studies that link drinking soda both regular and diet to the onset of alzheimer's and wild there might be a correlation between getting alzheimer's and drinking and soda that doesn't mean that one necessarily caused the other to happen well that's a good point i mean these kinds of lifestyle considerations can be kind of reassuring for us to think about but the research i do find most exciting this stuff aimed at finding new detection methods for alzheimer's it's two thousand eighteen and it feels like we need a better system than having to dissect these brains postmortem agree and that's why i was excited when i first found out that we actually do have tests that can identify those gene mutations i mentioned earlier the ones that make a person more likely to develop alzheimer's but as it turns out many people who develop alzheimer's don't actually carry that genetic marker while many who do never end up exhibiting alzheimer's symptoms well so this is kind of like the plaques and tangles then right like they're reliable markers that maybe point the way to alzheimer's except for all of these cases where for some reason they don't exactly and even genetic testing can't provide any real degree of certainty one way or another and that's what makes it also confusing like even if you don't have the genetic markers you could still develop the disease or thankfully some researchers have begun branching out from genetic and environmental factors and they're concentrating on these socalled biomarkers instead now the idea here is that the body exhibits tell tell biological signs of alzheimer's that we don't necessarily have to look at the brain to find so instead we can look for these clues in all kinds of places that might be in the blood or in this rebrov spinal fluid we mentioned earlier or even in the eyes of all places and honestly that last one is probably my favorite because all it involves is administering these fancy eyedrops and let's just so much less obtrusive than digging around and somebody's brain yeah i mean obviously sounds way better to me but walk me through what makes these address so fancy well even though we have things like pets cans to help us take a closer look at living brains it can still be incredibly tough to identify those beta amyloid bill ups that often point to alzheimer's and that's largely because the betas are just one of many kinds of amyloid and there are all kinds of hard to tell apart plus there are many different neurological disorders that are linked to specific amyloid 's so if you can't tell which protein you're looking at then you really can't determine which disorder it's pointing to i see so how did the eye drops without all right well this is where things get really cool so you you know how the eyes are closely connected to the brain right well the connection is so closed that amyloid actually accumulate in our is to not just the brains so the researchers are hoping that by adding these fluorescent markers to eyedrops they'll be able to light up the amyloid in the is in different colors and of course each color would correspond to different amyloid and by extension from that to the disorder it's associated with so in theory you could have a doctor diagnosing patients condition just by looking them in the eyes and then incredible it really is and it actually.

alzheimer parkinson journal of neuroscience
"alzheimer" Discussed on Part-Time Genius

Part-Time Genius

02:05 min | 3 years ago

"alzheimer" Discussed on Part-Time Genius

"Podcast listeners welcome to part time genius pearson and his always i'm joined by my good friend main guest shot ticket her and on the other side of the soundproof glass hunched over his brand new copy of mandarin for a while since i've seen a dummies book but that's our friend and producer trysted mcneil and of course he's on theme as usual you know i i was reading just this week about how learning new language can help stave off alzheimer's in some cases and this was from a study out of york university in toronto where they actually examined over a hundred longtime bilingual alzheimer's patients along with over a hundred monolingual patients and it turned out that on average the bilingual patients have been diagnosed with alzheimer's about four years later than the monolingual patients so the idea is that because learning a second language gives the brain such a strong workout it can actually help keep the full effects of the disease at bay longer which is really interesting but you know i it's honestly sometimes tough to say for certain because they're all kinds of genetic and environmental factors that can increase or decrease a person's chances of contracting alzheimer's and we'll be talking about a few of those later on but ultimately no one is immune to the disease in the greatest risk factor associated with it of course is is just age itself in fact studies have clearly shown that the number of people with alzheimer's disease increases with age so much so that roughly one in five people now suffer from it by the age of eighty five and i know all of this is upsetting to think about and people have alzheimer's disease in their family are already dealing with it on a daily basis and those of us who've been lucky enough not to have to face it in some big way would probably rather focus on just about anything else but the truth is this is something everybody needs to stay informed about particularly if you plan to live past the age of sixty now the good news is that scientists are already hard at work on new research and new treatments and that's what will be focused on today you know all those promising approaches alzheimer's disease that could hopefully lied earlier detection and improve symptom management and.

pearson alzheimer york university toronto producer trysted mcneil alzheimer's disease four years
"alzheimer" Discussed on Aging In Full Bloom

Aging In Full Bloom

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"alzheimer" Discussed on Aging In Full Bloom

"Alzheimer's and other forms of dementia and they may be unkind but it's not intentional it's it's a product of their disease so we're not gonna count that that that that's not what we're talking about and then third is it hurtful so is an ongoing is it hurtful is intentional ongoing intentional and hurtful if it's those three things than indeed it is bullying and i'll give you an example in case sharing what i still don't know what you're talking about so years ago i remember i was in a senior community and there was a new gentleman who had moved in and we we had some clicks in the community some groups of people who like to hang out together and sort of excluded everyone else from their little group just like in high school and there was a one group in particular that watched all the new residents because they wanted no the low down on everybody so they could get busy spreading gossip and sure enough whenever the ladies was being very watchful this gentleman when he first did his laundry and notice that there were some what she thought were feminine items in his laundry and at first they went to the office and complained that someone else must be living with him that wasn't on the lease so that's how it all started well there wasn't anyone else living with him and eventually escalated into their the rumor that was spread was that he was a cross dresser as it turned out what had happened was this gentleman had completed his laundry taking it back to his room and another woman had come in and put her clothes in the dryer so it really wasn't even his laundry that had been observed in the first place but it's just an example of how bullying takes place a lot of times what they're arguing over in is the dining room that's a shared resource and they want to sit in there sir.

Alzheimer
"alzheimer" Discussed on Bulletproof Radio

Bulletproof Radio

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"alzheimer" Discussed on Bulletproof Radio

"On this just because i wasn't raised that way and so that's an area of my life that i still need a lot of work on because i think like many people you know once you're a sugar addict it's it's a tough thing to break even though you intellectually know it so changing behaviour i think is something we all have struggles with maybe some people just maybe you're just like got it cool i love the way i feel so i don't i'm not tempted at all i'm not that girl but i think you know i tried to check the boxes of strong spiritual life i try to stay in community but i think it's a big issue also or how do people age and stay in community how do people age and stay involved how do people age and feel need it feel useful find meaning these things we know the opposite of that loneliness isolation we know that that's not good for the brain or the body and that that increases your chances of getting alzheimer's or increases the likelihood so i think i'm really interested in the larger conversation of how we treat people as they age do we discard them how to families care for parents as they age whose job is that had we take it from duty to joy how do we build our cities to incorporate that how do how does corporate america respond to people as caregivers so that's a huge other conversation but i think it's a really interesting one and needed one if someone came to you tomorrow said based on your incredible life experience what are your three most important pieces of advice for someone who just wants to perform better as a human being just at everything they do in their life what would you tell them matters mouse well i think your health mattis mouth i just had that conversation with my kids at the table i asked them that what is the most important thing for you and i was threat.

alzheimer
"alzheimer" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"alzheimer" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Mci mild cognitive impairment yet the report from radiology states clearly alzheimer's um and i i it was really upsetting but i i asked to be diagnosed i was having memory problems that could not be explained uh in any other ways they did all the normal through while and we had the test and i kind of knew what the results would be yet when i got them i was still shocked and upset um and i realize now i mean this was back in july i realize now this i i'm of a lot of people wandering around out there who probably would qualify for the diagnosis if they had the brain scan they just don't know it because they're managing fine they have everything that they need to do and it's going smoothly for them so is it so for you to have the diagnosis and do you think's it having that diagnosis would you want to complete in advance directive now know on what you know akin comment that i i need can make uh because of the time you know sis ii went to seek a friend i didn't have any friends so we started to look into who could be a friend and w the person that i did find who was very uh compassionate told me about the document they use where he works called the five wishes it's a twelvepage document published out of florida by ageing with dignity and it's a beautiful guide for um for people that need to make advance planning uh it breaks it down into different categories and coaches you what to do what not to do it's recognized as a legal document in almost all of the states in the states in which it's not recognize you can still use it but you have to supplement it with a couple of other things that are.

florida alzheimer
"alzheimer" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

01:49 min | 3 years ago

"alzheimer" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Worse this patient were still completely able to understand the medical decisions that they're facing and could make them themselves what what would they be choosing and it's really really hard and so we go back and look at the living wills advance directives that many of those people have filled out and the reality is that the way that just about all standard advance directives are written um they don't really apply to what if i were to develop dementia than they are very focused on pretty specific and it's important but very rare conditions like a persistent vegetative state or a process comma but don't really speak to what if uh that person had dementia all right and of course dementia and alzheimer's um you know effect can affect a lot more of us during a 2012 ted talk global development expert alana shake told the audience that her father has alzheimer's and that she is changing her life with the expectation that she too will eventually develop the disease if the martyr wants to you the monsters gonna get you especially for me because alzheimer's tensor on and families so i'm preparing to get alzheimer's disease based on what i've learned from taking care of my father and researching what it's like to live with dementia i'm focusing on three things and my preparation i'm changing what i do for fun i'm working to build my physical strength and this is the hardwon i'm trying to become a better person so these all sound like really good and worthy things that one should be doing but of course she doesn't mention the thing about preparing for what happens once she gets it.

persistent vegetative state dementia alzheimer alana shake alzheimer's disease
"alzheimer" Discussed on Fear Based Life

Fear Based Life

02:21 min | 3 years ago

"alzheimer" Discussed on Fear Based Life

"Yes you i mean like yeah love your deal i know yeah but like every saying it's so strange that everything intangible seems like an absolute fairytale to me lately yeah we'll get also in the me maybe that's just where you are now maybe like i love for there to be a heaven you know especially as my parents get older and look i i'd love for there to be something like that i don't know if i actually believe in it yeah i feel that same way i've gone back in the north yeah have you ever seen anyone die yes my grandmother oh you saw heard i am so sorry yeah no it is it was time it was time what happened being thin asking um she she'd been living with my parents and i was a college but i was a college that was very close and uh and basically got the phone call from my mom and she's like mom i'm starting to go can you come home and they would just you know it was time she'd been she had alzheimer's she wasn't she wasn't even really herself anymore and hadn't been for quite a long time and so it was basically just you know she was she wasn't even in her in there anymore the watching watching her body gives out we've kind of peaceful 'cause she wasn't the same anymore because yeah because she wasn't she wasn't my grandmother anymore you know when you she hadn't really really bad dementia towards the end and you know she you know she'd been this sweet kind of kind of simple woman you know and you know and she she cds incredibly horrible things when she was in the throes of dementia like enough to the point they you i don't know if you've ever seen anybody in with dementia.

alzheimer
"alzheimer" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

01:50 min | 3 years ago

"alzheimer" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Early on said alzheimer's disease and these of patients who can develop in their fifties 40s and even 30's and for them many of them have inherited a genetic mutation which gives them a 5050 chance of developing the disorder and so some patients will have a genetic mutation that if they carry that particular genetic mutation they will certainly go on to develop alzheimer's and there is a test for those individuals and in the book i interviewed many of the patients with earlyonset alzheimer's disease and some of the patients decided to have the test and found out they were positive and it sort of change a life in in in many different ways and other patients decided they didn't once night but for the vast majority of alzheimer's cases what we call the lateonset alzheimer's cases the stories a little bit different it's more that there are as opposed to genetic mutations there what we call genetic risk factors and these adjust variance in dna just in the same way that you have very syrian sin dna the account for differences in eye color height hair all these things that differentiates us from one another there are lots of the risk factors route seimas and we've identified about twenty so far and we know that they just slightly tip the scale in favor of out seimas but there is one in particular risk factor coot apob four and we know that that is a particularly strong respect to fraut seimas we know for instance that after the epa we fool gene is present in about thirty percent of the population but it's also president about fifty percent of all out seimas cases so you could if you want to to you know they're all these companies these days who allow you to have your genome sequence too you can be tested sudden jeans.

alzheimer epa president alzheimer's disease thirty percent fifty percent
"alzheimer" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

01:49 min | 3 years ago

"alzheimer" Discussed on Fresh Air

"The evidence for these memory games and he's brain training games is it is very conflicting there is some evidence for its uh but the trial the trials and not port the problem is the trials in a big enough sophisticated enough and they have been replicated enough for us to say definitively if you engage in this memory game you will significantly increase your memory and loss of researchers think that actually you know your your trading son pulse of the brain and you'll you'll because you're getting through to the game itself as opposed to increasing the capacity and the ability of your memory in a in a global sense and so it's it's an ongoing air research it's just it's something that we there is evidence for and again i would sunny still encourage people to add to do these things because c training your brain and remaining monthly engage an active in as many ways you can is good for the brain but we still don't know for sure whether or not these having a significant effect everybody who reaches a certain age and start losing some of the memory things like omega i am i getting alzheimer's and let everybody always says is if you lose your keys you're just being forgetful if you forget what your keys are four then you're starting to have dementia as that a helpful way of looking at at uh i think that's a very helpful way of looking at it because it helps to distinguish between just normal everyday for guessing on something that is potentially a bit more sinister so as you said you noted losing aquis if it gets and we put a gloss is completely normal it's it but it when you find your gloss no keys and you think what are these four that's the sign that there's something else going on that it's not just the match.

alzheimer
"alzheimer" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

02:09 min | 3 years ago

"alzheimer" Discussed on Fresh Air

"You know there they're all tests it for you to understand your risk um but as notts for the vast majority of cases as not attest to to to know definitively if your destined for alzheimer's there labs several memory tests on the market can i tell you that you're having a memory declined because of aasheim asked mm it's very difficult to to to to to clean up meaningful information from memory tests because memory works by many ways to a a muscle and often people have every day for guessing simply because they're a bit tired they might be a bit depressed they have an navy given enough attention to thing they're trying to remember in the first place so they're all these different factors that can affect your memory and when you go through the process of getting an a diagnosis for alzheimer's so i did this in the book uh for one of my chopped hisashi went through the process of having the cognitive tests and having the memory tests and speaking to the memory specialists and going through every step along the way of of someone who goes on to learn if they have out was on on and all the memory tests do is just it it they add to a collection of evidence that then allows clinicians to say that the diagnosis of probable outside missed disease is what they call it we can only tell definitively a postmortem when pathologists than look in the brain and they see the buildup of these stick keep proteins that we complex and tangles and they they they they they look at that and that's in in collaboration with the deficits in memory and the behavioral changes and all of this sort of clinical signs that you see in a patient during life that is will put together to then to tell them eulogists okay this person had out seimas disease so the memory tests ernie a small piece of the puzzle and you know it's very interesting because recent research is actually suggested that although memory is one of the first things to go and out signs disease.

alzheimer
"alzheimer" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

02:28 min | 3 years ago

"alzheimer" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Yes i think um the family is that first community is add two gives you feedback about the changes and gives you the place where you can try out this new way of being and as and so the the family it is a place where people can talk about it too can uh again that word on normalize life again it it it's also the place where a lot of learning has to happen um i one of the things and i think jerry mentioned is like just around the dining room table uh when the conversation goes so quickly am and we don't even realize especially at uh when their holiday gatherings the conversation goes so fast in it to remember that the for the person uh with alzheimer's out there trying to process what's being said and and often by the time they get their thoughts together um the conversation has already gone onto the next topic and and so it's so important to beat for the family to be become sensitive to this and in that case so to slow down in in to whom i may concern we have uh a refrained adjust give me a minute and and and that's what that touches on somewhere about the theater project that you just brought up to whom i may concern what are you dear what does it mean for people who share their stories on every it's it's an opportunity you know people are invited to to share people who are aware of what's happening to share uh what life is like and then um i scripted into a letter forms so that they are then able to read it before an audience of a care partners and and and professionals and what um this this developed uh from my dissertation years ago when i like kept listening to these stories and thinking you know i can't use told these myself people need to hear this and that's what to whom i may concern it it puts on stage uh people uh with alzheimer's or other forms of dementia and gives them a chance to initiate the conversation tell the stories and then in the talkback allows the audience to ask the questions that maybe they were hesitant to ask uh so so.

alzheimer jerry