36 Burst results for "alyssa"

"alyssa" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

04:35 min | 9 hrs ago

"alyssa" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

"Of the jim crow era we should also whole this out. that's right our tax. Laws are remnant of the jim crow era absence. Thank you for this incredible education. I feel embarrassed that i wasn't more aware before. I read your book as an activist. Someone that tries to fight for racial justice obviously have so much to learn. But thank you for this education and speaking to this and it being used. You shouldn't be embarrassed because remember. I went into tax law thinking it had nothing to do with race. And i went to school for dance floor. Yeah it's really incredible. It's really incredible and your work is really incredible. And though question i'd like to end these interviews with is just a simple question of what gives you hope what gives me hope was all the people worldwide marching in the street this summer during covert nineteen for racial justice and equality across the board that gives me hope surveys. That show seventy something percent of white americans think. Racism is a problem that gives me hope. But there's so much more work to do but the conversation i'm having with you. Somebody is talking to me about race in tax. That gives me hope. Elissa because remember been in the wilderness since nineteen ninety six. You're not in the wilderness anymore. I hear here with you. I am by your side. Let's do this. let's do this. Dorothy brown you give me hope so you thank you so much for all that you do and for being a part of the podcast. The us has very high disparities. I income wealth and ability compared to other countries and these disparities are heavily skewed by race and inheritances are an important part of this because they magnify all of these forms of economic inequality. If you look at the data black households are about half as likely to receive an inheritance as white households and when white households do on average. It's twenty six times larger than black house so in order to address these systemic in all we need to do a lot of things but a vital component is changing tax policy so the average federal tax rate on income in the form of inheritances is just about one seventh of the average tax rate on income from savings in good old hard work. If you're one of those people who say white privilege doesn't exist. This episode better have changed your mind. As white people we benefit from advantages. We never even think about and both the advantages and the fact that they never cross our mind are proof of our privilege. We already know that. Our tax system benefits the wealthy. We all know that proportionately mitt romney pays way less than a teacher or a nurse or a plumber. We all know that. Paul ryan and donald trump made that so much worse but the clear truth of the matter is that it is even worse for those who are not white and especially for those who are not white and male. It is all backwards. The people who benefit most from society need to contribute most to it. None of the wealthiest got there alone. None of them are self made millionaires or billionaires that is eat total myth every single one of them had help from society. Designed to perpetuate often at the expense of the non wealthy and we know who the least wealthy americans are and they are not white. Our nation runs on taxes without tax. Money there is no so. Our tax system needs to be reflective of america supportive of our citizens and not geared to the people who need the least help. We need to end the whiteness of well. Sorry not sorry is executive produced by alyssa milano. That's me our associate producer has been jackson. Editing and engineering pashas jake guts and music by josh cooke. Alicia eagle and milo bleary. That's my boy. Please subscribe on spotify itunes or wherever you get your podcasts and if you like the show please rate review and spread the word..

josh cooke alyssa milano Paul ryan Alicia eagle Dorothy brown milo bleary twenty six times donald trump mitt romney both jackson one jim crow jake guts Elissa spotify this summer seventy something percent nineteen ninety six about one seventh
Fresh update on "alyssa" discussed on Channel 52: The DC Podcast

Channel 52: The DC Podcast

01:09 min | 7 hrs ago

Fresh update on "alyssa" discussed on Channel 52: The DC Podcast

"Year warranty this. We're going to offer them. The colts town the roses back. Expect expect you sleep would keep putting out solid pet. Sorry roswell that's right. We put out the song all right. So yes we're talking badly leaking hall for one through four mini series from nineteen ninety eight or nine hundred eighty eight. It shows that way though. It's weird 'cause like it was written by the guy. Who's writing batman at the time. Jim starling for those who may not know. He created in command state Character called dana's the cosmic stuff. That's what always surprises like. He did a batman. Nra we wanna get kind of like weird like mental batmans kind of the go to guy. He pitched this all the way. They didn't come in with this. He came to them with it. True you wanna get nuts come on. Let's get nuts. Show you crazy So yes written by starling pencils bernie wrightson inks bernie wrightson. Oh fancy shuttles. They'll ray colorist. John costanza letters coast. In of course. Dan rambler denny. O'neil editors flat. I mean that the best way so this should be good as long as it liked worked into that grim and gritty thing. You know kinda got batman away from the goofiness than he was a gareth. Yeah thrown in. Yeah yeah whatever but yet throated So pretty nice. I liked the commerce. Like the painted covers must painted and more in my my my book that has actually a lot of interesting back in the refinement that i'd probably buy them in tournaments hosted things yelich especially that issue won crystal and hit that me over the manhole cover. Yeah alyssa manhole cover girl. Little house turtles best though judgments say ray agree on something on having a sausage best. Alright so yes issue. One will book one deal and boy is it though. Yes from august. Nineteen eighty eight. It is dark in the wayne. It is dark at the wayne estate. As an isn't it always. And bruce wayne finds himself walking towards a mysterious house that has never existed before i know lord by some mysterious and magnetic attraction bruce's tempted to enter the erie place and he goes deep into the darkest corners of the building until he finds trap door as its in the name. Come on Oh really russell. He says this. This book made my brain melt. Yeah you and batman So yes he goes to the trapdoors. Bruce opens that the word joker comes out of it and threatens to blow himself in the entire place up with bombs strapped around his body. Bruce camp stopped the joker but the bombs turn out to be an april fools joke. Hey birthday present. What about sending me presents capes and lunatics. I team Bruce canton yeah Bruce lose is tempering gradually transforms into the batman the angrier he gets Dr banner would have a word with her. When the transformation is complete batman precedes the brutalize joker before he picks up an axe and mutilates the criminal ending his torment. Or good kill me. He killed with their election. Not wait kills the joker. Oh thank god finally finally apple some like into the joker offers give him something. Oh for that ended. That snyder cut out so he's got a best friend. What are you talk radio It is then that batman wakes from his nightmare the same that he has had since he was captured and taken down to the sewers of gotham city. Batman has been tied down in prisoner for many days by lowlifes and homeless people. All of whom serve the mysterious man called deacon black fire a black guy in it. What is with these with these fancy people come up with fake names and end in fire. Come on. I feel so called out right now. Take a break. The self appointed leader of the cult when the members is a commune and we classify as a religion for tax purposes man. That's what i want for us. Man come on kids drink. Kool aid senator money When the members of the cult notice batman has awoken they tell him the story of black fire once again and how he is supposed to be the mythical godly shaman from ancient times according to the whole stick. I don't appreciate according to the accolades backfire. Tried to guide the megani tribe into the path of righteousness. Come on what did you hellfire. Why don't you go with black fire. Come on branding the no true okay. You mean like black panther. Black life janka. Black lightning expire bro. Health appearance imple-. Oh my god. Did you watch falcon of winter soldier episode to yet now okay. I won't spoil too much but yeah they're walking down. One is really has anything to do with the plot. They're walking down the street him in some kids like oh. Hey he's like he's like black falcons. He's like black folk music. Yeah my dad says your name. Black falcon black kid. He goes he goes. Oh so you're black kid. And his friends like all poked. You read Yes but he re read the lead the tribe the righteousness but he was spurned attacked. By the tribesmen injured and agonizing backfire was supposedly locked inside a cave in a totem was placed outside as a warning of backfires false purposes centuries. Later the megani abandoned lands until they have good common. Capers abandoned the lanes till eventually disappeared an event that the acolytes credit to the mystical force of black fire went from the running. The doctor hurt eventually. The land was founded by. Oh my lord. Eventually the land was founded by the dutch in nineteen zero six. Everybody's loves betty. White's birth years organ macneil hardy nineteen o six. La no she's like nineteen zero three. Yes she'll be a hundred season..

Bernie Wrightson Dan Rambler Denny Bruce Wayne August John Costanza JIM Falcon Of Winter Soldier Bruce Alyssa ONE Batman Four Mini Series Betty Nineteen Ninety Eight Nineteen Eighty Eight Nineteen O'neil Nine Hundred Eighty Eight
The Utah Jazz extend their Home Game win streak

AP 24 Hour News

00:39 sec | 2 weeks ago

The Utah Jazz extend their Home Game win streak

"Took advantage of a depleted Brooklyn Nets team to run the home win streak to 17 games with the 1 18 88 victory. Nets without all stars Kevin Durant, James Harden and Kyrie Irving and the Jazz wasted no time jumping to a 21 point first quarter lead. Donovan Mitchell led Utah with 27 points. We've had instances um in my time here where we've played, you know differently because guys have been out, you know, and I think tonight really showed the mental fortitude we had throughout the entire game to contain it, Toe. Keep your foot on the pedal. Boy, Um Bogdanovich and Mike Conley and at 18 points apiece for the Jazz, while Alyssa Johnson, making the most of a 10 Day contract led the Nets with 23 points and 15 rebounds. I'm Jim Bernard.

Brooklyn Nets Donovan Mitchell James Harden Kyrie Irving Kevin Durant Nets Jazz Um Bogdanovich Utah Mike Conley Alyssa Johnson Jim Bernard
Colorado shooting suspect to make 1st court appearance

AP News Radio

00:45 sec | 2 weeks ago

Colorado shooting suspect to make 1st court appearance

"The man suspected of carrying out a shooting rampage at a Colorado supermarket has his first court appearance this morning twenty one year old Ahmad Allawi Alyssa has been jailed for investigation of murder since he was arrested inside the king soopers supermarket in boulder on Monday his first court appearance will be before district judge Thomas Francis Moore the hill in a closed courtroom he's accused of gunning down ten people including police officer Eric Talley three supermarket workers and six others let's just hear the pending charges he faces and will not be asked for a please until later in the process unless it was last seen by the public handcuffed and bloody wearing only a pair of shorts being let out of the supermarket by police he was treated at a hospital for a leg wound a rifle and handgun and a green tactical vests were recovered from inside the grocery store according to an arrest affidavit I'm Jennifer king

Ahmad Allawi Alyssa King Soopers Supermarket Thomas Francis Moore Eric Talley Colorado Boulder Jennifer King
Official: Colorado shooting suspect prone to rage, delusions

AP News Radio

00:58 sec | 2 weeks ago

Official: Colorado shooting suspect prone to rage, delusions

"As the victims of Tuesday's mass shooting are being remembered in boulder Colorado former classmates of the alleged gunman say he had a short fuse the family of twenty one year old Ahmad al Ali we Alyssa reportedly told authorities he had some type of mental illness with delusions and fears he was being followed some former classmates in our vita say Alyssa got thrown off the high school wrestling team after threatening to kill everyone after losing a match the arrest affidavit outlining Tuesday's massacre says Alyssa had purchased an assault weapon just six days before the attack at the grocery store in boulder why did this happen district attorney Michael Doherty we don't have the answer to that yet flowers candles and mementos are being left outside the supermarket and at the police station where slain officer Eric Talley was mourned the victims ranged in age from twenty to sixty five hi Jackie Quinn

Alyssa Ahmad Al Ali Boulder Colorado Michael Doherty Wrestling Grocery Store Eric Talley Jackie Quinn
Colorado suspect got assault weapon 6 days before shooting

AP News Radio

00:59 sec | 2 weeks ago

Colorado suspect got assault weapon 6 days before shooting

"Authorities say the twenty one year old Colorado man accused of killing ten people in a supermarket attack had recently purchased an assault weapon according to the arrest affidavit the twenty one year old gunmen purchased an assault weapon March sixteenth six days before he allegedly opened fire outside and then inside a boulder supermarket boulder police chief Maris Herold suspect has been identified as Ahmad Alyssa twenty one of our father he has been charged with ten counts of murder in the first degree police sources the family says the suspects suffers from mental illness including delusions the shooting attacks at shoppers scrambling for cover and sent shock waves through the community says governor Jared poll lists real horror and terror for all of us the simple act of of shopping at a grocery store the shooting attack came just ten days after a judge blocked a ban on assault rifles passed by the city of boulder in twenty eighteen I'm Jackie Quinn

Maris Herold Boulder Ahmad Alyssa Colorado Governor Jared Poll Jackie Quinn
Here's What We Know About The Victims Of The Boulder Shooting

All Things Considered

01:01 min | 2 weeks ago

Here's What We Know About The Victims Of The Boulder Shooting

"Authorities in Boulder, Colorado, have charged a 21 year old man and a shooting rampage yesterday that left 10 dead, including a police officer. Alleged shooter has been identified as a med Alyssa. He faces 11th degree murder charges and an 11 charge of criminal attempt. Boulder Police chief Maris Herald read the names of the victims at the press conference this morning, Denny Strong 20 years old. Nevin Students Key 23 Ricky Odds 25 Kelowna, but kind of the yak 49 Suzanne Fountain 59. Terry Liker 51. Officer Eric Talley 51. Kevin Mahoney. 61 Len Murray 62 Jody Waters 65 again the Boulder police chief reading the names of the 10 victims of the mass shooting in Boulder, Colorado.

Boulder Police Maris Herald Boulder Denny Strong Ricky Odds Alyssa Colorado Suzanne Fountain Terry Liker Eric Talley Nevin Kevin Mahoney Len Murray Kelowna Jody Waters
Boulder supermarket shooter ID'd as 21-year-old man

AP News Radio

00:45 sec | 2 weeks ago

Boulder supermarket shooter ID'd as 21-year-old man

"Authorities in Colorado have identified the suspect and victims of a mass killing at a supermarket boulder police say twenty one year old Ahmad all of Lee well Alyssa is charged with ten counts of first degree murder why did this happen we don't have the answer to that yet boulder county prosecutor Michael Daugherty says investigators have no motive for the shooting he says Alyssa was hospitalized before being moved to the county jail police say the victims ranged in age from twenty to sixty five they include a fifty one year old Eric Talley a boulder police officer killed during a shoot out in the store a law enforcement official tells the AP the gunman used an A. R. fifteen rifle Sager mag ani Washington

Alyssa Michael Daugherty Boulder Ahmad Boulder County Colorado LEE Eric Talley AP Ani Washington
New York Times: Current aide accuses Cuomo of sex harassment

AP News Radio

00:41 sec | 3 weeks ago

New York Times: Current aide accuses Cuomo of sex harassment

"I'm Julie Walker a current aide to governor Andrew Cuomo says you look down her shirt and made suggestive remarks to her and to another staffer Alyssa McGrath told The New York Times that Cuomo culture beautiful Italian referred to her and her female colleague as mingle mama's asked why she wasn't wearing a wedding ring and inquired about her divorce she also says a female colleague was the same woman the governor is accused of groping and that he asked that it not to say anything to her about it McGrath is the first current eight to come forward and join the mounting allegations of sexual misconduct against Cuomo which he denies and which is being investigated by the state's Attorney General I'm Julie Walker

Julie Walker Alyssa Mcgrath Andrew Cuomo Cuomo The New York Times Mama Mcgrath
New York Gov. Cuomo Investigation: Eighth Accuser Reportedly Comes Forward, Current Aide Alyssa McGrath

Closer Look

00:54 sec | 3 weeks ago

New York Gov. Cuomo Investigation: Eighth Accuser Reportedly Comes Forward, Current Aide Alyssa McGrath

"Has come forward with sexual misconduct allegations involving New York Governor Andrew Cuomo as NPR's Sally her ships report. She's at least the eighth woman to allege Cuomo acted inappropriately and the first current employees to share her name publicly, according to a report in The New York Times, 33 year old Elissa McGrath says while working for the governor over the past three years. She was repeatedly subjected to inappropriate behavior. The time says Cuomo told McGrath she was beautiful and asked about her pending divorce. At one point, she told the Times when called into Cuomo's office to take dictation. Quote he was blatantly looking down my shirt. The governor's office did not immediately respond to our request for comment, but he's repeatedly said he's never consciously made anyone uncomfortable. My grass lawyer, Marianne Wong, confirmed the story with NPR via email, she wrote. The governor's deflections are not credible. This was not just friendly banter. Sally,

Cuomo Governor Andrew Cuomo Elissa Mcgrath NPR Sally The New York Times Mcgrath New York The Times Marianne Wong
Police request 60-day extension of Guard at US Capitol

AP News Radio

00:49 sec | Last month

Police request 60-day extension of Guard at US Capitol

"The capitol police want the National Guard to stay at the capitol for now the more than five thousand guard members still here in Washington are slated to leave next week the APS learned capitol police are asking them to stay another two months underscoring continuing concerns about the complex is safety we should have them here as long as they are needed still house speaker Nancy Pelosi says that's a call for the capital security officials democratic congresswoman Alyssa Slotkin a former top Pentagon official says some lawmakers are worried about more permanent security plans and the capital should not depend on the National Guard but rather its own police force the Pentagon says it's reviewing the capitol police request standard checking would states to see if troops are available Sager made Donnie Washington

Capitol Police National Guard Alyssa Slotkin APS Nancy Pelosi Washington Pentagon Sager Donnie Washington
"alyssa" Discussed on Cyber Security Interviews

Cyber Security Interviews

06:19 min | Last month

"alyssa" Discussed on Cyber Security Interviews

"Hello and welcome to episode one hundred. Fifteen of cybersecurity interviews. This is the third episode a multi part episode diversity equity and inclusion and we're speaking with alissa millet elissa leads the security strategy for sap global ratings as business information security officer connecting corporate security objectives to business initiatives. She blunt a unique mix of technical expertise in executive presence to bridge the gap that can often form between security practitioners and business leaders. Her goal is to change how we look at the security of our interconnected way of life and focus on attention of defending privacy in cultivating trust a native of milwaukee. Melissa began her. It careers a programmer frozen based financial software provider. Her security passion quickly shape her career as she moved into a leadership role within the ethical hacking team conducting penetration testing and assessments along with her team. As a hacker. Elissa has a passion for security. That she evangelize is to business leaders in industry audiences to work as a cybersecurity professional to various public speaking engagements while not engaged security research and advocacy. She's also an accomplished soccer referee guitars and photographer in this episode. We discussed why. She misses conferences starting with computers that in early age diversity equity inclusion the discrimination. She has faced the lack of understanding of privilege discriminatory hiring practices how to be an ally and so much more. I hope you enjoy the episode. As much as i did. Thanks for listening a less. Thank you for joining me in cybersecurity interviews. How are you today. I am doing wonderful. Doug how're you. I'm doing great so our are things in the beautiful middle part of the country. I is i to in colorado. But has milwaukee doing these days. Gosh we are about to get our first real dumping of snow at least over your recording. This by the time at arizona probably have had tons. But i'm actually gonna go get gas for the snowblower the last place. I really got to travel and speak at. Wasn't milwaukee in january flew in and out. It was gonna be a one day speaking thing in you know anybody. I should have known better having in law that those up all my family from the midwest. North chicago and ohio january. You're not getting in and out of anywhere in the midwest without some type of delay in my you know my arrogance of that being about a three day delay. They kept cancelling how to drive from milwaukee to chicago and it was a whole thing but i got to see the lake. Cresting waves as the snow is blowing in milwaukee so it was very interesting. Clear that you can get out of chicago easier than milwaukee usually milwaukee. Is you know. We're kind of like canada south with that. As long as they can. Keep the runway clear enough to get a plane on it though. Fly planes out. But if it gets bad enough i know they. They've shut down a few times. Speak that i mean you you were you were you know. Have built a name and a brand by traveling and speaking. Do you miss the travel aspect this year of getting out there and being on stage like you have no idea of feeling i have an idea. Trust me on the wall. I went into twenty twenty expecting all this international travel. I just changed jobs. And and it was part of that job. Was supposed to include a lotta travel to international conferences and even our our locations and yet none of that happened i did. Rsa and then besides tampa was scheduled to go to singapore and sydney in the two weeks following and in between those two. They shut down all travel. And yeah i've been. I've been here in my home office which i feel guilty saying suffering is pretty pretty awesome office but yeah i i cannot wait to get back on a plane. Fact even allman i have been talking about how a bunch of us are going to go find someplace to all traveled together. Just because it's we've all missed it for so long that he's actually somebody. I gotta hit out back channeled him. Because i'm trying to raise the next level of hackers and my daughter who's ten and her friend. The condition was they were able to go get the leftover halloween candy at their at my friend's daughters house. If they can get through the lock. I said cool. I'll teach guys lock picking. And i'll get you a signed copy of the lock picking guy so i try to get them to learn about lock. Picking it sucks not being out there and kind of seeing the whole community. What drove to obviously not not a wallflower. You wanna get out there and talk. What drove you to kind of get on stage. It's it's not something that's always a done by folks in our industry where where they can somewhat be a little bit more reserved. Yes so it's kind of funny. Because i've been speaking at conferences since two thousand fourteen and but i never really got was ever really serious about it like i do one here and there and it was a lot of it was because i was working in a consulting role. And it's good for you know when you're consultant especially it's good for your organization to have people out there speaking and i found right away the first time i did it like that was actually a lot of fun But then the more. I did it the more i started to realize like i just i i really you know. I've got a lot of ideas. I want to share and i love doing this because i've always been believe it or not. You know you you talk about me being out there and it's like i was very socially awkward like i was the person i go to a conference and be completely alone in a sea of thirty thousand people at defcon. Right which i mean. That's not unusual. People do that all the time but even smaller conferences like i was just never very good at starting conversations with people and so when i would speak it was a whole different world because you'll people would recognize you from having been on stage in an it. Stop you in the hall to ask you questions about what you talked about or whatever or just to thank you and it was such a great icebreaker because now i could get in. I could have conversations with people in the hallway about all this stuff that we were passionate about and we could. We could share ideas. And that's what conferences are all about to

Melissa chicago Elissa colorado singapore sydney ohio january two ten Doug today North chicago arizona first twenty twenty canada south two weeks milwaukee one day
interview With Alyssa Miller

Cyber Security Interviews

06:19 min | Last month

interview With Alyssa Miller

"Hello and welcome to episode one hundred. Fifteen of cybersecurity interviews. This is the third episode a multi part episode diversity equity and inclusion and we're speaking with alissa millet elissa leads the security strategy for sap global ratings as business information security officer connecting corporate security objectives to business initiatives. She blunt a unique mix of technical expertise in executive presence to bridge the gap that can often form between security practitioners and business leaders. Her goal is to change how we look at the security of our interconnected way of life and focus on attention of defending privacy in cultivating trust a native of milwaukee. Melissa began her. It careers a programmer frozen based financial software provider. Her security passion quickly shape her career as she moved into a leadership role within the ethical hacking team conducting penetration testing and assessments along with her team. As a hacker. Elissa has a passion for security. That she evangelize is to business leaders in industry audiences to work as a cybersecurity professional to various public speaking engagements while not engaged security research and advocacy. She's also an accomplished soccer referee guitars and photographer in this episode. We discussed why. She misses conferences starting with computers that in early age diversity equity inclusion the discrimination. She has faced the lack of understanding of privilege discriminatory hiring practices how to be an ally and so much more. I hope you enjoy the episode. As much as i did. Thanks for listening a less. Thank you for joining me in cybersecurity interviews. How are you today. I am doing wonderful. Doug how're you. I'm doing great so our are things in the beautiful middle part of the country. I is i to in colorado. But has milwaukee doing these days. Gosh we are about to get our first real dumping of snow at least over your recording. This by the time at arizona probably have had tons. But i'm actually gonna go get gas for the snowblower the last place. I really got to travel and speak at. Wasn't milwaukee in january flew in and out. It was gonna be a one day speaking thing in you know anybody. I should have known better having in law that those up all my family from the midwest. North chicago and ohio january. You're not getting in and out of anywhere in the midwest without some type of delay in my you know my arrogance of that being about a three day delay. They kept cancelling how to drive from milwaukee to chicago and it was a whole thing but i got to see the lake. Cresting waves as the snow is blowing in milwaukee so it was very interesting. Clear that you can get out of chicago easier than milwaukee usually milwaukee. Is you know. We're kind of like canada south with that. As long as they can. Keep the runway clear enough to get a plane on it though. Fly planes out. But if it gets bad enough i know they. They've shut down a few times. Speak that i mean you you were you were you know. Have built a name and a brand by traveling and speaking. Do you miss the travel aspect this year of getting out there and being on stage like you have no idea of feeling i have an idea. Trust me on the wall. I went into twenty twenty expecting all this international travel. I just changed jobs. And and it was part of that job. Was supposed to include a lotta travel to international conferences and even our our locations and yet none of that happened i did. Rsa and then besides tampa was scheduled to go to singapore and sydney in the two weeks following and in between those two. They shut down all travel. And yeah i've been. I've been here in my home office which i feel guilty saying suffering is pretty pretty awesome office but yeah i i cannot wait to get back on a plane. Fact even allman i have been talking about how a bunch of us are going to go find someplace to all traveled together. Just because it's we've all missed it for so long that he's actually somebody. I gotta hit out back channeled him. Because i'm trying to raise the next level of hackers and my daughter who's ten and her friend. The condition was they were able to go get the leftover halloween candy at their at my friend's daughters house. If they can get through the lock. I said cool. I'll teach guys lock picking. And i'll get you a signed copy of the lock picking guy so i try to get them to learn about lock. Picking it sucks not being out there and kind of seeing the whole community. What drove to obviously not not a wallflower. You wanna get out there and talk. What drove you to kind of get on stage. It's it's not something that's always a done by folks in our industry where where they can somewhat be a little bit more reserved. Yes so it's kind of funny. Because i've been speaking at conferences since two thousand fourteen and but i never really got was ever really serious about it like i do one here and there and it was a lot of it was because i was working in a consulting role. And it's good for you know when you're consultant especially it's good for your organization to have people out there speaking and i found right away the first time i did it like that was actually a lot of fun But then the more. I did it the more i started to realize like i just i i really you know. I've got a lot of ideas. I want to share and i love doing this because i've always been believe it or not. You know you you talk about me being out there and it's like i was very socially awkward like i was the person i go to a conference and be completely alone in a sea of thirty thousand people at defcon. Right which i mean. That's not unusual. People do that all the time but even smaller conferences like i was just never very good at starting conversations with people and so when i would speak it was a whole different world because you'll people would recognize you from having been on stage in an it. Stop you in the hall to ask you questions about what you talked about or whatever or just to thank you and it was such a great icebreaker because now i could get in. I could have conversations with people in the hallway about all this stuff that we were passionate about and we could. We could share ideas. And that's what conferences are all about to

Milwaukee Alissa Millet Elissa Midwest Elissa SAP North Chicago Chicago Melissa Soccer Doug Colorado Arizona Ohio Allman Tampa Canada Singapore Sydney
"alyssa" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

02:39 min | 2 months ago

"alyssa" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

"You. <SpeakerChange> That's a problem. <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> One of the worst things <Speech_Female> we do as a <Speech_Female> nation as profit <Speech_Female> off of prisons <Silence> and prisoners <Speech_Female> were built <Speech_Female> a financial <Speech_Female> incentive <Speech_Female> to keep people <Silence> locked up. <Speech_Female> And you know <Speech_Female> it's not white people <Speech_Female> who are paying the <Speech_Female> most of this price <Speech_Female> industries <Speech_Female> use prison <Speech_Female> labor for pennies <Speech_Female> on the dollar <Speech_Female> states and <Speech_Female> the federal government <Speech_Female> signed minimum occupancy <Speech_Female> contracts <Speech_Female> with <Speech_Female> four prophet prison <Speech_Female> companies guaranteeing <Speech_Female> a certain number <Speech_Female> of inmates <Speech_Female> and while <Speech_Female> these corporations <Speech_Female> profit off of <Speech_Female> this forced labor <Speech_Female> and forced confinement <Speech_Female> the <Speech_Female> people <Speech_Female> and we must never forget. <Speech_Female> These are <Silence> people <Speech_Female> often <Speech_Female> can never escape <Speech_Female> their sentences. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> The fines <Speech_Female> stigma <Speech_Female> the disenfranchisement <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> and the lack of support <Speech_Female> during <Speech_Female> and following incarceration <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> a cycle <Speech_Female> of recidivism <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Female> cycle of prophet <Speech_Female> for these <Speech_Female> immoral profiteers. <Silence> <Silence> It's not <Speech_Female> right <Speech_Female> and it's made even <Speech_Female> worse by taking <Speech_Female> away the vote of those <Speech_Female> people who <Speech_Female> have completed <Silence> their sentences <Speech_Female> keeping <Speech_Female> these returning citizens <Speech_Female> from <Speech_Female> having any <Speech_Female> say in breaking <Speech_Female> that cycle <Speech_Female> at a societal <Silence> level. <Speech_Female> We need <Silence> to do better. <Speech_Female> We <Speech_Female> need to get rhonda. <Speech_Female> Santa's the governor <Speech_Female> of florida <Speech_Female> who has shown over <Speech_Female> and over again <Speech_Female> that he does not <Speech_Female> care about profiteering <Speech_Female> on the suffering <Speech_Female> of black <Speech_Female> and brown people. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> The hell out <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> of office. <Speech_Female> We need <Speech_Female> to outlaw for <Speech_Female> profit prison <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Female> we need to make sure <Speech_Female> those inmates who <Speech_Music_Female> are forced to <Speech_Music_Female> work <Speech_Female> are paid at least <Speech_Music_Female> minimum wage <Speech_Music_Female> for that work <Speech_Music_Female> so that they can <Speech_Female> pay any debts <Speech_Female> and find security <Speech_Music_Female> when they are <Speech_Music_Female> released <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> we need to stop <Speech_Music_Female> incentivizing <Speech_Music_Female> states <Speech_Music_Female> and businesses to <Speech_Female> lock people up <Speech_Music_Female> and start <SpeakerChange> incentivizing <Speech_Female> them <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> to lift <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> people up. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> We have the <Speech_Music_Female> highest incarceration <Speech_Music_Female> rate in the world <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> in america <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> more than <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> cuba more <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> than china <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> more than iran <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> more <Speech_Music_Female> than north korea. <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> We need to be <Speech_Music_Female> better. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> Sorry not sorry <Speech_Music_Female> is executive produced <Speech_Music_Female> by alyssa milano. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> That's me <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> associate. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Producer has been <Speech_Music_Female> jackson editing <Speech_Music_Female> and engineering <Speech_Music_Female> by natasha's jacobs <Speech_Music_Female> and music <Speech_Music_Female> by josh cooke. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Alicia eagle <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> and milo. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> That's my boy. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> Please subscribe <Speech_Music_Female> on spotify. <Speech_Music_Female> I tunes or wherever <Speech_Female> you get your podcasts. <Speech_Female> And if you like the show please rate review and spread the word.

Family, friends say final goodbyes to Houston Police Officer Ernest Leal Jr.

Houston Public Media Local Newscasts

00:25 sec | 4 months ago

Family, friends say final goodbyes to Houston Police Officer Ernest Leal Jr.

"Officer earnestly al junior was laid to rest after his battle with covid. The service today was held at christ redeemer catholic church with many honoring lee legacy including mayor sylvester turner because the city of houston is so much greater. Lee alyssa i h. pd officer. Who have died of covid. He leaves behind a wife and four children. The number of texans falling initial

Al Junior Christ Redeemer Catholic Churc Lee Legacy Mayor Sylvester Turner Lee Alyssa Houston
We Gather Together - Creating an American Thanksgiving with Denise Kiernan

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

06:00 min | 5 months ago

We Gather Together - Creating an American Thanksgiving with Denise Kiernan

"So denise. I want to start by asking you to cover the early history of thanksgiving were all taught. From a very early age that the pilgrims landed in plymouth and shared a feast with the native americans living in the area. How close is that accurate. What's so interesting about thanksgiving as we celebrated versus thanksgiving as it has been on this planet for much longer. I'm always fascinated about how traditions and practices evolved the concept of gratitude and giving thanks has been around basically as long as humans have walked the earth. The word thanksgiving and even the practice of thanksgiving has been around for centuries before even conception of the united states of america. Yes the pilgrim's did land at plymouth. Yes the pilgrim's did have a meal with the woman. Og indians was. That proclaimed a thanksgiving now. When thanksgiving became a federal holiday in the united states of america was that event singled out as the reason for establishing that holiday. Now i want to be clear. I am not putting anything out there. That other people haven't said for a while and what's really interesting. I think is that every year. You'll see these. Hey here's the real. This part of thanksgiving and i think part of the reason. Is we tell these stories. We tell this. Essentially two kids in school and then later on when they get into high school or college or whatever we don't necessarily re contextualised and give them the full story so every year it's almost necessary that we keep trotting these things out and contextualisation of history is so important to really kind of look at everything that went into a particular event and thanksgiving again. Like i said you know. I am not the first person to come out. And say yeah. That's not exactly how it happened. But what i'm interested in. And what was one of the linchpins at making me want to do. The book we gather together was the ageless. Timeless concept gratitude view stevens. I'm and author here in madison wisconsin. And i'm thankful for men. Women working press in use of the people. The you don't have a great thanksgiving. There is an alternate true factual story about thanksgiving and gratitude and harvest festivals. And all of those things. And how. The actual holiday came to be in america and evolve and erica so i thought was an alternate entry and wouldn't that be fun and i'm interested. How thanksgiving celebrations changed in the seventeenth and eighteenth century. So a lot of what thanksgiving is rule out of things like harvest festivals. Which again go way. Way back thanksgiving's were often religious practices in various parts of the world. You would set aside a day sometimes for fasting and humiliation as they would say to give thanks for could be particular event. When i was working on we gather together. I came across some really interesting articles including some archives from the atoms stanley. john adams. John quincy adams. Abigail adams and john adams writes in his diary thanksgiving for the repeal of the stamp act. So like that was something. You would have a thanksgiving for declare thanksgiving for thanksgiving's for various wins in battle or days of general thanksgiving or like. I said fasting and humiliation so those sorts of advance existed outside of north america. What we now consider the continental united states they existing europe and those traditions were obviously brought over when people came over but the concept of having days set aside for saying thank. You is something that goes back a very very long time. Tell us about. Sarah josefa so sarah of a hail was so compelling to me because she was a young woman born in the early nineteenth century actually of the eighteenth century. She had no formal schooling but her parents instilled in her a deep deep love of reading and learning and she was obsessed with the written word. She married a man who shared her love of all these things. They used to have study hour together in the evenings. She lost him fairly early on in their marriage and so she was a widowed mother of five children and because of her desire to write ended up becoming one of the most influential editors in the nineteenth century. She edited to popular women's magazines. The american ladies magazine and then go. Jeez ladies magazine which was one of the most popular magazines in the nineteenth century. And just to be able to do that to me whether thing but what really moved me about her was that she had all of these things that she needed not wanted but like needed to do for herself and her children but she still found time to raise money for people who have less than she did and to bring people's attention to causes she thought worthy and her ten city was just. I mean seriously. I was interviewing her thinking good. What have i been doing with my time. You know how i feel like. I'm talking to her. You know when. I am interviewing her. I'm looking at what she wrote. I'm looking at what she was quoted as saying. I'm looking at the book she put out. I'm looking at the end. Policies that she curated

United States Plymouth Women Working Press John Adams Denise Sarah Josefa Abigail Adams Stevens John Quincy Adams Erica Madison Wisconsin Stanley American Ladies North America Sarah Europe
Happy Halloween, Steve Saturn! - burst 04

Apocalypse...Now?

08:17 min | 5 months ago

Happy Halloween, Steve Saturn! - burst 04

"We had an eventful weekend. We did. We got a lot done. Tell Buddy tricks he's trying to tell everybody what we did this weekend. Celebrated Archie. wa-was fifth birthday with a zoom dog. COSTUME CONTESTS PARTY TO SAY that. Just. It, was nice to see. Everybody was nice. Yeah. Was a nice excuse to see family and the kids seem to enjoy themselves. I thought it was appropriate that on the little kids was the one who won the actual dog costume contents I. Think we're GONNA open it up to everyone next year not just dogs. No I think he was excited to be the best dog was he was something about that it was a very good cost to. What was it again he was shadow from the sonic the HEDGEHOG Games. Sure. He's very into sonic. That's awesome. So it's good and that's why I did it was just to have everybody together. I got admit I wanted to perform a little bit. So thank you. Excuse I mean it's Halloween time. You know 'cause we're usually very very busy at Halloween. are sadly this year because of the virus. You're not I think people understand like people that work in haunted houses as soon as October hits, it's Halloween like all the time. So soon as September heads yeah. The End. Depends on how much you're working on the actually putting a haunt together though you know the people who are in charge and running those places you know they get started in the middle of summer. Yeah. You're not in gear by July. You're going to be so far behind GONNA have a rough year. Higher. filthier there were. Some drive-thru haunts you want to go through a drive through haunt picture maybe. Just a touch your car better. Not I know I want because I know how bad corn Syrup is for paint jobs on cars yeah. I don't know. Excited about that I? Mean I guess if they did it like, Hey, ride style where like no one actually comes up to the car and touches it. That's not how they roll at the Bates Motel. They come right up to you. The can't do that now because. I WanNa, hit any actors with my car. Obviously, you would be going at like that's the thing it's like you drive your own car seven directing you have you sign a thing where like if you run over one of the actors You. There are. Lots of drive through entertainment. Nobody thinks about those things. Nobody's foot gets run over. Yeah. That's a big deal. See working on a house we're used to like chaos happening because it's Halloween people are drinking insure. End when people are scared they first reactions, I mean I've had some pretty crazy experiences haunted houses with people and their bodily fluids you know. It was someone you're going through with no somebody. I several people that I was they were the patrons I was. We made them pay their pants. Yes, that's good I. Guess. Not for them, for them. Because then there's a puddle after deal with hit. Yes. I've been things like people have hit me. So it's like someone would hit me with their car. I've been kicked been headbutted really. Did, did he get escorted out? Yes sees what happens when you hit on actors new new spend sixty dollars for nothing in. You have to leave I mean to his credit I was towards the end of the haunts. Through most of us, we just saved US what he wanted to go out with A. Give me a nice head to remember and by it sucks. I mean it was right. All those people are. Sometimes. I would break and when people were really drunk or if I was really like afraid, they were going to hit me I would break character and be like you pay to be here right? Like you paid for this experience. Yeah. I. Don't know if that's GONNA deter them though. Well then I also like go get security. Just, drop character, and that's my are tip to any hunters that are listening have like escape doors in each scene, somebody can duck out. In don't keep. Your weird voice dreicer. So they know it serious drop then be like that's not cool. No one's going to be hitting anybody this year. GonNa be going through any haunts this year there's there's not. That I. Know of unless there. I mean I'm sure there are some L. Some of them are open. I'm seeing the one instagram and I'm like, how does that work I mean a place that is that when? I was there. It was hard to breathe pre pandemic because it was in a underground place with no ventilation. Would actually help in that situation you. Could stay in that area for a long time. Zone does actress I'm thinking about the actors I mean the actors there every night with all these people coming through. One person to go through man it's like it's all the you know you're essentially an essential worker at that at that. Really. Haunted houses are like extra terrifying this year because you could die if you got co did. Any one of those professions that people have where there is a steady stream of strangers say that five times fast did it again steady stream of Strangers Alyssa? Coming through you know like, where like like people who work as any kind of customer service job? Any kind of restaurant any kind of supermarket. Like literally, you're just standing there all day long with Rando, people coming through my heart goes out to all of them. Yeah. We've been really thinking about people that have to have to do like especially the grocery workers and stuff like that. They were there from the beginning dealing with us and it's really it's scary and it does make me realize the things that I have and one thing I wanted to do and I brought you on was just to say thank you so much. I'm so glad that I am quarantined with you. We're very lucky to have the situation that we have I, I've. Heard you're working you've been working very, very hard. So many people out there who are who are working so hard for. For whatever they have like, I feel for all the people who don't have a steady paycheck coming in all the people who are struggling through this time you know especially with all the crazy stuff beyond just colbrad going on in the world. With I just wrote it this weekend. That was something that got done. It feel. For about an hour and a half. A lot of now who had to stand in line, but everybody had their masks on. One person got turned away. There was one person who walked up without a massacre. US older woman and unfortunately she she made kind of a stink about it instead of going to get her mask. By reducing, she acted like a Karen. Oh Now Karen status she was just very a lot of huffing and puffing, okay she had to walk back to her car to get her mask. They're keeping themselves in check now I don't know maybe. I. You know I haven't really cross paths with many Karen my time. No. White man was I suppose when you're well, I think the only time that we would run across them as when we're working in retail right when I was working at best buy for example, there is a good amount of because they see you as lower status when they are accuster on your employees a retail store, it also is the scenario. There has to be like a perfect storm of situations to I'll tell. Merge I was so guilty of it when I was younger. I try to work. Well. Here's what he did. I would go like, say to my hot topic to return something if they'd be like, oh, we can't really take this. It'd be like look I could go get my mom who's at boss cavs right now. Little Carrot Junior. Or we could just do this and your day will be so easy. Karen though is it I mean like my mom all when she wanted to she when she wanted to refund you better believe like my mom once we had.

Bates Motel Archie Buddy WA Rando Alyssa Karen United States Cavs
Prom at the Polls - Young Voters Taking Charge

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

04:54 min | 6 months ago

Prom at the Polls - Young Voters Taking Charge

"Thanks for being here. So so be tell us about promised the polls, what it's all about and what promised polls doing in the weeks leading up to the elect show prometheus polls is a youth led civic engagement event meant to take back twenty twenty, and we're doing this through a series of social media challenges and different fund ways for young people and adults to get involved and make the voting process. Exciting. We lost our promise graduation. We lost so many things due to the pandemic and we're GONNA, take that back with prompt the polls we are creating excitement around voting through the challenge. Hashtag proposals and Hashtag address up to vote. Those are the two main things that we're working on now and all the way up until the election. So the first one we're using the HASHTAG proposals is challenging someone to go to the polls if you or to vote by mail with you, and we're doing this to create a big wave of youth voters and to get so many more people engaged to wouldn't have before. So if I challenged my friend to vote and they vote with made than they challenged someone else I'm reaching so many more people than if I just voted alone so. You may ask what is a puzzle so a proposal similarly to proposals in highschool for problems or forms it is asking someone to go out with you. So in our case, we're asking people to come with us to the polls or to just vote with us from the comfort of our own home. The other aspect of this is dressing up to vote. So we're using the HASHTAG dress up to vote, and if you participate in any of these challenges, which we really encourage you all to do make sure to use the Hashtag online. So we can spread the word and share the. Content that you're creating but dress up to vote is exactly what it sounds like. It's putting on prom or formal attire and either going to the polling place or walking to your mailbox or going to a dropbox to cast your ballot. But making sure that you're voting in style and just making voting fun and exciting for everyone and up until the election will be participating and we have some really interesting people and Super Cool influencers who are participating, but it really comes down to the youth and the population participating everyday people getting out getting excited about voting and participating in these different challenges. Tell us a bit about how promised the poll started promised. The polls began when you actually introduced the five of us and put us in kind of a think tank room and we all are really passionate about getting out the youth vote and making sure that every young person in this country knows that their vote matters and that their voice matters and we wanted to come up with a fun and creative way to inspire young people to go to the polls to vote and make their voice heard on election day. Nicole Brown celebrities are really stepping forward. So just one quick word of encouragement. Please encourage other folks to get involved in their platforms the way you are. I WANNA say that first of all is not lost there is still time there's eighteen days as a young man named Jerome, Foster, the second who created prompt the polls. That's the thing we joked about at the beginning he's trying to encourage young people to enjoy their senior year at the polls. So find somebody you WANNA, take to the polls and and shout them out and shoot your shot, and then just encourage people to find different interesting Korean of ways to go and make a different voice matters use it out of the first meeting after you connected us we came up with this idea and ever since then have been meeting daily to pull it off and make it happen. Where can people find out more information? We have a website promised the polls, dot com but most of our information at all of our content is on all of our social media platform. So twitter instagram tech, pock facebook you can go there and we'll be posting some super cool content from now until election day on the various platforms and you can find more ways to get involved. They're amazing. And Matthew. What do you think is the goal for promised the polls what do you hope that promised the polls will accomplish I. Think we succeeded if we have even just one person vote in planning on voting before obviously the goal is a lot bigger than that. But at the end of the day when we sit out to start the prompted the Bulls project, you said to results what do We want to accomplish how do we WANNA help and how do we think the country needs to change and one of the big things that we talked about that the vote isn't being considered enough is being cared about enough and there's people in the country in our generation that are voting. So we thought let's take that opportunity. Let's take that situation and make it something fun. Make it something. that. They can enjoy but also make it something that they're going to participate in for the next. However many years they want to see you know really at the end of the day the goal is if we get as many people voting as possible that haven't voted before as many people involved in the political process that weren't involved before and there's many people interested that weren't interested before we've succeeded.

Nicole Brown Twitter Bulls Matthew Jerome Foster
South Carolina vs. LSU Football Preview

The Paul Finebaum Show

08:38 min | 6 months ago

South Carolina vs. LSU Football Preview

"Certainly one of the most eagerly anticipated games of the day tomorrow night in Baton Rouge between South Carolina and Lsu. Castaneda joining us from down there Quin. Thank you very very much. Appreciate the time, and it looks like a weather. Is An issue for what's going on down there right now? Well, just for the moment I'm across the street Tiger Stadium's to my left in their facility straight across the street I'm about to record up and advancer for tomorrow and had a little lightening. got. Dark severe winds and pouring but you can see the nicer weather up on the horizon. So things should be back to normal about ten minutes. We'll good because. That is a place that doesn't need Louisiana does not need any more bad weather. Quinn let's talk a little bit before we get to the game just about your job this year it's different I'm sure. A lot of zoom calls a lot of unusual situations caused by the pandemic. How would you describe the the obvious difference between this and every other year you've been on the sidelines for ESPN and ABC. Well, it's taken a lot of the fun out of it taken a lot of the things that I enjoyed get on campus to meet with the coaches to talk to the strength coaches just to get a vibe for how that team's doing and you learn so much whether it's Roman down the hallway and talking to a tight ends coach or bumping into a recruiting intern about video, they just paint so so that. Part of my investigation is is far less exciting. This year there's no social aspects in terms of our TV crew, our TV team so it's just zooms and when I'm on the road I'm the only one here are our broadcast crew will will broadcast this from Bristol. I'm the only one here. So I kind of treat this like I'm a spy, I don't touch anything I talked to strangers and I couldn't. quit. There's always a challenge on the sidelines especially. When there is weather but is it any or how different is it i? Guess I'm trying to ask dealing with the crew. Fifteen hundred miles away or maybe longer or farther right upstairs nothing you can see them but you at least know that they were seeing the same thing you're seeing. Yeah there's a little bit of a time delay in the audio so it can be anywhere from two seconds four seconds. So I've been on a crew with Jason Bonetti and Rod Gilmore. The last couple years Mike spent hot the whole game this year I've changed crews almost every week, and because we're doing it remotely. They can't have my mic on because we'd be talking over each other. So we do it old school and I'll talk to the producer I talked back and say, Hey, after the third down, play I wanNA talk about upon her coming out for hey, if they make a first down here I want to talk about how they're tight ends doing a great job so. Do it old school and go through the go through the producer in the in the remote truck. In order in order to get on air whereas in the past I could just talk and we were seamless. Clean on the sidelines I mean to say the least there are restrictions what are they and how much do you have to tiptoe around? It's really not bad. I mean we won I. Did a game not they actually made me call the game from the stands in the front row was good seat but I really couldn't get a feel for what was going on on the benches since then they've just widened appalled widen areas it's actually easier now because there's less hangers on, there's less alums, there's less NFL scouts until the sidelines are vacant and it makes my job a lot easier. I also feel pretty secure in that the players and coaches have all been tested recently as recently as Friday or Saturday morning. So I, feel good in that regard So it's actually almost easier less fans less crowds more space. Speaking of testing. How often do you have to be tested? we test once a week it's either an ad home test, and then you mail it in test results come back in about thirty six hours or it's an onsite tasks on a Thursday afternoon then you quarantine. And then Friday, they released you so so far knock on wood six for six negative tests. That would be Kinda. Nerve wracking you show up at a game and you have to sweat it out and you hope you don't get a a Nick Sabin positive. Let's talk about the game because. It's a really interesting game. Let's start with South Carolina just your. As I know you do gather as much information as you can you probably would like to. Be Able to gather more in person but. Your impressions of what you've seen to them and and what you expect. Well they beat Auburn as you know, and they got the three turnovers and converted those in touchdowns. My issue was South Carolina's they're operating an offense with very limited downfield wide receiver threats shy Smith is a natural slot receiver. Colin Hill is is working Mike, Lobos offense efficiently and their offensive line in running backs or carrying the day. Okay. That's with this team is I'm not sure they're ever going to be a high scoring team defensively they're really good corners who can shut you down they add to the box so. I think South Carolina given that Lsu has a freshman quarterback. I'm leaning towards them having some success defensively in this ball game. So I kinda like Carolina's ability to negate lsu with a freshman quarterback but Carolina's physical they're tough. They're not nothing flashy about him and I think big plays are hard for them I. Think they have to manufacture find ways to manufacturer big plays but I think this team is definitely moving in the right direction I. Think they've improved each week. And the other side of that you alluded to the quarterback situation team that has struggled mightily on defense quarterback play has been pretty good I. Know I know it's impossible to gauge because we don't really have a lot of information but. What have you what have you been able to learn about where they are right now? Yet, teach gets the start a freshman Ponchatoula high school. He's gigantic six, six, two, hundred and forty two pounds nets down from to sixty s a big toll righty and you watch his high school tapes just drops in the pocket and he conflict the ball and it goes forty yards without him even trying he seems like he's calm. He's Louisiana product of this dream for him the ADRENALIN will be running. Also expect to see, Max? Johnson. The son of NFL, quarterback Brad Johnson a lefty also tall but more of a dual threat and when you think about calling the game around a freshman quarterback making his first start, you know any kind of run game would be beneficial and to put the quarterback in successful positions. Early in the game, get him hit but but get a couple first downs give him some easy throws and I think that'll be on the mind of lsu going to be a little more conservative game plan I'd. Imagine. You know he's got targets downfield terrace Marshall their running game I thought was anemic Missouri game that was the most disappointing part of the game in my eyes Missouri was without three defensive tackles in that game and Lsu had no running game whatsoever good news for the Tigers to get Ed Ingram back at left guard. But this is an offense through the air with Miles Brennan that's been outstanding. But now you've got a new freshman quarterback. So expectations drop again, I'm seeing a little bit more of a lower scoring game here. In Clinton's you've seen them. The. Biggest used on defense. Would give. Horrible And coach today sentence embarrassing. Alignment. Very, often they're they're moving at a snap making checks that is when the coverage changes on the fly because of emotion because of formation change that has been a dismal day of given up big play after big play against Mississippi State, it was more catching and run the air raid defense was was atrocious quite honestly continued to play man defense got shredded by crossing patterns but I was at the Mizzou game and That game was defined by busts. I mean just blatant bus where I got him. No you got to I got you got him guys wide open touchdown in the running game. Their linebackers are not playing physical. They're not playing north not playing north. They're not getting to the line of scrimmage and engaging blockers to waiting for runners they're missing tackles remember the tyler beatty runs Missouri fiscally untouched broke attack Lens. Gone So. Those are the headlines here new quarterbacks for Lsu and a defense that has had no answers.

LSU South Carolina Missouri Louisiana NFL Street Tiger Stadium Mike Baton Rouge Castaneda Espn Producer Brad Johnson Bristol Ponchatoula High School Quinn Carolina Nick Sabin Colin Hill
Bringing Democracy to the People With Amanda Litman

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

04:12 min | 6 months ago

Bringing Democracy to the People With Amanda Litman

"So Amanda Run was founded on the day of trump's inauguration. So tell me a little bit about the organization and why you founded it. So I worked for Hillary's for two years before that for President Obama for the Florida Governor's race in for nonprofit and between the week after election day I, got a facebook message from somebody I went to college with Hey Amanda. You've worked in politics. You know this world I. Want to run for office because of trump president seems like anybody can do this. What do I do and I did? Not have an answer for him. I did not know what to tell him to go. He wanted to be more than just a volunteer and more than just voter. If he wanted to actually lead, there was nowhere that would be guaranteed to take this call. So I reached out to a whole bunch of people. One of whom became my co-founder that's incredible operative, Dross Morales for Cudjoe we wrote a plan we built a website and me launch run for something. As you said on inauguration day we thought we'd got maybe a hundred people who wanted to run for local office instead in the first week, we had a thousand as of today we're up. To more than fifty one, thousand young people across the country who've raised their hands just say I want to run for local office what next so we've built an organization that does best that we find more people who wanna run things like School Board City Council and state legislature and we help them through the process I think it's so cool and one of the things I love so much about run for something is that you proudly self identify as progressive and that you came from the Obama and DNC campaigns and I, think there is this kind of lake mistaken belief that you can't be progressive and be a traditional. Democrat. So what are your? Thoughts on that lay that out for US unpack that a little bit. How does it work for us? I think we define Progressive Democrat really broadly, we look for a set of shared values shared belief that everybody deserves access to affordable healthcare that everybody's sort of access to education that we need to fight for working families that we need to protect organized labor that we need to protect it and for the environment, and we can share those goals and disagree on the tactics that we need to accomplish them. But the only way we get to really implement those tactics or even have a starting place to decide a meme is to win elections. I. So, for us a Democrat or progressive in New York might look a little different than Democrat in Vienna right. But we gotta be willing to win everywhere to run everywhere on our set of shared values and we also know that for most people especially for local elections. Partisan identification is the way they make their voting decision they look at the ballot and they say, this one's a democrat. Cool. That's all I know about them. So for us, right really important to support people running under that party line knowing that that's the way the most voters make up their minds. It's so smart and it makes so much sense because every district of restate the. Issues are different and I think people forget that when we live in these big cities that when you look at some place, a state that isn't sort of a metropolitan city, you get such tunnel vision about what the issues are in the context of your life that you forget that it could be different in the context of someone else's life and especially because what we only work on local elections. So Library School Board, Water Board, University Board and Community College Boards and Yes State House and State Senate. The issues that you're focusing at these levels is often a little bit more but also a lot less partisan it how keeping water clean how are We getting trash picked up are we funding our roads and our schools? The tangible delivery of those issues makes it so that what it means to be a progressive on them are things like my favorite example here we work for the Coroner Candida in Jefferson County. Colorado which factor more than thirteen hundred counties they'll elect corners he was reading on a progressive platform. The thing that he wanted to ensure was that after death trans people were not being this gendered, which was something that the current coroner was doing, and that is a really important thing because the way that gender is recorded on death certificates affects crime statistics and homicide statistics and suicide statistics. All of which are really important especially as they relate to a community that is disproportionately represented in things like suicide homicide. So as you think about what is the progressive value look like an issue like a coroner's office? That's one of the ways in which you can show up and it was a really interesting way to see the way that our values can trade themselves into progressive policies and all kinds of offices

President Obama United States Amanda Run Donald Trump Cudjoe Facebook Hillary President Trump Florida School Board City Council Jefferson County New York Yes State House Dross Morales Co-Founder Colorado DNC State Senate Vienna
Cassandra Speaks and the Power of Women as Storytellers with Elizabeth Lesser

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

05:01 min | 6 months ago

Cassandra Speaks and the Power of Women as Storytellers with Elizabeth Lesser

"So Elizabeth let's talk a little bit about storytelling. Why is it so powerful? This is the way humans learn. We've always learned through story. I. Mean I often think about the first human sitting around the first fire kind of grunting pointing and telling stories about What's going on here? How did we get here? Where do we go? When we die? What do we do in between the way we learn the bestest through telling stories, making up stories to explain mysteries to create power structures. It's all done through stories I totally totally agree with you and I also think storytelling is the greatest tool when we're trying to change narratives but I do think that throughout history stories have mainly been told through the eyes of men do you agree? That's how our stories have generally been told. Well, I certainly do agree I've written a new book. That's all about that. I wrote it because I've led these conferences for years for women maybe about fifteen years ago I thought to myself why do I get so uncomfortable when I put the words women in power together women empower those even makes me uncomfortable and it certainly makes other people uncomfortable makes men. Really uncomfortable. I. Just thought why is that I wanNA gather women together whether they're in the arts or leadership or astronauts or any place where women are in that space and say, what do you think about power had a you feel about the word? Is there a way to do power differently and over all those years I heard from so many great women but I never got to the bottom of why Why did we get to this place where we trust ourselves? So little women why we're always apologizing and giving space to the more powerful and how do we get back and how did this happen? So I went back into the oldest stories I could find five appre bio Greeks, Chinese, the stories and elicit. It's just bizarre and amazing. How many of the earliest origin stories are about I to be created male second in creation female She's the first to sin, and that story is repeated over and over whether it's eve or Pandora or Cassandra or other tales we were born second, but we send I and there's a lot to unpack in that idea that women got blamed for a lot of the general problems of being human and that sticks to us stories, stick to humans. Created only by men are really stories about men. This is the problem with many of our origin tales hero's journey myths. And Foundational Literature left out of that Canon. Are the voices and the values and experiences and priorities of women. When women join the storytellers, the human story changes. You might think I don't read the Bible. I. Don't even know who Pandora is what, but it sticks to us and we're still run by those stories. And I think that also when you look back at how women have throughout history for as long as there is time been basically property of men and you think about how we are today and how those stories have evolved you know like I just learned recently that rape was always almost justified if it was someone who owned their woman whether that be through marriage whether that is the enslaved and so throughout history I don't think there's ever a time that we can look back to where true feminism has ever been even within our reach any country I think it's something that we strive for I think it's something that we understand the intersection -ality of an how really vital it is but I Don't think you can go back to a time where we were empowered. So my question to you is what changes when women become the storytellers we're seeing right now how hard it is to change narratives, Anna how much effort disruption it takes, I. Mean we're seeing it with white supremacy. Now, that story is being exploded in front of our eyes so that we can change it. You can't change something that you don't see.

Elizabeth Rape Foundational Literature Anna Canon
White House Communications Director Alyssa Farah Says Trump Is 'Improving Dramatically, Quickly'

Mark and Melynda

00:48 sec | 6 months ago

White House Communications Director Alyssa Farah Says Trump Is 'Improving Dramatically, Quickly'

"Boxes. John Boxes. Decker John Decker is live is live in Washington in Washington White House White communications House communications director director Elissa Elissa Farrah Farrah on Fox on Fox News, News, giving giving the latest the latest update update on the president's on the president's health. health. The president's The president's improving improving dramatically dramatically and quickly and quickly But listen, But listen, we understand we understand he's not he's out not of the woods. out of the woods. He's continuing He's continuing to be monitored to be monitored by his by doctor his doctor and medical and medical team here, team here, the president the president on Twitter, on Twitter, promising promising his followers his followers that he will that be he back will be out back on out the campaign on the campaign trail soon. trail soon. And blasting And blasting polls that polls show him that show trailing him trailing Democratic Democratic presidential presidential nominee nominee Joe Biden. Joe Biden. Separately, Separately, staffing staffing has been has reduced been reduced in the West in the Wing West Wing and President and President Trump Trump is not is not set set to be in to the be in Oval the Office Oval Office anytime anytime today. today. Lisa Lisa thanks, John. thanks, John. The White House The White says House more says precautions more precautions will be taken will be taken to protect to protect essential essential staff staff around around the president. the president. As court As court challenges challenges to postal to postal service changes service changes continue. continue. The Postal The Postal Service Service in a filing in a filing today is today asking is asking a judge a to judge clarify to clarify

President Trump Elissa Elissa Farrah Farrah Washington White House White C Joe Biden John Decker John Boxes White House Trump Trump Fox News Wing West Wing Twitter Office Oval Office Lisa Lisa Director Washington John John.
"alyssa" Discussed on A Beautiful Mess Podcast

A Beautiful Mess Podcast

06:14 min | 7 months ago

"alyssa" Discussed on A Beautiful Mess Podcast

"You're listening to the beautiful must podcasts for this week's mini episode where catching up with Alissa Rosenheck when my good friends and the author of the new southern. Thank you so much for joining us today. I'm so so happy to talk to you and I'm so excited about the new southern we have known each other for a long time because we both in. Nashville. So would you tell our listeners quickly how we met? I met. Yes. Well, first of all I adore you and you're such a talented creative Unicorn I remember I got a email from I. think it was country living magazine and they said that you had selected me to shoot for one of your features and I was like what no way and it was just the sweetest really supportive between to create of women and I fell in love with you right then and there I was in your kitchen was shooting you. You're just a total bad ass and I just adore you. Yeah. Yes. So we started working together whenever I would have a magazine a feature at my house and we did together like three or four. Would you say? Still lived in that house, and then the final shoot that we did was for your book yeah. It was a really great full circle moment and I just you know everybody asks you know, I, think there are some creative moments in your life like when did you have your first where somebody believed in you and selected you? You know it was it was one of those. So shooting for the book and your home and just having you there and so supportive. It was a really beautiful full full circle moment for me. Thank you that's. Very special and I'm very excited about the book. It was the last shoot I ever had with the blue floors. So I'm happy that they were immortalized. and. Yeah. So it's a beautiful beautiful book congratulations. How did it feel the first time that you got out of your mailbox and held it in your hands in person? It felt like such a release. Books. Take a long time. You are definitely familiar with the process and this has been a three year journey. The story was living inside me for so much longer but to really be able to see it materialize and to be able to put it out into the world the way it is hopefully going to organically take on its own life. It's just been such a release and I just wrapped I mean I like Joe jumped up and down and wept. Oh, that's so beautiful. I'm so happy for you I. Know It was one of the items on your bucket list. It was definitely one of those one of those things that scary you and then you just know that you need to pursue it and walk through that fear. So tell us a little bit about the new southern dislike a primer for anybody WHO's hearing about it for the first time. Yes. So the thing that makes the new southern. So exciting, it's a movement grounded in cultural change where we're humanizing and honoring our differences through the Lens of creativity, and we really have to understand where we have been to know where we're going and the vehicle for me as creativity at such an expensive tool to challenge old beliefs to bring everybody inclusively to the table and by no means is it a silver bullet solution, but it's my vehicle to where I'm documenting how a chef's knife. Poets, pen a camera and all of these beautiful conversations in studio tours in home tours. It's an all access pass where I'm documenting how creativity really transcends division. So. Beautiful. I'm so excited about this. Tell us a few of the people who are featured in the book. The book is broken up into two segments, and then it goes into six different design genres, and this is a beautiful coffee table book and it's huge. It's big. It's very needy and it's a book that you can really read and also find that substance that you're looking for every day and so I have, I'm highlighting creative entrepreneurs nationally with older new ties to the south. So Bobby Burke Gray mail-in Elsie Larson clear sheer mini Chauhan Alex. Yeah many. It's amazing I mean just really beautiful creatives where we're all using our voices to unify to really connect and really hone in on our authentic gives to really tell us the truth about about the world in really come together with acceptance. So tell us about where you're originally from and sort of became southern because I was not always southern I'm from the Mid West. So but I feel a little bit southern now I feel like we're similar in that way we are similar and again I'm profiling. All of us with old and new ties to the South I grew up in Tulsa Oklahoma I left when I was eighteen I moved to the south for school, and then I joined the corporate world. When I grew up I really crave stability and for me that was going into the corporate world to be financially independent and climbing the corporate ladder and doing the nine to five and just in that grind and when I first moved to the south you know I really didn't feel like I had my community. Very independent I didn't fit the the specific quote unquote traditional southern mold, and you know through all of my life experience I went through. was that moment for me when I was still in the corporate world is thirty two years old that really connected me to that stillness in that pause and and I picked up a camera for the first time just as a healing Catharsis Ed. that. Yeah I was in Chicago. Working for a very large fortune, one, hundred company didn't have a vacation for six years. I was in the medical device spine consulting industry..

Alissa Rosenheck Nashville Tulsa Mid West Oklahoma Chicago Bobby Burke Gray Joe Elsie Larson
"alyssa" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

02:16 min | 7 months ago

"alyssa" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

"Mass incarceration is violence. We stopped from slavery to Jim, crow to mass incarceration, and the generational effects of this violence of this hateful discrimination are devastating and itself perpetuating. We've created a for profit system of locking up black and Brown people, and then when they're free a law enforcement system, which is designed to lock them back up. Whether you say the whole thing is broken or that it's working just as it was designed to do I don't think you can argue with the fact that there is much injustice in our criminal justice system. Recently, a non violent protests in Pennsylvania street medic named Taylor was arrested and told she had to post a million dollars in bail for her release. A million dollars she didn't hurt anyone she was trying to help people that were hurt Taylor is not white. Now I know that I am millionaire and if I was arrested in the same situation, nobody would set bail at a million dollars I know my kids wouldn't have to spend their lives visiting their mother in prison. This is not justice. This is not peace. There is neither law nor order in this country because this discrimination is rotten to its core, we need to fundamentally remake our entire criminal justice system from the writing of the laws to policing to prosecuting and to incarcerated. We need to do it. Now, we needed to do it two hundred years ago, but we can't wait. We cannot wait another day. Sorry not sorry. Is executive produced by Alyssa Milano. That's me. Our associate producer has been Jackson editing and engineering by Natasha Jacobs and music by Josh. Cooke Alicia Eagle and Milo. That's my boy. Please subscribe on spotify I tunes or wherever you get your podcasts and if you like the show please rate review and spread the word. Sorry..

Taylor Alyssa Milano Jim Pennsylvania Alicia Eagle Natasha Jacobs executive producer Josh
"alyssa" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

09:09 min | 1 year ago

"alyssa" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

"So I think the thing that people do not want to do is to just sit at home and think sit at home and read the Internet. I think that is GonNa really tell people some national balance in the wrong direction and finally. I know it's hard to project at this point because we're so fresh in it. But what lessons do you think we can take forward with US after? This crisis is over an into the future to make the world a better place. I mean. That's a beautiful question. I think if you take a moment and look over the trajectory of our own individual alive my guess is we've all weathered some storms some some dark night and I think we can use those as a point of reference and I. I mentioned this because I think it's important. We recognize remember our strength and our resiliency right our ability and tendency to rise above the city. And I think if we even take a broader lens if we look across the whole of humanity from an evolutionary standpoint. We are a wildly resilient species and think about what our ancestors had to experience and endure so we not only have evolution on her side but we have our ancestors at our backs supporting us and I find comfort in that and I think it's important to remember that and really across spiritual practices from Christian Mr Mysticism to Indian Yogis. We we can all speak to that. Deep in print think EPA genetic ability to not only endured times but to rise above them and I think this is providing an opportunity for us to remember that collectively and individually and beautiful gift or opportunity to rise up for me that one of over linings and all of this. I want to say this without discounting all the very real suffering that people are going through because there are people who are you know are not able to pay their rent. People who are I mean? I think a large proportion of our country lives on the edge of survivor all time and so taking into account. I think what we can take away from. This is people eating at home. People nourishing each other. Like I know for me. I haven't cooked this much really there. Ever actually really loving the fact of being able to nourish the people in my life. I loved the idea of maybe trails are more important than we used to view them. Maybe the earth is more important. Maybe connection if we can come out of this and be more kind to the other people around us. I noticed noise. It's like at a minimum. You know yeah people are giving I mean through social distancing. I mean they're giving people more space but also think people are just being a little more kind a little more generous and I'm noticing it gets grocery stores. People are actually. I noticed when this started there were a lot of fights over toilet right and now it's like people seem to be taking that into account and I would love if we could come out of this being a kinder more supportive society because I really feel like we need to remember. Stephen Hawking writing about a crushing saying that it was an evolutionary. Holdover isn't working for US anymore. Because how live and I would love. This could be one of those tipping points where we could say. Do we really need to have to buy stuff all the time? Do we really need to be served productive so that we can just consume? Can we actually find more enjoyment just by sitting with the person across from sitting with our family? So any let me ask you this. Where do you find hope in these uncertain times? I think right now hope is really important and I think one of the ways that we want to cultivate that is underneath. Resilient tends to be laughter enjoy and I think one of the things we really wanNA focus is amidst this deluge of negative information or or intense information. I think it would be. It's really great to make sure that we're still smiling if it's rather than you know. Put something on net flicks. It allows you to smile like something that allows you to Find laster found some joy to find happiness to you. I know there's the John Kuczynski show about trying to find the bright spots amidst all of this. Because I think that's really important like when they say laughter's the best medicine I think right now. It's really salient point for everyone. Well thank you both so much for your insight and guidance. I certainly appreciate it and I know my listeners will to reach out connect be kind to yourself relieve you today with this very special spoken word from Prince. Ea scared yet. They say this thing it kills your immune system attach your lungs makes it hard to breathe spreading spreading like wildfire causing havoc. Your friends and family are going to get it if they don't already have. It is tragic. I tell you madness. Scientists say old people get worse but most get eventually they say this is new. Would no no no? This has been around for centuries look at history is just a different name a different strain and now there's no way to contain. It affects the rich poor young old. The unknown the famous. It's dangerous everyone's on edge. Locked inside of their homes nervously borders a close countries declare state of emergency. Grocery stores are empty. Nobody's praying in church. The world has gone to crap. No one to toilet paper so without first. The stock market crashed laid off work hand. Sanitizer was going for a million dollars. Escort you better not sneeze. Because no one's going to say God bless you pay might even arrest. You don't mean a stress you but washing your hands obsessively in the restroom. Not Protect you. Friends I'm talking about Corona virus. Now this is a virus even more deadly the F. Virus you've seen it is spreads every minute like epidemic lives on surfaces most commonly remote control. Tv's screens cellular. Phone makes you desperate doctor. Say every time you scroll down to feed reinfected it invades the brain and with a mutated turns into hatred. Blame CHINA DID it. No no Italy did no no Iran. They'll Spain a why didn't make it clear. The Virus Ladies and gentlemen is fear. But don't be afraid despite what you hear on Seal Your TV. There is good news during this tragedy to fight loneliness. People up performing concerts on balconies in Iran Japan donated supplies to China for free Britain on them was a poem that said we are waves from the same. See listen to me like every tragedy we can let this destroy us. We can use to our benefit in repair relationships with our sisters and brothers. Wipe away silly questions because when it's all said and done all we ever really had in this world with each other. So let's flatten the curve and expand our hearts social distance boost our moon systems. Be My for the where we put our hands but also where we put our attention be alert not fearful because the virus is a pandemic easily transmitted if you do contracted or exhibit symptoms. We recommend immediately hotline of a level headed friend. If you are exposed to your TV change the station. Decontaminate yourself through dance laughter meditation. Twenty twenty has been morbid from Kobe to cove it. Maybe these tragic moments to finally wake up to what's important right now. Tell someone that you care for them. Yes right now tell them that you cherish them if they are not in the same room ring them up and tell them you will always be there for them because together is how will rise above the only vaccine for this F virus and every other virus is love. Sorry not sorry is executive produced by Alyssa Milano. That's me our associate producer has been Jackson editing and engineering by Natasha's Jacobs and music by Josh Cooke Alicia Eagle and my. That's my boy. Please subscribe on spotify. I tunes or wherever you get your podcasts. And if you like the show please rate review and spread the word..

Iran CHINA US Indian Yogis Stephen Hawking John Kuczynski spotify Alyssa Milano Twenty twenty EPA Spain executive Corona Kobe producer Josh Cooke
"alyssa" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

09:46 min | 1 year ago

"alyssa" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

"Explained to my listeners. The difference between climate change and climate justice. Well climate change is. What's happening to us? All around the ongoing cheating of the planet and Catastrophic Effect Climate Justice is the reminder that happens a world. That's deeply unequal and unfair and the changes happened deepened at unfairness and injustice. 'cause if you're rich start that you can avoid climate change but you can figure out how to live with it if you lose your summer home in some places to a fire. You probably have another home to go to. But if you're peasant farmer on coast is the day of Bangladesh. They have been gold rises. You know eight inches and pushes salt water into your fields and makes it impossible to grow food there? I mean your other option is to live in a cardboard box and the edge of the national capital. You know and that's what already we think. Last year by twenty five million climate refugees were on the move the UN prediction. For how many weeks expect a little of the century tops out of about a billion people or one of being having to get up and leave your homes you know. I think that there's also a connection between these bona rebel areas and countries electing authoritarian regimes. That come in and make promises but that actually make the issue worse because they are loyal to the oil industry. I think that's true. We watch all over the world. This collection of autocrats all of whom have in common their fealty to with status quo and especially to the richest people in it who are often people from the fossil fuel industry so Putin in Russia the Saudi Royal Family Trump. I mean you know. Trump couldn't be bothered to roll out testing kits for the corona virus but when wanting this big campaign backers racking Baron Herald Ham us two billion dollars a day in the stock market collapse in twenty four hours it proposed a big bailout for those kind of firms right so these guys they get a good return on investment for their campaign donations and it's a huge huge part of the problem. Well Earth Day is coming up. What is your message to Americans and people around the world on Earth Day? Well big deal. It's The fiftieth anniversary. So the use of Said. Let's take the first day the twenty second as a kind of day of commemoration which think about the things that we've accomplished in the things we haven't accomplished and then when that's over issues the next day and the day after that to get to work people. Twenty third Thursday is been called Finance Day. And that's when we're really taking on these banks and others. So that's Today. If you have a chase credit card in your wallet to cut it up and to do it on social media so everybody else can see and your odds of having chase credit card are pretty damn good if you have an Amazon credit card united mileage card whatever it takes a little work to go do that but on the list of things that people have to deal with climate change. It's not like you're having to become a refugee and moved to a camp someplace. It means you have to find a different credit card so you can do it and it would be a huge signal to people like chase that we're sick of. We're not gonNA take it anymore. It's not okay to be trying to make money off the end of the planet right now. The oil gas and coal companies are laying waste to our planet. You take these dry corporations would have all the money. They need to continue full speed ahead but no they don't. They need money from banks to look for more coal oil and gas and the big banks have been eager to comply. Chase is the worst says the Paris. Climate Agreement Chases poured one hundred and ninety six billion dollars into digging up more fossil fuels that makes chase justice responsible for the destruction of our planet as Exxon Chevron. Vp and all the rest the final day Friday. The twenty fourth of April is Politics Day. In young people will be registering. Everybody vote getting them set for November. Because we're running out of four year cycles to waste if we WANNA have significant action by Twenty Thirty Twenty Twenty. The latest we can possibly begin to go down that path. You know that governments don't turn on a dime so it's a huge year in so many ways. There are two huge levers to pull on them as political. The other is financial. We need to Yank as hard as we can. Go through them and see what happens. She what kind of change we can still create and speaking of the financial change our their funds people can invest in something like a 401k or investment fund that is managed for people where all the stocks in it are ethical and environmentally conscious. If your investor it's now relatively easy to find fossil free funds if you go to go fossil free dot org. There'll be some ideas any investment advisor now easily you there and the good news is if you if you started investing means a few years ago you would have made out like a bandit system has underperformed the rest of the market by huge percentage over the last inner ten years which would expect because you know someone else's figuring out how to do the job of producing energy or cheap ringing or cleanly so they're going to get their lunch that's why they're stocks are in the tank if you need a credit card. You don't have to go to chase bank. Their aspiration bank on the web. There's Amalgamated Bank on the East Coast Beneficial State Bank on the West Coast. There's local credit unions that are invested in fossil fuel. So these are the places to be keeping your money taking a credit card. These are all places that we can exercise some leverage as long as we do it together and publicly that's why going to stop the money pipeline dot com kind of join this joint effort so many different groups would be a really good idea so personally. Do you think we can make the change in time for this to really make a difference? I don't know I wish I could tell you for sure that if we did everything right at this point it was gonna work out. We know we're not gonNA stop global warming we've already raise temperature one degree. Celsius next enormous effect. We're not taking that back. And in fact the temperature is definitely gonNA rise some more. There's GonNa be more damage done. The best science indicates that we have a narrow window left albeit one. That's closing to make real change. That might still affect the outcome. In Large ways at period of leverage is short as I said the scientists tell us really the next decade is our best chance to be making huge change. This is the existential question of our time. In the same way that a century ago for our parents and grandparents the existential question was about Fascism in Europe and people had to cross the Atlantic and kill or be killed can order to deal with it. We don't have to do anything that hard. But we have to do more than we're doing now. Our Planet is outside. It's comfort zone so we need to be outside our coverage out and we need to be there fast. Well thank you for your life's work. Bill appreciate you so much and thanks for being on sorry not sorry we leave you today with Joy Harjo reading her breathtaking poem remember. Remember the Sky report under no each of the stars stories. Remember the moon now who she is. Remember the son's birth at dawn that is the strongest point of time. Remember sundown giving away tonight. Remember your birth. How your mother struggled to give birth. You are evidence of her and her and hers. Remember your father. He is Your Life. Also remember the earth's whose skin you are. Ritter Blogger yellow earthquake. Earth Brown earth wheat. Our earth remember the plants trees animal life who all have their tribes their families their histories to talk with them. Listen to them. They are alive poems. The win remember her voice. She knows the origin of this universe. Remember they were all people all people are you remember and this year versus you. Remember all is in motion is growing. Is You remember language. This remember the damn slight. Which is that life is remember. Sorry not sorry is executive produced by Alyssa Milano. That's me our associate producer has been Jackson editing and Engineering Natasha's Jacobs and music by Josh. Cooke Alicia Eagle and Milo bleary. That's my boy. Please subscribe on spotify Itunes or wherever you get your podcasts and if you like the show please rate review and spread the word..

Twenty Thirty Twenty Twenty Chase UN Bangladesh Amalgamated Bank Europe Alyssa Milano Trump Exxon Chevron Saudi Royal Family Trump Russia Putin Amazon Vp Joy Harjo East Coast Beneficial State Ba advisor
"alyssa" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

05:10 min | 1 year ago

"alyssa" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"Her this no breaking up Alyssa that place now why would you want to leave that I don't think I'd want to sell a lot either man go there right now they're not offered enough money for place of that's just one of a kind of play now did you think we'd be bad going on there got a great view of the ocean got a great view of rocket launcher that song yeah Ciara SpaceX trying to buy up those homes of retirees but many are saying I don't want to they would they want to stay a report states that while he lied muskets company was approved on local state and federal level back in twenty fourteen it only started become unbearable living there for research in recent years according to some residents of accepted the buyout others apparently are holding up pretty well for a whole lot more well I understand people want to say I understand if if somebody wants to leave I mean the yeah this is not a safe living there anymore because Charles by said that they're doing test down there and rockets are exploding yeah I need more space there's a look at your ability could you go put your so yeah and then there's been a lot of people's goals you know their retirement that's the that's the ultimate goal the ultimate in for some that's what people want to live out the rest of the line I got a really I bet they got a really involved H. away retirement communities like that all man I've always gonna they always got out of a group of old old folks they just love it very political very political I nasty nasty nasty hero he parks his car on the line yeah exactly exactly he's got his boat on the side of the house his car's been out there for seventeen days five one two eight three six zero five not even I'm paying attention nearly a two week search for a North Carolina woman who disappeared while out dumpster diving as well it's come to a tragic end horrible stores a horrible story authorities have found the body of a thirty year old woman named Stephanie **** in a landfill yeah the burning to police department revealed on Wednesday the discovery came just hours after the vehicle was found parked near some dumpsters behind a shopping center investigators believe that **** was rooting around in the dumpster on January the thirtieth when a garbage truck collected its contents and **** about one forty five in the morning an autopsy has been scheduled in a term of the exact cause of death but it's believed that she was in the dumpster the dump truck came along picked it up to its contents in the back of the garbage truck and then on to the landfill yeah it's a very trust sad tragic story for this this young woman and I just stopped you know I just wonder how many homeless people have we thrown in the landfill well I know that's a horrible thing to think about but is it safe to say on a cold night there could be homeless people they get warm inside a dumpster I'm I mean only a garbage truck can can confirm this but I bet there have been times were garbage men and and women in this city I've had to wake up the homeless people to kick him out of the dumpster before they empty I I think it would be impossible that the if if that had not happened who and where we have to be clear about that so says poor woman that they found in the in the landfill she was not homeless use dumpster diving looking looking for good to people with on what exactly had and and she was very attractive far from homeless woman but yeah I see that's what I thought the first thought when I saw the headline was she must been homeless since you must've been sleeping there whatever the case but I think it's a daily obstacle for garbage company just down no waist manager apps and has to be I talked to at least maybe sleeping in it or behind it or near at swap out to pick this thing up get out away we have a listener in is probably listening right now I know you're talking about such showed up in a BMW remote so aesthetic okay yeah I came out to mine as well as nearby yes and he hated that exact scenario that he has to deal with on a daily basis I don't know about his name or other other you know drivers out there we'd love to hear the stories though at five one two eight three six zero five nine other I think they're very threatening to in some cases since their home your your your your master with a home here my warped my safety my security yeah so the scenario the unfortunate scenario that you pay there I'm sure it's happened many times and we have no idea that it is happen idea no idea speaking of our community there's a new community survey that finds dissatisfaction regarding Austin's housing traffic and our local government sixty nine percent surveyed say they don't have faith in the transparency of the Austin city council nor that their tax dollars are being used as intended that is a drop from one year earlier fifty two percent think the city streets are filled in among other highlights most people say they're still lack of access to cheap housing the flow city streets as a constant headache and more than half say walking alone at night downtown makes them feel unsafe it's also worth noting that as the council works to a sweeping over all the land development code only sixty percent of the city's actually planning properly.

Alyssa
"alyssa" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

04:17 min | 1 year ago

"alyssa" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

"<Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <music> <Music> <Silence> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> Twenty Nineteen <Speech_Female> Jeff basis <Speech_Female> saw all <Speech_Female> his wealth. <Speech_Female> Drop by <Speech_Female> nine billion <Speech_Female> dollars due <Speech_Female> to divorce settlement <Speech_Female> and he's <Speech_Female> still the <Speech_Female> richest man <Speech_Female> in the world <Speech_Female> that's right he <Speech_Female> lost more <Speech_Female> than the annual <Speech_Female> GDP of <Speech_Female> at least twenty <Speech_Female> countries <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> is still <Speech_Female> so rich. <Speech_Female> Nobody <Speech_Female> can catch him <Speech_Female> and yet <Speech_Female> until <Speech_Female> very public <Speech_Female> pressure forced <Speech_Female> Amazon to raise <Speech_Female> minimum wage <Speech_Female> to fifteen dollars <Speech_Female> per hour. <Speech_Female> More than half <Speech_Female> of its workers has <Speech_Female> made less <Speech_Female> than twenty <Speech_Female> eight thousand <Speech_Female> dollars <Silence> per year. <Speech_Female> They earn <Speech_Female> ten percent less <Speech_Female> than the national median <Speech_Female> income <Speech_Female> while laboring rang <Speech_Female> for the world's <Speech_Female> richest <Silence> man <Speech_Female> I'm talking <Speech_Female> specifically to <Speech_Female> the Republicans now <Speech_Female> and those <Speech_Female> who complain about <Speech_Female> Food Stamps Welfare <Speech_Female> Medicaid housing housing <Speech_Female> benefits <Speech_Female> and <SpeakerChange> other social <Speech_Female> safety net <Silence> <Advertisement> programs. <Silence> Here <Speech_Female> because <Silence> this is important <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> we need those <Speech_Female> programs in in <Speech_Female> large because <Speech_Female> of situations <Speech_Female> like this <Speech_Female> huge corporations <Speech_Female> and extremely <Speech_Female> wealthy <Speech_Female> business <Speech_Female> owners like <Speech_Female> basis <Speech_Female> and the Walton family family. <Speech_Female> Use these <Speech_Female> programs your tax <Speech_Female> dollars as <Speech_Female> an excuse to <Speech_Female> not pay <Speech_Female> living wages <Speech_Female> and benefits <Speech_Female> to their <Silence> workers. <Speech_Female> You'll notice Chris. <Speech_Female> They never <Speech_Female> seem to take <Speech_Female> smaller bonuses. <Speech_Female> Stock <Speech_Female> payouts golden <Speech_Female> parachutes <Speech_Female> or other multi-million. <Speech_Female> Dollar perks <Speech_Female> but their workers <Speech_Female> can't afford award <Speech_Female> housing <Speech_Music_Female> or food <Speech_Female> or healthcare <Speech_Female> or any of <Speech_Female> the other basic <Silence> necessities in <Speech_Female> life. <Speech_Female> Now if you <Speech_Female> have a problem <Speech_Female> with social all <Speech_Female> safety nets <Speech_Female> then you should be <Speech_Female> demanding <Speech_Female> that these incredibly <Speech_Female> powerful <Speech_Female> and wealthy people <Speech_Female> pay <Speech_Female> their workers <SpeakerChange> instead <Silence> of themselves. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> It's <SpeakerChange> corporate <Speech_Female> welfare <Speech_Female> going to those <Speech_Female> who absolutely <Speech_Female> do not <Speech_Female> need it. <Speech_Female> I can already <Speech_Female> hear you screaming. <Speech_Female> Socialism <Speech_Female> and <SpeakerChange> redistribution distribution <Silence> of wealth. <Speech_Female> Will <Speech_Female> guess what <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> you can't <Speech_Female> redistribute <Speech_Female> something <Speech_Female> which has never <Speech_Female> been distributed <Silence> in the first place <Speech_Female> the the <Speech_Female> vast amount <Speech_Female> of money <Speech_Female> in the hands <Speech_Female> of so few <Speech_Female> has been taken <Speech_Female> out of communities <Silence> across America. <Speech_Female> Your <Speech_Female> purchase at <Speech_Female> Walmart doesn't funder <Speech_Female> schools <Speech_Female> it funds the <Speech_Female> Waltons. Next <Silence> mega yacht <Speech_Female> azure <Speech_Female> towns roads <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Female> infrastructure. <Speech_Female> Get worse <Speech_Female> and closed storefronts storefronts <Speech_Female> appear <Speech_Female> on Main Street. <Speech_Female> Jeff Faso's <Speech_Female> is personally <Speech_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> funding a <Speech_Female> private spaceflight <Speech_Female> company. <Silence> <Speech_Female> How many any <Speech_Female> fifteen dollars <Speech_Female> an hour Amazon <Speech_Female> workers <Speech_Female> do you think <Speech_Female> will end up <Speech_Female> on those luxury junkets <Speech_Female> to orbit <Speech_Female> back? <Speech_Female> Businesses <Speech_Female> have a responsibility vence <Speech_Female> ability to their <Speech_Female> workers <Speech_Female> and to the community <Speech_Female> is where <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> they operate <Speech_Music_Female> period. <Speech_Female> That's it <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> the deal has <Speech_Female> always been hard <Speech_Female> work for a fair air <Speech_Female> wage <Speech_Female> but not <Speech_Female> anymore <Speech_Female> when someone can <Speech_Female> lose <SpeakerChange> nine <Speech_Female> billion dollars <Speech_Female> and not <Speech_Female> notice it while <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> their employees are <Speech_Female> losing their homes and <Speech_Female> to enable <Speech_Music_Female> this extreme <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> wealth. Something <Speech_Female> is fundamentally <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> broken. <Speech_Music_Female> It's <Speech_Music_Female> GonNa take good. <Speech_Music_Female> Corporate Governance <Speech_Music_Female> and more importantly <Speech_Music_Female> good <Speech_Music_Female> government <Speech_Music_Female> affects <Speech_Music_Female> we <Speech_Music_Female> live in the new <Speech_Music_Female> roaring <Speech_Music_Female> twenties. <Speech_Music_Female> And we <Speech_Music_Female> know of last <Speech_Music_Female> bill around we <Speech_Music_Female> get <Music> to act <Speech_Music_Female> now <Speech_Music_Female> <SpeakerChange> before it's <Music>

"alyssa" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

02:42 min | 1 year ago

"alyssa" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

"I felt such a loss of power and I would go to the Internet. You know and just search I noted for something inspiration and all I was not on twitter. But you can see tweets from people like in articles and there were just people I just. I remember that resonated with me and I started to look at their twitter timelines more and I thought it's myself and I discussed this with my partner because as you mentioned I am a very or I should say was a very private person. There are people in my life who didn't even know that I had kidney cancer. Who didn't know that I have lupus and a lot of them actually found out when I she did eventually go to twitter but there isn't a lot of awareness for people who are man with Lupus Lupus the the population lupus night mostly ninety percent women? Ten percent man wanted people to this day I still get tweets at me. That say I didn't even know that men could have lupus and you know they're being truthful and it's it there's just so much there's just not enough awareness and so I figured if I go to twitter and I do something to empower myself than I feel like I have some sense of control. You know some sense of empowerment. So that was my goal that if I could impact one person's life and I told my partner Jerry and I said if I could do that then Dan I'll just delete my account but you know the truth. Is it happened in a week. Somebody said you really changed my life and you know why it felt so good. I didn't WanNa stop and I just kept going and it was just it was like I was reaching shing people who felt alone and I know that feeling of feeling isolated alone scared limited and I wanted to reach them and I wanted to give them hope because we needed hope. especially that time especially when the repeal repeal for the was starting to go through Congress and go through the House and the first time it failed but it was coming back it wasn't than stopping and there it was like I just I just might level of involvement kept getting deeper and deeper until I started working with my Representatives.

Lupus Lupus twitter lupus partner kidney cancer Congress Jerry Dan
"alyssa" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

03:53 min | 1 year ago

"alyssa" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

"There were too many important stories in twenty nineteen for us to get them all in one episode. Sui asks you to leave us a voice message judge on what you think. The big stories were here. Are some of your thoughts Alyssa This is Chris. I think I think the biggest story of two thousand nineteen was the government shutdown A note was early in the year but I I think a lot of us were afraid that the government would of never open again and I think that's a big concern. Turn with who we have in the White House right now That things aren't functioning the way they should be functioning. And that's a big story for for a lot of us out here. Thank you I. This is Peter. Morley patient advocate from New York City. And I'm also a patient might top news story of Twenty Nineteen Gene is the trump administration's continuous efforts to sabotage healthcare and the healthcare of hundred thirty million people. Oh in America with pre existing conditions. Hi Alyssa my name's Hassan Martini. I am the executive director of note Democrat left behind never before or have a coalition of Congressional Democratic candidates. Running in deep red districts. Come together like they have in two thousand twenty two form. No Dem left behind no dumb left behind the Pitney of grassroots organizing. These campaigns are run by candidates. Pure creatine will with with very limited resources and virtually no funding from the democratic establishment. I know deb left behind his Made up of nine candidates from across the country three of the nine vets six out of the nine female seven out of the nine candidates running in rural rural America. And of course nine out of the nine or Patriots to hear stories like Hell veteran Chris running of rural tenures Tennessee have his campaign event overrun on by KKK. Yes you heard that the KKK. You need to select know dem left behind. My name is Jeff Paris. I am a retired Air Force. Master Sergeant I believe the biggest story of two thousand nineteen the concentration camps in the United States. This administration has gone on record saying these people do not deserve personal hygiene products sanitary products products or adequate sleeping items like beds. This administration has also gone on record refusing to give vitals lifesaving. Vaccines like the flu. Shot due to this mistreatment treatment. People including multiple children are dying in these camps this administration. It's denying free. Healthcare being offered in there even arresting doctors that are driving having to bring lifesaving healthcare to these people for these reasons. I believe the United States of America is committing crimes against humanity in these camps under Article Seven Paragraph One item K of the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court and that this is the biggest story of two thousand nineteen highly suffer that I am happy birthday. I believe that we need more people. Are you more people that really care about the future of the she rent in our ball or short laid to for Eunice Bob during biting PS two Shannen Doherty. Because I really want to hear her talk about they are currently the IC so that she does a Lotta stuff on her social media and also about The new platform You seem to give people hope with a breasts concerts wholesale. I liked to that please known I know if she Inboard for Sean Revived Review Baugh or she Issue we thank you. The highly sought mytalk story for two thousand nineteen is brexit..

United States Alyssa This Shannen Doherty Sui Dem Jeff Paris White House executive director Eunice Bob New York City Morley Tennessee deb Air Force Patriots Hassan Martini Chris Sean International Criminal Court
"alyssa" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

03:18 min | 1 year ago

"alyssa" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

"Teams have therapists on staff. Like they have like a physical therapists. Do they have a mental therapist on staff No I mean. I don't think it's common practice. I think I think from the time that I got drafted onward. It was the advent of of people starting to explore that option. I think sports psychologists had been part of what teams were looking to do. But there's a huge difference between sports psychology and then and then methodologically breaking down mental health from a proactive standpoint treatment. If need be in an even more so not reacting to what an individual maybe facing and then manifesting as an individual person but what do we know about mental health and how do we create environments. That actually acknowledged what we know. You guys are under the impression that mental health is going to by default reduce production of an individual have played played against the best and and presumably the number one pick. Is Anthony Davis and shortly after Michael. Caygill Chris and these guys that I've performed time and time again but unfortunately personally because of my mental illness. I'll probably slip out of that range that those guys off. Aw Equation Mark any Asian rented. A room is against you and the council the rest of the room. Mikhail says you're Jewish Orlando Commandos often August twenty. Indiana's Miami jail. All again. I went through an entire season. Where played I was stay with an anxiety disorder where I ended up being one of the only players in history to lead my team in? Aw five stat categories. We ran rave about Royce White. If it's a smorgasbord a basketball players. He scores he take scoring rebounding assists blocks and steel so all categories. You could shoot it. Pass it jeeze physical. You better be paying. Lean attention if it's got the ball top and I think if you look at my life with all the things that I do it definitely has not hurt my productivity productively. So that's that's a bunch of bullshit. I mean you could make the argument bad. Hey you know if Elissa didn't have anxiety then maybe she she would have been able to do this. But but the point is that comparatively to the rest of your peers or to the rest of society. You've accomplished major major things right away. Who knows if I didn't have anxiety Zayed's if I could still do everything that I do? Absolutely that's the bigger. The bigger point. Part of the gift of being in in my body is that I am able to multitask and think completely too many issues at once while also raising my kids and and and doing a series is an an. I don't know if I would be that person if my brain chemistry and the way in which I think in process things.

Royce White Elissa Anthony Davis Orlando Commandos Indiana basketball Miami Mikhail Zayed Chris Michael
"alyssa" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

02:06 min | 1 year ago

"alyssa" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

"My my start was an independent cinema and for me at the end of the day to always story. Can I connect with the story. Does it resonate with me. Does it challenge my beliefs. I do I feel that it's going to resonate with an audience. That's how I think all of my decisions I don. We're just wondering are you less Listen there are pros and cons of being a principal. Don't what okay to hear the princess. Diaries I know that is going on. You're not telling me friends tell you know what. Here's your friendship tar. I'm taking it off and it's going into I think at Brock's and you know voltaire hair. I would personally like to learn about voltaire okay religious so enchanting nineteen having jackass might now multiple ones. She stole prescription drugs and broke the law. Your honor may you may. We're not sir. You're lucky day mistakes. I'm going to put you under house arrest. It's funny because I think acting has become less interesting to me the more I know who I exactly exactly exactly exactly dude. I just back figured out who I am. I don't want someone else. Baskin me a little bit at eight. Yeah and for me I now Alan to the point where I love story right. Where for me? It's story is what connects us. It's were the were the architects of the heart. You know like I can identify you know with a nine year old kid battling rolling aliens on Mars. But what I can identify with the feeling of terror. It's the feeling of loneliness the feeling of regret..

Alan Brock
"alyssa" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

12:23 min | 1 year ago

"alyssa" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

"alyssa" Discussed on 10 Things To Tell You

10 Things To Tell You

11:42 min | 1 year ago

"alyssa" Discussed on 10 Things To Tell You

"It doesn't cost you anything extra but it does support the cost of making the show so i do appreciate v._8. You guys using those links lastly in the self promotion department. I have to tell you that my secret posts newsletter the email that i send out with all my recommendations all my personal thoughts that i do not want to share publicly on the internet that newsletter is is going out to subscribers this week for the first time in months and months. I do apologize if you've been on that list and have not received need a secret post in a while. I'm fixing all of that this week. The secret posts are like a mini magazine sort of i write l. little personal blurb then i share the books i've been reading the best links i found on the internet. There's always a beauty and style section. It's a lot of content for one email and typically. They go out monthly. You can sign up for the secret posts at ten things to tell l. u. Dot com you can also unsubscribe at any time and despite the fact that i haven't sent one out in a while it really is the best way to stay in the know with all the things i share online and don't share online if you're already subscriber. Please look for a new edition in your in boxes this this week. Okay today's guest my internet friend alyssa herzog like i said before. I followed eliza for so many years now. I started following her back when i was blogging a lot more regularly she's such a fun person to follow. Alyssa lives in hoboken new jersey with her husband or two kids. She worked for years as a beauty editor at magazines such as a lure brides harper's bazaar good housekeeping being what a fun job right she is now the contributing beauty editor at rachel ray every day magazine and she also freelance writes for several publications locations. She's a lifestyle blog called the sparkly life. You can find that at the sparkly life dot com and you can regularly find her on instagram as elissa assert sig and her new books degrom account that handle is elissa is booked one quick thing about our conversation today so the last book that i highlight in my top five is the need by helen phillips. This book is almost impossible to talk about without spoilers really is so i give a brief overview of the book in the main show and why it made my top five but then listen i have a full full on spoiler central analysis of the need we just had to it's totally the type of you need to discuss with someone the second you're done reading it snipped out the spoiler section of that discussion and i've put it at the end of the show after the ultra music at the very very end so if you don't wanna hear that part and if you plan to read this book i promise you do not want to hear that part then once you hear the music at the end of the show press stop if you do do want to hear us talk about our theories on the book the need by helen phillips then hang in there until the very very end all right. That's all my disclaimers promos. Let's get to a great conversation about some of the best books of the summer with my guest. Alyssa hurts elissa. I am so excited to talk books with you today because i have followed you for years and years on instagram and i just love your reading taste. I love your posts and now you have a bookstore grandma account which is even better said. Thank you so much for. You're agreeing to be on this show with me. This is actually our first time ever speaking or looking at one another. Thanks for having me. I'm so flattered because i feel like oh. You are like my book guru for years. I've gotten so many great recommendations from you and i also feel like you're a little bit of a book twin with me like a lot of times. If you like something all of it if you don't lay be on your favorites not usually my favorite as well so i'm excited for this conversation okay good tell the listeners dinners i just a little bit about yourself your story your life your blog and then in a second we'll talk about your reading habits but like just sort of introduce introducing yourself to the listeners so i live in hoboken new jersey which is right outside of new york city says sometimes they say new york city to be easy <hes>. I'm i am a mom of two. I have a six year old and a nine year old and i work from home for years. I worked in an office as a magazine duty editor and that was sort of my life for fifteen years ears and now i've transitioned to working part time so i wor- i freelance writing also a contributing beauty editor rachel ray magazine and i'm a momma's well also that's what i do at home and then with reading i definitely have been a big reader my whole life as a kid i was the kind who went to the library and a huge stack and just which saw them love is always reading but i haven't been over racist reader relate throughout my life. There are definitely been periods where i've kind of given it up for awhile gotten busy with other things things will definitely becoming a mom sort of put a big dent in my reading for a couple of years and then i sort of and i was always reading but i wasn't reading atone necessarily campbell books and then last year. I tried to read more. I didn't make a great sort of effort at it. I think i read twenty two books last year it which was not a ton but then towards the end of the year. I really started to pick up. I really really started to become more excited about reading began dan and this year. I really sort of taken it to the next level. What happened at the end of last year that ramped up. You're reading situation. I think i think guy was started. Following people who were big readers getting a lot of great recommendations getting more excited about it and then i read a string of books that i really really loved and so but then i just sort of made a on my blog i made a sort of declaration that i was gonna read thirty bucks this year. That was it was kind of like wasn't too much. We're twenty two last astros. Gonna read war started once. He started keeping track of them. That was huge for may. I use a tip from you. Actually you've given a tip on your podcast. <hes> several episodes go about reading twenty minutes a day and i started doing that and that made a huge difference for me and now i don't. I don't necessarily do the thing where i set my timer anymore because now i'm i have my books. I'm reading. I wanna i wanna read but for sort of kick. Start me again. That was a huge help for me. Discovered audiobooks ice. I i mostly read quote regular books but i but i also read audiobooks as well those just sort of like finding these opportunities to read throughout the day for me as just sort out of exploded my reading and i think as of last night eighty one bucks this year so the big big change for me over last year. Yeah that is a huge change. You went ahead and blew pass. Is your third goal. I hit thirty and like i don't know february or something like that. In march maybe wow eighty something bugs okay so a few do things i have a lot of thoughts on the timer rule the twenty minute timer role even though i read every day it's a huge part of my life. I still set my timer. That's great now. Not if i have like you know on a weekend unlimited few hours to read or not read but on the weekdays or just if i know if i have a short amount of time instead of scrolling rolling my phone setting my timer even if it's for ten minutes twenty minutes i think is is ideal to get through like a couple chapters but setting the timer. It's such a simple tip but it really does work in getting you through books like if you set your timer for twenty minutes a day i mean you can probably read a book every week or two so obviously depending on the size of the book but anyway that's like my number one tip so i- secretly very happy that you used it i can adjust it works talmadge so then you started a books to graham and i actually am interested in what you said about how that people that when you started following people that sort of motivated you to read or was giving you good recommendations because i also post a lot about my reading on instagram but i feel like it's a little bit of a double edged sword one is when i started following the people who were giving amazing recommendations my to read pile got so big like almost too stress me out a little bit like i was like oh. There's so so many good things out. There and i'm not enjoying this because i just feel like i'm behind all the time. I don't know d. is that is i guess. All the stress rests on the t._v. Are pile. That's for sure. The keeping keeping track of books has helped me a lot with that because i like anyone who loves a list loves to check check something off. It's almost like it's almost like checking something off because you're adding to it but in a good way and so you sort of see the progress of everything and so it's fun to do seventy nine eighty eighty one you know it's really it's it's very satisfying moment and i keep it on my phone in the notes app and so literally like the second i finished my book i go to my phone and plug it in and righted in until that has been very satisfying but yeah i definitely have the stress of the pile i my kindle is full right now how of books and i but i kind of ignore those and get new ones all the time anyway so yeah i would probably be embarrassed to go through and see how many books are in my house else and in my phone that i have not read yet. It would be a lot. I know me too and i just keep buying new ends. I cannot thinking that i'm going to do a thing like you see. Some people being like i'm going to be on on a book buying ban and i'm just gonna read through my the list of things already have and i think oh that's such a good idea and then i never do that now. I've never i heard on that. Sometimes i try to check myself a little bit when i know i've been buying too many and i have a lot so i will just kind of satisfy the urge by just putting it on my amazon wishlist so at least if i don't put it anywhere or terrified that i'm going to like lose the idea to read this book but if i put it in my amazon wish list at least at somewhere that satisfies somewhat avenida via the easiest thing is to just buy and have a waiting for you that is smart to put it in your wishlist another thing i'm gonna do while i just turned forty over over the summer and i'm being like nostalgic about all sorts of things including books and one of the things that i sort of want to do and i have been saying for a few years but now that i'm at this milestone sonum actually going to do it. I want to go back and reread some of my all time favorites yeah. I've avoided that because in one sense stance it feels like i wanna leave those books in the time when they were my favorite like what is twenty or something when i was in college so i don't want to revisit them and they'd be like oh. Oh this actually isn't that good or you know. This isn't what i remember. I take something wholly different from it now than i did then so i haven't wanted to like mess up the memory of it and i'm not going to do all of them for those specific reasons but some books that i know have withstood the test of time because they're classics or because people still talk about them to stay that kind of thing those i do wanna revisit and some of them are really big like last year. I reread stephen kings. It and it's like nine hundred pages or something like that. That's like a commitment..

alyssa herzog beauty editor new jersey rachel ray helen phillips new york amazon elissa l. Dot eliza astros editor stephen kings dan guy harper talmadge d. graham
"alyssa" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

10:20 min | 1 year ago

"alyssa" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

"Safe access to abortion throughout much of the united states is about to look much like it does in syria the same people who scream about a non existent problem of sharia law in america are taking away women's rights rights to have their own bodies the same people who shout about the alleged virtues of small government in america are making government so big that it fills our wombs the same people who are all for taking away access to basic healthcare healthcare coverage for children are demanding fetuses have protections that no human in america receives it is terrifying and it becoming more and more dangerous to be a woman in america and i could not ask these brave souls to tell their truth without telling mine so here it goes in nineteen ninety three. I had two abortions. I was in love for the first time in the breathless way. You can only be in love when you were young. It was huge overwhelming even it filled every part of living and it was a joyful and exciting and powerful time in my life. I was on the pill taking birth control because i knew i was not ready to be a parent. I had finished working on who's the boss and i was starting to work on films and other projects and my career my life were in front of me and i was living them as fully <music> as i could and also at that time i was taking a drug called accutane. Accutane is an acne medicine that is so likely to cause birth defects if taken by a pregnant woman that the f._d._a. Now requires doctors pharmacies and women to sign signed up to a registry before prescribing dispensing or receiving it. I knew this and so using birth control was a doubly important decision decision for me and i still got pregnant. It was devastating. I was raised catholic and was suddenly. I put in conflict with my faith faith. I was coming to realize empowered only men to make every single decision about what was allowed and what was not how to loud. I had a career future and potential and also i suffered from sometimes crippling anxiety so i knew i knew at that time i was not equipped to be a mother and so i chose to have an abortion i chose it was my choice and it was absolutely the right choice for me. It was not an easy you choice. It was not something i wanted but it was something that i needed like most healthcare. Is i refuse to allow anyone else's bullshit morality to force me into a life of premarital selfie. I refuse to live in the narrative that sexual pleasure for men and that women exist to deliver that pleasure my body gives me pleasure sexually connecting with my partner gave me pleasure. Nobody will try and say that he was at fault for enjoying sex with me but you could be damned shore that the men enacting adding these laws think less of me for deriving the same pleasure from him and so i continued to enjoy a sexual relationship with the man i loved they tell you the pill is ninety nine percents effective at preventing pregnancies and yet a few months later i i found out i was pregnant again. So i had done what i knew to do to prevent pregnancy and was still pregnant so once again i made the right decision to end that pregnancy be assault against women's bodies over the last few years has forced me to reflect on what i would have lost. If i never had my abortions i would not have have my children my beautiful perfect loving kind and inquisitive children who have a mother who was so very very very ready for them. I would not have my career. I would not have the ability or platform. I use to fight against oppression russian with all my heart. I would never have met my amazing husband. David who steadfast and immeasurable love from me sustains me through these terrifying times fifteen years after that i love had fizzled my life would be completely lacking all paul. It's great joys. I would never have been free to be myself and that's what this fight is about. Freedom freedom from oppression freedom for women to have the audacity to be equally sexual beings as men freedom for women to live the life they were meant into have not just the life that is thrust upon them by pregnancy that cannot exist in their life my the reasons for having an abortion a real. They surround me every day. The reasons of all the women who have had abortions are real. They are hours and they are none of your fucking business. We told these none of your business stories not because we wanted to we told them because our voice is just about the only thing that male dominated government is leaving women for now i for one will never stop using my voice. Sorry not sorry she was born. She was just twelve a month ago. She was she was david livid anyway. Uh she was young. She didn't know the she didn't say no. I thought it was for a locker room after she. She couldn't tell anybody could until she didn't know oh was she should do also knew that it was sears. Zero living and bam shoes living in high uh to go uh. She told a friend been down roll told a friend was and a friend says she had no choice. Stay and the girl have much money and the boy is the issue was abusing as you wrote in a and bam an ohio george <hes> uh she anyway this place around <hes> a place young girl state bah <music> shingo chances <music>. The man brown's the man <hes> i just have a simple question and <hes> you see the young girl died today. <music> <music> sorry.

america David united states ohio sears syria partner assault brown fifteen years
"alyssa" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

02:17 min | 3 years ago

"alyssa" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"Should not exist that is used as its existence and its broad power to abuse human beings and to push the limits of the law and beyond it did so under president obama and under president trump and has received free rein to be abusive additives taken that license to the max now trump i won't read all of his tweets but he says these big flows of people actually i believe immigration has down but we'll let that go for the moment he's big flows of people are all trying to take advantage of dhaka they want in on the act exclamation point let me repeat that last sentence for you folks they want in the act i got news for you mr president freedom it's not an act this country is not enact this country is supposed to be built on fundamental liberties fundamental liberties that you don't believe in or frankly even understand now our good friend good friend of this program representative keith ellison had the right answer no more daca deal says keith you're never doing a dhaka deal your actions gave you away cancelling daca with no plan making racist comments about black and brown imigrants ejecting several bipartisan deals i think i think key representative alyssa alyssa made a mistake b y bipartisan deal you didn't for anybody he's right he didn't fool anybody trump has no idea how daca works there are tight requirements for qualifying for it he ignores that he makes it act like it's a party where everybody's coming in the aclu wrote yet another reminder that real donald trump ran on an anti immigrant agenda and his work to create a machine of human misery for emigrant communities since taking office now the way we treat immigrants in this country this country that was built on the ideal of the lantern of liberty being raised for human beings everywhere is an absolute disgrace this president is an absolute disgrace and an embarrassment.

obama dhaka representative alyssa alyssa aclu donald trump president keith ellison