15 Burst results for "alison flood"

"alison flood" Discussed on The Guardian Books Podcast

The Guardian Books Podcast

10:47 min | 8 months ago

"alison flood" Discussed on The Guardian Books Podcast

"Hello and welcome to the guard in books. podcast with me Richard and Claire this week. Our colleague Alison Flood Speaks to Sophie Hannah about her recipe for crime. Fiction and Claire will be telling us all about her trip shipped to the Hay Festival in Cartagena. So if you Hannah started out as a poet but after publishing her first novel little face in two thousand and six she's become a crime fiction bestseller Seller in two thousand fourteen. She turned ventriloquist with the first of three poirot novels sanctioned by the Agatha Christie state but her latest haven't they grown returns to the present day when she came to the studio to talk to Alison. She began by explaining the peculiar mystery at its heart. Sophie I I saw the premise of your novel when you read something about twitter and immediately obsessed with reading that are you've got a line on the front cover here of having grown twelve years of pasta children in. Don't look a day older. Why so I wanted to know? Why on Earth did this come? Here is such a chilling premise. And it plays out so well of course of course of the book. There's no O'Connor supernatural explanation or anything like that as to why basically Beth decides to drive pass for home. Her friend who she hasn't seen for twelve years she watches her and her kids. Get Out of the car and Thomason. Emily haven't aged today. They still look five and three and a lot of the idea came from a real life thing that happened in. It's exactly the same as is in the book so the part about the children who haven't grown is totally made up did not happen but it did happen. That a friend of mine mine who I hadn't seen for probably not twelve years but maybe six or seven years had come into a lot of money and bought basically a mansion. The happened to be very near this football pitch that I was having to take my son to and it was just one of those coincidences so all my son was playing football. I thought I'll just go and have a nosy Z.. The mansion and while I was parked outside I just started to have various strange thoughts and one of them festival. I was thinking. It's really weird head when you go when you do anything in the present that sort of almost feels like visiting the past so even though this was a new house I knew that it belonged to my old friend and just being made me think about the past and then I thought wouldn't it be weird if while I'm here. She drives lives up in her car and goes through the gates and gets out and there she is actually see as well as the house And then I thought imagine if she had her the kids with her in the car and they looked exactly like they had when I last saw them. That would be weird but that would be really weird. Why would you? I don't know why entered my head. Yeah but I did just sort of almost have visual picture of her getting out of the car in the driveway and then opening the back door and these two little kids hoping out of the car and then being exactly the same and then I just as soon as I thought that I thought. Oh that's actually so cities to what would I do. I mean it. Factually actually happened. which I know it never would but if it did what would I do? Because I wouldn't know that what I was seeing was impossible and yet I would trust that. My eyes were seeing what I thought they were. And it just went from there and you know ten minutes later I have to write a book in which that is the starting point. That thought thought I had no idea at that. Point how I would resolve that very strange initial seen but I knew I had to do it and then and then it just stayed in my mind and I did various other projects I but I always knew I was going to write a book called. Haven't they grown starting with these children apparently haven't grown. Yeah that was going to be my next question because Beth and her kids are husband worked through various scenarios trying to think why. Why have you seen in this? Have you gone mad. Did you see something that just kids who looked similar they work out all of these possible explanations and I was going to say that you to you kind of trying out out different things but that might explain this as as you were writing. I don't think so because fairly soon after having the initial idea I knew what I wanted to be the explanation so I knew the the ending I was working towards So lots of the explanations that Beth in her family. They discussed the possibilities. I'd already ruled out but I really wanted to for the benefit of the reader. Stop by having some apparently sensible people just sit in saying okay. We know this comte of we know that children do grow up. This can't be true and yet you've seen so what might be the explanation. Because I think it's really important in a book especially in a thriller whether something really outlandish the reader. They want to be reassured that everyone in the book knows how weird it is because he always bad. If the raiders thinking I think this is really weird but they all seem to. You think it's normal then. The reader feels really like I caught identify these but oh And so I I kind of wanted to to to reassure the reader that everybody Beth husband her kids. They all know that that this as she thinks it is literally not possible The has to be an explanation but then when they start getting into what the explanations might be. Most of them are so absurd the they are ruled out straight away like you know that the parents of invented some special anti aging drug and you know so they all kind of while. They're still in shock about what Beth seems to have seen. They're also able to sort of take the Mickey out of these more ludicrous and the scale of possibilities like cloning and anti-aging drugs and all that kind of yeah. I like the fact that Beth breath always felt clear about what she had seen as well. She didn't really doubt herself she. It wasn't one of those. Those folks were her mind she she sort of lost in her own mind wandering around thinking that she's she's confused. She was pretty sure that she'd seen despite nobody believing her despite he was absolutely sure of wheat seen and very much didn't want to write a book where it goes sometimes in a thriller. where the heroine's or the protagonist mental state? It's possible issue. It's always signaled in a very clear way. You know if you have a heroin in thrilla saying things like I don't remember much joy sure I can't really maybe I'm falling apart and all of this. Then that's a signal to the reader. Okay this woman's perceptions are on necessarily at all reliable and it's really important for haven't they grown as a as a novel that Beth has to be a reliable witness otherwise it's not interesting if it was just that she's bonkers and she hallucinated. These two children then fine but there's no massive mystery. Yeah and what I loved about. The idea was specifically. There was this inexplicable real perception. And Beth isn't going my out But at the same time what she seen is so impossible. Suppose that however cogent coherent presents us there will be people in there are in the book who say no no no day. You couldn't possibly have. I've seen that because it's impossible and then it's frustrating for her because she's like I know it's impossible yet. I also know that I saw it. So what do we do now. Yeah where do we we go from here. Yeah you've always loved the impossible to strike from little face when you have the woman who is sure that it isn't her baby in the corner husband says there is or or am another one of my favorites. The other half lives were man confesses to the murder of a woman who still alive. I wanted to know. Have you ever painted yourself totally into a corner with your crazy twists but then you can't find a realistic plausible explanation for them and had to be like cost the novelist sized dog. I've never I've never come up with the premise so ambitious icon eventually solve it. The hardest one that I came up with was the other half lives because if a man confesses assist to the murder of a woman. Who definitely isn't dead? Where can you go? Look what on Earth could be going on So that was really hard in. That took me nine months months to think of any way to make it work writing for nine months looking just having it in my head around fairly resigned to the probability of having to give up on it because I couldn't think of a scenario where that would ever happen and then one day it just all came to me and I was like VAT is how it could happen in a way. That isn't disappointing. Disappointed 'cause obviously you could just have the man on the last page going. Juno what I got it wrong. I didn't kill her after all me. That would be disappointing. So it's not only only coming up with an answer. It's coming up with an answer that is really satisfying and isn't going to disappoint anyone. But since the other half lives when I really thought I might have to admit defeat. Suddenly the entire story came to me. Ever since then I hundreds percent believe and trust that I will come up with an answer to a- any premise. I come up with but it's not the what I love is. The impossible premise of the twist is never an impossible. If if there's a twist at the end of the book than that is an explanatory thing that makes things make more sense. The twist is usually just a surprising element to the ending but the thing. I'm addicted to is the impossible premise. Where the book starts with some thing that makes the think no way and then he called out Outta this yet? Yeah because and the reason I love these books was that the first crime writer. I really fell in love with was Agatha Christie and what I loved about her books folks was that that she so often started her stories with the premise that was so outlandish. All apparently impossible and yet eh was happening. I love those books so much. Because the mystery factor in the suspense is ratcheted up an increased. I so much. If it's not just a mystery where you can think of loads of possible solutions in most mysteries you can think of quite a few. That's the point in my life life when I became very fond of those kind of super-ambitious premises. Yeah I was. I was reading yesterday about the detection club which Agatha Christie and other writer setup in one thousand nine hundred thirty and I was reading that they had a set of rules for members. You must make no use of feminine intuition on Divine Revelation on Mumbo jumbo the current events and must conceal vital clues from your readers must be no sudden appearances of identical twins..

Beth Agatha Christie Sophie Hannah Alison Flood twitter Claire Hay Festival Cartagena football writer murder Richard Thomason Emily heroin Mickey
"alison flood" Discussed on Overdue

Overdue

16:37 min | 8 months ago

"alison flood" Discussed on Overdue

"Was over or was about to be over as you knew it. What would you like to live in? What superstructure would andrew and well it depends on what you choose right if if I choose something that is only fun with electricity. Their Electricity Pity presumably you have a way to make some electricity. Yeah Okay I was. I was thinking like arcade but then I was like. That's too small why I would. I'd like to live in an old mall. I would love to live in an old mall. Having spent most of my life already in an old off the from the heyday of malls to not these ghosts. These newfangled ghost malls with all the anchor stores ripped out. No if you WANNA see what the apocalypse would look like I would suggest you drive somewhere in the Midwest and go to any mall. I would live in a mall especially if like enough clothes. Were still there and the equipment if the players were still open and we could go get stick on ear aches definitely yes and if the back chair if the massages if like the back massage is chairs the massage chairs would be. We'd have to hack them so that we would have to pay dollars hacking a massage. Josh chair massage chairs very important where the survival of arm all societies true. Well that's where we're going to be but that's not what this book's about this book is about a silo that people people live in It's unclear where the silo came from. And at first for a long period of this book I thought maybe it was is like a nuclear. It was converted like nuclear missile silo. I guess I I guess either that or it's like a the movie twenty twelve style l.. Scenario where it's just enough. People saw this coming that they were able to build a purpose built structure underground for this purpose. Hold onto that thought Andrew you because that's definitely the right so when I started reading this book I didn't know that it was five discreet stories. which which the way that some of the information gets meted out was surprising as I was reading it so I am thinking about that because you just guessed a little little bit about why the silos are there? The first story you're chapter. Whatever you WANNA call it is about the sheriff of this underground underground silo? Yes it has a sheriff Andrew. Of course it does and his name is Halston. And he's not having a good time. His wife died a few years ago because she had to go out and do a cleaning. If you lived in Underground Silos Society Andrew. What do you think going outside aside for a cleaning is I gotTA hang your laundry? The whole silos laundry on clothes on lines lines so it can dry out. That would be good if the Sky Orient ask you once a year. Oh yes we do. The one laundry load The Sky leaning meaning is mostly acid and dirt. So when when people go a little bonkers in the silo or commit mid heinous crime they are sent out for cleaning and Halston wife did one three years ago And he's about to do do one himself so how he loves himself a Tarantino esque like in Medias rests chapter opening okay. I was going to say he. He just likes to throw vampires. No book is oddly. It is not very supernatural. If that is a like a type of Cy I five words like alien. There's no aliens aside from the apocalypse. Having happened. Yes yeah yeah And so he likes six to like put someone in a dangerous situation and then you get a little bit of like I bet you're wondering how I got here and then like cut back and chapter so So the sheriff's wife went out for cleaning. He is about to turn himself in to go for a cleaning. Mostly because he's so grief stricken and can't like just hang anymore. He's just having a really rough time. Can't get over it he can't get over it And it's also pretty clear that she she figured something out about their world that Kana drove her to the brink and he's been sitting on that information also so when you go out for a cleaning of the the the information that that she found or the information the information that she knew something the information he does he know the thing he knows the thing they had a conversation about it or he knows that she is thinking about the world outside so this is the end of the first story. It has like a moment where it's like the world is not what you think it is. It felt really early in the book for that month to happen. Like I'm not sure what I think. The world is yet yet. I'm not sure what preconceptions I have the shatter. Yes so kind of a couple of reveals and I think big picture. I found the first first half of this book. Way More interesting than the back half is because like he was able to keep those reveals happening And and then I was kind of waiting for the ending. I could see how it's GonNa end and then it was like okay. Let's get through the adventure part of the story. Where there's there are fewer like information and reveals? That are that are clearly. What's most exciting about this book? Yeah that's interesting. I was reading a Guardian Review by Alison flood who says And other elements. Don't work so well. It's partly down. I think to the way that the novel developed started life as a very good short story. That story grew as readers fell in love the world how he had created an se wrote the tightness in the skill with which he began unraveled somewhat. He throws in a character who rings false. The love interest for protecting. We'll talk about later And while he mostly writes well sometimes he gets a bit flowery. At one point he indulges in some truly dire love poetry. Wait for me wait for me wait there my dear let let these gentle please find your ear. Oh man it did happen. didn't Ha- hugh the. Yeah that's A. I'm sure we talked about some in the in in the intro. But yeah he he wrote it and then as he tells it without a lot of like promotion or anything from him it took off with people and then he wrote more in response to it taking off so it's a little bit like that Book Pen Pal. Yes I Putu over this past cheer. And yeah the part where. He's the part where he had a story he wanted to tell it. Sounds like is the front part and then the part where he's writing more because people wanted on a more it sounds like might be the back part yeah and it it just it becomes a slightly different book and one that I found personally less exciting. So the what is really really compelling about the first story is Something in the history of this society which has been people living in this silo for hundreds of years has been kept a secret by someone There have been some. Somebody has been like deleting part of their history they do have some computers They don't have like a Internet right. They you can I m people but as we learn like later in the book you have to pay extra money to do it It's way like long distance. It's channel. Yeah it's cheaper to write a note and send it to someone to run down the giant central staircase in the society. You how big silo are we talking about at least one hundred fifty floors or so one hundred hundred fifty. There's no elevators thing is eighty non compliant a and I don't think there is an Ada Yeah that's very might not even be A. I just feel like I say if you'd stand there for decades if not even hundreds of years which they have you would at least install like a dumb waiter sis have a pulley system which does not exist so so like just maybe a shoot that rouse from the top of the things at the bottom of it so they above ground there are sensors that show show the outside world and in the top few floors of the society there are walls that are essentially giant video screens that depict the outside disaster world that you're in which is just like brown skies like dirt ground. You don't know what happened. But it's the apocalypse deal with it. What you want to see? That is it to keep people from wanting to go sort of. It's to be like okay. Well we can't go out there You know what it is and I made eight a cheek year note of this later in my notes. But here's a good time song about inky it is it. Is the the thing about earth not being ready from Wally Ali. It is the like it is. We can't go out there because it's dangerous so we just have to figure out a way to live in here and we're going to keep telling you that it's bad Out there so that no one ever thinks about going out there and so when they send someone out for a cleaning they go out there and they're usually usually some sort of dissident and you can watch the cleaning take place from the videos if you live and the top few there was like a whole class system of course This is closer to the horrible outside better or has better be those. That's where like the bureaucracy lives. There's a mayor there's a sheriff. There's there's a deputy sheriff there other whole building. There's one mayor yes there's and they have elections. I don't know who think that they would split it into districts Sunday. I think it's a few thousand people. So it's like South Bend Indiana or something. So she had a lot of like the mayor would have really really bad knee problems. I think after a couple of terms books from going up and down the Dang book to is all about a woman named John's who's been the mayor for a long time she's old and she has to walk all hundred forty floors and it sucks and she has a terrible time doing it. You would think an opponent would be able to capitalize On that in an election most people run unopposed ironically enough so sold mayor's so decrypt ultimate insider. She's been inside for so long. She can't even climb the stairs to deal with the problems everyday silo dwellers like like you and me face. This mayor's GonNa Promise an elevator. But how's HE GONNA pay for it so when you go out for cleaning your usually some mm sort of dissident and they they put you in a suit and you go out there and everyone does the cleaning. They always do it Andrew even though you think all they were a dirtbag dirtbag they didn't like the silo or whatever. Why do they always turn around and clean the sensors? Well you find out at the end end of this story when Halston goes out there to do the cleaning. He walks up the ramp. The airlock opens. There's like a whole thing. Where like the airlock as to push out a bunch of gas to keep the bad air out and then you have to get out of the airlock before the fire starts to burn all the bad air And he goes out there. Now keep in mind. His wife has done this before and before she went she told him that the people in. It new secrets that the people you need to know. I'm just going to say that to you because we'll come back to it and that's typical I feel of all. It departments in all organizations okay. Yeah so he's got this like his dead wife was like. Hey what if the our world isn't the real world he goes out there. Top of the Ramp Halston saw the heaven into which he'd he'd been condemned for his simple sin of hope. He world around scanning the horizon his head dizzy from the site of so much green green hills green grass green carpet beneath his feet Halston whooped in his helmet his mind buzzed with the site hanging over. All the green there was the exact hue of blue from the children's books the white clouds untainted the movement of living things flapping in the air. And he's like Oh man. The walls are fake. It was like he has never seen the matrix but he'd be like it's like the Matrix. They told us it was bad. Everybody's got come out here. And so he turns around and he goes back and he starts cleaning the sensors. And he's like you guys got see this and they start running out of air and he's having trouble so he's like okay. Wow does take my helmet off because as beautiful out here. He takes his helmet off and his helmet was a screen and it was lying into him and it is bad out there and he dies. World Sucks you're dead and I was like Whoa. What an opening to a book? This is pretty very cool. And that's the that's the story that launched the rest of the series right. It's a cool like double twist that I found pretty effective. The twist is that. Ah stuff isn't bad but then the double twist is. Actually it is bad. Yes and you're left wondering like why would that happen..

Halston Andrew Midwest Medias Josh Kana Tarantino Alison flood hugh Wally Ali South Bend Indiana John
"alison flood" Discussed on The Guardian Books Podcast

The Guardian Books Podcast

14:19 min | 11 months ago

"alison flood" Discussed on The Guardian Books Podcast

"Alison Flood Talks Drugs Mexico and Donald Trump with the legendary American crime writer. Don winslow flu later. We discussed books as tools of protest. Don winslow is a bestselling authors written over twenty novels that he's the recipient at the L. A. Times Book Prize and the Inflaming Silver Dagger amongst many others his most recent novel. The border is the latest in the cartel trilogy. A series that copies matter Eh betrayal drugs and family ties the final part of the trilogy. As trump in the state of modern America in its sights less alison went off to find out more started by asking don to read a passage from the novel. What a mall a city September? Twenty fifteen for all of this ten years Nico Amira era has no nothing but Elbasan Vero the garbage dump is his world he so why hero one of thousands of scrape out a scant living scavenging garbage pigeon city dump. Nico's very good at what he does. A small scrawny kid dressed in torn jeans holy sneakers and his one treasure a Barcelona Lona football shirt with the name of his hero Lionel Messi number ten on the back he is a master at looting. The guards at the Big Green Gates into the dump kids aren't supposed just to go in although Nico was one of the thousands who do and he doesn't have one of the precious. ID cards that would gain him entrance as an employee so he has to pick his spots. That's where being small small helps in now clutching black plastic bag in his right hand. He ducks down behind an adult woman and waits for the guard turn his head when the guard does Nico Dashes. Che's in the dump occupies forty acres in a deep ravine Nico looks up to see the parade of Yellow City dump trucks wind. Its way down the switchback delivering over five hundred tons of garbage. Every day each truck has numbers and letters painted on the side and Nico although he can barely read or write knows the meanings of these numbers prison letters as well as he knows the alleys Warren's of the shantytown he lives in just outside the dump the code refers the neighborhood from which the trump collects in Nico has his eye appeal for the trucks that come from the rich parts of the city. Because that's where the best trash comes from rich people throw away a lot of food. Nico is hungry. He's always hungry. He throws away nothing done. How'd you thought that you were done with a story about Kelly at the end of the cartel absolutely? I thought I was done on with with art. Keller at the end of the first book the power of the dog in fact. I promised everybody I wasn't going to write a second book. nevermind third will happen At the end of dog as I call it. You know I said I'm done with this. World is too too harsh tougher. Couldn't go back to it. I my wife asked me. You know to to walk away from this And then I started feeling guilty because I felt I was on the sidelines. During the most violent period during which two hundred thousand people were murdered in drug related violence in Mexico and and I thought I could explain it to a reader albeit in a fictional way after that book the cartels. That's it you know done done done. But then I realized that I'd made to really bad mistakes One is that I've I've said to everybody in a very public way that the so-called Mexican enjoy a problem is not the Mexican drug problem. It's the American drug problem to a lesser extent. The European drug problem but at looking at the first two books I realized that I had set seventy five percent of the books in Mexico I needed to bring the drug war home where it belongs in that required a third book and the second mistake that at the end of the book. I thought I'd resolved Keller's conflict and I had in terms of the external conflict. Keller v Barreira but I hadn't resolved his internal conflict Keller versus killer in terms of the things that he had done over the the forty years of the war on drugs and and I also like to be really honest with you hadn't resolved my own conflicts about it. Who what I thought about this what I felt about it what I thought about my own? Twenty two years on the story which says something in particular that made ag one particular point that you thought. Oh God I'm going to have to go back to this story. I'm not done yet. The heroine epidemic What we experience agreeance in the United States I mean for instance last year for the first time we had more deaths from opioid overdoses then from either automobile accidents or even gun violence And I'm watching it living through it you know Sadly several of the people who were sources sources for this book and others died during that era Still in touch with their families and so again I thought AH headlines have a way of becoming labels. How do you mean well? We talk about the OPIOID crisis or the heroine epidemic that that becomes a label but we don't really see the individuals behind it. We talk about illegal. Immigrants appraiser use in single quotes. Don't really really agree with it. And we lose a sense of the human beings behind that and I think what novelists Tsk can do because we have the freedom to do it is to bring the reader into the hearts and souls and minds and and living experiences and try hi to see the world through those people's point of view so it's one thing to talk about a heroin addict. You get an idea of what that is but then to try tried to see the world through in this case her point of view. Jackie Jackie yeah is a different experiences in e dedicate the book to the money into the memory of many people of these people that you were using a sources for the book no in this case In the case of the border there are forty three renames that the book is dedicated to those were students who were slaughtered on a bus in Mexico by the police drug cartel. This is something that you touched on in the ious. Yes yes it's unfortunately a true story. You know almost all of the incidents in all three of these books actually happened in one form or another When when you realized that you were going to go back to the to the world of the cartel where you kind of horrified that you are going to have to dive into this again? You knew that you were going to be writing the book a took a real deep breath. there was a big part of that just did not want to go back A cartel without dramatizing. This you know the the real heroes in terms of writers are Mexican journalists. who were killed? So they're the real heroes. I'm not you know I didn't suffer. Suffer certainly you know not to that extent but yeah I I thought about it and again you know. I promised my my wife that I wasn't going to do another one that I wasn't going to go back into that world. Either in the sense of researcher writing but but I also knew that that it was incomplete. You know that I I hadn't finished the story and I needed to finish the story So I went back to and what. What was your research like for for this book? You know it's funny. When I started to write the first book dog I knew nothing about the drug? Trade didn't interest me at all. Why did you start then Ah there was a massacre of nineteen innocent men women and children in a village not far from me. I live along the border in California not allowed to say the town anymore anymore and I couldn't get my head wrapped around how that could happen now. Mind you by the time I came around to writing the cartel. Nineteen dead was wouldn't even have made the papers you know was low body count on any given day but at that point in time shocking And so I started to research it and one day I started typing. How is it different for the border? Then which is much more set in the US twenty years down the line I knew a lot more. The I didn't have to make so many connections. They were already there. I had a fairly immodest but a fairly early deep background understanding of of the issues in the players what it meant and I could easily talk to people so it was quite different but it was also. Oh I think different in the sense I mean particularly in the case of of addicts. You know that I spent a lot more time with them and with their families. Addiction wasn't really a topic in the first two books. Oddly enough drugs themselves were not much of a topic in the first two books in this one when they were in are and so it was a matter of spending time with attics on-street and treatment centers with treatment professionals. And all that kind of thing in those stories don't usually end well don't usually end happily. What what does it do to you when you're digging into these lives lives in this much violence and this much tragedy? Well I. I wouldn't come here to lie to you. You know It has its effect. I think Those stories don't ever really leave. You know now Again without wanting to be melodramatic about it you know you you do think about it It I've said this before you know. I think I've left the war on drugs but I don't think the war on drugs is ever going to leave me when once you've talked to these people and these people how do you then right about it realistic tea without crossing a line into being exploitative about the stories always always worry about that you know But I think that that my job is to to let the reader see a world that he or she could not otherwise see or maybe help them to see it differently. And to do that I I have to be intimate and I have to be perhaps perhaps exploitative. I only hope that the result is is better than the crime that there's some good that comes out of that but I do do worry about that that that you are exploiting people And their stories but yet you want to tell that story and if you don't tell stories always been what other stories are stories about don't deserve to be told a tool role exactly and and you know I've I've had Surviving family members approach. Oke Me and thanked me for tilling stores. How about a M- cops? He read it. Do they feel that you get it right. They do they. Do you know because I think I have to tell you that to be perfectly honest with you. I've spent a lifetime with cops have worked with cups of worked against cops. You know when I was an investigator of worked homicides on on both sides of that street So I think I do get it right now. Look you're always generalizing. Generalizations are always always dangerous so there some cops that might read my stuff in these books and it has nothing to do with their experience. They wouldn't recognize it and that's in quite fairly so And other cops who live different kinds of lives at work. Different kinds of jobs recognized immediately. You know Joseph Wamba the great seminal. I think copywriter told Michael. Conley told me that he wasn't so interested as to what cops due due to crime he was interested in what crime does to cops. And I've always taken that As kind of my way of working I'm always more interested in what crime does to criminals and what crime does to cops interested in in vice versa. Yeah you have your copy goes undercover in in this what it does to him. Two years of spending meantime being a body how that affects him once he tries to come out of it. Yeah you know as an investigator I did a number of undercovers and there. There's always is this sort of moral psychological jeopardy. Because if you're going to do your job well you automatically relate after period of time more closely to the people. You're pursuing the people that you work for otherwise you couldn't do that job you get caught and so there's always that danger and I also think that cops ops who work the drug beat you know eventually most of them come to the feeling that they're in this revolving door And and street cops beat cops uniformed cops there the the men and women who who see the drug problem up close every day. They're the ones who go to the overdoses they're the ones who go to the hospitals the morgues. They're the ones who have to go to the families. You know to say your son's not coming home your daughter's not coming home and it really does have its affect your your cost. You're working so huge from the new generation of the NARC as to the addicts are falling prey to the Herron in Fenton. Did you always intend that at your story would be so big that it would stretched so far right up into the highest tendrils of government. No no it was totally unintentional national. You know But look I mean. I think that you have to tell the story. That's there and what I realized early on in the trilogy was that In order to understand the detail the heroine addict you had to understand a thousand years of Latin American in history you. You can't explain 2017 without explaining nineteen seventeen at one hundred. BC really can't the that these tentacles stretched deep and wide so in in trying to explain the current insane era that we live within you realize that it works in the other direction to that..

"alison flood" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:44 min | 1 year ago

"alison flood" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And water before finally evacuating everyone aren't says hospitals typically reach the breaking points when they lose their power or water and the engineering that could help ensure that doesn't happen is incredibly expensive and in. in a climate where healthcare costs are ready are considered pretty extraordinary starting to talk to people about the need to modify a building so that we can be better prepared for something that may never happen. that could be a pretty tough sell but back in Houston after tropical storm Allison preparedness wasn't such a tough sell anymore this was filled with thirty three feet of water when tropical storm Allison occurred so you can actually see the line right there the tide line I have them specifically do not pressure wash that line off that's Robert Emery he's a risk manager at the Texas Medical Center and he's pointing to residue left on a building by Alison flood waters eighteen years ago when he talks about the storm here Pete's a curious phrase we we got religion. he means the storm taught everyone a lesson to respect a kind of higher power they weren't going to get caught off guard again Emory outlines the engineering built up in the years after Alison first up a moat almost like a reverse moat around the entire building. he's talking about a hydrostatic wall about seven feet tall a mix of granite and a half inch of glass this glass is actually glass like like an aquarium and so if I if you can hear I think it is. it's like sea world and outside of that and earth and burn their pumps in this river smoke to get rid of any water that makes it over but then even if that fails I guess the best way to try to think of a bank vault door and there's four of them in their sixteen feet high there are dozens of these flood doors in various sizes they're balanced so single worker can close them. some pains lock into place. a pump inflates rubber seals. not long ago they were put to the test torrential rain people rescued from flooded homes volunteers with both twenty seventeens hurricane Harvey it beat out Allison for total rainfall devastated the region but it Texas Medical Center maybe six inches of water in this loading dock area compared to thirty three feet of water in the past the engineering worked in fact the only major problem was getting staff to and from these relatively dry little islands amid a flooded Houston and the research animals like generators and critical mechanicals they're not kept safely on upper floors Claire Bassett who described returning to the chaos at Baylor following Alison set up shop at the Medical Center before Harvey hit you bring up a nice air mattress and you bring a water bill you sing you bring a couple of changes of clothes she didn't see some Texas no a leading animals out of a flood instead she walked the mostly dry holes checking for broken windows Bassett remembers cancer patients weren't about how they get the regular treatments but as soon as the roads were clear enough for them to get to the Texas Medical Center they found it was ready for them and when we went and saw them I guess three days after the storm is when we opened it yet there were people literally in tears they were so thankful for here now I'm jets Lehman. and Elizabeth trove all from Houston public media contributed to that report it's here now..

thirty three feet eighteen years sixteen feet seven feet six inches three days
"alison flood" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

03:09 min | 1 year ago

"alison flood" Discussed on KTRH

"Go to war on. Everybody knows you're selling trees that are dying at thirty degrees. Much less eighteen. We had a home improvement. The truth shall set you free that we had a home improvement product. The ally said was this the most expensive one on the market, and like we're gonna take legal action. Okay. Please into. When you go to court and everybody, here's your the most expensive bid out there on every single job. Then the truth will set you free. This is so funny. It's a weird business that we work in on this kind of stuff when you do endorsement advertising that there's the follow up and the tail end of the part of the discussion we had earlier this morning when now the Joe is on his way out the door after a couple of years. He finally realizes why we played the disclaimer at the start of every program on Saturdays and Sundays usually right around six o five six. Oh six and it says that not every ad you here on this program. Is something that Randy lemon endorses. That's another way of looking at it. So we're gonna take that quick little break. Here is a true endorsement, right? It's the only tree company I've been endorsing for over sixteen years. Yeah. Sixteen years when I came to garden line. There was a tree company that actually liked and they did gray work poor guys about two km. Remember what year it was? When I think it was Allison the tropical storm, Alison flooded, Houston, the company that we used to endorsements for did not have any of their equipment insured. They let their insurance lapse whether they knew it or not. And when it came time to go to insurance and replace everything they didn't have any insurance. All this major tree equipment, all these trucks. All this major Chipper shredders all their chain saws. So basically, they went out of business right then and there and it took about two years to find another company that we can endorse or tree work. And that company was and still is affordable tree service. They are never the most expensive bid. Remember, we we're talking about that the most expensive bit. I can never endorse a company for anything that is purposely giving the most expensive bid on things, but they're never gonna beat the cheapest bid either because they ensure their workers they ensure their equipment and those companies that don't have like workmen's comp they're usually the cheapest bid out there. I actually. Got a Email. This was maybe six months ago was back in October November and guy showed me this tree that feld into his neighbor's fence and car, and he's like what do I do? Now. I hardly tree company. They came in something bad happen. It all fill the wrong way. And now, it's damaged my neighbors car and when it happened. They left the scene. Oh, that's horrible. Yes. But now you're on the hook for all that insurance and you'll never find that company, and they probably won't ever answer phone because it was the cheapest bid, and it's because they didn't have insurance, and they didn't have workman's comp and they skip out when things go bad and.

Joe Randy lemon feld Allison Houston Alison thirty degrees Sixteen years sixteen years six months two years two km
"alison flood" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

02:58 min | 1 year ago

"alison flood" Discussed on KTRH

"Had a home improvement. The truth shall said, you we had a home improvement product. The all I said was this is the most expensive one on the market, and there's like we're gonna take legal action. Okay. Please. Two. And when you go to court, and you everybody here's your the most expensive bid out there on every single job. Then the truth will set you free. This is so funny. It's a weird business that we work in on this kind of stuff when when you do endorsements advertising, but there's the follow up and the tail end of the part of the discussion we had earlier this morning when now Joe is on his way out the door after a couple of years. He finally realizes why we played the disclaimer at the start of every program on Saturdays and Sundays usually right around six. Oh, five six. Oh six and it says that not every ad you here on this program. Would as something that Randy limited endorses that's another way of looking at it. So we're gonna take that quick little break. Here is a true endorsement, right? It's the only tree company I've been endorsing for over sixteen years. Yeah. Sixteen years when I came to garden line. There was a tree company that I actually liked and they did gray work poor guys about to. I can't even remember what year it was. When I think it was Allison the tropical storm, Alison flooded, Houston, the company that we used to endorse -ment for did not have any of their equipment insured. They let their insurance lapse whether they knew it or not. And when it came time to go to insurance and replace everything they didn't have any insurance in all this major tree equipment, all these trucks. All this major Chipper shredders all their chainsaws. So basically, they went out of business right then and there and it took about two years to find another company that we can endorse or tree work. And that company was and still is affordable tree service. They are never the most expensive bid. Remember we're talking about that the most expensive bit. I can never endorse a company for anything that is purposely giving the most expensive bid on things, but they're never gonna beat the cheapest bid either because they ensure their workers they ensure their equipment and those companies that don't have like workmen's comp they're usually the cheapest bid out there. I actually. I got a Email. This was maybe six months ago was back in October November and guy showed me this tree that feld into his neighbor's fence and car, and he's like what do I do? Now. I heart a tree company they came in something bad happened. It all fill the wrong way. And now, it's damaged my neighbors Vint car, and when it happened. They left the scene. Oh, that's horrible. Yes. But now you're on the hook for all that insurance. And you'll never find that company then they probably won't ever answered her phone because it was the cheapest bid, and it's because they didn't have insurance, and they didn't have workman's comp and they skip out when things.

Joe Randy limited feld Allison Houston Alison Sixteen years sixteen years six months two years
"alison flood" Discussed on The Guardian Books Podcast

The Guardian Books Podcast

06:58 min | 1 year ago

"alison flood" Discussed on The Guardian Books Podcast

"And it reads health bango spitting teeth into the sink trace, the broken landscape of my body and find God within myself, an tools, the poem gunmetal, which was the one that that brutal list to light, which was a prize winning poem, reads ramshackle girl, spitting teeth in the sink. I traced the foreign topography of my body. Find God in my skin. Yes. So the proportion of words, I mean, clearly, it's the same thing. Basically, isn't it a few few of the lines of change? Yes. And mckibben was not particularly receptive to. Apology the area to offered because in her view. And I think this is perfectly valid view is this isn't borrowing this stele, but then you get back. If you go back to the case of Helen Keller, which is really interesting, which Alison flood very clever news reporter has actually referred to in discussing this who at the age of twelve was was accused of plagiarism. And she said she had no memory of having read the fairy story from which it was taken. But she must have internalized it. Yeah. So it's quite a fascinating. So she was twelve and she wrote this story short it to the adults around her. She's she was a deaf blind child showed it to the adults around to who really loved it and one of them advice to about the name. So they said how about equal the frost king? And she did that then it was published and she was really excited about that. And then people started pointing out the similarities between her story an alias story. Written by also called Margaret he can be cool defrost varies. Got the frost fairies in the frost king. And it's such an interesting case in that she was twelve and blind. How she got this story. Whether someone read it to not she actually doesn't know how she she admitted that it was fully possible that she had been read the story or somehow exposed to the story, but she has could not actually determine when and how which is such an interesting idea. So in that, she was actually acquitted of any sort of plagiarism because you know, she was up front about the possibility of it. But nother, Harare self could actually anyone else could prove any link between her and this other stories one of the problems with this plagiarism issue is that it is an issue with so many different manifestations which span a massive range of cultural possibilities, for example, Shakespeare famously plagiarize from Hollinshead, no Graham, swift was accused of plagiarizing from William Faulkner's as I lay dying. But. In both cases, they were you could say they were Shakespeare's case he just did lift stuff. But in Graham, SWIFT's case, it was it was a knowing Omar it wasn't. He didn't steal. And interestingly in the news, we've had a lot of stuff about Dan Mallory recently. So Dan Malary's book the woman in the window. It was published in January twenty eight so he writes under a pseudonym coup AJ fan. But there was a another book by a radical Sarah Denzil could saving Alice and Herbert was published in March twenty sixteen and there are overwhelming numbers Marty's in the plot. So both of them revolve around an Agora phobic alcoholic woman in denzel's book characters could Hannah in his book. It's Anna both of these women have lost child and partner through car accident. And this woman blames herself which is not revealed for quite some time in the book both of them feature new family moving in opposite to this woman's house. She becomes obsessed with watching them. She becomes convinced that the husband is a. Using his wife, and then befriends their adopted teenage child who after gaining her trust turns out to be the villain of the whole. I mean, that's that's sort of like an intellectual construct rather than words can you plagiarize construct with? That's the thing that that's very hard to prove any sort of way, you'd have to prove basically that somehow he had got hold of this book her book before writing his and actually his lawyers and his agent have gone to great lengths to prove that this is not the case. So then you at times ran a piece about the similarities between these T booze and said isn't this remarkable a very careful way over that accusing him of anything. But I mean, he he's been very upfront about acknowledging Tiki rear window, for example. It's clear linked to rear window, but he's been very upfront about watching that. And actually having the idea just as he finished watching it or he also loves Jillian Flynn and k Atkinson's writing. So he's always been very upfront about those things. But then there was this very uncomfortable similarity between this book that came out two years before his but his his Lauren and agents actually responded to the new at times and said. Well, actually, we can show you that he submitted a full seven thousand five hundred word detailed outline for what he was going to write in September twenty fifteen and Sarah's boop. She didn't start writing into the month. After so interesting. I it's the sort of thing that it's quite possible. They both watch ruined. Without getting about it. You know, get stories in the air. There is linked do happen. And of course, they're both sort of coming off the back of this thrillers. And this is already established appetite food stories about women who somehow unreliable narrators. So it's not like, you know, completely alone out in the wilderness by themselves, and it's a strange coincidence. It's just interesting to say how many similarities there, but it does touch on on an anxiety in the culture, which is connected with the easy, accessibility of everything permission. And and I sometimes find as a journalist, I'm I do use Wicca pedia. And then you have to be very careful not to just find yourself quoting Wikipedia s not that we you know, we compete is actually quite a reliable source, but it's somebody else's word. Yes. You have to be very careful about how you're absorbing everything. Rachel mckeown's had a lovely language. Perhaps is a good place to end on. Which is she said who are we? If not our words who are we? If we're not allowed to tell stories I survived my own, vanishing. I arrive in my art. And I think that is the nub of it. There is a sort of genuine, the artist occupying a genuine place in the culture who may be boring who may be paying homage to all sorts of influences and people, and then there is there hawks tres, and we're inevitably so at the moment so unprotected against the huckster because information is everywhere. Yeah. Well, next, we'll hear some fresh ideas from Lewis dot, no. But before we do we just wanted to take a few seconds to let you know that the guardian is editorially independent. So we have free to follow any story wherever it takes us. But producing in-depth really meaningful journalism is expensive. And we want to keep it open to everyone. So we need to ask you for hill. If you can lend a hand and help secure a future, then please visit g you dot com slash books pod. And you can find that link in the episode description. Thank you.

Sarah Denzil Shakespeare Graham mckibben Helen Keller Harare Dan Mallory Dan Malary Lewis dot Margaret William Faulkner Alison flood denzel Rachel mckeown reporter Lauren Jillian Flynn Omar Anna
"alison flood" Discussed on The Guardian Books Podcast

The Guardian Books Podcast

02:51 min | 1 year ago

"alison flood" Discussed on The Guardian Books Podcast

"I'm very happy to say that will now be joined by Alison flood out books. Reporter very reason for this week's put cost without his club. Platz talking about her latest novel, the flower goes, and of course, we are going to be talking about Alice's books and other books that shocked us with things like sexual violence, abuse and Buddah. So if you do not feel like joining us, that's fine. We get it. But do you have a scope book too? Many other wonderful interviews in the books put gossiping we're not always like this. Listen, why did you want to talk with Alice? Well, we tons of thrillers. I'm I'm hardened to murder and terrible things happening. I read, but I find myself particularly disturbed by the flower girls in a way that intrigued me so it's about it opens two little girls lure toddler away. We don't find out. What happens is pretty care that she's killed. Then skips to nineteen years later. One of the goals is in prison and her little sister has been given a new identity and its own. This goes twenty fifth birthday. She's staying in a hotel and another child disappears. And as a result of this. Hurry like entity as one of these notorious flower goes killers comes out, and it kind of circles between the disappearance in the present day of the toddler and the merger of the toddler one thousand nine hundred earlier, and I just found the the topic. So hard to read about the even though it's not it's a tool, she writes. Well, it's a good mystery. Just having to kept having to put it down on sort of God, this is. You think it's because you've got a total at that that it's particularly shocking to you, maybe, but it seems simplistic in a way to sort of put it down to to being a mother. So I can understand what it is for child to to be killed. But maybe that's I couldn't read lullaby. Either got to the open. Open Smuts Lemani. Yeah. Which opens baby is dead. Yeah. Maybe. Put my two year old. So I'd like to think about the the beating death of a two year old. But I think a lot of people would feel the same way it's not a pleasant topic. So I was going to talk to Alice user, former human rights lawyer, he writes, really well about how other people had reacted to the book other people had found it hard to get through. And I need to add that I could get to the end is a book, I did have to place it aside on a few occasions and read something else to kind of cleanse my. Yes. I had lots of reaction where. I think the subject matter of children being involved in such a brutal crime of the hugely upsetting. Not only in terms of the victim being so young. But the fact the crime was was done by children. I think it's bad, isn't it? It's the children doing the crime. Yeah. And I think, you know, as we obviously you children as ultimately innocent on the idea that that could be lurking underneath the sort of childlike facade is this sort of more mature and horrible instinct, I think is hugely upsetting for. Yeah. When people have been reading it. They have expressed that..

Alice Alison flood Reporter Platz Smuts Lemani murder two year nineteen years twenty fifth
"alison flood" Discussed on The Guardian Books Podcast

The Guardian Books Podcast

03:08 min | 1 year ago

"alison flood" Discussed on The Guardian Books Podcast

"The. The garden. Hello. And welcome to the guardian books podcast. I'm Sean Kane. I'm Clara, Mr. to leave one of us have had those moments in reading when a book is so shocking that we have had to put it down or even hide it to help get it out of our heads. Now. You think we might be made of stern stuff considering the amount? We rate even we have limits. Guesses surprised me that my reaction were so strong that sometimes I had to put the book down and be like off this world is just talk. Outfit for Ben. Reads, so much gory killers serial murders, and all of this kind of thing that was out books reporter, Alison flood, he conquered her own fears to speak to Alice Clark Platz author of the flower goes, which even hardened Thrilla Rita. Allison struggled to finish the fest. Claire we just spoke to you about being in Calcutta last week. And since then you've been among the literati in Cartagena in Colombia and us about the festival there. Yeah. It's a four day festival out post of our own hay festival and it's in its fourteenth year. It's really buzzy mix of local and international speakers and Ron considering that we quite often see them both in the UK the two headliners both huge stars were Sadie Smith. And Jim Amanda goes Ichi now Sadie talked fascinating Lee about density politics in the straitjacket that social media search ability places on our ever-evolving identities issue is on political correctness. Somebody says to me, you know. A black girl would never say that. I'm like really, how can you possibly know? Have you asked all the black girls is there is a mass agreement about what we say what we don't say. And how we say obviously fiction is always the risk of likelihood that that's the risk of fiction and certainly with white teeth is all kinds of mistakes. I'm sure cultural mistakes. But I had a choice I can either write novels about middle-age mix race go from Willesden forever. Just her and nobody else or I can take a chance. The chance of wrongness to me is not. Deadly. I'm it's not deadly. It's okay. If I if I make mistake here or there, it's okay? And the question of of the mistake is interesting. It's a seeming. For instance, I've written a lot of characters faith, Muslims, some Jewish people Catholics all kinds of different fades to say that you would make an error with a character suggest. I think is sometimes young writers think that you're writing a, for instance, a Muslim character that every young Muslim walks around with the whole of the Koran in the head, for example. This is not the way people with so various that that this policing of correctness. It'd be hard to see philosophically how that could be true. You could say this is not close, I'm this person. And it's not like me, but there's a lot of people in the world and that kind of freedom and risk in fiction is necessary..

Sadie Smith Sean Kane Alison flood Alice Clark Platz Calcutta Cartagena Allison Willesden Ben reporter Claire Thrilla Rita Colombia Jim Amanda Ron UK Lee four day
"alison flood" Discussed on The Guardian Books Podcast

The Guardian Books Podcast

04:00 min | 1 year ago

"alison flood" Discussed on The Guardian Books Podcast

"The. Ghosts? And all the rest of the run series is published by nights of listening to that interview. It strikes me that the way Reynolds writes about young people is very different. The way Sanjay was writing about them in the forties and fifties. Do you think that's part of a wider shift show? Well, at this point, we've got pretty defined ideas about brackets. So we've got children twins. We've got teens. Young adult side. It's got all these sort of set divisions. We have sort of ideas about how should I behave. Whereas when when Salinger was writing, I suppose it was the point at which teenagers were really kind of being considered to be their own thing. And so it's interesting that with catcher in the rye how timeless it is. Because he did capture some sort of truce about what teenagers alike, and it sort of universal truth. And it's interesting that while Jason Reynolds does a lot of writing that brings true to me in that his kids are often frequently quite a moral, and they just sort of do stuff because they have an impulse to do it. And they understand why. And you can they don't really understand why adults around them have the reactions that they do. Well, that feels very true. He's also riding a very specific reason. And he part of that I think is a very necessary drive that he feels that. There are certain stories that need to be told. For younger people as well was writing for reading about younger people Jason Nelson seems to me is writing for the case. Yeah. I think that's probably too that. Perhaps there is a sort of ephemera idea of children's literature the writing specifically for a child audience in there. Someone someone came up with this term Joanna raccoon she a memoir my Salinger year, which was basically when she was working as his editorial assistant at a big literary agency, New York, and she said she coined the term the Salinger moment. And she said, it's basically the point at which between either twelve and twenty that you have when you read catcher in the right for the first time everyone raids between about twelve and twenty and they feel recognized by it. But now there's a whole kind of marketing category addressed exactly. As a massive cheers. Cheers, massive market all around the world in the UK, though. It's it's amazing just how many children's books so so I suppose really Jason instead of doing something that works because of the industry that has been built around children's literature. Sort of is it is universal. But it also allows think for setting amount of Sydney SHA pill, which is really in his benefit because he does it. So well, and he's right. There's not enough people writing about minority kids and say he's doing it for basically, thanks to Harry Potter, Ohio. Always thanks Harry Potter. I thank reports every day of my life. Next week. Have you ever read a book that was so shocking? You struggled to finish it out very own Alison flooded and she faced phys by speaking with the author Alice clock Platz about her terrifying. Thrilla? The flower goes pushed hardcore Thrilla love Alison over the edge. The I reddish shocking literature, probably the understatement of the year, but I do relish working here with you folks at guardian which reminds me this episode of the books podcast was sponsored by guardian jobs. They can help you find good company and organizations with like minded individuals, just like these find your good company, g u dot com slash good company. De-subscribe and review wherever you get your podcasts. And join the discussion on Twitter at guardian books by leaving comment on the podcast page. So from ritually Kane. An producers who's under Cillian, thanks for listening. And goodbye. For mobile put costs from the guardian. Just go to the guardian dot com slash costs.

Jason Reynolds Joanna raccoon Salinger Alison Jason Harry Potter Jason Nelson Sanjay Twitter UK Alice clock Platz Kane Cillian New York editorial assistant Ohio
"alison flood" Discussed on News & Talk 1380 WAOK

News & Talk 1380 WAOK

03:59 min | 1 year ago

"alison flood" Discussed on News & Talk 1380 WAOK

"Thank you for your call. Let me say that I could have have described. It better is almost like if you don't play ball my way on the school yard. I'm gonna take my ball and walk away. But the ball here is gonna fake thousands of people government workers and others if he shuts down the government, and as you accurately say that he said over and over and over again rally after rally. Media peers after media appearance, he was going to build a wall, and he's gonna make Mexico pay for. So how do you go from Mexico and having to pay for it to telling Chuck Schumer of the Senate Democrats Nancy Pelosi of the house? Democrats y'all got to give me the money fatal wall. I've got the votes in the house Nancy, and if you don't do it, and they don't do it. I'll shut it down. I thought we'd have to pay anything. Then he further lies saying already. We building the wall. No, they've done repairs on things that are already there. They're not building a wall just stayed out. So as you said, so what kind of fool am I I mean, he is talking to his own base assumes that they don't know bet like he assumes that whatever he says will go on. On check to non question. And now I'm waiting for his tweet to come now that they've announced that his friend, David peck, and the American media Inc has now gotten a a non prosecution agreement, and they can substantiate would corners already said, and that is that Trump himself directed and was involved in these payoff to these women the purpose of not hurting his campaign is not about the women does not about his infidelity. Daddy deals with his wife. That's private, but it is for political reason using money, which is a campaign contribution unreported. I don't know. How he's going to spend his way out of that. I do know he's gonna try because that's what he does. Go to Alison flood on Sirius XM one twenty six Ellis. Hey, are you doing I'm doing? Well. How are you? Wonderful. I remember if you missed it in your travels and that but on the amendment for that. Work hard to get the petitions and get it on the ballot. Legislatures is trying to your way. Yep. Free. If they have any fans or restitution or court costs if they have been paid they can't register until they say. No, I did not miss that. As one of the things I dressed in Orlando yesterday. And one of the reasons why we need to be on the ground because one I think it is extremely important that they know what their face first of all we need to defeat the legislation saying that we need to put pressure on the Friday legislature. 'cause that was not part of what was voted on an amendment four of you. And I know this work for, but Secondly, they need to know what it is that they're facing researching and get it done. You're absolutely right Ellis, Florida legislator is just like Wisconsin, just like which in trying to change what was voted for after the fact, thank you for your call. Let's go to Tim in Georgia. Tim..

Nancy Pelosi Chuck Schumer Ellis Mexico Tim American media Inc Alison flood David peck Wisconsin Orlando Trump Georgia Florida
"alison flood" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

Talk 1260 KTRC

02:16 min | 2 years ago

"alison flood" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

"alison flood" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

Talk 1260 KTRC

09:08 min | 2 years ago

"alison flood" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

"Next wednesday. All right on Wall Street today. We finished up a week the Dow was up Dow is up one hundred and twenty four points. Dow is up one twenty four finished the week twenty five thousand four hundred thirteen. Nasdaq was down eleven points, seventy two forty eight. And the s&p was up six points twenty seven thirty six down as and p up NASDAQ down. Four two four twelve sixty. If you want a pair of tickets to lantern launch second caller right now. All right. I said I had wolf stories, and I had a FOX story. Once again, the FOX story simply that I'll be on Fox News. I know Fox News. They need a liberal from a border state to talk about immigration and the caravan. So they found me I'll be on Fox News Sunday morning eleven thirty A m FOX the same channel at Hannity. Laura Ingram and all that. Levin. Thirty Sunday morning to show called America's news headquarters. L D short. It'll be sweet. But if you have nothing else to do, you know, set your recorder June? So that's my FOX too. Wolf stories. One is the one is the continuing saga. And and if you haven't found it if he forgot about it or. Didn't hear about it. There's a fantastic piece from last Friday a week ago in the guardian British newspaper website. And it's about George Martin. And is written by Alison flood. And she does a great job writing about it and her trepidation, which he'd heard his reputation about being prickly. Anyway, she found just the opposite. She was told don't ask him about the new book. He brought it up. It's a great interview in the guardian Georgia Martin when I begin a game of thrones. I thought it might be a short story eight talks about well. He talks about kind of one of the early images was of was of dire wolf puppies and brings up the fact that he and his wife. Support the wild spirit wolf sanctuary which is our friend Layton cougar. You know, what they ask him or he brings up about fame and fortune. He said the fame part of it. Not so much. But the fortune part of I love because he gets to do things like support the wild spirit wolf sanctuary. Anyway, that's one we'll throw the other wolf story. And here is my hope, here's my hope. I would put this in a lantern light a candle and let it fly away. My hope is that with the new administration. And new. Cabinet secretaries, new thoughts, new hopes around economic development and tourism things like that. And the new game commission. One of the first things. I would do if I was Michelle Luhan Grisham would fire the entire game commission fired them all maybe even string them up or put them in put them in leg-traps, put them in bear club. Put him in those traps snafu ankle, you have to bite off your leg the kneecap to escape. Maybe a little extreme. There's a story. We'll get back to it out of the Huffington Post. And it is dateline. Son Pedro last Haridas in Spain. And it's about. A very very rural area in Spain. Used to be a lot of farmers there. Used to be a lot of hunters. And they would shoot all the wolves in that area. Because the wolves that come and get their, you know, their baby sheep. Well, the farming died or farm farming is dying ranching is dying because the kids are moving away. There's less ranching farming, less sheep, more wolves. So whether they decide to do let's make the wolves into a tourist attraction that is a better outcome for wolves. Then what we have here in New Mexico, either poisoning or shooting the Mexican grill anyway, so wolf tourism. That's my second. We'll we'll get back to that. All right, Kate nobles here running in the door. How are you? I'm all right. Thank you. Catch your breath at just about okay serious road. Oh traffic on a Friday afternoon. We forget we forget, even as Santa Fe. Sometimes it gets a little slow. It's. Your nerves shot now who yelling at people. No, I'm okay. No, no road rage rage son in the car. No, okay. So you could have raised you just didn't. Well, I mean, what's the rage about we live in Santa Fe, New Mexico? I'm not going to rage about traffic reports day. Yeah. You know? And I was on a phone call. So. Okay. That kept me out of trouble. Let's hope so all right. She is a school board member. But she's going to be here today as a vice president of a mouthful, that's right. You have a new gig. I'll do for vice president for policy and stakeholder engagement new early childhood education development, in partnership United ways, can is all of that on your new business card. It is and more. Yes. I'll give you one. Okay. Good. All right. So an actual new gig. Now, you were here spring early summer, and we're talking about some some work contract work, you I think you were doing at the time for United way Santa Fe county. Correct. Yes. And it's transition to a staff right now your fulltime staff. Same kind of work though. Right. Yes. All right. So you have a new report. Ford is I didn't print it out. It is one hundred and twenty four pages long. It is only thirty four. So it is called community outreach report business planned for early childhood. Yes. All right. This came out of the obvious. I mean that we need help. And is a it's a huge topic in New Mexico. It is well into this is, plus it's United way Santa Fe counties. It's there one mission. Correct. And the New Mexico early childhood development partnership is the policy arm of United way counting. And so that's really where I work and what we were here about back in the spring. I think it was may or June was the contract work began. And this is really the outcome of the five months since then. So we've been going around the state we've been all over the place. There's a nice map with all of the places. We've engaged folks. We've heard for more than three hundred members of the community partnered with an organization called the native American budget and policy institute. And all of this was around this this thing and engagement, but this this document that's called a business plan for early childhood, and it has five levers. And really looks at it it talks about being a systems based approach to how we can effectively expand early childhood in New Mexico. So it really looks at how do you operationalize this not just saying Moore and throwing painted a wall? But saying, okay, how does the more work in the most efficient and effective way? And what this report and the work. I've been doing for five months has has been around is what is the reality on the ground out there in New Mexico? So what is going on in Gallup in SPN Yola in Deming in silver city in Hidalgo county in Lee county and Hobbs in jail in these are all places every you weren't doing these by Email. You're actually going around visiting the committee menu. Correct. A few. We did on the phone. We did can foreman interviews on the phone, but all of those places I just listed. I went to and Farmington in gel and hatch and Janelle different than Joe it is. Well it. I mean, this is one of the and it's been so much fun because New Mexico has so many unique communities, and it's different in different places, and I really feel more grounded and rooted in the state, and what's going on probably than I've ever been just from driving just from visiting and we're going back. I mean, there was a twenty three long dirt mile road and Katrin county. It was so beautiful. There wasn't a lot there in terms of human infrastructure, but really beautiful hundreds of people in the entire communities. One of the biggest in the entire county for the beast counties in the state one of the biggest counties in the country. Yeah. There are several hundred people in the entire county. Yes. And that was you know, but it's gorgeous between it was so beautiful inbetween hat off in town or not. Yes. Of course. Yeah. So it's been it's been a lot of fun. And you know, but there are universal truth out there. That's the background. We set it up, and we're gonna come back. But before we take a break here. We'll come back with Kate noble talk more about this report what they found in one word, can you sum all that up as dire or hopeful or. I don't know that I can sum it up one where divers I won't make you. There's a word. We'll use diverse. We'll come back Kate noble. What a call in chat about early childhood education. She's.

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"alison flood" Discussed on The Guardian Books Podcast

The Guardian Books Podcast

03:20 min | 2 years ago

"alison flood" Discussed on The Guardian Books Podcast

"In and take its resources and just such such a cool world as third one comes at the end of the month cigar this one and it's about five hundred pages and you'll love it and then you can go read another thousand pages if you're in london go to the royal academy where you might see brian catling loping around dressed as a cyclops that's right he's not doing that this year he did want to do at the pretty but brian catling is really cool visual artist does sculpture and he does live performances and stuff like that so there's a whole crazy world of catling to enjoy in that's basically how i'm spending summer and everyone else should cover allison well should i cheat something old that i really love should i choose something that's just coming out now what would you choose what ever you really love whatever you really think will make somebody summer okay well i was telling richard about this the other day but the book that has really moved me and i have a door lately is living nearby ursula liqun so it's her alternate telling of the aeneid it she takes a tiny tiny part from the need lavinia who marries in as much later on and tells her whole life at set in pre rome italy as this arrives and live near is the daughter of this minor king there and it just explores life in the ancient world but from the perspective of of a woman and it's it's amazing it just filled me with joy every time i read it made me feel happy every time i read it and it's part of a strand of books i really love the moment which is kind of we telling of history from the women's expected also to get another book i really love the children of jah casta she enough you're not kind of move residents i'm gonna recommend exactly the same thing we say surti by madeleine millan appended homeric myth this time putting the witch of the island of the center of the story instead of it's brilliant and very timely well i am going to actually do a bit of a cheat because i haven't read this but he's one of my absolute favorite writers at thompson and the book is the novelist never anyone but you and he is really good as our gut in review described it at doing dangerous psychic territories but he what he also does and i think this is a project that's going on at the moment in lots of areas fiction is is sort of reclaiming the demi monde what the nineteenth century would call the demo so people who are who live by all turn their own rules and in this case it's a biographical novel of the lives of the artists claude kowloon and massa moore who were sort of syria lists painters designers photographers who mingled with dr leone andre bretagne hemingway gertrude stein but it also raises this thing about gender fluidity which is just in the air at the moment a lot of my reading this is being around gender fluidity identity fluidity has actually did hear that that that novel is particularly good so yeah actually that's good i was speaking alison flood sean kane and richard lee next up ross raisin in this week's extra books podcast retreating you to a reading by bill nye of the moon short story the invisible child by tova anson in association with them his little extract.

"alison flood" Discussed on The Guardian Books Podcast

The Guardian Books Podcast

04:05 min | 2 years ago

"alison flood" Discussed on The Guardian Books Podcast

"Hello and welcome to a summer reading guardian books podcast with me play armistead this week is all about recommendations for the sunny weeks ahead i'll be speaking with ross raisin whose novel natural about football and their families as surely found its moment in these climactic weeks of the world cup handily for those who regard holidays as an opportunity to pursue those long press boned writing dreams he's also just published a nifty little handbook titled read this if you want to write a good book he'll be joining us later to explain how but i the studio filled with rather demob happy group of books journalists as we gathered to tussle over the mustreads of the summit alison flood made a rabbit always welcome appearance alongside the usual suspects sean kane and richard lee this season when every section dutifully trots out the reading lists of the great and the good and we're not ception on guardian review so richard what what has come out the usual the usual selection of exile recommendations including one john panda which caught my partly because it's the excellent collar ravelli who heard on this podcast before the order of time of course this time round from anan lame banville says anyone with the least interest in the science of the physical world you might just say anyone will be by turns astonished baffled and thrilled richard i detect a bit of back slapping that for yourself that we happen that happens to have chosen this person because we have excellent judgment i think he's very smart and it's a really good book then john bound bill agrees there is an partly teasing you but there is also serious pointing this that how seriously do we take these recommendations sean pretty serious somen rusty rereading the whole of nabokov i love to visually if he actually tells rate than ted play rushdie but i really believe that there's some great this could stakes in that and this stuff that i i've i've actually got on my list like david has excited about the new rachel kushner the mazarine awful which is fantastic joycean things i'm not to foreigners reading the new collection of david sedaris essays which is a year defining event for me every single time there's in usa collection from sedaris but then there's people mostly in says he's going to read the iliad which i that's sort of summer reading invited comments that i'm ever gonna be doing true because in some ways you know two weeks on a beach exactly the time you can read the iliad that you'd never would concentrate i find that when when i go on holiday in some my books sort of tend to get fatter and more depressing which is sort of like me and win winter i tend to go for things like like a couple of years ago i have very memorable experience reading the natural way of things by charlotte would which is sort of female dystopia setting these straight out back in i was on a beach in minorca and i was having a jolly time maybe this is probably because you coach really confused coming from australia actually the middle of winter summer i mean what what we can pretty much bank on a lot of people going off with books they pick up in the airports they said they'll be going off with a lot of john rework they and this is where alison comes in because i listen is is an expert on particularly on crime and thrillers well i do think that they'll be picking up in the air force and what's on display on the app in the airport will be lots of the best selling titles of the moment this week for example most of the charter taken up by thrillers particularly ones for names like the other women and the decks and things like that dying dying women so yeah i mean for me what i what i we didn't in the summary is hora i would definitely eat her i think it dates back to being a teenager and being on holiday in portugal and finding stephen king on the shelf there and delving into into that well for the first time and it still what i like to read in hot weather on the beach something that properly frightens me so you like to bit of shiva to give you shift melting in the heat yeah definitely all like to eat something that is set in the place where i am the books the books.

armistead two weeks