17 Burst results for "alexis christoph"

"alexis christoph" Discussed on Yahoo Finance Presents

Yahoo Finance Presents

03:07 min | Last month

"alexis christoph" Discussed on Yahoo Finance Presents

"From younger finance this election amish? I'm rick, Newman and I'm Alexis Christoph for us today we are talking about what to do with your stock portfolio with the presidential election just four months away, joining us to talk about this is veteran market strategist. Mark Mattson of Mats and money and Investment Advisory Firm with about eight point eight billion dollars under management mark good to see here on election. Amish thanks for being with us. I guess for no for a lot of investors looking ahead to to November third. They're thinking. Wow, which which person would be better for me? In the white. House president trump or Joe? By what would your answer your short answer to them? Well, my short answer is. Let's just hope Biden doesn't get in. Got A. Call this, my biden debacle. Kind of separate the advice into two areas one is the portfolio advice, and then the other is kind of living your life, and how it's GonNa Affect you economically. and. The Biden plan is going to be a disaster. For especially from a tax standpoint, he wants to completely do away with the tax benefits for companies to go from twenty one to twenty eight. He wants to take the maximum rate from thirty seven back to thirty nine point six he wants to eliminate capital gains, which is a twenty percent tax to up to forty percent tax for certain taxpayers. The average. Americans going to have a massive tax increase which will hurt. The economy reduced GDP by estimated one point five percent so economically biden a typical tax and spend Democrat with a generous portion of rhetoric for redistributing wealth. And I I think it's bad overall for the economy now as far as the markets concern. The market's a little different because the market has. Already boiled into the prices, so all the knowable and predictable information already into price today, so I always recommend people don't try to play chicken with the market based on who thinks going to be the president because that's largely baked into the price of the securities already. long-term equities, the greatest wealth creation tool on the planet, but you could as a you know an American paying taxes. You could get hurt pretty severely provided. You still have a job when he gets if he gets elected. Hey, mark, let me let me put fat on some of those thoughts. So when Obama President, the top corporate rate was thirty five percent. Trump cut it to twenty one percent the top income tax rate was thirty nine point six percent, so biden doesn't want to put the corporate rate back to thirty five. He's talking about just putting up to twenty eight, and of course that's that's not the effective rate. Companies will actually pay just a nominal rate so for typical companies. The tax rate would probably the thing with Patrick who actually pay go up a couple points, and still be lower than during the Obama years, and the stock market went up during almost all of Obama's two terms. So, what's the problem?.

Biden Obama Mark Mattson trump President Joe Investment Advisory Firm president Alexis Christoph rick Patrick Newman
"alexis christoph" Discussed on Ballots and Dollars

Ballots and Dollars

08:17 min | 2 months ago

"alexis christoph" Discussed on Ballots and Dollars

"From Yahoo Finance this election. I'm Rick Newman, and I'm Alexis Christoph Ras thanks so much for joining us on this edition of Election Onyx or twenty twenty has been an extraordinary year. Right no matter how you slice it on so many levels. It's been extraordinary. We've had the pandemic a deep recession, a rip, roaring stock market, and now of course civil in our country, but let's not forget the table has. Has Been set for what many believe will be a pretty contentious presidential election. Come November joining us on this edition of election to map out what could go wrong in the battle for the White House, is Lou Jacobson. He is senior correspondent at politic fact and columnist for the Cook Political Report. Lewd is so great to have you here. There's a lot to dig into on. Of different scenarios you know starting to bubble up to the surface here each with their own unique set of legal and constitutional landmines, of course before we jump into that low is all this predicated on it being a very close election between president, trump and JOE buy. Yes, I mean what I'll be talking about today. The sort of scary scenarios about. And and the uncertainty would be greatly eased. If there is a large margin, candidates, not saying it'd be totally gone, but There's an old saying that the election administrators friend is a wide margin of victory because some of the inevitable teas that don't get crossed and is that. Don't get dotted. Kind of fade into the background of somebody easily wins. If it's really close, all those things come into play. And the two sides can get very very heated. About? So you did this a column for the Cook Political Report which grabbed my attention immediately and I think give some Democrats heart attacks. A lot of the so these are problematic scenarios in close election, and a lot of them have to do with mayland voting right down the possibility that we. We're not talking about fraud. I don't think that's right. But it's might not actually have I will have the ballots in time or on election. Day. And then there might be some questions about whether whether to count them after the fact, so why don't you just discuss the role of Malin? Voted here definitely, I mean that's the big variable. That was thrown into the mix because of the coronavirus you have. A situation where you know election administrators very familiar with how they've always run. Elections often a heavy voting in person at the polls on the daily election or prior to the election early voting but this year because of concerns over safety and health a lot of states have felt compelled and. Understandably to kind of rely more heavily on the mail voting So you've got a situation where I mean th. This family emerged months ago as a possibility that. Your this and so they don't have a lot of experience doing it. These are new systems that are not familiar with. Doing a lot of places, of course, states that are very familiar with mail ballot in California has done a lot about Oregon Washington Utah and also. have a very heavy reliance on male balance I'm not concerned about those states, but you know this just sets. The tried and true way of doing things, and it leaves open You know more risk for error, even know a lot of ways that makes sense to do it because people could be having voted vote in the middle of a serious pandemic wave this fall. So. Yeah, in addition to all the other, the hyper partisanship and the norm breaking that going on for the past couple of years throwing the mail balloting is one more variable, which was sort of makes things challenging for what's one of your scenarios is a close race in which some of the mail ballots are still out. as of Election Day, and we don't actually know who wants this, is it? This would be a swing state, but we don't know who won. The swing state in becomes contingent on mail in ballots. That might show up late right right so so they are really kind of two questions here one is were the mail ballots sent out in time for people to vote, and then there's the secondary question which is once once. The ballots are out and. And voted upon can be counted in a reasonable amount of time after election day. I on, but the rules are in a given state so so on the first question, we actually have a little bit of experience now with that Pennsylvania, and Philadelphia there were some voters who didn't get their ballots in time. for the for the primary now of course is the primary If there are any really close elections, which could be. Affected by this but it's a real reminder that they sort of mechanics. Just getting the ballots out to people is a challenge and if it doesn't happen I, mean what what are you GonNa do disenfranchise thousands or tens? Or tens of thousands of people and if so, you know, if not, if you give them some flexibility if you have them, allowed there. There's actually a federal a a a federal ballot which can be used for absentee voting. Usually by servicemembers overseas. Could say well. You know you guys didn't get your ballots in time. Fill out one of those at your and drop it off at your nearest polling place or whatever and do that. So the dry run in a lot of the estates has not been looking to great. It doesn't mean that it can't be fixed by some in November, but it does. Definitely raise eyebrows about some of the challenges going forward. You. Know Lou I. Think we can all agree. Were sort of living in a heightened polarize time. You said it in the Cook Political Report Story. That you know this is a high tower. Partisanship is how you put it like that W-. What if what happens if both candidates claim victory here you? Can you look back in history at a time or something like that happen. And how does it play out? I mean we've never had anything that that dramatic in the past we have had you know. The eighteen seventy six election was disputed. and. We can talk a little bit of about that later. But I mean one of the really striking scenarios that folks who are experts talk to me about? Let's you've got the state of Michigan now. The polls are showing Biden's ahead by a decent amount right now, but if that's. Sensitive, wise in two thousand sixteen, which could happen you could have some of the more rural counties more trump supporting counties getting their ballots in fairly early because they're. They're maybe not relying heavily on the mail in ballots, and some of the urban. Centers, which are more democratic counting late into the night, maybe have rules that they can count ballots that are post marked by the date. Who knows so what? What you have is a situation where. On the of the election that trump is winning Michigan because of just which are the counties that sent sent their ballots in, and then as Democrats locations in that state are counted you know. Biden comes closer and closer than overtakes trump. If trump can say hey, look, you should have stopped kind the ballots. You know it's over. Bennett wind'll. He was still A. Space you could have a situation where the state's Governor Democrat and the state's attorney general and the Secretary State are also Democrats. certifying the election for Joe Biden, but the state's Republican legislature saying we're. We're not gonNA. Abide by that. We're going to have our own.

Joe Biden trump Michigan Yahoo Alexis Christoph Ras White House Lou Jacobson Rick Newman fraud twenty twenty Malin president Bennett Lou I. Oregon Pennsylvania California
"alexis christoph" Discussed on Yahoo Finance Presents

Yahoo Finance Presents

03:50 min | 2 months ago

"alexis christoph" Discussed on Yahoo Finance Presents

"From younger finance this election. I'm Rick Newman and I'm Alexis Christoph thanks so much for joining us on this edition of Election Onyx today we are going to talk about how the civil unrest unfolding in our country may impact the presidential election this year, and joining us now to talk about that is Ted Johnson He is a senior fellow at the Brennan Center for Justice and Teddy so good to have you with us. There's so much to get to I. Almost don't know where to begin, but let me start by asking in life. We say a lot of the time. Timing is everything. is the timing the confluence of this pandemic the economic recession the civil unrest is the timing working in favor or against president trump. a big question and it's hard to know the answer so I thanks for having me so a what political scientists and historians like to do is look to history to see if there are any clues and all of us now talking about nineteen, sixty eight and the riots in the hot summer of Sixty, seven, sixty eight, there was a war unpopular war, going on incoming president at the time was not running for office, and you had out. WHO's Lyndon Johnson and Richard Nixon was running on a platform of law and order offer the Republican Party, and you had George. Who was running third party sort of segregationist taken for for the South and Nixon ends up winning that appealing to the. Essentially white conservatives who are really uncomfortable with the amount of racial tension and anti-war rallies happening around the country, even at nine, hundred, sixty eight democratic national. What does that mean for us today? We don't know because of a few things one in political science. We know that usually when white voters are angry there turnout in election goes up black voters when they're angry, usually a protest or find external ways to exert pressure on the political system and not necessarily run to the polls to create change using the democratic processes available. The other thing in terms of this election, lack turnout is probably going to be what determines whether trump wins or biden wins, and because we can't sign higher turn out to the current anger that we see. We'll have to look towards a May Be Biden's EP selection, maybe the state of the economy, which is usually a good bellwether on whether the incumbent president stays are not as to whether. Turn will be high generally, and whether turn out will be high among black voters Just as a baseline of where does president trump stand with black voters? I mean black voters. We normally associate them with the democratic. Party in Jill. Biden is popular among black butters, but trump has some support among blacks, doesn't he? Does, so he received about eight percent of black votes in two thousand sixteen. That's four percent from black women and thirteen percent from black men. What trump will tell you is that? He did better with black voters in both. And John McCain the previous two Republican candidates, which is true differences. He Ran Against Hillary Clinton who was shall we say less popular among black voters than Barack Obama the first black president, so in reality trump underperformed every republican nominee or incumbent for the presidency since Richard Nixon in. Eight, so he has not improved the prospects for the Republican. Party in black voters despite the change, the seemingly positive change between twelve and twenty sixteen, currently, his unfavorable are extremely high among black voters in the range of eighty five to ninety percent..

president Richard Nixon Biden Republican Party senior fellow Brennan Center for Justice John McCain Lyndon Johnson Hillary Clinton Rick Newman Barack Obama Teddy Alexis Christoph George
"alexis christoph" Discussed on Ballots and Dollars

Ballots and Dollars

02:56 min | 2 months ago

"alexis christoph" Discussed on Ballots and Dollars

"From young finance this election. I'm Rick Newman and I'm Alexis Christoph. Thanks so much for joining us on this edition of Election Onyx today we are going to talk about how the civil unrest unfolding in our country may impact the presidential election this year and joining us now to talk about that is Ted Johnson He is a senior fellow at the Brennan Center for Justice and Teddy so good to have you with us. There's so much to get to I almost don't know where to begin, but let me start by asking in life. We say a lot of the time. Timing is everything. is the timing the confluence of this pandemic the economic recession the civil unrest is the timing working in favor or against president trump. a big question and it's hard to know the answer, so I thanks for having me so a what political scientists and historians like to do is look to history to see if there are any clues and all of us now talking about nineteen, sixty eight and the riots in the hot summer of Sixty, seven, sixty eight, there was a war unpopular war, going on incoming president at the time was not running for office, and you had out who's Lyndon Johnson and Richard. Nixon was running on a platform of law and order. Offer the Republican Party and you had George. Who was running third party sort of segregationist? For the South and Nixon ends up winning that appealing to the. Essentially white conservatives who are really uncomfortable with the amount of racial tension and anti-war rallies happening around the country, even at nine, hundred sixty eight. Democratic national. What does that mean for us today? We don't know because of a few things one in political science. We know that usually when white voters are angry there turnout in election goes up black voters when they're angry, usually a protest or find external ways to exert pressure on the political system and not necessarily run to the polls to create change using the democratic processes available. The other thing in terms of this election lack turnout is probably going to be what determines whether trump wins or biden wins, and because we can't sign higher turn out to the current anger that we see we'll have to look towards a May Be Biden's EP selection, maybe the state of the economy, which is usually a good bellwether on whether the incumbent president stays are not as to whether. Turn will be high generally, and whether turn out will be high among black voters Just, as a baseline of where does president trump stand with black voters I mean black voters. We normally associate them with the democratic. Party in Jill Biden is popular among black butters, but trump has some support among blacks, doesn't he?.

president Jill Biden Nixon Teddy senior fellow Republican Party Brennan Center for Justice Lyndon Johnson Rick Newman Alexis Christoph George
"alexis christoph" Discussed on Ballots and Dollars

Ballots and Dollars

11:28 min | 5 months ago

"alexis christoph" Discussed on Ballots and Dollars

"From young finance this election amish. I'm Rick Newman and I'm Alexis Christoph risk and this week we are talking about the resuscitation of Joe Biden's campaign. I liked the way the New York Post put it. He's alive after Super Tuesday. Rick Newman First off not to be too backward-looking but what happened to sort of swing the momentum who can Joe Biden. Thanks for that is it. South Carolina is a Congressman Clyburn for putting his his support behind Biden. I think it's that sort of an all of the above development in the change of momentum here has been so dramatic I mean even Joe Biden is surprised. I mean so just to illustrate how surprising it is so going into the South Carolina. Primary on the twenty ninth I mean the expectation then was that Biden would win but that it would probably be pretty close and it wasn't close at all. I mean it was a landslide for Biden and then in Super Tuesday Biden Biden did win some of the southern states where there's a stronger proportion of black voters than in the north some the northeastern and Midwestern states. But he won Minnesota total surprise. He didn't even campaign in Minnesota. Now we know pretty much why he won Minnesota because Amy Klobuchar senator from Minnesota dropped out of the presidential race and endorsed him but even even when she did that the expectation was that Joe Biden would would win Minnesota and Excuse me that Bernie. Sanders would win. Minnesota and here comes by in Windsor. Joe Biden Wins Massachusetts Amazing. Senator Elizabeth Learns More Number Elizabeth Warren thome steak and Bernie Sanders backyard because he's from Vermont just to the north and Joe Biden Wednesday. Happening here is Bernie Sanders. Losing the younger voter. He's No. He's not he's winning. The he is winning the younger voter. But there just aren't enough of them so one of the Bernie Sanders has been up until now had been. He's not the front runner anymore. Biden is now the front runner Bernie Sanders had been the front runner mainly because The moderate vote was getting split among four or five candidates and since we've seen a rapid consolidation of the moderates behind one Guy Joe Biden. So now mostly all that moderate vote and this is going to be even more pronounced in forthcoming elections. I mean for Super Tuesday which was March third in a couple of the states. A lot of the vote was actually early. Voting people who mailed in bow. They could've mailed in ballots two or three weeks ago which means before Biden surge in South Carolina before this big change in momentum so but now I mean every every analyst out of every analyst. I know I've been following. Is SURPRISED IF NOT GOBSMACKED BY BIDEN? Search here because it's just hard to think of a time when there was this dramatic of turnaround in such a short period of time and even when trump surprised everybody by winning the Republican nomination in two thousand sixteen but the shift in momentum didn't happen this quickly You had a lot of candidates who stayed in it well beyond this point and it was kind of slug fest in two thousand sixteen. So let's get highlights. How splintered we keep using that word house splintered. This party has been and how most of the party probably is moderate Democrat when you take away. The other players like Buddha Judge Club. Hr on Bloomberg. We're those moderate Democrats going to go. They're going to go behind Joe Biden and so I would take that one step further and say it turns out. Democrats as a party are really not that splintered at all so there were a lot of candidates vying for the vote. So here's so here's what we're learning from These are some exit. Poll results here so Biden is doing really well with voters over forty five. That's not surprising when you compare him in. Sanders Biden is doing much better. Among voters over forty five and sanders is doing much better Among voters under forty five which is which means young people. I mean we know there's this Kinda surprising ironic situation that the oldest guy in the race is the most popular among the youngest voters The problem for sanders is that he's not getting enough young voters to actually turn out and vote not not even close and we can talk for a second. There have been some these sort of national poll saying Would you among all these Democrats? How would you vote against this? Democrat Democrat trump. So mostly it's Been Elizabeth Warren people to Judge Bernie Sanders and Joe Biden and Sanders has done well in those polls Those polls show him actually beating trump by maybe six or eight percentage points but that is I think misleading and there's now been some more detailed analysis of that so first of all those are national polls not focused on what would actually happen in the six or eight swing states that are going to determine the election and second of all it for Bernie Sanders to beat. Donald Trump would require a record level of turnout among young voters. And we're not seeing anything close to that in the primary election so far so Bernie Sanders. I guess thinks his revolution is going to start with young people and the young man so with maybe not with Clo- Buddha judge and now Bloomberg backing Biden. What can trip him up at this point and does a contested convention in July which we kept talking about look less and less likely. Now it's hard to say so it's GonNa be a while before we know the final. Vote tally for Super Tuesday. We should point out Bernie. Sanders did probably win California. Think it's safe to say. He did win California. He doesn't get all the four hundred and fifteen delegates from California. But he's going to get more than Biden but nonetheless. I mean this was unthinkable a week ago. That Biden actually has the lead now and there does seem to be a pathway to Biden winning by simply getting a majority of the delegates So I I think you know they're among the momentous developments here It's not the biggest one so the other candidates falling in line behind behind Biden and that's Cloture Buddha Jesuit also beto a work so you know Joe Biden wants one Texas also kind of unexpected. I mean again Bernie. Sanders has been very strong among Hispanics. Who are strongly represented in taxes and there was an expectation. I mean it was pretty close in Texas but I think the odds were Biden. Excuse me I keep messing up Biden because it's Bernie and Biden to be expectations. Were released sanders. Going to take sanders was GONNA win Texas. And he didn't and it's possible that aerobic maybe help Joe Biden get over the top in Texas. So but I think that this point the even bigger development even more momentous is blue Bloomberg nachos dropping out. But he said you know I am now behind Joe Biden who he called my friend and a great American and remember Mike Bloomberg has said he will do whatever it takes to defeat Donald Trump and his mission Moshe Moshe. Yup Most surprised that he's doing this. Frankly but mostly that means spent however much money it takes so if Joe Biden Joe. Biden's campaign was broke two weeks ago. There were out of money. I mean they barely had offices open in. Some of these important would not was not. Alice could be being the most flush campaign in the history of American politics. If money what is what will Bloomberg actually do. I mean he can't he can't put unlimited amounts of money into Biden's campaign directly but he can put unlimited amounts of money into what would essentially be a super PAC type of operation and if it would just be Camp you know spent in running ads and get out the vote efforts and other things you would do against Donald Trump and in favor of Joe Biden and because billionaires can through that mechanism through the SUPERPAC mechanism. He he He can essentially spend as much as they want We're going to see we've already seen an unprecedented mount of spending for an election because Bloomberg and also because Tom Star but mostly because of Bloomberg and without a doubt. We're we're going to see a lot more of it. So I think the odds are stacking up against trump's reelection in ways that I think almost nobody expected to see it's including trump. I know I'm putting the cart before the horse here but do you think perhaps we could see Mike Bloomberg. Take a cabinet position if Biden where to go all the way to the White House. I mean I know Mike Personally. Having worked for him years ago I find it hard to believe he would but again if his mission is to make it a better world for all of us maybe. He thinks he can do that. Your position within the cabinet It's I mean it's certainly plausible. I mean it's not out of the norm for the people who you know the most tip to be in your cabinet you know buying in. Bloomberg ran a gentlemanly contest against each other. I mean you never saw the two of them going after each other. I mean you know the more vitriolic and there wasn't much of this because remember. Bloomberg was only in two debates and there have been. I think almost maybe ten. I've lost count even though I've watched almost all of them. Elizabeth Warren is really want who went after Bloomberg. And you've even seen some analysis after Super Tuesday saying Biden should think Warren for bringing down Bloomberg. I don't buy that so much. I think it was fired on Warren. The way she I. Guess Fates that Warren. Wait a minute let me finish on. Bloomberg was all I think much Bloomberg just kind of brought himself down. I mean he was just so bad in the debates he was so flat and you know he looked irritated and he just he did not make his case. Well at all I th I thought Elizabeth Warren and bringing series both gave him openings where he could've defended himself better and made a stronger case. Anyway he's out so we don't really have to talk about him and Warren out any moment. Now but what does she hanging on for? So as we're sitting here. She's still in the race. I think that by the time are millions of audience. Members are watching and listening to this. Podcast she probably will be out. She pro I mean she can't go much beyond the middle or the end of March next on somebody's take issue on the sanders ticket. It's a great question because I it's not a given that she would even show. She will endorse somebody. It's not a given. That centers will be the person she endorse now. Why not because ideologically? They are the closest of the candidate. So why I can't get into her head but remember there were first of all. There was this sort of personal disagreement with Senator supposedly saying behind the scenes at some point within the last couple of years. There's no way a woman like Elizabeth Warren can win and then did you call me a liar. This act this gets out into the press and what he's denying it and she's saying are you calling me a liar then. She didn't shake his hand at the end. A little bit. Tv knows how much of a sort of personal squabble there really is there. But I mean if Y- Elizabeth Warren is really smart. She's been sheep. It really has been a great campaigner and it's a little bit mystifying. Why she faded the way she did. I mean essentially not winning a single primary and when you lose your home state. You're done. I'm sorry but if you can't win your home state the people who are the best tough you you you don't..

Biden Biden Judge Bernie Sanders Bloomberg Sanders Biden Joe Biden Joe Biden Joe Biden Mike Bloomberg Elizabeth Warren Donald Trump Minnesota South Carolina New York Post Rick Newman Buddha Judge Club Amy Klobuchar Windsor California Senator Elizabeth
"alexis christoph" Discussed on Ballots and Dollars

Ballots and Dollars

08:33 min | 1 year ago

"alexis christoph" Discussed on Ballots and Dollars

"I'm i'm rick. Newman and i'm alexis christoph ras as the election nears. President trump seems to be having more misses than hits when it comes to fulfilling his promise to lower the high cost of prescription drugs in this country. He pulled off the table those rebates. We were supposed to be seeing on drug prices. Why did he do that. I guess they decided that just was not going to be workable. They didn't even <hes> get to the point where they tried to implement something may not a lot of what we've seen with trump as he will pass an executive order and say just do it <hes> and then it gets to the courts and it's it's the courts that say no you can't do that but in this case. They just decided this wasn't going to work. This is <hes> that was a thing hardly any normal. All people understand there are these sort of behind the scenes rebates <hes> that get paid <hes> between the drug companies and the insurance comes at by the drugs or pay for them and some people say that the rebates actually <hes> lead the personally pharmaceutical me just to make the list price is higher so because a rebating some of the money that actually lets them <hes> make the list price higher or the m._s. r._p._m. So the trump idea was to get rid of the rebates but they just decided that wasn't gonna work <hes> they may have decided it was it was not gonna survive a court challenge and not even bother in of course this comes after the judge did knock down and other trump plan which was that plan to require drug companies to who list the prices of drugs when they run t._v. Ads <hes> and i should say people who look at this problem don't think either of those measures if they had ever got into effect so they're they're all those are both off the table <hes> kind of from a transparency standpoint i mean i don't know a lot about drug pricing but i do know that i like to know what a drug costs and i like to be able to compare that price with other prices. Why what are you going to give that information down in an advertisement. Why is that possible. <hes> i mean for practical purposes. It's it's <hes> even if it were possible. It would not really be helpful because there's no one price <hes> you know. We've talked about the crazy elements of the health care industry street that are unlike any other part of the of the u._s. Economy <hes> in one of them is pricing <hes>. You never know what anything cost. There's no there's absolutely no way to go. Look someplace like like amazon and say see here's the here's the price that everybody pays for the same thing because that's not the way it works. <hes> your insurance company negotiates a price with <hes> <hes> with pharmaceutical companies that they're going to cover it at this price. It probably varies depending on the type of patient. It probably varies depending on the employer. <hes> what what kind of deal the employer made with the insurance company which then makes a deal with the pharmaceutical folks their kids single price <hes> so if if the drug companies companies had been forced to actually advertise their prices <hes> it would just not have really get get sticker shock and then not know where to go from there. You wouldn't be able to compare because it's the price that they would show on t._v. Would not necessarily be the price that you pay <hes> you know. There's we all know. There's a big difference. There's at one price for the people who do not have coverage and there's another people do have coverage and then they're all different gradations of coverage some covers more some covers less depending on you know even within the at the same employer are you can pay for a lower deductible plan or a higher deductible plan. You can pay a higher premium comoro. I mean so trump continues to try. Try to make good on this promise and and you get the feeling that he's almost panicking as it gets closer to <hes> to us going to <hes> to the voting polls in twenty twenty honey. What is the reason for that so this was one of his important campaign promises. He said the drug makers are getting away with murder when he was running for president in twenty sixteen in and that he was going to do something about it as with many other things <hes> you know he sort of acted like everybody who came before me a fool in idiot and only i can get this done and while he's got zero to show for his learning. It's it's not that easy so what is not easy by the way what is he doing. What is on the table. What is he trying signed to do now that some of the things we talked about are off the table like the rebates. The only thing that <hes> i know about is he wants to come up with another plan that would <hes> sort of set guidelines for states <hes> being allowed to import drugs from other countries mainly canada. It could be anywhere. I mean it could be canada or europe or any place else live at least comparable regulatory system two hours so i would imagine it would be quite different in these countries and you you think to yourself like a lot of these are american companies. A lot of these medicines are made in the united states. Why would they be cheaper. In europe or canada exactly the only reason they're cheaper in those countries is because those countries basically have nationalized healthcare and they have put price limits. They have put legal price limits on what the pharmaceutical companies can pay for those drugs. So why can't we use that as a blueprint because we don't believe in price fixing in the united states i as a matter of principle <hes> <music>. Some people do obviously but this. This is actually what the whole conversation is about the <hes> the way drugs are priced in the u._s. Economy right now is basically free market pricing. <hes> the drug companies want to charge as much as i possibly can like an like anybody else who's selling something in the market and anybody who's trough. Every producer wants that's right. Every four profit producer wants to sell their wares for however much money that the maximum amount of money they can get whatever the market will only what happens is competition competition comes in as if you're making a law if you have a high profit margin while in others wanna get into that game and they want to compete with you can offer it for a little bit lower and still make a nice profit and so forth until competition brings the price down and so with drugs that would be the form of generic drugs right so there's the wrinkle that when a drug is patent protected there cannot be the competition for it until it goes off patent unless somebody else comes up with a different formula that does the same thing so that's where drugs are actually unique relative relative to <hes> to all the other products that were familiar with <hes> and you know there are other types of products that have patent protection but a lot of times you can come up with something else that does the same thing and <hes> just does it in a different way. I think about automobiles for example. I mean <hes> every automaker. Pry has hundreds or thousands of patents on the way this or that component operates but all cars essentially do the same thing in the same way and it's a highly competitive industry just not it's not the case in the drug industry so that's why here here in the united states. We really have <hes> there probably are exceptions to this but for the most part we we do have <hes> insurance companies that <hes> do have the power our to negotiate drug prices so that is a free market principle that if i'm going to buy a lot of something from you that gives me leverage to demand lower price <hes> but we do not really they have anything like price fixing on a widespread scale well trump campaigned on promises to quote negotiate like crazy with the with the drugmakers on these prices and the insurance insurance companies. I guess that negotiating is going so well. He's he's actually not negotiating and there's one conspicuous thing. Trump does not support <hes> and this is sort of the biggest idea in this issue on this issue is to let the federal government which runs medicare which is the largest purchaser of pharmaceuticals and healthcare in the country <hes> to let medicare negotiate for prices with pharmaceutical companies. I mean you if you just approach this. As a normal person outside the realm of politics took she would say of course medicare should be able to do that. That's taxpayer money. Why shouldn't medicare be able to negotiate the best fear there <hes> the the reason they don't is because the pharmaceutical industry prohibited <hes> they they this is the mo one of the most effective lobbying operations in washington and it would require congress chris to pass a law saying medicare negotiate drug prices and there's nothing that stands <hes> in the way of congress passing a law that says medicare can now negotiate drug prices just accept pharmaceutical lobbyists and i know i have a lot of the people who are running for and they donate and they donate a lot of money due to <hes> to politicians and <hes>. I think the former school industry has some reason why this would be bad for patients which is what they always say. There's just there's no rational argument to say <hes>. This is taxpayer money now. Another government on behalf of tax payer should always be able to negotiate the best possible deal uh-huh without limit. This.

trump united states price fixing medicare canada president europe rick Newman producer alexis christoph ras amazon congress executive murder
"alexis christoph" Discussed on Ballots and Dollars

Ballots and Dollars

11:25 min | 1 year ago

"alexis christoph" Discussed on Ballots and Dollars

"And I'm Alexis Christoph today, we're talking about Medicare for all it is the hottest idea in the democratic presidential race for overhauling the nation's health care system, and Rick. I think it's a buzz phrase. We are going to hear throughout the twenty twenty election. You're exactly right. Democrats have figured out that healthcare is one of the biggest issues for voters, and they want to hit this hard. They think this could put them over the over the top Medicare for all was kind of a fringe idea when Bernie Sanders popularized it in the twenty sixteen election, but it has caught on now. I think what's really important. I you have we have to go through some terminology and understand what Medicare for all really is. And then you have to understand think people need to understand, is this helpful that there are many other ideas for how to solve the problems in the healthcare system without going as far as Medicare for all. Which would be really a huge change in the healthcare system. It would be very disruptive. It would be very expensive, and it may be politically implausible, but we're gonna hear a lot about it and on the less. All right. So let's back up a little bit is a single payer Bill introduced by Bernie Sanders supported by Senator Elizabeth Warren, who, by the way, as one of the other Twenty-three candidates running for president and several other presidential hopefuls have jumped on this Medicare for all bandwagon. What is it? Mean it sounds good. And it makes a lot of promises what, what does Medicare for all actually me? Let's back up a step and talk about universal coverage or universal healthcare. What universal healthcare means is simply that everybody in the United States would have some kind of health health coverage or health insurance, regardless of where it comes from it could be a patchwork of the private health insurance system that we have now where people get it through an employer along with some government programs, which is basically what we have. Now, we just have thirty million people who don't have any coverage. At all, and many others who find they, they have some kind of coverage, but they can't afford it. So that would be universal coverage. Just everybody has care. Then you get to this idea of a single payer plan, the single payer in this case would be the government. So that means all health care would be provided for the a provided by the government. And that is what Medicare for all is Medicare for all is one program. That would cover everybody in the country. It's possible. You could have Medicare for all. And then have a supplemental private system, where if you wanted to get additional coverage outside of the big program, the big government program, you could do that. But basically, everybody would get their coverage through this program, as they do, for example, in the United Kingdom and in Canada, what now in Australia. Do they have universal lower health plan, and John straight? I don't know. I do know that almost all advanced economies have something that is like Medicare for all the distinctions are. So they're usually as a switch. Island's a good example, a national health plan that offers some level of coverage to everybody. But it might not be, you know, there might be long wait times or things that you don't want. And you let's say you want to choose your doctor instead of just going to ever happen to be on do that day in a lot of countries that have national program, you can get that supplemental insurance or private healthcare, so that you can go, see whatever doctor you want. And in fact, I think in some European countries, doctors who will work for the government program, actually make a lot of money on the side, providing care in a privatize make sense. So Medicare for all makes like we said, a, a lot of promises that make a lot of people's ears perk, up no premiums, no co pays no deductibles. No limits on care. But how does Bernie Sanders and other lawmakers who back Medicare for all? What is their plan for how the government would actually be able to afford this wreck? Yes. Bernie Sanders uses this misleading word free. So if you're in this program, it would be free. Accept it would be really, really expensive and somebody would have to pay. And this is one of the guess would that be the one percent? Yes. Of course and businesses. So we're gonna raise taxes on businesses in the wealthy to pay for this, the supporters of Medicare for all say, look, this is the most efficient way to provide good care for the most people. And I think they would be right if you were starting from scratch, and that is the rub here that we're not starting from scratch. We have a very you could call it a complex, or sophisticated health care system, that has basically been in place since World War Two. So we, if you were starting a system from scratch, you would not say, let's make healthcare the responsibility of employers that doesn't make sense. Because our parent company Verizon communications company, they don't they have no expertise in healthcare. Why would ever want to get into this? But if you know, business actually wants to be in the business of providing. Healthcare to their workers. The reason we have the system we have today is because in world during World War. Two companies were not allowed to raise salaries their salary freezes. And so to get workers, they competed by offering benefits and one of those benefits healthcare coverage and it just evolved into kind of a monstrosity. I mean, nobody foresaw the complexities of the healthcare system that we have today back in the nineteen forties and nineteen fifties. But that's what we've got. So if you were to go to Medicare for all you would take everybody who has insurance through an employer and put them into this government program. So that is about one hundred and fifty million Americans, which is almost half the population. So for this reason, this is the number one reason why I think Medicare for all has no chance. Because try selling that to one hundred fifty million people, there have been serving that, meaning that I already have a job and I get health insurance job, right? That would change if Medicare for all to be instituted and what? What would happen to my level of care? And while my options to personalise this, I've needed a little bit of medical care this year. Nothing serious thankfully, and I have found it quite easy. I mean, I have a primary care doctor through my health insurance plan, I have found it quite easy to go to a specialist, one you to specialists, and I I'm getting into see doctors on less than one week's notice. I was able to get an MRI ordered twenty four hours notice. And I went in this is this care is not free. I you know, I have pay deducted from my paycheck and my employer pays on my behalf and I probably get a lower raise than I would otherwise, get if you know, our employer variety, we're not paying exorbitant costs for healthcare. Nonetheless, the carrot self is good. And it's readily available so you know about seventy five percent of people who have employer provided care actually like it. They say it's pretty good. There are some who misconstrued people think that everybody's just hates the system and hates their health. It's not true. You're totally right. That, that is not the case. So most people who have insurance or coverage through their employer like it. And so your so let's say it's one hundred fifty million people who have at three quarters, like it's, let's say one hundred ten or one hundred twenty million people. So you're going to go to a hundred and ten million people as a politician and say something that's vitally important to your life healthcare. You're happy with what you have. But I'm gonna take away what you have. And I'm gonna make you go into a government program. A great way to not get I mean when you break it down like that it's not going to happen. Right. So the, the New York Times did a survey recently of the democratic candidates and found that many of them the candidates themselves perfer less sweeping changes than Medicare for all in effect. Joe Biden who many now, see as an early front runner says that he would prefer something called a public option in the healthcare system that would compete effectively with the private plans. What is this public option? What do we know? Well, I'm looking at a list of candidates here and I tell you the ones who are. Strongly in favor of Medicare for all, or this huge government program to cover everybody Cory Booker. Let's see Cureton gillibrand, comma, Harris Bernie Sanders, and Elizabeth Warren, probably the most well known candidates who favor some kind of Medicare for all. So everybody's in a government program, as you pointed out a lot of the others, including Biden favor something that's not quite that dramatic and would essentially leave in place, the private healthcare system. And then we have some candidates, we don't actually know what they stand for, because some of them have not really come out and said, but so many debates between now and then I'm sure we'll find out and there are actually about a dozen bills in congress to reform the health care system, all of them are backed by Democrats. The Republicans still they're only they're kind of a one note party here. All they say is repeal the they really have nothing on health care, which is too bad. Because there. Should be more thought in the Republican party of actually providing more cheaper and better healthcare to people instead of just undoing the Obama program. But you'd better think, though, that these democratic candidates when they go up against Trump are going to point out that week. Yeah, what is your plan if you want to repeal and replace? What are you going to replace it with Mr President? Well, of course, Trump has said he's going to come up with a plan, a terrific plan. We don't know what it is yet. And in the meanwhile we're getting we're getting sidetracked here. But in the meanwhile, the Trump administration is still trying to repeal the Affordable Care Act, aka ObamaCare through the courts. They are a party in a lawsuit that says we need to get rid of this entire law, including the provision that really quite popular, which is the most one of the most obvious ones. Is that insurance companies can no longer exclude people for pre existing conditions? They used to be able to do. The Trump administration actually is trying to undo that which I find to be unbelievable because everybody hated. The way the insurance companies used to do that. Nothing seemed more at any rate, so there are about a dozen health reform bills in congress, and only, I think four of them are Medicare for all, and the rest are some new form of a public option. So it could be a program that similar to Medicare. In fact, one of them would be administered by the same agency that runs Medicare, but it would be separate. So you're not putting a bunch of new people in Medicare, which might upset seniors who think that this is going to hurt their benefits, or somehow all these people come flooding in will they be able to see doctors and stuff like that. So you set up a, a different program, that's just like Medicare or some of the proposals are let people buy into Medicare buy in being an important phrase. So one of the groups of people that really still suffers in our system, and I've interviewed a lot of people who fit this profile are people who are say over fifty couples, let's say they're over fifty. They might be. Contractors by people who for whatever reason, do not get coverage through an employer, but make too much money to qualify for subsidies under the Affordable Care are horrible sweet spot. Right. Have to go by their own policy. So they have no bulk buying power. The way a company or a big company like our company horizon does, and they have just been getting screwed year after year after year. Because every time the insurance companies need to Ray Jack up their rates. They can't Jack up their rates on the big employers. Big employers have bargaining power and said, well, you're going to raise rates..

Medicare Bernie Sanders Joe Biden Senator Elizabeth Warren congress Alexis Christoph Verizon communications United States New York Times Rick Republican party Trump United Kingdom
"alexis christoph" Discussed on Yahoo Finance Presents

Yahoo Finance Presents

07:43 min | 2 years ago

"alexis christoph" Discussed on Yahoo Finance Presents

"Welcome to the Yahoo Finance presents podcast. I'm Alexis Christoph for us. Thanks for listening and remember to subscribe on Apple podcast or wherever you get your podcasts. So you don't miss an episode. Wayfair is betting that a growing number of people will choose to buy their furniture and home to court using their smartphones and other devices. The online furniture store CEO near its Shah recently sat down with Yahoo Finance is Julia Laroche to discuss way fierce prospects and just who is driving business. Some welcome near it. I'd like to start from the beginning you and fellow Cordell classmates. Steve Cornide launched in two thousand two just after the dot-com bubble burst. Tell us about the early days of the company. Short will joy. Thank you for having me here. Yes. So the early days of the company. So Steven, I were a Cornell classmates were engineers Cornell. We actually graduate from Cornell 1995 a we start our first company right out of college, and that was for the beginning of the commercial Internet. So even though the dot com crash in two thousand was obviously very a seminal moment. We were still very bullish about the prospects of the internet. And so when we get started in two thousand two we had come to a point of view that he was alive and well sort of despite the dot-com crash. But with a point of view that we need to focus on certain types of categories where there was additional complexity and where they weren't well-served. And so that was sort of our our. pro-Chian those kind of like the mentality we went into it with So talked to us about the first business. It was racks in stands dot com. How did you recognize the need to sell? It was TV stands, right? How did you recognize the need for that exact? So in those days, Some of the shopping websites would actually tell you their top hundred categories. And we'd found the TV stands at speaker stance were both on that list. And then actually Yahoo for the paid search term advertising with overture, and and those days it would actually give you the search counts by term for the last month. And we it found that the those categories TV, stand, speaker, stands, entertainment, furniture, entertainment centre were quite big categories in terms of words that were being searched. And then when you looked at line, You wouldn't really find obvious place to go their budgets sites. But we thought we could do a better job in terms of bigger selection better merchandizing and so that is why we picked it is our first sight. Antastic well, you are certainly an entrepreneur at a very young age rate out of college. We. Did you get that entrepreneurial spirit? Was that something that was instilled in you growing up? Yes. So my, my parents Botha emigrated to the US from India. So I think that takes a certain types of entrepreneurial spirit. My grandfather was an entrepreneur himself. Uh, so I think that was probably part of it. And then as a child, You know, I I I'd had the lawn mowing business and I had the paper route tonight I sort of had a bunch of these entrepreneurial experiences certainly liked them. So I think it was sort of a always a piece of me. You may. Well, I understand that the way you runway fair is a little different. I understand that you do not have an office. He liked to sit out there on the floor. So Talk to us a bit about the culture at Wayfair. Yes, shore. So we we believe very significantly in you. We want to get the best folks, and we want to be very ambitious, be super customer aligned. We want to run really hard. Everything we do. We want to have fun. And so when things we found is that by having an open ledger Now it makes it a lot easier for folks to know what's going on. Mix communication a lot easier. And it actually increases the energy level, and so we started that in cut up from date zero, and we've basically kept it. And so today that that we have no private offices for anybody in it's it's just worked out very well antastic wool. I do want to talk about the business now you all sell products that all different price points. So I can imagine that you'd have it pretty interesting perspective on consumers. Possibly how they're feeling home. So what he's seen from your customers today? Yes, So you know it's a little hard to get total consumer read because will The fact is people are increasingly going online. So Online's growing at fifteen percent off lines only growing at one or two percent. And then on top of that, we're taking a lot of share. So we've been growing a forty percent, Even though Online's only fifteen percent, but we're seeing a huge amount of demand or seeing customers be at variance who is the ask about shopping online, visiting more and more often. We're seeing them shop across all our categories, and we're seeing all kinds of positive signs. You know, when I think of furnishing a home, I think of my generation, the millennial generation, Howard millennials driving how you think about your business Yet will. So there's a bunch of things we notice nurturance. So the use of our app, for example, is growing the mobile traffic has outpaced all other forms of traffic is growing very fast. So when we think about our core customer, we do tend to think about folks and when they get, uh, kind of old enough to get married by how start a family because that sort of the kind of core 20 years of furnishing their home really starts then. But a lot of what's happening in terms of the and technology, I think will actually make online shopping incredibly popular with millennials as they get older and older because the idea of going to a store driving they're having to spend two hours in one store two hours in another store. Sales folks not really have good access to selection, not know as much product information as you want. It just doesn't seem very appealing and weep. That's what we're seeing. You know. With millennials are basically very familiar and accustomed to the modern technology in there, absolutely enthusiasts, Right. Well, it just from personal experience. I see you all all the time when I'm scoring from my Instagram feel like Justin, Maine, and I want to click on it all that looks really neat. So how important is social media? How important is visual is Eishin when it comes to your business? I think incredibly important. So social media is very powerful in terms of not just us being able to reach consumers, But consumers being able to share their opinions and thoughts with others. And then we've certainly benefited as the world's becoming Christly transparent, whether that be Gugel whether it be social media, uh, whether that be things we can do or things that our customers do. And I think that's been a great, uh, force on I I also think that visualization. If you think about our categories one of the few categories Israeli home and it's fashion, That's visual. It's a motive. It's all about the look you want to achieve. You actually don't want the same exact items as everyone else. But if you're looking for paper towels or batteries, you're looking for the same exact things as everyone else. And so because we focus on that, I think it's what makes us different than the you know, the same categories that Walmart and Amazon and target need to battle it out over. We're instead focus on these categories which are really much more a personal choice, A personal style. We just mentioned I kind of the elephants in the room, The WalMart's, The Amazon's of the world, and I know that you have an acknowledged in the pass. It is a highly competitive space, The furniture business, he of big box retailers, furniture stores, and some of those e-commerce giants. So walk us through how you compete. How do you stay competitive? How do you stay relevant in the future? Yes, So what we found is that by being a home specialist and just focusing on home, were able to have a pretty significant advantaged in And the reason is kind of a few things. One is, you know, we've built dozens and dozens of private label brands which have hundreds of thousands of items in them. That's the majority of our revenue today. And those basically give lifestyle looks at prices that no one else can compete with This is selection that's not really available elsewhere. Then the second thing we built a delivery and logistics operation that offers

Yahoo Wayfair Cornell Walmart Alexis Christoph Amazon Steve Cornide Cordell Shah CEO Julia Laroche Steven Instagram Botha US
"alexis christoph" Discussed on Yahoo Finance Presents

Yahoo Finance Presents

10:30 min | 2 years ago

"alexis christoph" Discussed on Yahoo Finance Presents

"Pretty cool So within it needs to be efficient, but it's point the external parts got to be inefficient cry. I mean, cross-border by the lowest common denominator for cross-border transactions is enabled through SWIFT. It's an able to this correspondent banking network, and there are a very small number of banks who dominate that, and they they extract billions of dollars of profits from the rest of the banks. They still on the top, You know, when you ask, why is Jamie diamond sane things about me? Jamie diamond will actually city is kinda number one HSBC spry number two which eight JPM is Way up there at the top and they're making a lot of money from other banks. When we go talk to banks ninety nine point nine percent of banks that like We want Ripple to be successful because I'm sick of paying these guys in the other taking a lot of money from me that I didn't have to take from my customer. And why do I want to feed city to be more competitive with me in this local market or at the very least, they've heard that block chain is hard. And they need to be doing something. Blac Chyna. There is some truth to that too. I want to make sure we hit this. You know, you were talking earlier about the Fahd in some misunderstandings medics R P and and I appreciate that were sort of addressing that one question I I want to raise and just see if there's an updated take on You got into it on Twitter with a reporter. We were talking about whether the banks that have been announced as being partners of Ripple are really using Ripple. And there's just kind of an interesting exchange. I, you know, you kind of jumped on their on Twitter that got a lot of attention. Any any thinking nearer look. Look. I'm Abdel choose what words will, whichever it. I think particularly in today's political climate, real facts are really important. And it When I believe people are not or or manipulating at the margin information, I think that is It's it's bad for journalism. Do you think that in general the crypto-currency space has had a lot of problems in the media? I mean, I think I know the answer, but there's just so much misinformation out there. And you know you have a website coin deaths which were partnering with today. You know they are a trade publication, they they cover a lot of this stuff sort of expertly. We cover a lotta crypto But then I noticed in the explosion of December, you know you've now got a lot of websites that some some is telling you cover Bitcoin and it's and it's tough to get everything right? It's looked this is it it adolescent stage of this industry? It's incredibly important to me for the success of Ripple, but for the whole ecosystem for the whole industry to mature. And I think that applies to the media coverage in. It's really frustrating when you go out and you read people who haven't really scratch the surface to understand the facts And look, I think I don't view other blocking company's competitors because a lot of them go after completely different use cases. We like the early days of the Internet. Your who is not competing with Amazon. There are totally different. Think they've the Internet needed grow up again. The forward to twenty years later, But my point is I want all boats to rise. I think it important element of the the maturation of this industry is also the natural of the coverage of all aspects are. Are you concerned bread about I mean, sort of taking a step back on government. It's cracking down on and regulating war crypto in in all sorts of ways. I mean, India, South Korea, Even Japan. Credit card companies. Facebook does all that. Is that all gonna I mean is that at the sign of a maturing business or the sign of a backlash against a maturing business? I get I'll go back to. I do think for me this feels a lot like ninety ninety six ninety seven in the birth of the internet. Because I was a young whipper-snipper doing stuff in Silicon Valley the time. The earliest days of the Internet governments Reich. Whoa, wait a minute. What does this mean? And there was lots of kind of whipped sign back and forth about what regulators are doing. I actually think most of what you see happening is regulars be behaving as they should. There. The they're trying to make sure that we have regulations Around know-your-customer. There's There are reasons for that, And so if exchanges are trying to circumvent KY see requirements, they should they should come in and force that. My only concern I would have in back to the match Racean is the people understand the differences with one of the things I think is an interesting this recent downturn sell off that's happened is for the most part, the whole the whole category has moved at about the same decrease like a whole category went down near thirty percent over a few days. That's interesting, right? Like There are some tokens whose express purpose is to enable anonymous transactions. Instead the regulators are saying, Well, we we're not okay with that. By the way, I think they should say that, but what is the whole market react that way? I don't. That doesn't actually That to me is not a rational market. There are tokens being used in regulated sections. I mean, I'm thinking of ex are P in this case, But either way, I think I'm going to take the long view. I think it's gonna Lot of volatility. I think what we're building it has, you know, solving a real problem, And I think all of the tokens, My advice to anybody would be understand the utility. If there's really utility And there's real value being delivered to a real customer, There will be value in the token. Otherwise, I think you know, be careful when we talk about the market sort of rising fine together and I I do agree. Usually it's either all coins are opera all are down, but I think in the last month or so, he seen at least a little bit of a differentiation some days Some days, fearing his out, the Bitcoin is down and maybe that's encouraging and people are doing more homework. But let's do. Let's do hypothetical. We ask you about X or P at the beginning. He said, You know, I don't I don't define Ripple success based on the price of. R P, let's say that. Okay, so that in short-term or good to be very clear, Ripple owns sixty one point X percent of all ex Arpey as soon as an ASIO I want very successful ex-army ecosystem. The way I measure the success, that ecosystem is around volume velocity. The the success of any asset is going to be dictated by its usage by its demand. My point was simply, I think my point earlier was I don't think about this and I try not to check the price of ex are multiple times a day. Sure, I probably check or wants day, But look, It's going to go up, going to go down. What I care about is if we are delivering for our customers, there's going to be increasing opportunities to use things like X rapid to solve a multi trillion dollar liquidity problem. That's an exciting thing to you out insolvent frankly for the employees of Ripple. I think there's a mission driven. We want to put our debt in the universe And really enable enabling Internet. A value to truly let value move the way information moves today. And that is possible. And it has a lot of effects that I think are hard to predict in the same way. The Internet of information in 1997 could we have predicted I could walk outside and get a car on demand or a you anything onto whatever it is. Do you think that X are P right now is behaving based on Ripple the businesslike hypothetically, It should rise or fall based on as ripples signs, more banking partners. Well, it is a market completely sensitive everyday. Speculation, I think as we talked already, There's a lot of correct information is a lot of misinformation. I just try not to think about the price of acts are be at I certainly don't comment on the press price of ex RP. I will again point out Ripple the company as an owner of sixty one percent of the tokens today is the most interested party in the successive excerpt ecosystem, and we will do things to invest in the success of the except the ecosystem, because that's in our best interest. Wanted to get a question from the audience from a Twitter from Alexander daily. Bread Did you see Ripple in working with financial institutions in the same line of work as chain? I guess they mean the company chain or any other company building private Blockchain's for banking and financial institutions? We'll look, I've I have a lot of respect for Adam. Heidt always up your earlier by impression is that chain has shifted their focus to a product. They called sequence, which is I think more of a kind of a I don't think about them it as a competitor in what we are doing. I know they they did a a pilot with the NASDAQ They did a some stuff with Visa. My impression is that they are you're working on kind of a new segment of that customers that So you're in the cross-border payments space, a ripple is far ahead of what anybody else is doing. And you know, I I I feel good about the contraction momentum in the pipeline of customers. We uh, we we have going. So Are you a block chink? Company Are you a crypt to company both? Neither. What are the first is what our aim its company? Yeah. Okay. So your. Your I'll go back Either. I'm computer make fun at Makiko back tonight ninety seven I feel old. I you will used to talk about this comes their Internet. Companies is Yahun Internet company, no young as a media company. Why? I think the people around to fester debated that. But the the point is, I think of Ripple as a payments company that uses blocked chain in digital assets to solve a problem for payments. That one of the challenges I think there's a lot of companies and platforms out there that I think heavy peanut butter problem. They're trying to be all things to all people. If you have a hundred different use cases, you're pursuing, You have zero. Because you cannot understand one hundred different customers and one hundred different needs of the buyer, and the need to focus and understand, and we're going to solve for this vertical, and we're gonna use block chink technologies to do that. So I I. I'm a payments company that uses block chain and uses digital assets to solve the payments in liquidity problem. Let's let him have the last word, whereas And I knew a lot of people wanted to hear what you had to say. They Brad. So thank you very much for coming here. Brag Girling has See you of Ripple. Please join me in thanking him. Thanks for listening to the Yahoo Finance presents podcast. I'm Alexis Christoph risk, Be sure to rate review and share this podcast and remember to subscribers. You never miss an episode. Mm.

Ripple Twitter Jamie diamond Facebook Fahd HSBC reporter Yahoo KY R P Amazon Alexis Christoph Brad Yahun Internet Heidt Blockchain Makiko Adam
"alexis christoph" Discussed on Yahoo Finance Presents

Yahoo Finance Presents

08:38 min | 2 years ago

"alexis christoph" Discussed on Yahoo Finance Presents

"This wants a to just blow it out of the park. How do you think Hollywood may tap into, uh, the black market, if you will going forward? So in Honestly, just ruining back since two thousand sixteen when the spill was announced, Let's Twitter has been hype about this ever. Say it's in literally the hype never die down. So we knew that this was gonna be a blockbuster. We knew that this was gonna break wreckers. So the fact that if finally is here, You know a lot of black people are happy within a lot of others are. Live really surprising this like, No, this is what we've been asked me more. This is what we've been demanding. We've been demanding to be her. We've been demanding to be represented in included in a lot of these big projects. So there we too can feel special. And I really hope the Hollywood finally pays attention because we seen with, you know, a lot of these television shows in a lot of other projects coming up or um, that we've seen in modern history. A lot of them have been or rather the past two years love them have been more inclusive in showing more diverse voices, but they're still this hesitation to like, jumped in, do something like a, you know, just because like is black or just because is Latino or just because this, whatever. But there is racist appetite, It sounds like. Iran, not only not only from the black community, but you know, from from every wants to see themselves represented in in to see others representing we're tired of seeing the same tired. Storylines portrayed about, you know, some white guy saving the day. We want to see ourselves and think Hollywood's getting the message Keren. I think they are, you know, um, Black Panther was first created as a marble comic-book character by Stanley of course. Great. Stanley back in the 1960s during the whole Civil Rights Movement, looking back, Do you think Stanley was ahead of his time? I think he was on par for the course, especially given everything that was going on at that time. Black Panther was created in 1966 literally a few months before the Black Panther Party in, um, you know, a in the midst of all of these revolutionary movements. And I think is important to know that you now art imitates life in these things. In these themes that we've been exploring and talking about amongst ourselves for the longest, They are not new. The only thing this new in frankly overdue is the fact that the world starting to take no. Now, we've also got the Black Panther album, which is doing phenomenally well with Kendrick Lamar Souza a whole bunch of others weekend. You name it. Talk to me about how the narrative of that album coincides with the narrative of the film. Oh my God. So I cannot listen to that out without legs. Having chills Thoma's by because it's just so powerful in this. This is another just another iterating of us being represented in evoking they're saying says a pride that we see in the film. You know, like I even think about the all the stars video with Kendrick Lamar Insulza is so beautiful is vibrate so many colors. That's just another way that we see the glorious. The glorious size of you know African cultures represented in. I think the day the video, the album, the film They really go hand-in-hand. I'm so glad that Ryan Kugler the director um, recruited Kendrick um, in TD his label to do this album because they really speaks not only lyrically in Sonic leave. To a live, the themes that we're talking about in the movie, but also just like each Sanski field cannot listen to. And right. 'Cause I I love Kugler because here we are talking about how this is a movement Ennahdha movie but he's a, you know, at the end of the day I want people to have fun. I want them to be entertained. And I'm sure at the end of the day Lamar saying, I just want people think this is cool music and they want to listen to it because we're all the same in that respect that we're all universal in that respect. What about the men in this movie not to be overlooked by the women? Michael Jordan plays the villain. I know you had a chance to talk to him, right? Yeah, I did in I spoke with him before I saw the film just, you know, see what he did to prepare like what my state that was in leg, You know, uh, since and things like that. And he said he he wants to a dark place. Similar to heat leisure. Where he did for for dark night is a he he didn't want to share. He wants to keep that personal. But he kept a Journal throughout his entire time onset And he said it was just beautiful going on, set in being able to see cast members that looked like him telling this story, Not only just like his cast members, But people behind the camera to, you know, that goes back to what are saying about representation in front and behind the camera. Um, but yeah, but as far as as far as the story goals, Michael Jordan really knocks ballpark, nothing. He's going to go down in villain history. There's he The riders did a really good job in getting us to sympathize with a Ryan Kugler who plays our excuse me with Michael be Jordan who plays air, kill monger in Black Panther up in hit his relationship with such aliens. I chat with bows yes. Play which I buy Chadwick Boesman. Who was the Black Panther. Um, his relationship with their relationship is is very. Similar to the relationship, or it speaks to themes that the relationship between African Americans and people who were born on the continent of Africa, the black people were born on that continent feel in there's this disconnected, a lot of black people, half because we don't necessarily have that those routes to tap into that cultural pride that you know hazardous Hollywood rich history, Right? Exactly. In this all day, Michael be Jordan's character once in this film. So it's amazing They they did a really good job of riding him know. It'll be interesting to see how, uh, awards season The next two word season looks at this film because we know Restorick Lee, they don't look kindly upon this genre. Do you think that that might change your the performance is such that that might change? I really believe the Black Panther is a game-changer in that may just be me running on the Black Panther high. Second last night in, you know, that adrenaline in in excitement is still there, but I really believe that this film is Oscar-worthy in if this film can bring home. Um, marvels first Oscar for a cinematic film then uh, I think that it, it really I think it really It really is a movement Right. Oh my God, So alike. Hands-down hands down. And even if it does a, you know is still does a great job of reflecting a lot of the things that we should be talking about is is is not too um, socially heavy on purpose is just naturally, is that in the what has he serious themes? The spine So far? No watch at the end of the day, again, is the universal language. So turn Finley If you all could see her right now, You look beautiful. You've got some African culture are that you are wearing right now. They ground yet as in on your head. Yes. I have a nice little, um, head rat by the head of the Rap live African-inspired necklace. I'm not even sure I got this wrong look at it. Fin the mail, and also your nails are pretty fear, soul th-annual and their long. And I think they fit right into the Black Panther that Lohan low claw turned Finley of HuffPost thanks so much thing. Joining us. All right, thanks to all of you for listening to the Yahoo Finance presents podcast. I'm Alexis Christoph Ras Be sure to rate review and share this podcast and remember to subscribe, see and never miss an episode. Moon.

Black Panther Kendrick um Michael Jordan Hollywood Ryan Kugler Black Panther Party Kendrick Lamar Souza Twitter Kendrick Lamar Insulza Stanley Iran Lamar Yahoo Alexis Christoph Ras Thoma Africa Finley Civil Rights Movement Keren
"alexis christoph" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

01:43 min | 2 years ago

"alexis christoph" Discussed on KOMO

"Of a point of being a good human beings they are in organizations of that and that makes me proud to know that talk about a boost for these kids all of whom come from some very difficult circumstances now there's always talking at our life that we have to overcome so this song is talking about overcoming adversity and is being able to discontinue trying uh you know she followed down and get back jan in the it'll make you stronger brian calvert komo news a french nun whose cure has been deemed a miracle says she is not a star charleslouis desmond reports a french bishop declared on sunday that benedict modahl's recovery from decades of spinal problems after she visited the catholic shrine in lourdes with a miracle that there was no medical explanation for it now who is a non says she's no one special just a little sister glad to be able to walk freely again she's told reporters how she gave out move theme on her leg brace of visiting the shrine saying i am here to bear witness but i'm not here to make you believe me that cases the seventieth event formally recognize as an act of divine intervention at the pilgrimage site in southern france i'm charles as my komo news time ten twenty or komal propel insurance money update now we'll take a look at his numbers on wall street in just a moment first the jobless rate a good snapshot into the employment sector but it doesn't tell you the whole story abc's doria all bigger tells us why ever wonder why it's so many people are being hired the jobless rate doesn't really seem to budge alexis christoph.

benedict modahl france charles abc doria alexis christoph brian calvert charleslouis desmond
"alexis christoph" Discussed on Yahoo Finance Presents

Yahoo Finance Presents

07:05 min | 2 years ago

"alexis christoph" Discussed on Yahoo Finance Presents

"Welcome to the Yahoo Finance presents podcast. I've Alexis Christoph for us. Thanks for listening and remember to subscribe on Apple podcast or wherever you get your podcasts. So you don't miss an episode. It seems Wall Street doesn't have much of an appetite for movie theater stocks as of late in 2017 for example, shares of I'm Max fell twenty six percent AMC Entertainment stock was off fifty three percent and just recently shares of the luxury theater chain. I pick entertainment dropped eighteen percent on their first day of trading on the Nasdaq February first the company's initial public offering was for a little over eight hundred eighteen thousand shares priced at eighteen fifty a peace which raised about fifteen million dollars. Most of those proceeds will go to expand the luxury theater brands. Business. I sat down with I pick entertainment CEO and founder Hadid has Shemi just prior to his company going public. Here's our conversation. Hammeed. Welcome. Thanks for having me. So your company read. Cently IPO on the NASDAQ and you took advantage of something that was created under the the jobs act. Our recently called rag A or regulation a, This is how you went public. It's called a mini IPO, um, explained to us why that was the right path to go public for your company. Sure. Uh, first of all, there's really nothing Mesnier voted because you go through this same exercises you do in terms of legal accounting Registration with SEC. So I think people called me because the dollar that you raising or less than would people typically people are accustomed to, but from a processing Now we're listed on Nasdaq is identical to in Tunis one filing basically. Now why we chose this route is really simple. When you look at the opportunity that various companies are size have in terms of raising capital pretty much it ends up being private equity because today in within the financial community, If you're taking your company public, the bankers want to raise hundred two hundred and twenty-five lean on a first round because if he's are, You're the is justifies. The work. That they're doing, uh, for a company and they want to sell twenty two twenty five percent of the company. So basically, a company is valued by five hundred million dollars. Well, that is is very hard for small company start-ups to get to that level in a short period of time. So the option for them is really today's private equity. Now, go back ten to fifteen years ago, companies like Cheesecake Factory. They have four stored when they went public companies like BJs restaurant had 10 location when they went public. There was a time that you raise capital to growth company today. Most IPO's because the companies have been finance along the way with private equity. They look at IP has an exit for the private equity. It's an exit strategy for shareholders rather than an opportunity to really help raise money and build out The company. Now, this IPO values, your company at roughly two hundred twenty million dollar isn't about three two enterprise value by three hundred twenty five million. And what do you plan to deal with the money raised from the IPO, uh, purely growth capital. We're not taking any money off the table. All the Dodgers thing in there. We have currently sixteen locations, We have four under construction. We have pipeline of another sixteen sides of They're going to open Right after that in our goal is to build 4240 four to five locations a year initially. And you know this capital along with the line of credit that we have available to us, will he. He no laws to build the that are in development is the goal to be in nearly every major city in the country at some point long-term goal. The long-term goal is we believe that there's capacity to build two hundred these location in this country. So again, we got a long way to go is a lot to do, and that's our path. I mean, we think this is something we can bring to every neighbourhood in this country. Frankly, Why is now the right time to go public? Because if you look at the movie theater space, you've got a M C and regal and others near share prices are hurting. They they are having a hard time getting people off the sofa and into the movie theater. And we've also got things like movie pass. They've seen tremendous growth. They hit a one and a half million subscribers. Recently, they seem to be having some success with their business model. But why was now the right time for your company to go public in this environment day? A is great question. I mean, when you talk about stock of other theater, companies, um, is true, Dave, You know, they've they've been struggling a little bit. They knew that have been they've had their ups and down there completely dependent on movies. You know, when you look at what we do box of is a small portion of our revenue. We do so many other forms of entertainment from gaming. No, he did 500 gaming events in our theaters last year, you know, live performances are a major part of our business today will do north of three hundred performances this year. Now we have from mental ism to magic to, uh, book-signing red-carpet events. I mean, these, this, these locations or really becoming your neighborhood performance, The a mini performance art destination. And now would we also have were again not comparing to other people We have, and it really a robust and a great dining experience that go comes along with it? Yeah. These location, Dow have restaurants, They have bars, You know, they're really lean. When you look at the amount of time that our guest spending in theaters about four and a half hours, You know what we've done. Really, this is such a simple idea. All we've done. We've taken the two most common forms of entertainment and brought it under one roof And what we've done as a result of an you know, traditionally you get in a car, you drive to arrest Ron. Sometimes you miss your movie because of who took longer Right in and you get in your in a car after you had your meal, You drive to a movie theater. This is half an hour's timing between the you always used to spent. So by us, giving that Hafner back to your time is a commodity. None of has none of us have enough of it. It just makes this single destination be really becomes you Country Club where a nightime activities Lot of the people that go to our theaters on a Friday Saturday night, you find eighty percent of the guests during the restaurant. They're not even going to see a movie. This is the place where they go for happy are these theater Ford for dinner very frequently de Just go to a restaurant in leaf and vice versa. Now, to be clear, You can't eat your meal and drink your beverage sometimes and alcoholic beverage while you're watching the film. Oh, absolutely. We have basically in our in our locations, We have a restaurant Stenaline restaurant there three different con. Ups Tanzi restaurant, which is an Italian, artisanal City purge which is a formed is a basically farm-to-table l All American food in Tucker. Tucker is really a it's a fun place Gastropod which is focus of his more on the bar site of it. So yes, you you go there, you can eat at those restaurants And then we have a different menu completely different. Many deserving in Detroit. Everything in the auditorium is basically be able to pick up a couple of you're having a fun. It is often your food, but it's really high quality food. And what we've done is we really in the really the mastermind behind our A behind a Connery's Cher yard Sherry has been with us now about five years. He started initial has consulting for a year and then she came aboard full-time. James Beard winner 3-time Jane beard winner worked for Wolfgang Puck for twenty years open thirty some restaurants around the world. So she is sending credible challenge is an incredible leader. She knows how to bring our team together. She knows how to build a team that can really deliver a quality food that you would expect

AMC Entertainment Yahoo Alexis Christoph Cheesecake Factory Max Dodgers Detroit Tunis Hadid CEO SEC James Beard Tucker Mesnier BJs Country Club founder Dave
"alexis christoph" Discussed on Yahoo Finance Presents

Yahoo Finance Presents

02:52 min | 2 years ago

"alexis christoph" Discussed on Yahoo Finance Presents

"Welcome to the yahoo finance presents podcast i'm alexis christoph arrests thanks for listening and remember to subscribe on apple podcast or ever you get your podcasts so you don't miss an episode silicon valley is busy crafting a future filled with drones flying cars and everything in between but none of it will matter if consumers don't get on board us secretary of transportation elaine chao says consumer acceptance is quote the greatest straight to growth when it comes to technology while at the world economic forum in davos switzerland chow told yahoo finance editor in chief andy sir were an anchor john rogers that she's learning more about how government can encourage technologies while mitigating security and safety concerns so it's a really momentous time to be a transportation secretary i have to say because there is so much change going along with drones the hyper loop driverless cars how do you keep up to speed with all the things going on a part of the makers responsibility is to prepare for the future and so while there may be differences as to when automated vehicles will come into everyday life the reality is it's going to happen so we at the department want to make sure that we are addressing legitimate concerns about safety security and privacy while not hampering the growth and innovation in this sector because as americans the innovation and creativity that is occurring in this sector as part of our competitive advantage so i've been here all week and not all week a day actually in davos talking with various groups about you know what is happening in this field of automated vehicles speed drones or cars or trans or trucks or hyper loop or so many other flying cars were even talked about well let's exciting so what is the future and what is the proper role of government before we get to flying cars i think we'll have the autonomous vehicles on the ground and people are very interested in when that's going to happen you have been not only at davos this january you have been at ces and you were also at the detroit auto show so there's sort of two different industries working on the driverless car you've got tech and then we've got the automakers having been to both of these events junus sense which industry is getting the lead you don't think they're in our digital it's not as heroes a game you should not be zero sum game safety is not israel some dane security is not as eurozone game nor is privacy i think.

elaine chao chow john rogers secretary davos yahoo alexis christoph switzerland editor in chief andy sir detroit israel
"alexis christoph" Discussed on Yahoo Finance Presents

Yahoo Finance Presents

02:08 min | 2 years ago

"alexis christoph" Discussed on Yahoo Finance Presents

"Welcome to the yahoo finance presents podcast i'm alexis christoph or his thanks for listening and remember to subscribe on apple podcast to wherever you get your podcasts you don't miss in episode bank of america ceo brian moynihan says ceos here in the us and overseas appear to be excited about the new tax overhaul in the us he told yahoo finance editor in chief andy sir were that he was surprised by the enthusiasm from foreign ceos he also talks about the challenges of cybersecurity bitcoin block chain and where he sees bank of america fitting into the cryptocurrency craze i'm here with brian moynihan chief executive officer of bank of america brian great to see it's great to be here thank you for having me so we're here in davos it's a beautiful out here yet is trump there's a helicopter may be coming in with some of the trump delegation which is coming here to sell american policy talk about the new tax law and the opportunities in the united states what are you hearing from ceos that you're talking to hear about what the trump administration is doing so it's interesting there's a on the tax change united states you've heard from a lot of american companies still that sort of the positioning from international companies who already thought the us being very attractive because a talent because the rule of law and the understand the if you have an ngo engine really prussian requirement the raw materials and energy right there and while priced there are saying hey this taxing now at another major benefit that i'm coming with more production from foreign companies had a plant amid expanding nine states because he already had two final demand and now they can actually have a lower tax rates they're not feel have to do it outside in and try to bring it in through the miracle of terrorists and stuff so i think there's a an added level those years it frank i hadn't really thought through versus the american companies which is understandable we need we need a competitive tax rate we needed a territorial system because it our tax code didn't work for corporations outweigh in this accomplish that i was surprised by the international ceos being so enthusiastic about the tax.

alexis christoph brian moynihan chief executive officer davos united states yahoo apple america ceo editor in chief andy sir bank of america
"alexis christoph" Discussed on Yahoo Finance Presents

Yahoo Finance Presents

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"alexis christoph" Discussed on Yahoo Finance Presents

"Welcome to the yahoo finance podcast thanks for listening i'm alexis christoph first here with rick newman and jared look read to discuss bitcoin and it's really hard to think of something so complicated that has become so popular as fast as bitcoin with the price of the cryptocurrency soaring and of course mainstream interest surging yahoo finance scott the clever idea of asking readers to send us their top burning questions regarding bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies and here to break down for us our reagan jarrett's a recall start with you this was sort of your brain child tell us why you came up with a survey we know there's tons of interest in bitcoin were practically talking about it every day on yahoo finance were watching the price very closely and of course a by the time i say how much the prices up it will be obsolete until ten minutes from now but it's absolving like eighteen percent of 18 100 percent so far this year and obviously what people just one and a how can i buy some i wanna make 100 percent return in two weeks how do i do that so so we thought we we would ask people what they know about bitcoin and what they want to know about bitcoin so he ran a survey uh we got more than six p six thousand people uh to respond to this uh the first thing we asked is uh have you ever bought bitcoin uh about twenty four percent of respect respondents suggests they have purchased bitcoin type sure that's higher end of the population over a while this is a guy who finance audience said these are these are people who think about investing in wanna know about it uh no we asked um do currently own any bitcoin uh and we got several thousand people who said yeah uh i do i do own some bitcoin and if we have a bunch of people who said i don't but obviously i'm thinking about it and i uh and i want to know more so that's where we gave them the opportunity to ask a question i'll leave the question with us openended is with uh typed it that the comment box we got more than 3500 questions i went through the whole list uh lucky year there are so many there were some recurring themes uh what is going on with my life was at the most probably.

alexis christoph rick newman bitcoin reagan jarrett yahoo jared twenty four percent eighteen percent 18 100 percent 100 percent ten minutes two weeks
"alexis christoph" Discussed on Yahoo Finance Presents

Yahoo Finance Presents

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"alexis christoph" Discussed on Yahoo Finance Presents

"Welcome to the yahoo finance podcast thanks for listening don't forget to subscribe on i tunes or wherever you get your podcasts so you don't miss in episode i'm alexis christoph risk here with yahoo finances rick newman and ethan wolfman to talk about health care and what comes next now that congress has failed to repeal the affordable care act and gentleman we're gonna be talking about two big things today one is ways we can fix obama care and then that the broader discussion will be we'd have what's the path forward for for health care in this country and rick i know you're gonna make an argument for universal health coverage time time restarted having figuring out how to get universal health coverage i wanna begin though with with some of the fixes if we're not going to repeal and replace ethan what are some of the things congress could concentrate on ways to actually fix the aca three major things that that are kind of causing problems here and it's up to the trump administration to fix them the ball is entirely in their court the first big one is something that's really troubled insurance companies they are not sure whether the subsidies under the affordable care act that they've been receiving will continue to be received and that's that's been the major factor cited in every exit from the marketplace for insurers and something that's really contributed to rising premium costs every single time this has happened this is what they cite and so that that that's a big one and the the next one is a really delicate when politically which is the enforce the enforcement of the mandate.

congress insurance companies yahoo alexis christoph rick newman ethan wolfman obama
"alexis christoph" Discussed on Yahoo Finance Presents

Yahoo Finance Presents

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"alexis christoph" Discussed on Yahoo Finance Presents

"That we use to measure of prior of sorry um future numbers against so relative to that weak firstquarter gdp because of the way we've set this up again read our method methodology were totally transparent about this uh that second quarter gdp number is expected to be around three maybe three and a half percent so we're good but but you have to avi obviously average this out because part of what was going on in the first quarter is some activity pushed forward into the second quarter so if we could at three point five percent gdp reading for the second quarter as some economists claim or are actually forecasting i think it's a good likelihood trump is going to tweet see i got the economy up to three and a half percent growth mission accomplished over the course mission is not accomplish because you know we're not going to have three and a half percent gdp growth for the entire year well look we thank you for all the work that you're doing with moonies and right now again trump's report card grade a b plus rating to be doing this periodically about once a month you will we we're going to get a we get new data more than one some several times per month with the new data in a soon as we get it and i think we're going to just write about it when something changes are we think there's something new people want to know about but we want people to go and have a look and see we're going to keep putting more data on their so people can see exactly how trump compare so the prior presidents and we want people to get engaged in tell us what they think that's a great idea rick newman thanks so much for talking about it thanks all you listeners out there for a being with us here for our yahoo podcast and don't forget to subscribe i'm alexis christoph risk free that's right that's the best part arrived for free messina.

avi trump rick newman yahoo alexis christoph five percent