17 Burst results for "alcoholic hepatitis"

"alcoholic hepatitis" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

08:54 min | Last week

"alcoholic hepatitis" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Of how things really quite recently used to be quite different. You know again if you look at pictures of streets before 1910 you do not see parked cars on them After 1910. Suddenly you see parked cars along the sides of streets Because people have decided that cars were cheap enough for the model T. You could you could drive to work. Then you need to have door locks on the car Ignition key, Which was a new thing, because previously you kept the car in your stable with your horse. The led light cars become more popular people commuting that you start to park them. And then, of course, people start demanding the right to park on the street. And then they're taking up a huge chunk of the road area with just parked cars all over the place. So you can see that change in the photographs and you can you can see the point at which the roads start to be to be paid. You can see the extent of the every time I look at historical photo now from the From the 19th Century. I'm looking at the horse manure. How bad was the horse video and sometimes it's really bad. I've really enjoyed sort of picking through all of the evidence, whether it's written evidence or photographic or Or failed to try and sort of figure out how things used to be different and how things could be different. What the analogies I like to use is that, um, fish don't know what water is right there surrounded by water, and they just assume that's normal. They don't know any other reality, and we're kind of the same now with cars. We live in a world that has been completely shaped and dominated by cars. If we live in the western world, and we kind of can't see past that, and so what I'm trying to do is point out the water to the fish and say things didn't always you know, there weren't always this way. They don't have to be like this way. And, you know, maybe we should think about doing things slightly different way. There's less dependent on the car. Well, there's so much in this book much more than we've talked about. And I want to thank you, Tom. Tom, You're always welcome on tech nation. We Hope to see you again soon. Thank you very much. It's always good to be here. My guest today is Tom Stand Ege. His book is a brief history of motion from the wheel to the car to what comes next. It's published by Bloomsbury. I'm more again. You're listening to Tech nation. Yeah. In a recent program. We interviewed Craig Parker, the CEO of Sarasin about the winter pathway, which is present throughout the body and can be utilized to trigger cell regeneration. You likely heard that the first condition service in will study in human clinical trials is alcohol, associated Hepatitis or For short, A H On Today's program, we explore another approach to cell regeneration. This time being developed by the company direct by coincidence, their first target is also a H, currently in Phase two clinical trials. Their treatment, like all of these emergent regenerative medicines also has the potential to treat other medical conditions. While the first clinical trial candidates for both are identical. These two approaches, and these two biotech companies are really quite different. Dr Jim Brown is the president and CEO of Direct. Well, Jim. Welcome to Tech Nation. Thank you so much more. It's so wonderful to be able to be here. Now. There have been a plethora of stories in the media about pandemic drinking. How serious is it? It's a big problem, and unfortunately during the pandemic, we've seen an increase in United States of alcohol consumption. Uh, that's about 30%. And this has been associated with as well. Hospitalizations due to alcohol of increased by about 50%. And the most common reason for this is a disease called Alcohol Associated Hepatitis Mostly When I think of hepatitis, I think of hepatitis C or hepatitis B, you've got a virus. You can This is entirely caused by drinking alcohol. It is it's an inflammatory process actually is much more than a very involved process, but it in acute assault on your liver that's brought on Most typically by binge drinking, and, uh, the patients present with with fever. They have yellowing of the whites of their eyes known as jaundice. They're tired. They'll often have nausea and vomiting, and they always have a history of recent heavy alcohol consumption or binge drinking. Is there a particular age group that's that's targeted here. You know, it's It's interesting there about 130,000 hospitalizations per year for alcohol Associated Hepatitis which we abbreviated H in the United States. And about half those people are between the ages of 40 to 60. Many of them will have cirrhosis. But it's really interesting and this population is on the rise. There are more than 20% are younger people there people in their twenties and thirties. They don't have cirrhosis. But there is just more of a culture out there in the millennial generation of going out, drinking on Wednesdays and Thursday nights, and it can add up to some people and some circumstances. Is there a standard of care for this? Is there a way to deal with this was there in the hospital? Unfortunately, there really isn't And in it's a deadly disease. The mortality of patients with a H. Is 26%. At one month and it's about 30% at three months, and there is no approved therapy. Today they will use abstinence. Of course, standard of care will be supportive care Sometimes they'll use steroids, but they've been shown not to improve survival, and in fact, unfortunately, the treatment for a H has not improved. Since the 19 seventies, and in the last 50 years, there's been no change in the survival of these patients. Now from Durex perspective, what actually goes wrong in the body? You know, we've all heard about DNA. You know, it's the molecule in the nucleus of all the cells in your body. It's effectively the blueprint of your body. You inherit the DNA from your mother and your father. You have the same blueprint in every cell in your body. But think about all the different cell types tissues that you have. You know, you've got hair skin muscle bone. And that's because the epic genome Allows for this DNA blueprint to be read. But if you look in the nucleus of a cell only about 5% of what's in there is the DNA. The other 95% is the genome, which is effectively the brains of the operation that allows those genes to be expressed. Back When I was in school, we were taught that the structures inside the nuclear cells were called his stones and they were there for structural basis. And now we know they're actually way more than that. They are driving the reading of the blueprint as it were they not just holding up the roof. No, not at all. Not at all, and, in fact, with a disease like a and with many other diseases. You get this regulation of the separate genome, and so you have certain genes turned on and turned off, and then you can move the cell towards. Unfortunately, disease. States can move themselves towards death. And, uh and, uh, you know, the outcomes that you get with the disease like Aah! So when you say this regulation, you mean Normally the 95% the genome there is operating on the 5% DNA. Everything's working out great, but when there's a problem It starts going awry. It's either not working or it's doing things it shouldn't do. And that's called this regulation. That's absolutely right. And we until now have known very little about it. We do use um, medicine that changes the genome in the field of oncology to kill cancer cells. What you do there is you go in and you disrupt the genome and the cells will die. But with what we're doing it directly have an opportunity to actually Repair the F you genome to bring it back more towards normal, and that has allowed for a greater understanding of of this component of biology and medicine. It's fascinating. I'm assuming with alcoholic hepatitis that your liver isn't working anymore. So we're talking about this. This regulation. Inside liver cells. So, uh, when this goes arrive, we're talking about liver cells that aren't functioning anymore. And then I guess your liver isn't functioning anymore. That's absolutely true. And it starts with the liver and then unfortunately goes to other organs. But just, you know, the focus on the liver cells themselves..

Craig Parker Tom Jim Tom Stand Ege Bloomsbury 26% 95% Jim Brown United States Tech Nation today thirties 60 three months Sarasin 5% DNA twenties about 50% about 30% both
"alcoholic hepatitis" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:29 min | 2 weeks ago

"alcoholic hepatitis" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Ever hear of the W N T pathway. The wind pathway is throughout the body and utilizing it may support treatment in a number of conditions. Including M s osteoporosis, irritable bowel disease and even severe alcoholic hepatitis. Craig Parker is the CEO of Serous Unknown in South San Francisco. Well, Craig, Welcome to technician. Thanks for having me speaking with you Earlier. I learned some things about the liver and my jeans, said the liver. But I didn't know before, So let's start there. I think we all know that the liver filters toxins, But what else does deliver dear? Well, it also has what's called a synthetic function or a function of making things And some of the things that makes it are really critical for body functions are clotting proteins. And so many of the proteins that when you get cut, cause your blood to clot are manufactured in the liver. As you mentioned. The liver also has a critical function filtering out certain things that filters out certain toxins. Many of the drugs that we all take our metabolized or broken down by the liver. And the liver is also able to regenerate itself. So many people may know that it's one of the few organs there upon injury can regenerate itself. In fact, when we give certain types of liver transplants The person giving the liver's load with their liver. Their liver can grow back and the person receiving that lobe that lobe can grow. And what we know from. Actually, some of the founders of Sarazen is that there's a biological process that's driving that regeneration, and that's referred to as the wind or Wnt pathway. How does that work? What happens? Well, we know in certain situations like drinking too much alcohol or if someone has hepatitis C, the damages their liver. That some of these wind proteins are produced, and they act on cells in the liver. These specific cells are called the parasites, but their liver cells are those cells that Provide that critical function of making proteins and metabolizing drugs and filtering out toxins and these wind proteins act on those cells and those cells can divide and make more liver cells. And ultimately, if you have more liver cells, you have better liver function. So has certain patients who have very damaged livers. They're not able to keep up with breaking down toxins metabolizing drugs, making those clotting proteins. But if you can give them enough normal liver cells, they can have normal liver function. And we know that the winds pathway or this went biological process. Is responsible for that regeneration in the liver and in many other organs. Well, let's get specific to our behaviors. Let's say we drink vodka or or any other hard alcohol, but we'll stick to vodka. What happens in the liver? When you drink vodka? Alcohol actually kills those liver cells kills them. It's not like well over time, eventually. No You drink vodka. It kills liver self, if you drink a lot, So you know if you couldn't tell you exactly how many drinks but I'm quite sure that if you had half a bottle of vodka, you would kill liver cells. And you'd be engaging this normal physiologic process of regeneration or repair. Now The problem is, if you do that every night Your body is not going to keep up with that damage and in many other liver diseases like hepatitis C, where you have a virus that's continuously damaging those liver cells. Unless you get rid of the virus unless you stop drinking the alcohol. Your body is not going to be able to keep up for a long time with that with that liver damage so you can out drink your liver. You can absolutely out. Drink your liver. Um, and the types of patients that we hope to treat and had provided clinical benefit, too. Are patients who are chronic alcoholics. Who typically have a binge episode and they end up in the hospital because, as you said, they just out, drank their liver's ability to keep up and it's it's likely because they had chronic alcoholism that they were teetering on that point. Already. And that one binge episode. Sometimes it's an infection or some other medical complication pushes them beyond that point where the liver can keep up. Now, how does the liver No in a normal circumstance, and you know 111 vodka, you know, occasionally or any other thing that could happen that might damage deliver. How does the liver no to restore damaged cells or create replacement self? Yeah. I talked about this wind pathway and this being a normal function of the body. It's much more complex than that, though, and we don't understand all of the signals that are involved in the liver, regenerating one of the interesting aspects Delivery generating that we don't completely understand is why it doesn't continue to just grow out of control. Right? So if you have this sort of accelerator On regeneration and forming new liver cells. Um and you're activating it with damage. Why doesn't it just keep going? So we've got really big livers. What? Ships of really big livers. And many organs have this limiting capacity. It's referred to as the rheostat function, rheostat meaning like a thermostat in your house, right? There is a set point. And we don't know what all the signals are that contributes that set point. We know some of them and the biology is quite complex. But we know there is this Sort of limitation function. And so when you have damage you're activating the wind pathway and others. You're getting this regeneration proliferation of cells formation of the normal structure of the Oregon so we know In the case of our candidate molecules, For example, When you stimulate this regeneration, the liver looks totally normal. You don't get a bunch of growth in one area or too many at one type of cell. It all looks very normal. And that's probably a very complex process that regulates all of that. But there is this limitation factor this self regulating or self governing aspect to it. So it won't go very far. But how does it notice? Start? How does it know to do that say, Oh, we gotta We have some liver cells. We need to repair liver cells We need to replace. So the damage activates. This went gene, and it can be active even in an undamaged situation. So in our intestines, for example. Many people know that. You know if you have some gastrointestinal distress, you know you eat some food That didn't agree with you. Um One thing that happens is the cells lining your intestines secrete a bunch of fluid. That's why you can have diarrhea is all that fluid coming out.

Craig Craig Parker South San Francisco Serous Unknown Oregon half a bottle of vodka hepatitis C one one type Sarazen one area One M s few organs 111 cell
"alcoholic hepatitis" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:15 min | 2 weeks ago

"alcoholic hepatitis" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Of Sarasin about their work, starting with severe alcoholic hepatitis and potentially other conditions such as M s osteoporosis and IBD. Stay with us. Mhm. You were listening to technician. I've been speaking with Jeff Jonas, chief Innovation officer and director of Sage Therapeutics. I have never met a patient. Who doesn't want to know if they're getting better quickly. Right? And but you think about the treatment model, which is and again I worked on a lot of SSR eyes and they're fine medicines, but they have a particular onset of action. And that's from weeks to months and imagine if you know in a few days versus a few months. I mean, It seems to be a no brainer. No time unintended so Our studies have shown this rapid onset of effect, and that's been very reassuring because we showed it with our first drug, which is intravenous. But then we showed it with a completely different molecule. Which is oral and you know the soul of science is replication. Is saying the same thing again and again And sometimes, people say What's your Ah ha moment and I have my answer. As always. You don't want to know how moment I want a moment where I'm saying, Yeah. I'm seeing the same thing again on That's that's the me you want to replicate your findings, and so far, we've been very fortunate being able to do that. But again, you know, going back up to the larger question, which is Can we alter the treatment paradigm? Psychiatry. That's a big challenge, right? Because what we do today is you take a medicine. You wait two weeks or a wait two months and then you're in. You're on the medicine for two years or too much You have months, two years. I was reading something. Yeah, from another company, and I won't say what it was, but it was something that really stuck in my brain and they were saying Patients. You must be on a drug for chronically because patients are and this is their word, Terrified. Other relapse. And I thought, if you want to reduce stigma, the first thing you need to acknowledge is that if you work with patients with mental up, they're not terrified, terrified as an asteroid coming into New York City while you're standing in Times Square, that's terror. Patients take control their lives. They are empowered and they manage theirs. They manage their illness and if they have an option to manage their illness in a complete new way. It's incumbent on us to offer it to them. And I think that's really you know, we've been about at stage, which is thinking about this completely differently and really challenging the status quo and If you just think about that model, it's deeply embedded in all of our belief, right? If you're depressed, you're a depressed patient that becomes who you are. My argument is no. You're a normal person with depression. You can treat it and you go back to being a person and and that is to me is a major paradigm ship. That is the next step that really completely getting rid of the notion of a stigma of mental health. You're just someone with an illness. You get it treated and you go back to doing what you need to do. Now you've treated 4000 patients and I'm sure are treating many more. Uh And people are now getting used to this phase one phase two phase three approval. Where are you in that cycle? So we've completed our phase three program with the Arenella in terms of acute major depressive disorder, and we now have to go to the FDA for what's called a pre end a meeting where they will then discuss what they will or won't want to see in a new drug application. We had some other studies that are underway that that should come out later this year that we are Don't believe will be necessary, profiled ones in a in an indication comparing our drug directly to S S R. I's in the hopes of being able to demonstrate rapid response against the standard of care. Now we think that's a very important benefit. We have such data but not collected in a study and then we have another oral study and postpartum depression. Because we think that you know we're very committed to looking at innovative ways to apply this mechanism and we we haven't improved drug with this mechanism, which is already so and you know, if you want to talk about an area that's severely underserved you I can't think of a better example than women's health. Um, So so we're very that's another study that's underway. When we started stage. There weren't many see in central nervous system companies and and no one was. People weren't doing work in your spirits. Although the narrative changes and I always Explain to people there's three stages. In the development of ideas in industry and academia. The first is you're wrong. The second is It's trivial, and the third is Oh, that was our idea. Today. Even with gather we have many. There are a lot of people who have embraced gather and we're you know, I give the sage team and the scientists a lot of credit for pioneering this and you know for an area that people have known about. For 20 years, but now doing something about it, and I think you know, and I think you know for me. It was a great accomplishment. But again, it's just the beginning of what we hope is an evolutionary change. And how we can treat psychiatric disorders. Well, Jeff such a pleasure, always a pleasure. And I hope you'll come back and see us again. You know, I'm always happy to come back. Dr. Jeff Jonas is the chief innovation officer of Sage Therapeutics. More information is available at sage therapeutics dot com..

Jeff Jonas Jeff New York City two months two weeks two years Times Square 4000 patients Today first drug 20 Sage Therapeutics today third first FDA second three stages later this year IBD
"alcoholic hepatitis" Discussed on TechNation Radio Podcast

TechNation Radio Podcast

08:27 min | 3 weeks ago

"alcoholic hepatitis" Discussed on TechNation Radio Podcast

"Ever hear of the w. n. t. pathway. The wind pathway is throughout the body and utilizing. It may support treatment in a number of conditions including ms osteoporosis. Heritable bowel disease and even severe alcoholic hepatitis. Craig parker is the ceo of sir. Sin in south san francisco bowl craig. Welcome to tech nation covering me speaking with you earlier. I learned some things about the liver and in my jeans and deliver that i didn't know before so let's start there. I think we all know that the liver filters toxins. But what else does deliver dea would also has what's called a synthetic function or a function of making things and some of the things that makes it a really critical for body. Functions are clotting proteins and so many of the proteins. That when you get cuts 'cause your blood to clot are manufactured in the liver. As you mentioned the liver also has a critical function filtering out certain things it filters out certain toxins many of the drugs that we all take our metabolize or broken down by the liver and the liver is also able to regenerate itself so many people may know that it's one of the few organs upon injury can regenerate itself in fact when we give certain types of liver transplants. The person giving delivers lobe of their liver can grow back and the person receiving that low that loeb can grow and what we know from actually some of the founders of sarazen is that there's a biological process that's driving that regeneration and that's referred to as the wind or w. n. T. halfway now if that were what happens while we know in certain situations like drinking too much alcohol or if someone has hepatitis c. the damages their liver that some of these wind proteins are produced. And they act on cells in the liver. These specific cells are called her pat ascites but their liver cells are those cells that provide that critical function of making proteins and metabolising drugs and filtering out toxins and these wind proteins. Act on those cells and those cells can divide and make more liver cells and ultimately if you have more liver cells you have better liver function. So certain patients who have very damage delivers. They're not able to keep up with breaking down. Toxins metabolising drugs making those clotting proteins. But if you can give them enough normal liver cells they can have normal liver function and we know that the wind pathway or this wind biological process is responsible for that regeneration in the liver and many other words. Well that's specific to our behaviors. Let's say we drink vodka or or any other hard alcohol but we'll stick to vodka. What happens in the liver when you drink. Vodka actually kills those liver. Stones kills them. It's not like over time eventually. No you drink vodka. It kills liver south if you drink a lot so you know if you couldn't tell you exactly how many drinks but i'm quite sure that if you had half a bottle of vodka you would kill liver cells and you'd be engaging this normal physiologic process of regeneration or repair now. The problem is if you do that every night. Your body's not gonna keep up with that damage and in many other liver. Diseases like hepatitis c. Where you have a virus. That's continuously damaging as liver cells. Unless you get rid of the virus unless you stop drinking the alcohol your body's not going to be able to keep up for a long time with that with that liver damage so you could out drink your liver you can absolutely out drink your liver And the types of patients that we hope to treat and provide clinical benefit to our patients who are chronic alcoholics who typically have a binge episode and they end up in hospital because as you said they've just out out drank their liver's ability to keep up and it's it's likely because they had chronic alcoholism they were teetering on that points already and that one been jacket so sometimes it's an infection or some other medical complication pushes them beyond that point. Deliver can keep up now. How does deliver no in a normal circumstance in you know one one one vodka occasionally or any other thing that could happen but my damage deliver has liver no to restore damaged cells or create replacement. Self i talked about this win pathway and this being a normal function of the body. It's much more complex than that though. And we don't understand all of the signals that are involved in the liver regenerating one of the interesting aspects of delivery generating that we don't completely understand is why doesn't continue to grow out of control right so if you have this sort of accelerator on regeneration and forming new liver cells And you're activating ed with damage. What isn't it just keep going. So we'd have really big livers. What is she really delivers. And many organs have this limiting capacity. It's referred to as the reestablish function reestablishing like thermostat in your house right. There's a set points and we don't know what all the signals are that contributes that set point. We know some of them in the biology is quite complex. But we know there's this limitation function and so when you have damage your activating the wind halfway end others. You're getting this re-generation proliferation of cells formation of the normal structure of the oregon. So we know in the case of our candidate molecules for example when you stimulate this regeneration deliver looks totally normal. You don't get a bunch of growth in one area or too many of one type of cell in all looks very normal. And that's probably very complex process that regulates all of that but there is this limitation factor this self regulating herself governing aspect to it so welco very far. But how does it notice start. How does it not to do that. Say oh we got. We have some liver cells. We need to repair liver cells. We need to replace so the damage. Activates this win gene And it can be active even in undamaged situation so in our intestines for example Many people know that you know if you have some gastrointestinal distress you ate some food. That didn't agree with you One thing that happens is the cells lining your intestines secrete a bunch of fluid. That's why you can have. Diarrhea is all that fluid. Coming out and those cells can die but they get replenished really quickly and the wind halfway actually is what causes that regeneration in replenishment as well so it's normally active in many places in our body and then it gets activated either more or if it's some somewhat static it gets activated in from the liver for example upon injury so that injury causes the gene to be activated and the gene secretes these proteins that bind to the in the case of liver to liver cells and that starts this whole pathway. It's referred to as the wind. Pathway because there are many many genes ultimately get turned off on that have to do with making the cell divide making the cell differentiate into a very particular type of cell. So it can have that function we talked about. It can have that function of making proteins filtering out toxins metabolising drugs. But.

ms osteoporosis bowel disease Craig parker sarazen hepatitis c alcoholic hepatitis dea loeb craig san francisco oregon Diarrhea
"alcoholic hepatitis" Discussed on Body Stuff with Dr. Jen Gunter

Body Stuff with Dr. Jen Gunter

08:38 min | 2 months ago

"alcoholic hepatitis" Discussed on Body Stuff with Dr. Jen Gunter

"Really shows the problem with the word. it's a chameleon you could make many things sound natural or unnatural depending on how you frame them. The word natural has a lot of power at its had power for centuries across many cultures including in classical chinese thought. The word that's translated as natural is the ron which would mean self so or or the way it is of itself. I actually really liked that word. For illustrating why natural has been important across cultures. There's an idea that natural means un-interviewed with things that are so of themselves they were created by forces beyond and before humans and of course the forces that come beyond and before humans are often announced and so naturalness has a kind of inherent divine purity associated with it because human artificiality our art. Our technology hasn't messed up the natural thing yet. Cleanses draw on other powerful religious concepts to like purification and hidden knowledge. Are you redick medicine. Traditional indian medicine. There are practices in which you sweat out toxins and if you think about native american rituals and the sweat lodges this was also thought of as as a way of purifying yourself and it's not that these rituals are bad or wrong. It's that these wellness influencers trying to yank the rituals out of their original religious slash philosophical context and say. Oh no no no. These are just. This is actually a purifier. It's a medical ritual. No this is in essence a religious ritual. And if you want to practice it as that. I think that's absolutely fine. Which you can't do is pluck it out of its original context rebranded as natural medicine and sell tear instagram followers as the cure. That they don't want you to know. This is cultural appropriation. Which makes this marketing even more troubling and just like natural in secret are great. Marketing ploys so is selling something as ancient this. All natural rishi mushroom funds was used by ancient. There's this idea that if something has been around for a long time know it must be good eastern cultures for millennia anchin as taxes to the ancient wisdom of tibetan herdsmen with this juice straight from the himalayan us history moves forward. You're playing a game of telephone and the original message gets corrupted and so that ancient fallacy is related to the desire to want to have the pure original version of something. When you think about all these powerful concepts that cleanses drop pon. It makes sense that this myth has stuck around for so long even after medicine moved away from using bloodletting and purging to get rid of toxins. It makes sense that so many of us find cleanses and detox appealing. What i want you to remember. Though is that marketing buzzwords like naturalness. Purity are not scientific or medical even if they claim to be. So what would you tell someone who wants to embark on a cleanse or a detox. There's thinking of doing one. would you haven't thoughts. You would want them to to run through. I would want them to reflect on why they're doing it the authority on which they're doing it and and what they expect to get from it if these rituals reinforced some kind of ideal of purity. I want people to really reflect on how that in the long term might end up making them less happy. There's no such thing as puberty wanting to be pure is ever an always going to be a frustrating goal. I think it's really important to point out that people are lured down these rabbit holes of misinformation. Medical problems are really complex and often doctors. Don't do a good job of explaining them or people don't have access to the kind of treatment they need and sometimes you know what not. Every medical condition has the treatment so there are gaps in medicine and people will take advantage of that to sell a scams. My two boys were born extremely prematurely and they had a lot of health problems as babies one son had a serious heart defect and the other had cerebral palsy. And these were things that could be made better with treatment but not cured. I'm a doctor. But after my sons were born i was really just a parent with two struggling kids and i did what a lot of parents do in that situation. I scoured the internet for answers. I found a clinic that offered stem cell transplants as a cure for both heart conditions and cerebral palsy. Two completely different conditions. That are in no way treated the same. That should have been my red flag. But i wanted to help my sons. I was desperate instead of emptying my bank account. I used my medical knowledge and connections to track down and expert. He said it was still an unproven therapy. And the way he said it made me realize that what. I was seeing online with stem cell tourism with tempting anecdotes bold claims and a slick website. I just needed someone to hear my pain and suffering acknowledge it and then explain the truth in a way that i could hear but most people don't have the connections. I have to find an expert. Health concierge so they're left grappling with these complex health problems and people selling products capitalize on that. They know it's hard to explain how our liver works. So it's easy for them to say that toxins are building up in your body and you need to try the cleanse. They're promoting and they know they can draw on all these powerful concepts from religion in history to entice us cleanses aren't going to help your liver and they might even heard it but there are things that you can do to keep your liver healthy. Here's our hepatitis. Dr hoda again. It's the boring stuff eat. Well eat a diet attain fiber and low in sugars low processed foods. If you do that and you get your recommended amount of exercise. You're going to put your liver in the best shape. It possibly be to do everything needs to do for you for the rest of your life. No scammy products. Just taking care of yourself. Dr hoda says keeping your diet low in added sugar is especially important for your liver once you reach certain levels of sugar then your liver starts to store those things. Start to say okay. We need to store this in case we need in the future. And it stores it as fat in your liver. We don't have great treatments for fatty liver yet. And we're seeing more cases of severe scarring or cirrhosis caused. Because of fatty liver disease. Something else you should watch out for. And this one's probably not a surprise to you drinking a lot of alcohol. There's the acute effect you can develop inflammation of the liver and that's called alcoholic hepatitis. And that can be dangerous. And that can make people very sick and then chronic use leads to chronic inflammation chronic inflammation leads to scarring scarring can happen over so much time that it can become surata completely scarred and when that happens like we mentioned before you liver cannot regenerate fix itself even if you stopped drinking and then.

cerebral palsy Dr hoda un himalayan us hepatitis cirrhosis liver disease alcoholic hepatitis chronic inflammation chronic i
"alcoholic hepatitis" Discussed on Short Wave

Short Wave

07:49 min | 4 months ago

"alcoholic hepatitis" Discussed on Short Wave

"This message comes from npr sponsor. Ford introducing the mustang mach e. Here's the global brand director of electric vehicles. Jayson castro data on the challenge of creating an all electric that drives like a mustang. The normal challenge of making suv go fast is higher center. Gravity the beauty of the battery electric vehicle platform is that all of the weight was down low on the floor. Because that's where the batteries housed. And that's where the electric motors are to learn more about the new all electric pony in the mustang stable. Go four dot com. Okay yuki we are talking about the increase. An alcoholic liver disease which doctors are especially noticing in young women during the pandemic. Tell me about that. Yeah and i want to introduce you to jessica dwayne okay. I'd started talking to her over a year ago. Hello this is just. That was just a few weeks into the pandemic. At the time she was thirty five living in louisville kentucky and was a middle school special education teacher. Doing you know as well as can be good state of the world. She wasn't just any teacher. She was named two thousand nineteen kentucky teacher of the year. Okay good job jessica. I mean i found her lovely and always and she has inspiring biography. She came from an immigrant. Family identifies afro latina. And she was the first in her family to go to college. Not only got a bachelor's degree but also a masters and obviously became a star in her field but she told me she had been hiding her drinking everyone especially the family that was so proud of her. It started in college and in recent years she had tried to quit. Then i started to kind of think that i was cured and i was like well. I can probably logistically figure out how to drink in a healthy way. Now that my body has reset itself and you know it can possibly get worse. But it would. She'd go back to drinking and at one point. She was drinking almost a leader of liquor. Night that's about twenty shots of alcohol far beyond the cdc's definition of heavy drinking for women and in two thousand nineteen. She was diagnosed with alcoholic. Hepatitis a. kind of our liberties accident. He down any food. I was losing weight. My belly's super sensitive. Like if i press on certain parts of it it would hurt a lot. My eyes were starting to get yellowish. All that sounds really really painful and a lot to manage when you're trying to just show up and go to work right. Oh totally but she says she never drank. Works was very clear about that. In fact she masked the shame that she felt by trying to be an even better teacher but she says the pressure just became too much. It's like i would drink in the evening fall asleep. And i would wake up with my hands shaking and i would feel sick as a dog during the day and you know i would find myself feeling. Irritable with students. And i love my students passionately so when i realized that he was starting to actually affect my treatment children. I felt like that was it and that i had to get health. So who did jessica reach out to for help while she went to rehab into treatment again and she even came out to. Her family is an alcoholic which was a huge relief for her. So by the time. I spoke to jessica the first time in april twenty twenty. She'd been in recovery for several months and her liver was healing she frequented twelve step recovery meanings on zoom and. She was doing this with the support of her boyfriend who was also in recovery. So as she ran off she sounded really upbeat. I am. I am feeling really good right now. You know the other nice thing is of course. Because i chose not to go through this alone like my boyfriend he. He's very sweet person. Any you know super great during this whole time and so we're actually gonna. It's nice weather here so we're gonna take the dog out for a walk. That is so sweet. Okay so It has been a year since your first conversation with jessica. How she doing right now. Well it's been quite a year for her even by pandemic standards. Let's just start with a personal essay. She wrote for the louisville courier journal published in december. Twenty twenty the headline is my darkest secret at kentucky teacher of the year shares story of addiction and recovery. Oh so she decided to share her story publicly. Yeah i mean she. She did because she wanted to talk about hiding her own addiction and how her recovery became really challenging the pandemic and she talked about some really tragic news in that essay last april. Actually on the day. That i i called. Her boyfriend relapsed and then later died from a heroin overdose. You know we were making plans for the future and you know everything we talked about. It was like okay. What is over. We're gonna try to get married. We're going to try. You know we had all these visions and those pain crashing out. I'm so sorry to hear that that's really sad. Now i mean it was just devastating and you know it was so hard and she relapsed and ended up in the hospital or rehab. She says about eight times since then really struggled to say sober. Eventually she moved to florida to be with her family and leaned on their support and focus on a recovery. She wrote that personal essay for her local paper. And you know. Just her past year. And i wanna read one of the last paragraphs today. I stand proud of who i am and embrace all parts of me. My recovery will no longer be my secret instead. It is my story to share to others that we all deserve a fighting chance at a good life. No matter how many times giving up feels like the only way out patas really powerful My recovery will no longer be my secret since publishing that essay in december. She must have heard from people. Like what was the public reaction to that piece. It resonated with so many people like hundreds of people wrote to her. And what i've noticed is quite a few of the women typically educators. There were moms or they happen to be. Nurses are attorneys like that was kind of like the groups that i ended up speaking with a lot so a lot of people who wrote in were women and they pour their hearts out to her about managing the crushing stresses of kids and work and home during the pandemic and they also vented about the pressures outside the home as well so imagine being a teacher who gets evaluated. Hire students to you given the situation today. I mean that makes me want to drink for them. You know like that's a terrible pressure to be under a lot of pressure. So yuki let's circle back to the big picture here there. Is this big rising alcoholic liver. Disease doctors are seeing especially among young women. You talked about that earlier and focusing on this group. Are they particularly vulnerable right now. Yeah i mean you know a lot of what jessica is talking about. You know these greater responsibilities at home and remote school personally. I can relate to that. That's all falling disproportionately on women. You know domestic violence eating disorders isolation these things also kind of add. The stresses and traumas and physically women's bodies generally for a number of different reasons can't process alcohol as much as men. I talked to one psychiatrist. Dr scott winter he treats patients with alcoholic liver disease and he told me the pandemic either surfacing or creating trauma whether this early life sexual trauma or they're in a recent or ongoing abusive relationship. Be see this link very very closely with with drinking. Just the sheer amount of trauma is.

jessica dwayne december florida april twenty twenty last april jessica Ford scott winter thirty five two thousand louisville kentucky first today twelve step hundreds of people two thousand nineteen about twenty shots first conversation a year ago Jayson
"alcoholic hepatitis" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:11 min | 6 months ago

"alcoholic hepatitis" Discussed on KQED Radio

"K c f dot orc? It's 5 22. It's morning edition from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep and Mai Martinez. More people at younger ages are getting alcoholic liver disease, especially women under the age of 40. Advanced alcoholic hepatitis and cirrhosis can kill half form or of those who get it. Stress and isolation are feeding that trend. NPR's Yuki Noguchi joins us, Yuki despite how big is it? Well, it's big enough to alarm Jessica Mallinger. She's a liver specialist at the University of Michigan and says she's seen a 30% increase in hospitalizations there since the pandemic began. And my conversations with my colleagues and other institutions. Everybody is saying the same thing. They're like, Yes, it's astronomical. It's just gone off the charge off the chart, she says, and likely to get worse, and it's been young women driving that trend. I personally switched all of my research in my liver transplant training year, two alcoholic liver disease because I was seeing so many young people in the hospital was like what is going on here. We're seeing kids in their late twenties early thirties with a disease that we previously thought was kind of exclusive to middle age. Well, it's tough to hear. We know you've been following one woman who struggle with this tell us her story. Yeah, Her name is Jessica Do Rania's and I first met Dwayne? Yes, that last April, just a few weeks into the pandemic. She just been named Kentucky's 2019 teacher of the year She was 35 in love. With a new puppy and a new house and level and she was four months into recovery. She told me she was tired of leading a double life as a star in her field and a closet alcoholic. Used to drink. Almost a leader of liquor and night is 20 shots of bourbon or vodka and 20 times the Centers for Disease Control's definition of heavy drinking for women. So by age 34. She developed alcoholic hepatitis. I couldn't keep down any food. I was losing weight, and I mean losing weight that I wasn't seeking to lose. My belly's was supersensitive like If I pressed on certain parts of it, it would hurt a lot. My eyes were starting to get yellowish. She says. She never drank it work. She's the first in her immigrant family to go to college. She master problems. I'm working extra hard, but that ate at her. I felt so terrible about who I was as a person because of my addiction that I just threw myself into everything else to make everything else look good, But I hate myself. I want to die. I feel miserable. I feel like less than person. Sadly, that feeling of entrapment is an uncommon we've spoken on April 11th of last year. At that time, Her liver was healing. She frequented 12 step recovery meetings on Zoom She rang off. She sounded a beat. I am feeling really good right now course because I chose not to go through this alone. Like my boyfriend. He's a very sweet person, and he's no super great during this whole time. It's nice weather here. So you know, we're going to take the dog out for a walk. I called the weight is again recently. It turns out shortly after we talked that day, she found her boyfriend. He'd relapse on heroin. He looked trapped and like completely out of control and completely outside of himself like that image is still frozen in my head. Two weeks later, she went to his apartment. Hang on the door. No response. Neighbors intervene. Police arrived. And when they got the door open he had he was gone. He he had overdose. He died at 42. They plan to marry. Have Children. Honestly, the next eight months are such a blur. Yuki like I Was hospitalized about eight times. My hospitalizations ranged from three day detox is an emergency rooms to 15 weeks day in a residential Rehabilitation facility. I could not stay sober at all. She took medical leave. She flipped her car over in a wreck. Doing a says she's normally politically active. But she only vaguely recalls last year's news from rehab. Protests over Briana Taylor's shooting election day. By November, she was ready, she says. Her last drink was on Thanksgiving. Days later, she wrote about her secret in the Louisville Courier Journal. I'm just down the 20 nights in Kentucky State teacher of the Year. I'm an alcoholic, and I've been suffering in silence for years. Hundreds of people responded to her piece. What I've noticed is quite a few of the women. Typically, they were either educators. They were moms or they happen in the nurses or attorneys like that was kind of like the groups that I ended up speaking with a lot. These women pour their hearts out about managing crushing stresses of kids work and home. Also vented about pressures outside the home. Imagine being a teacher who gets evaluated on harder Students. Do you get in the situation today? I mean that if you want a drink for them, you know, like that's a terrible pressure to be under the witness says she's heard so many stories like hers. Now she's making a project of telling their stories on her website about recovery. Yuki. Why's this hitting so many young women like when you especially right now? Well, you know, a lot of it's what she talked about, You know greater responsibilities at home and with remote school that's all falling disproportionately on women. No domestic violence eating disorders. Isolation also makes those kinds of stresses and traumas worse and you add to that women's bodies just can't process as much alcohol as men. So psychiatrists got windows, these patients with alcoholic liver disease and he told me the pandemic is surfacing are creating trauma. Whether this is early life sexual trauma are there in a recent are ongoing, abusive relationship? We see this link very, very closely. Just the sheer amount of trauma is really, really tragic. You know, And then you have ads and pop culture validating the idea of drinking to cope. You know, Mommy Jews rose a all day wind down Wednesday's All right, So you're talking about them the medical problem of liver disease and then on top of that, the underlying emotional struggles and addiction. So how do you treat all of that at the same time? Well, that's exactly what makes this disease so complex, you know, usually treatment. Does not address both at the same time, but to treat severe liver disease. Some people need a transplant and you don't even qualify if you're still drinking. Very premature is a hepatology ist at Northwestern University. Unfortunate transplantation is fine it There's not enough organs to go around. What unfortunately means is that many of these young people You know, may not survive and you know, died very young in their twenties and thirties. It Z horrific. You know, that means they started drinking very early in life. And now they're facing a life or just struggle. You can thank you so much for us sharing this story with us. Thank you. That's NPR health correspondent Yuki Noguchi..

Jessica Mallinger Mai Martinez Steve Inskeep Dwayne Yuki Noguchi Briana Taylor 20 shots Yuki Jessica Do Rania 15 weeks 20 times NPR 30% Northwestern University 20 nights NPR News Centers for Disease Control 2019 35 both
"alcoholic hepatitis" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:17 min | 6 months ago

"alcoholic hepatitis" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"K c f dot or G'kar? It's morning edition from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep and Mai Martinez. More people at younger ages are getting alcoholic liver disease, especially women under the age of 40. Advanced alcoholic hepatitis and cirrhosis can kill half orm or of those who get it. Stress and isolation are feeding that trend. NPR's Yuki Noguchi joins us, Yuki despite how big is it? Well, it's big in left to alarm Jessica Mallinger. She's a liver specialist at the University of Michigan and says she's seen a 30% increase in hospitalizations there since the pandemic began. In my conversations with my colleagues at other institutions. Everybody is saying the same thing They're like yet it's astronomical. It's just gone off the charge off the chart, she says, and likely to get worse, and it's been young women driving that trend. I personally switched all of my research in my liver transplant training near two alcoholic liver disease because I was seeing so many young people in the hospital is like what is going on here. We're seeing kids in their late twenties early thirties with a disease that we previously thought was kind of exclusive to middle age. Well, it's tough to hear. We know you've been following one woman who struggle with this tell us her story. Yeah, Her name is Jessica Delany Asses. And I first met Dwayne Ia's that last April, just a few weeks into the pandemic. She just been named Kentucky's 2019 teacher of the year. She was 35 in love. With a new puppy and a new house and Lovell and she was four months into recovery. She told me she was tired of leading a double life as a star in her field and a closet alcoholic. Used to drink. Almost a leader of liquor and night is 20 shots of bourbon or vodka and 20 times the Centers for Disease Control's definition of heavy drinking for women. So by age 34. She developed alcoholic hepatitis. I couldn't keep down any food. I was losing weight, and I mean losing weight that I wasn't seeking to lose. My belly's was supersensitive like If I pressed on certain parts of it, it would hurt a lot. My eyes were starting to get yellowish. She says. She never drank it work. She's the first in her immigrant family to go to college. She master problems. I'm working extra hard, but that ate at her. I felt so terrible about who I was as a person because of my addiction that I just threw myself into everything else to make everything else look good, But I hate myself. I want to die. I feel miserable. I feel like less than person. Sadly, that feeling of entrapment is an uncommon we've spoken on April 11th of last year. At that time her liver was healing. She frequented 12 step recovery meetings on zoom as she rang off. She sounded a beat. I am feeling really good right now course because I chose not to go through this alone. Like my boyfriend. He's a very sweet person, and he's been super great during this whole time. It's nice weather here. So you know, we're going to take the dog out for a walk. I called the weight is again recently. It turns out shortly after we talked that day, she found her boyfriend. He'd relapse on heroin. He looked trapped and like, completely out of control and completely outside of himself like that, and it just still frozen in my head. Two weeks later, she went to his apartment. Hang on the door. No response called Neighbors intervened. Police arrived and when they got the door open he had he was gone. He had he had overdosed. He died at 42. They plan to marry Have Children. Honestly, the next eight months are such a blur. Yuki like I Was hospitalized about eight times. My hospitalizations ranged from three day detox is an emergency rooms to 15 weeks day in a residential Rehabilitation facility. I could not stay sober at all. She took medical leave. She flipped her car over in a wreck. Do Enya says she's normally politically active, but she only vaguely recalls last year's news from rehab. Protests over Briana Taylor shooting Election day. By November, she was ready, she says. Her last drink was on Thanksgiving. Days later, she wrote about her secret in the Louisville Courier Journal. I'm just going that's funny. 19 Kentucky States he travel year. I'm an alcoholic, and I've been suffering in silence for years. Hundreds of people responded to her piece. What I've noticed is quite a few of the women. Typically, they were either educators. They were moms or they happen to be nurses or attorneys like that was kind of like the groups that I ended up speaking with a lot. These women pour their hearts out about managing crushing stresses of kids work and home. Also vented about pressures outside the home. Imagine being a teacher who gets evaluated on hire students. Do you get in the situation today? I mean, that makes me wanna drink for them, You know, like that's a terrible pressure to be under doing this says she's heard so many stories like hers. Now she's making a project of telling their stories on her website about recovery. Yuki. Why's this hitting so many young women like when you especially right now? Well, you know, a lot of it's what she talked about. You know greater responsibilities at home and was remote school that's all falling disproportionately on women. No domestic violence eating disorders. Isolation also makes those kinds of stresses and traumas worse and you add to that women's bodies just can't process as much alcohol as men. So psychiatrists got windows, these patients with alcoholic liver disease and he told me the pandemic is surfacing are creating trauma. Whether this is early life sexual trauma are there in a recent or ongoing, abusive relationship. We see this link very, very closely. Just the sheer amount of trauma. Is really, really tragic. You know, And then you have ads and pop culture validating the idea of drinking to cope. You know, Mommy Jews rose a all day wind down Wednesday's so you're talking about, then the medical problem of liver disease and then on top of that, the underlying emotional struggles and addiction. So how do you treat all of that at the same time? Well, that's exactly what makes this disease so complex, you know, usually treatment. Does not address both at the same time, but to treat severe liver disease. Some people need a transplant and you don't even qualify if you're still drinking. Hurry. PREE Amador is a hepatology.

Jessica Mallinger Mai Martinez Steve Inskeep Yuki Noguchi Yuki Briana Taylor Jessica Delany Asses 20 shots 20 times Dwayne Ia 15 weeks 30% 35 NPR Wednesday NPR News November last April four months both
"alcoholic hepatitis" Discussed on WBEZ Chicago

WBEZ Chicago

03:54 min | 6 months ago

"alcoholic hepatitis" Discussed on WBEZ Chicago

"Up the streets and I kept enough people clean up their homes and try to get some of these roots start before the next door for NPR news. I'm Stephen Masalha in Birmingham. A new study finds that increased alcohol consumption during the pandemic is leading to an alarming spike in related liver disease, hospitalizations for legal conditions such as alcoholic hepatitis and cirrhosis. Have risen around the country. NPR's Yuki Noguchi reports There are disturbing increases being found among young women store sales of alcohol are up since a pandemic started last year. Hard liquor sales increased 25%, according to Nielsen, a research firm. Jessica Melander says the number of patients with alcoholic liver disease increased at least 30%. She's a liver specialist at the University of Michigan and my conversations with my colleagues and other institutions. Everybody is saying the same thing they're like yet. It's astronomical. It's just gone off the charge, especially among women under the age of 40, she says, remote work and school as well as trauma, like domestic or sexual violence, eating disorders and isolation are fueling that. Yuki Noguchi. NPR NEWS This is NPR. 39 degrees at 604. Good morning. I'm married Dixon With WB. Easy news. A Chicago police officers being released on $1000 bond while he awaits trial for an off duty shooting that wounded two men. WB Easy's Patrick Smith reports. Officer Kevin Bungee teaches other officers when and how to use force. He had just gotten done with a shift at the Police Academy one night in December and was sitting in his car outside of his home, listening to a book on tape when a red car pulled up and parked behind him. A few minutes later, bungee got out of his car, pulled his weapon and opened fire. The driver of the red car was shot in the hand. His passenger was hit by shattered glass. The two injured men fled the scene and called 911. Bunch, he says someone inside the red car pointed a gun at him, but no weapon was recovered. He is charged with aggravated battery and aggravated discharge of a firearm. Patrick Smith w be easy news ill annoyances Young has 16 can begin getting vaccinations against Cove. It's starting April 12 that's part of a major vaccine expansion plan to be announced today by Governor J. B. Pritzker. His order does not apply to Chicago. Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot says that on March 29th, the city will start to vaccinate the next eligible group of Residences planned. The one seed group includes people at least 16 with certain underlying medical conditions and all essential workers. Illinois restaurants want to serve larger gathering since part of Governor Pritzker's phased reopening plan, which may be announced this week. Right now, restaurants can only serve up to 50 people are 50% of their dining rooms capacity, whichever is fewer. Illinois Restaurant Association chief Sam Toya says his group's been talking with Pritzker staff. Zoya says they also want to see conventions resume and stadiums reopen, both of which drive business for the restaurant industry. The Bulls lost the Spurs 106 to 99 whether today a wind advisory on starting at seven this morning until seven this evening. We're expecting rain, possibly mixed with snow this morning, but no accumulation and a high of 43 windy tonight and a low of 32 Tomorrow sunny and a high of 45 degrees. Mary Dixon, WB easy news. Traffic moving well on expressways and to always a slight delay on the inbound Stevenson Ram to the inbound Dan Ryan. WBZ traffic is supported by Jewel Osco, offering everything from salty snacks and dairy items, toe organic meats, bakery items and more at Jewel Osco. Coming up on morning edition. 10. Years of Conflict and Civil war have left Syria in ruins, and most of its people in poverty.

Mary Dixon Jessica Melander Yuki Noguchi Stephen Masalha Birmingham March 29th April 12 Patrick Smith Kevin Bungee Zoya $1000 50% Sam Toya 16 45 degrees Jewel Osco Dixon 911 25% NPR
"alcoholic hepatitis" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:19 min | 6 months ago

"alcoholic hepatitis" Discussed on KCRW

"Management director Russell Weeden says the immediate danger in his county has passed but responders air getting ready for more bad weather. Right now, we're just trying to clean up the streets and Helping people clean up their their homes and try to get some of these roots start before the next door for NPR news. I'm Stephen Masalha in Birmingham. A new study finds that increased alcohol consumption during the pandemic is leading to an alarming spike in related liver disease, hospitalizations for legal conditions such as alcoholic hepatitis and cirrhosis. Have risen around the country. NPR's Yuki Noguchi reports There are disturbing increases being found among young women store sales of alcohol are up since the pandemic started last year. Hard liquor sales increased 25%, according to Nielsen, a research firm. Jessica Melander says the number of patients with alcoholic liver disease increased at least 30%. She's a liver specialist at the University of Michigan and my conversations with my colleagues and other institutions. Everybody is saying the same thing they're like yet. It's astronomical. It's just gone off the charge, especially among women under the age of 40, she says, remote work and school as well as trauma, like domestic or sexual violence, eating disorders and isolation are fueling that. Yuki Noguchi. NPR NEWS This is NPR. U. S. Intelligence agencies say that the threat is growing from violent domestic extremists. A report says that individual domestic extremists or small cells are more likely to conduct attacks than extremist organizations. The most lethal threat comes from white supremacist or violent militia groups. The Intelligence committee says many extremists are motivated by falsehoods around the election and the Corona virus pandemic. NASA is preparing for a major test of the massive rocket. It is building to put the first woman and the next man on the moon, NPR's Nell Greenfield Boys, reports the agency will test fire the Rockets engines after three p.m. Eastern time Today. The 212 FT Tall core stage of the rocket is set up at NASA Stennis Space Center in Mississippi during a previous test. Glitch forced the engines to shut down early after only 67 seconds. This time, NASA is hoping the engines will fire for at least four minutes, hopefully eight to simulate what will happen when the rocket actually blasts off into space. Its first launch is scheduled for November. On that flight, NASA plans to send a capsule but no crew around the moon and back Del Greenfield Boys, NPR News Secretary of State Antony Blinken and White House National Security advisor Jake Sullivan will meet top Chinese diplomats today. Will be in Anchorage, Alaska. The group is expected to discuss thorny topics. These include trade, human rights and developments in Hong Kong. No major diplomatic breakthrough is expected today. I'm Corbett Coleman. NPR news. Support for NPR comes from NPR stations. Other contributors include Merrill Merrill Edge, Self directed investing has tools to help clients find answers to questions. Maurin. Merrill edge dot com slash within Reach Merrill Lynch, Pierce, Fenner and Smith incorporated registered broker.

Jessica Melander Stephen Masalha Yuki Noguchi Birmingham Corbett Coleman Hong Kong NASA Russell Weeden November Jake Sullivan Antony Blinken NPR Mississippi Nielsen White House Anchorage, Alaska last year NPR News Merrill first launch
"alcoholic hepatitis" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:26 min | 6 months ago

"alcoholic hepatitis" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Management director Russell Weeden says the immediate danger in his county has passed but responders air getting ready for more bad weather. Right now, we're just trying to clean up the streets and Happened. People clean up their their homes and try to get some of these roots start before the next door for NPR news. I'm Stephen Masalha in Birmingham. A new study finds that increased alcohol consumption during the pandemic is leading to an alarming spike in related liver disease, hospitalizations for lethal conditions such as alcoholic hepatitis and cirrhosis. Have risen around the country. NPR's Yuki Noguchi reports There are disturbing increases being found among young women store sales of alcohol are up since the pandemic started last year. Hard liquor sales increased 25%, according to Nielsen, a research firm. Jessica Melander says the number of patients with alcoholic liver disease increased at least 30%. She's a liver specialist at the University of Michigan and my conversations with my colleagues at other institutions. Everybody is saying the same thing. They're like, yes. It's astronomical. It's just gone off the charge, especially among women under the age of 40, she says, remote work and school as well as trauma, like domestic or sexual violence, eating disorders and isolation are fueling that. You can Noguchi NPR news? This is NPR. U. S. Intelligence agencies say that the threat is growing from violent domestic extremists. A report says that individual domestic extremists or small cells are more likely to conduct attacks than extremist organizations. Most lethal threat comes from white supremacist or violent militia groups. The Intelligence committee says many extremists are motivated by falsehoods around the election and the Corona virus pandemic. NASA is preparing for a major test of the massive rocket. It is building to put the first woman and the next man on the moon, NPR's Nell Greenfield Boys, reports the agency will test fire the Rockets engines after three p.m. Eastern time Today. The 212 FT Tall core stage of the rocket is set up at NASA Stennis Space Center in Mississippi during a previous test. Glitch forced the engines to shut down early after only 67 seconds. This time, NASA is hoping the engines will fire for at least four minutes, hopefully eight to simulate what will happen when the rocket actually blasts off into space. Its first launch is scheduled for November. On that flight, NASA plans to send a capsule but no crew. Around the moon and back. Nell Greenfield Boys, NPR News Secretary of State Antony Blinken and White House National Security advisor Jake Sullivan will meet top Chinese diplomats today. Will be in Anchorage, Alaska. The group is expected to discuss thorny topics. These include trade, human rights and developments in Hong Kong. No major diplomatic breakthrough is expected today. I'm Korver Coleman. NPR news. Support for NPR comes from NPR stations. Other contributors, including Merrill, Merrill Edge, Self directed investing has tools to help clients find answers to questions. Maurin. Merrill edge dot com slash within Reach Merrill Lynch, Pierce, Fenner and Smith incorporated registered broker dealer There is the morning edition.

Jessica Melander Yuki Noguchi Birmingham Stephen Masalha Hong Kong NASA Russell Weeden Korver Coleman November Merrill Jake Sullivan Merrill Edge NPR Antony Blinken Anchorage, Alaska last year Mississippi Chinese 25% U. S. Intelligence
"alcoholic hepatitis" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:18 min | 6 months ago

"alcoholic hepatitis" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"It's morning edition from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep and Mai Martinez. More people at younger ages are getting alcoholic liver disease, especially women under the age of 40. Advanced alcoholic hepatitis and cirrhosis can kill half orm or of those who get it. Stress and isolation are feeding that trend. NPR's Yuki Noguchi joins us. Yuki is this is the spike? How big is it? Well, it's big in left to alarm Jessica Mallinger. She's a liver specialist at the University of Michigan and says she's seen a 30% increase in hospitalizations there since the attempt, pandemic began. In my conversations with my colleagues and other institutions. Everybody is saying the same thing They're like yet it's astronomical. It's just gone off the charge off the chart, she says, and likely to get worse, and it's been young women driving that trend. I personally switched all of my research in my liver transplant training near two alcoholic liver disease because I was seeing so many young people in the hospital is like what is going on here. We're seeing kids in their late twenties early thirties with a disease that we previously thought was kind of exclusive to middle age. Well, it's tough to hear. We know you've been following one woman who struggle with this tell us her story. Yeah, Her name is Jessica Delany Asses. And I first met Dwayne Ia's that last April, just a few weeks into the pandemic. She just been named Kentucky's 2019 teacher of the year. She was 35 in love. With a new puppy and a new house and Lovell and she was four months into recovery. She told me she was tired of leading a double life as a star in her field and a closet alcoholic. Used to drink. Almost a leader of liquor and night is 20 shots of bourbon or vodka and 20 times the Centers for Disease Control's definition of heavy drinking for women. So by age 34. She developed alcoholic hepatitis. I couldn't keep down any food. I was losing weight, and I mean losing weight that I wasn't speaking to lose. My belly's was supersensitive like If I pressed on certain parts of it, it would hurt a lot. My eyes were starting to get yellowish. She says. She never drank it work. She's the first in her immigrant family to go to college. She master problems. I'm working extra hard, but that ate at her. I felt so terrible about who I was as a person because of my addiction that I just threw myself into everything else to make everything else look good, But I hate myself. I want to die. I feel miserable. I feel like less than person. Sadly, that feeling of entrapment is an uncommon we'd spoken on April 11th of last year. At that time, her liver was healing. She frequented 12 step recovery meetings on Zoom That she rang off. She sounded a beat. I am feeling really good right now course because I chose not to go through this alone. Like my boyfriend. He's a very sweet person, and he's there. Super great during this whole time. It's nice weather here. So you know, we're going to take the dog out for a walk. I called the waiting's again recently. It turns out shortly after we talked that day, she found her boyfriend. He'd relapse on heroin. He looked trapped and like, completely out of control and completely outside of himself like that, and it just still frozen in my head. Two weeks later, she went to his apartment. Hang on the door. No response called neighbors intervene. Police arrived. And when they got the door open he had he was gone. He had overdosed. He died at 42. They plan to marry Have Children. Honestly, the next eight months are such a blur. Yuki like I Was hospitalized about eight times. My hospitalizations ranged from three day detox is an emergency rooms to 15 weeks day in a residential Rehabilitation facility. I could not stay sober at all. She took medical leave. She put her car over in a wreck. Do Enya says she's normally politically active, but she only vaguely recalls last year's news from rehab. Protests over Briana Taylor shooting Election day. By November, she was ready, she says. Her last drink was on Thanksgiving. Days later, she wrote about her secret in the Louisville Courier Journal. I'm just going that's funny. 19, Kentucky State teacher of the Year I'm an alcoholic, and I've been suffering in silence for years. Hundreds of people responded to her piece. What I've noticed is quite a few of the women. Typically, they were either educators. They were moms or they happen to be nurses or attorneys like that was kind of like the groups that I ended up speaking with a lot. These women pour their hearts out about managing crushing stresses of kids work and home. Also vented about pressures outside the home. Imagine being a teacher who gets evaluated on hire students. Do you get in the situation today? I mean, that makes me wanna drink for them, You know, like that's a terrible pressure to be under doing this says she's heard so many stories like hers. Now she's making a project of telling their stories on her website about recovery. Yuki. Why's this hitting so many young women like when you especially right now? Well, you know, a lot of it's what she talked about. You know greater responsibilities at home and was remote school that's all falling disproportionately on women. No domestic violence eating disorders. Isolation also makes those kinds of stresses and traumas worse and you add to that women's bodies just can't process as much alcohol as men. So psychiatrists got windows, these patients with alcoholic liver disease and he told me the pandemic is surfacing are creating trauma. Whether this is early life sexual trauma are there in a recent or ongoing, abusive relationship. We see this link very, very closely. Just the sheer amount of trauma. Is really, really tragic. You know, And then you have ads and pop culture validating the idea of drinking to cope. You know, Mommy Jews rose a all day wind down Wednesday's All right. So you're talking about that medical problem of liver disease and then on top of that, the underlying emotional struggles and addiction. So how do you treat all of that at the same time? Well, that's exactly what makes this disease so complex, you know, usually treatment. Does not address both at the same time, but to treat severe liver disease. Some people need a transplant and you don't even qualify if you're still drinking. Hurry. PREE Amador is a hepatology.

Jessica Mallinger Mai Martinez Yuki Noguchi Steve Inskeep Briana Taylor 20 shots 20 times Dwayne Ia 30% Jessica Delany Asses 35 NPR 15 weeks last April Wednesday NPR News four months Thanksgiving November 2019
"alcoholic hepatitis" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

05:50 min | 8 months ago

"alcoholic hepatitis" Discussed on KCRW

"You for inviting me saying up to fracture. She's a professor at the University of North Carolina School of Information and Library. Science. Well, the loneliness of quarantine and lockdowns has caused a rise in alcohol consumption. A study from the National Institute of Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism found that liquor consumption last year was up by 19% for adults between the ages of 30 and 59. The economic conditions brought on by the pandemic have also made it harder for people struggling with sobriety. All this could be causing an increase in severe liver disease here to talk about that is Dr Brian Lee. He's hepatology ist and liver transplant specialist with tech medicine at USC. Welcome Dr Lee. It's very nice to be here. Thank you. You Well, tell us what you're saying. You're seeing a rise in patients with with problems with their livers and alcohol addiction. That's right. You know, it's It's really been a trend that we've been seeing even before Kobe, but it's been particularly pronounced with Kobe that is people who are drinking more and come in with severe liver disease in the hospital. What is severe liver disease? What are the symptoms? Right s o liver disease. People think about somebody who was yellow and with a big belly and early cirrhosis, which is end stage liver disease. But the reality is that most people with cirrhosis don't have any symptoms at all. So one. I think it's important to recognize heavy alcohol use and to speak to that with your doctors feel describe the screen for liver disease, but in the hospital when somebody is very sick What we see is that people come in with alcoholic hepatitis, which is severe inflammation from alcohol use, or they have been compensated cirrhosis, meaning that they've developed you know a fluid in the belly or infection or bleeding from their liver disease. So if it doesn't if most people don't have symptoms, how do you know if you have it? It's important to be screened for it. So we have blood tests, imaging or biopsies to be able to tell if you have liver disease. And what is heavy drinking? What's the definition? So the actual definition is, you know, for drinks per day for women and then five drinks per day for men on that's the definition for heavy drinking. But what people don't know is that you can develop liver disease at much lower amounts. So they've been shown that women who drink more than one drink per day on average and two drinks per day for men can cause significant liver disease over time. Wow. Is there any safe level of alcohol consumption? So we used to think that if you were below the threshold meeting, you know, one drink per day for women and two drinks per day for men. But, you know, there's a recent, very large global study that showed that any amount of alcohol actually reduced reduced overall survival and life expectancy. So Many people would see that there isn't any safe level of alcohol consumption. Well, I mean, doesn't deliver regenerate itself cannot repair itself if it's been damaged by alcohol consumption. Yeah, Exactly. So delivers an incredible organ in that, after damage, is able to grow back and regenerate, so people who have had heavy drinking And they developed, you know, hepatitis. If they're able to stop drinking, the liver is able to recover. Now there comes a point, you know, particularly when you have cirrhosis that it might be too late. It's really important to recognize liver disease early, especially when it's from alcohol. What are you hearing from your patients who struggle with with alcohol during this pandemic? What are they saying to you? I think that Cove it has caused a lot of stress in many different ways, and we know now that Stress. It's heavily linked to alcohol use, whether you start drinking where your drinking habits become worse. So you know, I've heard all sorts of stories. Whether it's from The stress of the virus itself for being lonely or bored at home or being divorced because of all the stress with Coben and then having that dream or losing your job, So we've seen all sorts of Different reasons to be stressed and anxious during Coben, and that's what I've been hearing time and time again from patients. And what are you advising? That they, Diogo? Um Are you saying you should not drink it all? Or are you advising moderation? Two people with liver disease, especially those who come into the hospital with liver disease. You know alcohol. It's really important that and I always say, not even a trump of alcohol ever again. Now That's easier said than done, and, you know, alcohol use disorders disease, But really somebody with liver disease really shouldn't be even having a drop of alcohol. And someone who may be on the verge of of it, who are maybe drinking too much? That's right. So I say that for somebody who's healthy from a liver perspective, you know, one drink per day for women two drinks per day for men shouldn't really cause significant liver disease. But those who already have liver disease, not even a drop. All right, Dr. Brian Lee. He's hepatology ist and liver transplant specialist with tech medicine at.

liver disease National Institute of Alcohol cirrhosis Dr. Brian Lee University of North Carolina S Alcoholism professor USC Kobe Coben Diogo Cove
"alcoholic hepatitis" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

06:00 min | 8 months ago

"alcoholic hepatitis" Discussed on KCRW

"The supply and vaccinated. Just be more delicious. Okay. Well, thank you. Wise words. Sociologist Zeynep to Fletcher. Thank you so much for joining us. Thank you for inviting me saying up to fetch a She's a professor at the University of North Carolina School of Information and Library Science. Well, the loneliness of quarantine and lockdowns has caused a rise in alcohol consumption. A study from the National Institute of Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism found that liquor consumption last year was up by 19% for adults between the ages of 30 and 59. The economic conditions brought on by the pandemic have also made it harder for people struggling with sobriety. All this could be causing an increase in severe liver disease here to talk about that is Dr Brian Lee. He's hepatology ist and liver transplant specialist with tech medicine at USC. Welcome Dr Lee. Hi. It's very nice to be here. Thank you. Thank you. Well, tell us what you're seeing. You're seeing a rise in patients with with problems with their livers and alcohol addiction. That's right. You know, it's It's really been a trend that we've been seeing even before Kobe, but it's been particularly pronounced with Kobe that is people who are drinking more and coming with severe liver disease in the hospital. What is severe liver disease? What are the symptoms? Right s o liver disease. People think about somebody who was yellow and with a big belly and early cirrhosis, which is end stage liver disease. But the reality is that most people with cirrhosis don't have any symptoms at all. So one. I think it's important to recognize heavy alcohol use and to speak to that with your doctors. She'll describe the screen for liver disease, but in the hospital when somebody is very sick What we see is that people come in with alcoholic hepatitis, which is severe inflammation from alcohol use, or they have been compensated cirrhosis, meaning that they've developed you know a fluid in the belly or infection or bleeding from their liver disease. So if it doesn't if most people don't have symptoms, how do you know if you have it? It's important to be screened for it. So we have blood tests, imaging or biopsies to be able to tell if you have liver disease. And what is heavy drinking? What's the definition? So the actual definition is, you know, four drinks per day for women and then five drinks per day for men on that's the definition for heavy drinking. But what people don't know is that you can develop liver disease at much lower amounts. So they've been shown that women who drink more than one drink per day on average and two drinks per day for men can cause significant liver disease over time. Wow. Is there any safe level of alcohol consumption? So we used to think that if you were below the threshold meeting, you know, one drink per day for women and the two drinks per day for men. But, you know, there's a recent, very large global study that showed that any amount of alcohol actually reduced reduced. Um Overall survival and life expectancy so many people would see that there isn't any safe level of alcohol consumption. Well, I mean, doesn't deliver regenerate itself cannot repair itself if it's been damaged by alcohol consumption. Yeah, Exactly. So delivers an incredible organ in that, after damage, is able to grow back and regenerate, so people who had had heavy drinking And they develop, you know, hepatitis. If they're able to stop drinking, the liver is able to recover. Now there comes a plane, you know, particularly when you have cirrhosis that it might be too late. It's really important to recognize liver disease early, especially when it's from alcohol. What are you hearing from your patients who struggle with with alcohol during this pandemic? What are they saying to you? I think that Cove it has caused a lot of stress in many different ways, and we know now that Stress. It's heavily linked to alcohol use, whether you start drinking or your drinking habits become worse. So you know, I've heard all sorts of stories, whether it's from the stress of the virus itself for being lonely or bored at home or being divorced because of all the stress with Coben and then having that dream or losing your job. So we've seen all sorts of different reasons to be stressed and anxious during covert, and that's what I've been hearing time and time again from patients. And what are you advising? That they Diogo? Um are you saying you should you should not drink it all? Or are you advising moderation? People with liver disease, especially those who come into the hospital with liver disease. You know alcohol. It's really important that and I always say, not even a trump of alcohol ever again. Now That's easier said than done, and, you know, alcohol use disorders disease, But really somebody with liver disease really shouldn't be even having a drop of alcohol. And someone who may be on the verge of of it, who are maybe drinking too much? That's right. So I say that for somebody who's healthy from a liver perspective, you know, one drink per day for women two drinks per day for men shouldn't really cause significant liver disease. But those who already have liver disease, not even a drop. All right, Dr. Brian Lee. He's a hematologist and liver transplant specialist with tech medicine at USC..

liver disease National Institute of Alcohol cirrhosis Dr. Brian Lee USC University of North Carolina S Zeynep Alcoholism Kobe professor Fletcher Cove
"alcoholic hepatitis" Discussed on KHVH 830AM

KHVH 830AM

07:32 min | 1 year ago

"alcoholic hepatitis" Discussed on KHVH 830AM

"You can hear recordings of this radio show weeks and months back if you missed out on something or a coming up this hour we got a lot of news to talk about but let's get to the phones because there's been a lot of people waiting to get on the air to ask their health question and if you want to join us you can too eight eight eight five five three seven two six two the only bad health question is the one you're not asking have you had your doctor Bob talk yet if not I'm here for you one triple eight fifty five the doctor Bob let's go to the phones first up this segment is and she's going in from St George Utah welcome to the program man hello hello good morning I'm wondering is it possible to reverse alcoholic hepatitis no it's not once you have scar tissue in the liver in the have paddle sites once their scars there those are forever more what you have to concentrate on and and really work toward is helping to make the cells that are not scarred up from the alcohol functional and as healthy as possible that's what you know the words it's kind of like you know look to think about your skin if you get a big key lawyer a scar on your skin that's there for life okay it's not going to change and if you try to do anything about it like take it off you got more scar tissue the body warms scar tissue in the process of trying to protect itself and when usually at the weight lay scar tissue down because of the toxicity of excessive alcohol in in the liver cells luckily our liver is so dynamic so large so beautiful we design that we have a lot of liver cells even though we kill it off in a lot of ways with Tylenol and alcohol and other illicit Annalisa drugs and poor diet and toxins in the environment we still are able to have a functional liver for the rest of our life if we can just preserve and make those cells that are still viable and healthy in and help them to function optimally so what we do with somebody who has alcoholic problems or hepatitis whether it be you know non alcoholic hepatitis which it can be or fatty liver hepatitis or alcoholic hepatitis we say to them look if you want to live in you want to survive you got to stop the poison and alcohol is a poison when it gets to a certain level and so what we do is we encourage them to get away from things that will make the liver sick alcohol being one another one being caffeine another one being sugar another one being the standard American diet the fatty diet that we eat in America we should switch over specially a person who has alcoholic alcoholic hepatitis should switch over to a Mediterranean style diet that's a much healthier diet and then learn about the herbs that can help regenerate tissue that still viable and protect in wall off the healthy cells that are still there by like eating more beets and carrots and green vegetables and taking herbs like silymarin or a a supplement like eight H. C. C. which is a supplement that has this mushroom extract in it that helps to detoxify the liver we love using alpha lipoic acid omega three fatty acids eating artichokes the liver loves eat having artichokes come through because artichokes heavy healing benefit in the liver tissue so that Ural there are a lot of things you can do none of which anything medical will have any help wanted their own other words you can't give somebody that has alcoholic problems like this hepatitis a medical pharmaceutical drugs just gonna make him worse because it has to be processed through the liver so that's how you get a can I ask you are no no medication would be okay for the liver to process what do you mean I mean like wood medications because I know the liver have to process it so say you're on an anti depressant or you need to take you know an Advil or something like that she well yeah that would be just as bad the key is dose if you're a splitting headache going nine you're risking losing an entire night sleep and tell you can find out why you have the headache like you need to see your chiropractor the next day or you're in such their post or stop the wind that had some preservative in it they gave you the headache or whatever yeah he I don't in minor amounts of Medicaid medications are important in that they can improve our quality of life in this that little bridge most of the time natural things can handle it but we're talking about people using over the counter drugs in perscription drugs on an ongoing basis that's you know that's where the problem is special for a person who's already got a compromised liver if you see what I'm saying if they haven't already Conroy's liver they can't handle it the older you get the worse it gets because the older we get the less likely we are to detoxify our detox okay if detoxification pathways basically wear down and wear out and that's why elderly people have more trouble with drugs and they're the ones who are drug the most yeah so you have a lot of well I had recently had blood work done and they said normal liver levels for about forty and mine was one sixty no no not at all levels the normal levels are twenty not forty forty is the top of the scale do you want to be you know a D. student or you want to be an a student a is right in the middle Rhine eighteen to twenty four that's the sh that's the level you should shoot for medicine mainstream medicine in commercial medicines all about close enough for government work as long as you can walk down the street without getting blown over biased wind the staff when you're fine so the the idea of being find a health care provider not a sick care provider and we need to have a sick care provider you need stitches or you got a fracture or severe infection yeah then you go with that but when you want to get somebody who wants to actually it is trained to help you get well somebody who can actually work with your lifestyle and help you make better decisions and teach you what you need to do to take better care of your liver it's time to find the nature path a doctor or a chiropractic doctor or nutritionist or eight am dear DO who's trained in a functional medicine or integrative medicine they're out there they're available is just what kind you like and sometimes you have to have both on your team one that can actually teacher how to stay well that is a non am a nontraditional Indy and one who is waiting in the wings in case you do something severe enough for you need triage and emergency care because you're not gonna get anything else there besides that most of the time how do you get it I think you understand so the idea is save the liver cells you have fanned by making those changes and you can make those changes they're pretty easy to do and you watch those liver enzymes go down you watch that go from forty which is unacceptable or a hundred and fifteen which is unacceptable down.

"alcoholic hepatitis" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:56 min | 1 year ago

"alcoholic hepatitis" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Will try win my trainer is he wants that and the winter lego land not too long ago he got his driver's license in Lebanon so then we got the call he feels he can drive my car because that he has a car that has car keys so he wants to now have the keys to try to drive the car but Iran to live she and it is all what a shame I would think that I still love him at all but I did and that disturb me much more than the anger I understood my hurt I didn't understand him I didn't begin to understand us we heard earlier how Christopher Dickey was fascinated with his own relationship with his father in fact one of his books summer of deliverance focused on it and touchingly it has a happy ending the next thing that happened was that he had alcoholic hepatitis and he flat lined he just about died and when he recovered from that he simply quit drinking and all of a sudden that fog lifted and it was possible to talk to him in ways that I hadn't been able to talk to him for years and years and years but Jonathan was never able to get back closure with his dad so instead he plays out the reconciliation he wanted in fiction he wrote a prison drama co stars up the film directed by David mackenzie and produced by phone full focused on father and son and makes because you haven't for the patient there is that a threat to the son's life in the fall the ultimately save him.

Lebanon Christopher Dickey Jonathan David mackenzie Iran
"alcoholic hepatitis" Discussed on Dog Save The People

Dog Save The People

05:38 min | 2 years ago

"alcoholic hepatitis" Discussed on Dog Save The People

"Welcome the dogs. They've the people apart cast about how dogs make our lives better. My name is John Bartlett in. I'm your host. Sex was given months to live due to late stage liver disease after years of alcohol and drug abuse sack had to commit to six months Brian in order to qualify for liver transplant out with the help of his dogs. He found the strength to become so Bor his recovery was so successful that alternately. He didn't need to have liver transplant. Zach story didn't end there after healing himself. He created a nonprofit organization named after one of his dogs Marley and began to rescue rehabilitate in rehome deathrow dogs. He's at it's John. Thank you so much for joining us today on dogs, the people. Absolutely, I'm so happy to have you here today. I'm such a fan of your work and everything that you're doing, and I'm so blown away to had this chance to talk to you today. Thanks that makes me feel great. Let's dive into it. I know about your story. And I hope you don't mind because I'm sure you've told the story many many times, but if you don't mind, would you please tell us a little bit about your journey, your health issues your sobriety. So in two thousand and eight I was diagnosed with end stage liver disease, I'd been an alcoholic probably since about fifteen everyday drinker since about seventeen and then I was an all day drinker from two thousand three when I got in a bad car accident and broke my chest shoulder became an all day drinker from that period of time until two thousand eight when I got sick. I was diagnosed. Was what's called acute alcoholic hepatitis? So it's basically just the erosion the sickening of your liver. Just gets worse and worse up into the point where more everything starts to fail. When you're an end stage of the reveal your kidneys aren't working your gallbladder. Your pancreas kind of everything is is shutting down and before that I had worked with dogs. I worked with the humane society, and to be perfectly honest, I when my ten year high school reunion was coming up. I wanted to get even more involved. So that I can kind of brag to my fellow classmates that, you know, even though I was an alcoholic and drug addict, accurately, say it, my reunion that I was that will matter of fact, the humane society my twin brothers getting his second master's degree in my mother best friends a professor in. So I got a figure something I can fit about make myself sound interesting. But I just fell in love with it that was that was worth that. I started in two thousand three two thousand four I really loved that work. But I didn't think there was a future in it. When I got sick. I was admitted to the to the hospital for almost six months appear in Bakersfield and. And then finally admitted to comprehensive transplant centered on Bakersfield done Beverly Hills. I'm skipping over a lot of details. Could take hours to explain the whole process. But what happened was after getting admitted to the conference transplant program at cedars Sinai. They sent me home and said, listen, you need to stay stay near emergency room. Because you're you know, you're deathly ill in things are going to get worse before they get better if they get better. But try to you know, try to find your will to live and try to just keep putting one foot in front of the other keep in mind hadn't I hadn't had a sober day ahead had sober chunk of hours for really anytime leading up to that point on through opiate withdrawal, which I had become addicted to in the hospital from lauded in morphine, I had no will to live. So when I got released I got really kind of obsessed with suicide in taking my life. I was one hundred forty pounds with his gigantic nine months pregnant swollen belly along with. You know, I was leaking from both ends, you know, pretty much blood on a regular basis. You know, they were tapping the was called paracentesis where they tap your stomach rather do it through the front of the back, and they extract all of this liquid which is essentially blood and bile piled that's accumulated in your abdominal cavity side is had everything. Everything wrong with me. Mentally emotionally, physically spiritually, I was just about as low as you can get and in a way kind of a hall moment that I had was gone to the bathroom in bed, which was a regular occurrence our taking this medicine called Angelos, which makes you lose your control of your bowels. It's supposed to help with ammonia build up on your brain your liver failure when your liver failure, the ammonia built up in your brain, really messes with you cognitively he you don't have balance. You can't really understand what day it is. Or what's going on? So it was a really important medicine. But so I'd gone to the bathroom in bed in the middle of the night in. I was naked standing in front of the mirror not recognizing what I saw on the Mary. Just terrified at what was staring back at me. I started to cry and just really kind of wonder how the hell did this happen? How did I get here? What is this? How do I what do I go from here? And I looked down on my dogs. We're looking up at me three of them morally tug in buddy. Like like, nothing was wrong. Like everything was perfect. Like like, I looked terrific. Like they saw who I was. And that was kind of the first day that I I said, all right? I gotta do something. I can't just continue to sit. Sorry for myself. I gotta try and induce something in what we did was we started to walk. This literally put one foot in front of the other take my rescue dogs out up here in the mountains in in just try to walk when I first started. I was on crutches in in really couldn't walk very far just a little bit

liver disease Bakersfield acute alcoholic hepatitis John Bartlett cedars Sinai Zach Marley Brian morphine professor Angelos Beverly Hills six months one foot one hundred forty pounds nine months ten year