35 Burst results for "alberta"

Is In-Person Worship an Essential Service?

The Big Story

02:05 min | 5 d ago

Is In-Person Worship an Essential Service?

"One day when this is all over we'll look back at what covid nineteen revealed about our society. One of the things will notice is what people were not willing to sacrifice the parts of our lives that we consider essential in charge. Do not and will reflect on this when we remember y and where people were willing to break the rules to defy police and public health officials to essentially say this right here is more important to me than not just my own safety but more important to me than everybody's safety and for some families that meant contact with the grandparents or loved ones for some jerks that meant going to a barbecue restaurant or jim but i think it's fair to say that after a year of this if you went back and plotted where exactly the most public. Anti lockdown actions were found in north america. Churches would be at or near the top of the list. Just listen this alberto church that has openly defied public health orders for months has officially been. Shut down thinking chanting in honking. Those are some of the sights and sounds seen inside the fence off on sunday. And then the situation escalates. I don't believe there was attack. Defense people parked without permission on the neighbouring inauguration. Land a lot of racial slurs being thrown out of bounce that was from grace life church in alberta last weekend it was quite a scene. Protesters tore down. Fencing vandalized a car and acted not particularly christian. But it makes sense first of all in the big picture because the rise of the religious right especially in the united states but also here has become linked with defying the government and flaunting public health measures.

Alberto Church Grace Life Church JIM North America Alberta Fencing United States
The Line 5 pipeline: A disaster waiting to happen, or necessary to avoid an energy crisis?

The Big Story

01:53 min | Last week

The Line 5 pipeline: A disaster waiting to happen, or necessary to avoid an energy crisis?

"First one that comes to mind. I'm gonna guess that you went with one of maybe three. The trans mountain pipeline which our federal government purchased a couple of years ago the keystone excel pipeline. Which is actually a pipeline. Because it didn't get built or maybe the end bridge line just because it's by far the largest of all the crude oil and natural gas pipelines. That run through this country. But i'm gonna guess that none of you zero named line five. I would be shocked. Many of you even knew that it existed. I sure didn't even though it has been running from alberta to sarnia ontario for more than sixty years line. Five is an offshoot of that main and bridge line and its distinguishing feature over. The decades is that it runs through a narrow strait between lake michigan and lake here. It's distinguishing feature right. Now is much the same only. It's the danger that it might pose to those two lakes and their shorelines and the legal fight over whether or not to shut it down as well as the massive economic cost. That would come with doing that. In short for more than half a century line five has moved more than half a million barrels of natural gas and crude every day and nothing bad has happened yet so the question is are we pushing our luck. What would happen if something bad did happen. How catastrophic could it be and is it as some governments would argue worth the risk to keep all that fuel flowing.

Sarnia Alberta Ontario Michigan
Casting the net wider: remaking the welfare state

The Economist: The Intelligence

08:23 min | Last month

Casting the net wider: remaking the welfare state

"Good evening my fellow americans to light. I like to talk to you about where we are as we mark one year. She's everything stopped because of this pandemic last night. President joe biden spoke to america in primetime address from the white house for the first time since taking office he promised to direct states to make all adults eligible for covid vaccine by may and discussed the bill he had just signed into law. The american rescue plan one point nine trillion dollar stimulus program extends unemployment. Benefits it helps. Small businesses lowers healthcare premiums for many it provides. Food and nutrition keeps families in their homes. America's not the only country that's responded to the crisis with increasing generosity. I kind of went in. It was like a state of panic. That i honestly i can't tell you day-to-day thoughts were because they were just scrambled. Like what am i gonna do. What am i gonna do. How am i going to survive. How am i going to what. That's more good. Hope a fifty. Seven year old self employed chef based in canada when the pandemic swept away all of her work. She didn't expect much outside. Help after alberta's oil crash in two thousand fourteen. She received no government support and had to close her restaurant. But this time around with covid nineteen. The federal government included the self employed in. Its rescue package. I honestly i couldn't believe it. Until i saw myself until i filled out the application i pressed met and two days later. There was money in my bank account. And i was absolutely shocked across the world from america to canada to western europe. The pandemic prompted a shift in thinking about the role governments can and should play in crises. The greatest expansion of the wealth estate in living memory in this past yet social nada is our public policy editor. She's been tabulating that expansion which currently stands at nearly sixteen trillion dollars. That's more than four times. The support that countries provided during the financial crisis of two thousand and seventy thousand nine. And it's a shot departure from the pas not just in size but in shape too and because of that this could well mark the start of a new chapter for the welfare state. How do you mean how was this response. Different from what came before significantly. I think it mocked a risk shift from individuals to the state with governments essentially bailing out the people say things like schemes in britain and much of europe as well as cash gifts and in unemployment benefits in america what lawsuit of the state stepping up and taking a lot of risks that otherwise would have fallen onto households and individuals that is a sharp contrast from what we've seen over the past couple of decades when risks such as example being replaced by an algorithm or foreign worker had actually increasing been offloaded from governments and employees own individuals and you saw a lot of countries just for pragmatic reasons really move to universalism so with government prefers blanket benefits instead of fussing of eligibility. Or what's the basis of the way that it was before the pandemic the risen one model of course of welfare state but if we take as a starting point side of a social contract where there is a certain amount of poverty relief and social security that is supplied by the state to go back to suit of the early twentieth century. So the great depression in america really triggered the idea of we need some social security and in europe of course in the second world war was reading the moment when people started to realize that there were these collective big risks that they wanted to ensure against and then the big shift in both sides of the atlantic ready staw in about the seventy s and the welfare state becomes leaner and more focused on getting people into jobs and so benefit make order to get the incentives work or boosted welfare in many countries become stigmatized and at the same time. The labor market is made. More flexible has made easy to fire people. And you really see particularly from the early ninety s on more and more risk being shuffled back to individuals but even before covert hit there was talk about a need to change things right absolutely as with so many things covid nineteen has really shown quite a start light on the flaws in the traditional model and although the lessons are different for every country there are a few general ones. The welfare state on the hall was built around yesterday's worker middle skilled work who today is increasingly. Rare will become even rarer we've seen the labor market polarize over the last couple of decades in rich countries. The sheriff skilled in high-skilled workers growing whereas middle skilled and indeed middle income jobs have been falling and will continue to fall and the pandemic also related to that highlighted. How little job. And income security many of our essential workers indeed have because they fall into that low paid bracket low security bracket and then the other thing that covert has exposed is the vulnerability of work with kids of course when schools closed. There was suddenly this extra job that needed to be done. The situation has put childcare which we knew was an issue before the pandemic but it sort of forced onto the agenda and one of the encouraging things. I think that might be coming out of this. Is countries making better plans for things like child benefit. So part of the coronavirus relief plan. Joe biden will temporarily raise the child tax credit quite significantly and democrats already whispering the really like to make this change permanent. And do you think we'll see that pattern more. Broadly a will to make permanent to the kinds of changes. The governments were essentially shocked into by the pandemic. The will is that. I think it's too early to tell but the demand is clearly. Then that's an important start. Say lots of people. Such as mrs hope who we heard earlier have experienced vulnerability that can come with the show but also have seen how the state can help these moments of shock. And i think it would be very hard in a next crisis for states to roll out similar policy bazookas to help the people so i think on the demand side and again this is something we already sold before the pandemic domon strengthening for better more generous safety nets are that will only grow on the back of the pandemic experience whether the will is that is launching a political question and it's also a fiscal question but i am carefully hopeful because this past year has provided a live experiment of all sorts of policies that otherwise would have taken years to get the political backing for and so after all this experimentation. What are the lessons from the pandemic that you think should last. I think the most important goal here is just to ensure or cushion workers against certain shocks and just to make that a bit more practical and most of communists have argued that covered his shown the generosity of benefits should be pegged to the state of the economy so that when indeed were going through a mass period of shock and it's much harder to actually find a job benefits should be more generous. And when the economy's healthy again then you can make them a bit. Less generous against more flexibility in the welfare system to short revamped post covid social safety net would on the one hand provide enough flexibility to incentivize work but also have a state that wasn't afraid to step in when disaster hits and crucially estate that would also invest in human capital in childcare in health in educating the next generation as well as rescaling older workers today and that second element is important because just bringing out a huge umbrella on the stormiest days won't be

America President Joe Biden Canada Western Europe Europe White House Alberta Federal Government Britain Depression Joe Biden MRS
Meet Christa Couture, Author, Indigenous, Disabled, Mom

Good Life Project

04:50 min | Last month

Meet Christa Couture, Author, Indigenous, Disabled, Mom

"There's something really important than i think. We need to talk about first. And that is the fact that apparently you fold everything including dishcloths. We gotta start with you. It's wtrw yes i do. I do fold everything away. Gosh my secret is out. I mean well. I am very like tidy very organized person and you know on one hand. I love like the drawer. Everything being neatly tidied and put away because then it's like pleasing. It's like a small little tiny moment of of having fresh flowers. It's just like oh that's nice And i think for a while. I mean there's probably a part in my life for any little mishap would crush me and i think it's sort of turned me into a bit of a neat freak because it meant that that was an area of my life i could kill some control over so there was a time. We're just kinda served me well to think okay. Well at least taken full these dish put them away so that when it opened the door. It's not total chaos. I can't do much else. So i think i've always been a tidy person. But i think it probably got heightened in the in the last years but yes. It's true it's true. I'm i think. I know where you may be got some secret intel. All i'm going to share is at the person who related this very critical intel to me said it also happened to be pretty life changing for them. So that's good to hear that a positive listed in the beginning right but but then ultimately life changing in every way match so you grew up. Sounds like into a certain extent. Kenneth splitting your time part With your mom and canada and then summers aish with your dad in montclair new jersey to set aside a new york for those who don't know where that is. Your dad Was cree and sounds like he was. A healer was a culture her first nations culture part of your life from the earliest days. I'm curious yeah. And in this way that i wouldn't have known was remarkable or even to name because it was just there and my dad did also live in northern alberta. There was yeah definitely split my time and a few few homes as per custody agreements and my parents both moving a lot and so where he lived in northern alberta was was on a a cre- reserve and and he was a healer. And so you know what. My dad's house. There was a sweat lodge in usually one or two ts in the yard and he ran various ceremonies and in the summer. We would go to another camp where he ran fast for people. And i would my sister and i would just be running around in the field and he would be doing that work. And so you know as a kid i didn't i. Of course. I took it for granted that the swizz present in my life and that i had access to ceremony which of course for a lot of indigenous people. There's been you know. A break for a lot of heartbreaking reasons and so i feel really grateful that it was just there i mean the soaraway. I feel about it now. Is that you know as a teenager. I was like okay. Whatever dad and then by the time in my twenties i was ready to come back and say okay wait. Can we now talk about this. Can you share these teachings with me. More you know explicit way was when he was was sick and when he died and so i wasn't able to kind of learn more from him in a more direct way but but of course it it shaped me and it was. It was there. My child had the. I mean even just to know that this is a part of you from the earliest days until learn through us moses through just being around it. I think that's so powerful. It's something that i've been come kind of fascinated with the concept of lineage and heritage over last couple of years. Maybe i'm at that point in my life where i'm getting curious about it. And if it like so often so many of us really know nothing about you. Know not just our parents as human beings but also the lineage that you know their parents and their parents and their parents and and what may have been lost along the way. Yeah and it's interesting. What gets shared. Because my dad was also french that my last name couture was my dad's last name but i know i know about french. Canadian like i would feel a bit shakey thing. I say a french canadian ancestry. I don't feel like. I'm part of that cultural group in the present whereas my from my mother's side she scandinavian and her parents lived in new norway. Alberta says it all right there and and so there was. There was some presence of that. You know adhere the stories and some of the words and the way. They talked about being norwegian and swedish. Was there but dia french. But i kinda i don't really talk about some like i wouldn't know what to say so it's interesting with the lineage. Because it's also like what was what happened to be present and so i can't the ways that i think of myself. I mean i think of my father very much as a cre- person although he was also mixed you know technically

Intel Alberta Montclair Kenneth New Jersey Canada New York New Norway
Is Biden Delivering on His Climate Promises?

The Ten News

01:28 min | Last month

Is Biden Delivering on His Climate Promises?

"His twenty twenty campaign. President biden promised move fast on environmental protections. Now that he's been in office for a few months. How's he doing on that promise. I want to hear everything well. So far his administration is added eighteen new regulations and overturned twenty policies that environmental groups like the audubon society and the natural resources. Defense council opposed now toll. Cain they've stopped a coppermine from operating in arizona. After local native american tribes argued it could endanger sacred sites and sensitive habitats administration. Also pump the brakes on a decision to slash three million acres of northern spotted owl habitat. At least for now maybe the biggest decision. So far was ending the permit to finish the keystone excel pipeline. Which was supposed to carry crude oil from alberta canada all the way to the southern states in the gulf coast. Why is that a big deal. Well environmentalists were against the pipeline from the beginning over safety concerns and the increased greenhouse gases that the pipeline would release into the atmosphere. It also threatens the water supply and lands of the rosebud sioux tribe and other native peoples. Is there more work to do abso lutely. But everything's gotta start somewhere right

President Biden Audubon Society Defense Council Cain Arizona Gulf Coast Alberta Canada
US, Canada pledge to achieve net-zero emissions by 2050

Monocle 24: The Globalist

00:23 sec | Last month

US, Canada pledge to achieve net-zero emissions by 2050

"President joe biden said that he and canadian prime minister justin trudeau have agreed to work towards achieving net zero emissions by twenty fifty. The partnership comes after biden revoke to keep permit for the keystone excel pipeline which would have transported eight hundred and thirty thousand barrels a day of carbon intensive heavy crude from canada's alberta to nebraska

President Joe Biden Prime Minister Justin Trudeau Biden Canada Alberta Nebraska
With no Keystone XL pipeline, whats Albertas Plan B?

The Big Story

05:02 min | 2 months ago

With no Keystone XL pipeline, whats Albertas Plan B?

"Jordan heath rawlings. This is the big story. Jason marcus off is the alberta correspondent for maclean's magazine. He joins us to try to explain what happens now. Hello jason wish me luck so in the couple of weeks now. Since joe biden has taken office and immediately cancelled the keystone excel permit. How his albert reacted. Not well as could be. Expected is opposed the way i'd put it. You know jason kenney got elected with a three word slogan not a phrase three word slogan jobs economy pipelines pipelines was the big punctuation point on that. And it's been a big issue for help out bird government and the economy for a long time that we don't have this big glut of oil sands and oil were producing and nowhere really to shit or no way to ship it out of there. That's been a big drag on alpern awale prices and benjamin prices for quite a while now keystone excel has been in the works for basically a decade now uh since they applied for this project as transcanada energies into long that they're no longer called transplanted called tc energy. Canada became less of an on vogue term to use in the names and this this has become the gun of the poster child. The original poster child for environmental activism and push back against oil industry pipelines The americans have been pushing back on this south from the left for quite a while. obama killed in two thousand fifteen. He decided to not allow permit. Donald trump brought it back in two thousand seventeen and it was no surprise. Almost anybody that Biden was going to kill it in in twenty twenty one Once he got nauseated and yet it was portrayed as a major disappointment and huge letdown for the government and to some extent for canada. Yeah i was gonna ask if obama killed this thing once already And it's really unpopular with the american left. Why didn't it seem like we were more prepared for this. You know i played a clip In the intro of kenny reacting on the day of biden's inauguration but surely as soon as it became clear he won. This was coming down the pipeline. There was an optimism and almost. I'd say an idealism about how a biden administration might act. People knew well the the history and the baggage that this project had that it was killed by obama when joe biden was the vice president of course and this had become this iconic push for the environmental movement did it it had that totemic status and yet there were people within the canadian government and especially the alberta government who thought they crashed an argument Through which this would work and that had several layers to it one Was the fact that there were many union. Jobs in america And in canada on the go for this there were was going to produce jobs at a time when jobs are scarce and these economies need these construction industrial and infrastructure jobs and they were hoping that would appeal to the lunch bucket. Union leanings of joe biden in his administration. There was also an argument that this was not the same project and the ever loyal sent throughout the same oil sands that they were in twenty fifteen when this project was rejected by obama or before twenty fifty back when there was much less of an issue of oil sands cleaning up their act like there is now out the oil sands have worked their best to lower the carbon intensity and the carbon footprint of their projects and they were going Tc energy the company that was going to build. This pipeline was talking about making their project. Carbon zero carbon neutral net zero through various means the actual pipeline construction itself. Not the oil flowing through it and there was also gonna talk Giving indigenous which oppose this quite often in the states Some equity stake in it so there were various ways. The canadians albertans thought they could thread the needle and make this an appeal peeling project. Make it some kind of package. Deal with other green initiatives that That canada and biden would go through jointly but the legacy of this project the baggage of this project mistakes the politics surrounding this whole saga from obama to trump to biden Made it an easy win for For biden to kill despite all the positives that this project could have given

Jordan Heath Rawlings Jason Marcus Maclean's Magazine Joe Biden Alpern Awale Barack Obama Jason Kenney Canada Biden Administration Transcanada Canadian Government Alberta Government Alberta Donald Trump Jason Benjamin Biden Kenny America
"alberta" Discussed on Front Burner

Front Burner

05:16 min | 2 months ago

"alberta" Discussed on Front Burner

"Hi i'm michelle shepherd host of sherman any from cbc podcasts in nineteen ninety. Nine fifteen year old charming and on devel- disappeared on her way to a job that police believed in exist. Four months later her remains were found in a wooded ravine. I revisit the case that stayed with me for over twenty years. ever. Since i've i covered it as a cub crime reporter for the toronto star you can find uncover charming or on your favorite podcast app. Hi damon fareless host of hunting warhead from. Cbc podcasts in the norwegian newspaper. Vga hunting warhead follows a global team of police and journalists says the attempt to dismantle a massive network of predators on the dark web winner of the grand prize for best investigative reporting of the new york festivals and recommended by the guardian vulture and the globe and mail. You can find hunting warhead on. Cbc listen or wherever you get your podcasts. johnny. I want to pick up on something that you mentioned a little bit earlier. That you know when the alberta government for started these initiatives the inquiry and then the adjacent war room That the ultimate goal was to improve the public image of alberta's energy industry ultimately to help get more of algirdas oil and gas to market. And how much evidence is that. That is actually Working that the strategy has been working. I i don't think that there's any evidence. I think a lot of people would agree with me. and in fact To the contrary that this is actually Embarrassing the province actually The this inquiry into Attemps alleged attempts to discredit the province are actually doing. Just that itself It feels like kenyan government have essentially painted themselves into a corner With the war and the inquiry and now they're just kind of trying to find a way out that this report will be quietly released Without taking any more political flak alberta In canada nationally and even in the us And it has been getting flack Usa today headline Recently from climate point which is it's weekly update on the environment and it was called biden. Takes aim at fossil fuels while alberta canada takes aim at journalists and it reference to story by jeff damn vicki advice about how tammy nethon. That report We talked about earlier suggested. Journalists who cover the environment are also part of the worldwide conspiracy and so alberta's definitely making headlines on this but it's for all the wrong reasons charles anything to add there. Well it depends on what you think. The real purpose of the inquiry is and what the war room is many political pundits and over to think that you know kenny had used the whole fightback strategy to i fire up. The party's political base during the election. And it did that and and now you know it's more about keeping you know his political base on side because polling shows support for the party and and kenny's own personal popularity has plummeted in you know at this point every time there's another scandal involving the inquiry critic says well there goes the last bit of credibility the inquiry had and then there's another negative revelation you know as we saw this week with work the story by by sandy garcia. No and at this point you know environmental groups. The opposition editorial writers and many in the public are calling for the kenny government to.

sandy garcia canada johnny today Four months later kenny jeff damn vicki over twenty years charles sherman Nine fifteen year alberta government Cbc cbc alberta kenyan government this week michelle shepherd damon fareless Usa
Biden’s first call to foreign leader is with Trudeau

Dark Secret Place

01:33 min | 3 months ago

Biden’s first call to foreign leader is with Trudeau

"President's first foreign leader call was to to justin trudeau of canada and apparently was completely cordial trudeau did not bring up the the the pipeline that biden cancelled. And just just to give you. The baseline of that pipeline has been laid from from canada to nedal nato londe texas that that is a ongoing pipeline. This is a shorter route. The pipeline goes nearly north south. I'm this was an improvement in efficiency improvement where the the tunnel had in canada would would require that a new section of pipeline belaid and almost forty five degree angle from from alberta through montana and then meeting up in in i've believed south dakota so anyway this is getting entail thousands and thousands of canadian jobs and american union jobs and it's been canceled. Trudeau did not bring that up. It was sort of a formal initial. Hi it's me. Joe biden and i'm the president of the united states now. Maybe you've been catching the

Justin Trudeau Canada Trudeau Biden North South Nato American Union Texas Alberta Montana South Dakota Joe Biden United States
Biden's Cancellation Of Permit For Keystone XL Pipeline Faces Mixed Reactions

Environment: NPR

03:40 min | 3 months ago

Biden's Cancellation Of Permit For Keystone XL Pipeline Faces Mixed Reactions

"Now president biden isn't just focusing on the pandemic one of the first things. He did after his inauguration. Yesterday was to cancel a permit to build the keystone excel pipeline that pipeline would transported crude oil from alberta to the texas gulf coast would have entered the us in montana from their yellowstone. Public radio's kayla roche reports on the mixed reaction to the cancellation tribes and environmental groups. Here and in other states the pipeline would have crossed have been fighting the keystone excel pipeline in court for roughly a decade last year in a video by indigenous collective buffalo defense. Roughly ten for pet tribal members protested in northern montana. They lined up with their hands held up fists and repeated a lakota phrase. That's become slogan. For the movement against pipelines like the dakota access pipeline keystone excel. Johnny were drawing. Water is life. The canadian company behind keystone xl tc energy operates a pipeline which spilled thousands of gallons of oil in south dakota and twenty seventeen and in north dakota in nine thousand hundred activists and tribal members say the pipeline endangers water-quality bricks tribal land treaties and pipeline. Construction brings the threat of human trafficking. Biden's decision to revoke a presidential permit. Donald trump granted canadian developer energy in two thousand nineteen puts a heart stop to the billion dollar project. Among those celebrating was fort belknap indian community council president. Andy work a member of the onny tribe. I'm just really happy. I'm really happy. And i'm really thankful in south dakota the rosebud sioux tribal government. Join fort belknap. In suing to stop the pipeline. Rosebud sioux president rodney bordeaux was busy coordinating cove nineteen vaccinations. When he heard biden cancelled. The permit agreed victory. Hopefully that's the end of it but will continue to fight it we're gonna watch it but pipelines supporters are seeing the collapse of ten years of work. Tc energy which declined to comment for the story. Released a statement in anticipation of the permit cancellation yesterday and said it. Suspending further activity on the pipeline county commissioners in rural northeastern montana where agriculture is the dominant industry said they had been looking forward to the tax revenue which the state estimated at sixty three million dollars. A year extremely disappointed mary. Armstrong a commissioner in montana's valley county where very large county with very few people seems like a perfect place in Perfectly compatible with us montana. Republicans strongly criticized by an institution. But keep an excel has also been supported by democrats here. Including former governor steve bullock and senator jon tester yesterday tester said he still supports the development of the pipeline but with conditions he had encouraged the biden administration to meet with supporters and opponents before making a decision while the pipeline from alberta looks dead for now the premier of that province jason kenney yesterday pushed for consequences the canadian province of alberta invest in one point. Five billion dollars in the project in a statement. Yesterday kenny culver biden and prime minister justin trudeau to discuss the decision. However the us government refuses to open the door to a constructive and respectful dialogue about these issues that it is clear that the government of canada impose meaningful trade and economic sanctions to defend our country's vital economic interest canadian prime minister justin trudeau in a statement expressed. Disappointment invite is decision but acknowledged biden's choice to fulfil a promise. He made during his campaign run

Texas Gulf Coast Kayla Roche Northern Montana Montana Keystone Xl Tc Energy Biden Fort Belknap Indian Community South Dakota Rosebud Sioux Tribal Governmen Fort Belknap Rosebud Sioux Rodney Bordeaux Alberta Donald Trump Buffalo North Dakota Dakota Johnny
Keystone XL pipeline halted as Biden moves to cancel permit

WSJ Opinion: Potomac Watch

00:21 sec | 3 months ago

Keystone XL pipeline halted as Biden moves to cancel permit

"Another order that is slated for biden ends day one signature is. He says he's going to revoke the permit granted to the keystone x. l. pipeline and just as a reminder. This is the project that is intended to carry crude oil from alberta canada to nebraska. Where it's going to link up with another pipeline going to the gulf

Biden Alberta Nebraska Canada
Work on Keystone XL pipeline suspended ahead of Biden action

AP News Radio

00:45 sec | 3 months ago

Work on Keystone XL pipeline suspended ahead of Biden action

"The Canadian company behind the keystone XL oil pipeline says it suspended work in anticipation of incoming president Joe Biden revoking its permit the seventeen hundred mile pipeline would carry roughly eight hundred thousand barrels of oil a day from Alberta to the Texas Gulf coast first proposed in two thousand eight the pipeline has become a symbol of the tensions between economic development and curbing the fossil fuel emissions that are causing climate change the Obama administration rejected it but president Donald Trump revived it now Joe Biden plans to reverse that presidential permit the project is meant to expand critical oil exports for Canada which has the third largest oil reserves in the world I'm showing up there

Texas Gulf Coast Joe Biden Obama Administration Alberta Donald Trump Canada
Canada urges Biden not to cancel oil pipeline on first day

Sean Hannity

00:24 sec | 3 months ago

Canada urges Biden not to cancel oil pipeline on first day

"One of Joe Biden's first acts in office. Maybe the end the Keystone XL Pipeline project in their reports that could happen is early is day one. President Obama initially rejected the $9 billion project to build that pipeline to transport oil from Alberta, Canada to Nebraska. Then down to the Gulf Coast. President Trump gave the project that green Like two years later, though, both environmentalists and local Indian tribes have tried to stop it.

Joe Biden President Trump President Obama Alberta Nebraska Gulf Coast Canada
Has the Internet Permanently Changed How We Speak?

Wild Wild Tech

05:14 min | 3 months ago

Has the Internet Permanently Changed How We Speak?

"We'll come back to wild wild tech a show about the strange frankenstein's monster of technology and culture shambling through our lives. I'm josh rivera. And i'm doing erika weber. I am the frankenstein and joshua is the monster. Let me paint you a picture jordan. It's the early nineteen eighty s. we're in calgary alberta. It's cold because this is calgary and a man named wayne pearson. Is typing three letters online for the first time l. I think you're familiar with this. Wouldn't rate yes. It clearly means lots of love joshua. It's like it's laugh out loud right. Yeah i mean this one's everywhere right with a few exceptions like you just said like everyone gets it. It's an example of what we might call like. Internet speak which can be a phrase acronym or a word that was either born or popularized on the internet. Do you have any favorites. A oh laughing my ass off or ass for you over there what else. I never really liked raffle because it sounded too fluffy. Yeah funny funny thing about raffle ruffles. Actually fallen out of popularity. No one really use it anymore. Probably because they feel the same way you do so your your taste maker good. Everyone should listen to me more. I have a friend who just types wrecked r. e. t. all caps when someone gets there s handed to them but like only in a very minor inconsequential way. It feels a little stupid talking about this stuff right. But i also think it's fun i mean we're both riders and language is kind of easy to take for granted. It just sort of like works and you don't really appreciate for the thousands of miracles that it takes to make it work so talking to a link and we've got to here today just reminds you of how much magic there is and how we speak to one another. There are very obvious differences in the way we speak and like sometimes it's fun. Pack that but before we go any further we should because this is an english language podcast or naturally going to discuss english and because language is also culture. It's worth noting. A big part of how. The internet influence language comes from cultures borrowing from one another sometimes in ways that are not particularly great or well-considered. We're mostly focusing on the tech angle. Here as the cultural one is enough to fuel an entire podcast. Yeah much as. I would like to pitch that podcast. Personally you'd be better off going to listen to the allusion est within a by helen saltzman. She talks about this kind of thing. All the time and you know talks about the conflict between loving the english language and also knowing that it has committed atrocities so today. I'm going to introduce you to two of my favorite interviews so far. The first is someone who has around fifty years of experience in linguistics and comes from your side of the jordan. Well i'm david crystal academically. I'm honorary professor of linguistics at the university of banja. Here in north wales. Also really. I spend most of my time at home especially lockdown writing books about language in linguistics and the english language gender close aspects of the internet to. He's here to give us an understanding of how the internet has impacted our language and the ways. It has actually happened before but first he starts with something. That's a little bit surprising. For all the words we don't know and rapidly growing lexicon. The internet's impact on the english. Language is actually quite small. Not because there isn't a lot of change but because the english language is so vast. Let's just stay with english for the moment over the past twenty years. I'm sure the internet has added several thousand new words and phrases to the english language. But heck the english language has over a million words each many more than that nobody knows. How many so an extra few thousand isn't a big deal. As far as vocabulary is concerned and then grandma. Oh well as far as i can tell the grammatical constructions. We will using back in one thousand nine hundred ninety just before the win. Came in exactly the same as the grammatical constructions. You and i are using right now. According to professor crystal this has had a side effect. I'm sure you've seen before. Those who treat changes in the language as a sign of cultural decay. So i went to see a show by susie. Dent she does dictionary kona on a countdown. I don't know if any of this is meaningful to you countdown. british television program with word challenges and number challenges and she does the dictionary corner anyway. She did this show about language and she talked about how people are often very concerned about it. Changing her thing was the word. Mischievous people often pronounces mischievous because they think it rhymes with devious. But it's actually mischievous more people probably say mischievous that. It will probably just change the word that kind of thing. Yeah and this is one of the things that professor crystal talked about length. The languages nature change. It's not inherently good or bad. it's just change.

Josh Rivera Erika Weber Wayne Pearson Joshua Calgary Helen Saltzman Frankenstein University Of Banja Alberta David Crystal North Wales Jordan Susie Dent Professor Crystal
Canada surpasses 15000 deaths related to COVID-19 with 37 new deaths in Quebec

Forum

00:53 sec | 4 months ago

Canada surpasses 15000 deaths related to COVID-19 with 37 new deaths in Quebec

"Has now surpassed 15,000 covert 19 related deaths. The latest numbers were announced as vaccines began to slowly roll out and some provinces imposed tighter health measures. Dan Carp in check reports. The grim milestone was reached after Quebec reported 37 deaths on Monday, pushing the national total past 15,000. Alberta. Officials also say more than 100 people have died in their province over the holidays. Health experts say the death toll is a reminder of just how serious the corona viruses Dr Gerald Evans and infectious disease expert at Queen's University in Kingston, Ontario, says Canada is seeing the large numbers of deaths from the virus that are being seen around the world. And Evans says the statistics should be a wake up call to anyone who believes the dangers of covert 19 are overhyped. Several provinces, including Quebec and Ontario, the country's two most populous have imposed tougher restrictions and lockdowns over the holiday period.

Dan Carp Dr Gerald Evans Queen's University Quebec Alberta Infectious Disease Ontario Kingston Evans Canada
Yemen in 'imminent danger' of world's worst famine

UN News

01:15 min | 4 months ago

Yemen in 'imminent danger' of world's worst famine

"In yemen. Fresh alert from the un. That time is running out to avoid famine in the country out of two million children who need treatment for acute malnutrition three hundred and sixty thousand. Our risk of dying if they do not receive medical care said well food programs spokesperson thompson. Theory we are running out of approximately six million. People cannot put food on their tables. This is a disaster. This is a ticking time bomb in the world needs to act into now. The un refugee agency unhcr also warned that hundreds of thousands of internally displaced people also face life threatening food insecurity they have been victims of ceaseless violence on the covid nineteen pandemic which left them without work to support themselves. Spokesperson baba balak told journalists in geneva. He cited a new. Un food security survey in yemen which showed the risk of famine like conditions was increasing data indicated that the biggest dangers were in areas of conflict. Which are home to half of yemen's displays population of four million the district's worst affected by acute food. Insecurity are in mihrab alberta albion hadhramaut and and al jawf governor. It's out of a total population of thirty and a half million more than twenty. Three million yemenis need some form of humanitarian assistance

Yemen UN Baba Balak Unhcr Thompson Geneva Hadhramaut Al Jawf
Nebraska Doctor Craves More Help, Less Hero Talk

Short Wave

03:45 min | 4 months ago

Nebraska Doctor Craves More Help, Less Hero Talk

"As of yesterday nebraska is considered one of the highest risk states in the country and some of alberta. Those patients have ended up in the hospital at the university of nebraska medical center. Where his partner. Dr jasmine marcellin is an infectious disease specialist. This particular hospital is known as one of the most pandemic ready hospitals in the entire country. Back in twenty fourteen. The hospital had one of only a handful of biocontainment units that were prepared to take in a bowl of patients and now it's taking in hundreds of covert patient's doctor merlin. How are things looking right now at the hospital at this point in time well we have been going through a pattern of a surge the last several weeks and we we were noticing that we're seeing more and more patients that are coming through all of that leading up to the hospital becoming more and more full and that was something that we were seeing across nebraska and my understanding is that you started with to covert units last spring But you have a lot more now. Yeah so our our hospital is. We still have a little bit of room. Not much room left how it has progressed over. The last several months has made it so that we a by early last week we had been up to ten covid units that we stood up in the hospital and so several floors of One tower we had to jump to another tower to create more covid units. And we seem to have just need for more and more units being opened. Yeah so. I know that you know. Even though that nebraska has a tremendous amount of cases per capita one of the highest in the country. Right now it does not have a mask mandate in place Many schools remain in person. You know restaurants and bars are open for indoor dining. I think you know it's safe to assume. Many people gathered in in groups over the thanksgiving holiday. What are you anticipating for the trajectory of cases in the region and capacity at the hospital. So usually we expect to see that you know when you see numbers doubling maybe every fourteen to twenty one days we can expect to see that after major events or large gatherings would be anticipating surges. And so as a whole as health care professionals in nebraska. We have all been pretty anxious about the holiday season knowing that. It's really such an integral part of a society to gather together but what we're concerned about is what the impact of people continuing to gather indoors is going to have and i'm just sad for what we could have prevented with more definitive actions. You know quite frankly. Sometimes it's devastating seeing the extent of the damage that this does to individuals and the death that it can cause all of that is just. It's preventable thing. That is the biggest tragedy me is is. It didn't have to be

Nebraska Dr Jasmine Marcellin University Of Nebraska Medical Infectious Disease Alberta
"alberta" Discussed on Front Burner

Front Burner

06:54 min | 5 months ago

"alberta" Discussed on Front Burner

"Can you compare him to other leaders around the country for me. Maybe i don't know. Doug ford in ontario. It's been really interesting watching. Doug ford and jason kenney in this because i think of all i mean there are quite a good number of provincial premiers who are conservative come from considered a parties but those two seem to be the most conservative logically. They've been quite different. We don't hear the same appeals to personal responsibility or the same disdain for lockdowns from doug ford in fact we've seen quite assertively eventually. Our modeling showed that if nothing was done we could face six thousand new daily cases in the coming weeks effective monday november twenty third. Twelve o one. Am toronto and peel will be moved into lockdown. People say it was too late enough but he has acted at much lower levels of spread then. Alberto alberta has a much higher rates. Now and jason kenny's reluctance has to act has been much greater than that of doug for not only that but also his tone is different and i think the tone matters so much in terms of public health messaging especially when we know that concerned politicians will reach a certain type of person that might not be listening to the daily briefings from the public officers of health. Right can you give me an example of that. So an example. Is you know a few times a week. We hear dr dna hinshaw the chief medical officer of health doing her news conference and her news update last monday. We announced eight hundred sixty new cases on sunday less than a week. Later we announced one thousand five hundred eighty four. She has a huge following of people who really hang on her every word. Listen to her on a regular basis. That's not everybody in this province and that's going to skew more urban jason kenny's political base skews more rural more conservative people who are less likely to want to do less in terms of economic activities social activities to keep themselves and other safe. There's a certain value when jason kenney gets up there and talks and he's done it a few times but not much much prefer to talk about the the economy job activities and defended the oil sector. These are things that play much more as wheelhouse then using the heavy hand of government to restrict people's liberties. It's a good thing that he wasn't using that kind of personal responsibility. Rhetoric and libertarian rhetoric during the started this pandemic otherwise we might have had a severe first-wave as quebec some of the us states or elsewhere. Why do you think he switched his tone moving into the second wave. And i used to have alluded to this earlier but i just be interested to hear your thoughts on why you think the switch happened. Pert of it is is the economic situation now. Berta i mean al. Burdens are still affluent. We still make a lot of money in oil there. The average wage is still higher than elsewhere but the decline has gone so fast. Now bernadette is really at a dire level that politicians do no matter of any stripe would need to respond in a much higher rate than they they might elsewhere and he's admitted that he has his own ideological perspective on this. You know he believes in personal freedom. He believes in liberties he's enjoyed saying. I'll open for businesses. The free aceh province. Would you describes a lockdown first of all constitutes a massive invasion of the exercise of people's fundamental rights and a massive impact on their not only their personal liberties but their ability to put food on the table. The other part is who's going to be in his ear. He's a conservative politician and his caucusing cabinet skew more rural than the rest the rest of the province and people. He's listening to Will skew more pro business. It was really instructive to hear him a few weeks ago. He was doing an online presentation or speech to the rural municipalities. Have overt group for counselors. And there he really had to stress. That look guys. Cova is serious. You might not see it in all your small communities. But it's a very serious risk. You need to make sure people are obeying public health. Risks you social distancing wearing masks when they're too close we have seen significant spread In various times over the over the past months in rural communities And we have. I think seen in some communities a skepticism in some rural communities skepticism about the The danger that covert poses so that signals to me that he's hearing from a lot of people that there is outright skepticism of even having rules or having gaza having life changed from covid. So he's he's hearing that much more than people will hearsay in calgary or tan and that seems to be coloring. His palsy response that is much slower than that of almost any leader other leader in the country. Well it's interesting to hear you say that certainly there have been these look like sizeable protests of people who are protesting for greater freedoms. Don't want lockdowns. But his his approval ratings are also in the toilet right like he is the worst rated leader in the country on his pandemic response from his own people by a pretty wide margin according to a recent leget poll. How do you explain that. Those are still pretty marginal groups. I walk around. Calgary go to stores. People are wearing masks. There are the occasional person squawking about you know not want wear masks and posting it on facebook and that get lot of attention just like these protests will but that's still a minority as it is in toronto when you see images of protests in terms of his popularity it speaks to that urban consensus that has been building right. Alberta needs to do more on kobe that this appeal to personal responsibility and appeal to prioritizing the economy over public health is is failing and that layers on top of other things. He's done to irritate the public. Some various budget cuts that. He's taken the huge war. He's had with public health workers during this pandemic over contracts with the doctors with the nurses with several of the unions. Alberta government plans to cut up to eleven thousand jobs in health services. At least eight hundred healthcare workers have walked off the job in alberta. There's a lot of frustration with how kenny is leading more. Not leading this province right.

Doug ford jason kenny jason kenney toronto calgary Alberta Alberto alberta medical officer ontario facebook aceh bernadette Cova gaza quebec us
"alberta" Discussed on Front Burner

Front Burner

06:08 min | 5 months ago

"alberta" Discussed on Front Burner

"He mentioned before that during the first wave things weren't so bad in alberta. Can you walk me through. How it is that things got to where they are today. I mean you mentioned sort of failure of contact tracing jason. Kenney has repeatedly toted the provincial. Contact tracing app but according to the province it's only been used to track down people who came into contact someone who tested positive with covid in approximately twenty cases twenty. You heard me correct. But what else are we talking about care. So much of it seems to have been two major factors. One is that people let their guard. We went through shutdowns of business. Schools being closed Life being totally disrupted in the spring are provincial leaders Certainly not berta. We're very proud to reopen things and both devout freedom and alberta has done extremely well on a global scale By taking a lighter approach restrictions than many other jurisdictions that had vast lockdowns and aggressive enforcement and micromanaging people's lives many of those jurisdictions have seen much higher levels of infections and fatalities and people were going back to their regular lives. they were having parties again. They were going out again with their friends. So that happened and the second thing that happened. Was that spite the fact that we knew that a second wave in the fall when things got colder was very very likely. It doesn't appear that are provincial. Leadership really acted with that in mind and tried to put the squeeze down on our on our goings out and our interactions before them. Because of this balance that so many leaders more than perhaps elsewhere had desire that they had to balance the economy and the and the pandemic as they say as i've said from day one of the pandemic our response is always need to be equally dedicated to protecting both lives and livelihoods jason kenny. What has he been like as a leader. What have we heard from kenny. In the last few weeks and the months since we've had this rapidly increasing cova curve. We haven't heard much. He's often talked about wanting to be laser focused on the economy in alberta. We have to get to work and again restored the jobs that have been lost and revived the businesses. That are barely hanging on. And with some good reason i'll burn as a con. Mi has taken a harder hit than any other in the country during this pandemic in large part because the pandemic came alongside a major crash in oil prices and crash in oil production so there is a huge demand for leadership to help out with with diversifying the economy supporting oil sector. Just helping people in really bad economic straights but to focus so much on that you know and take your off this global pandemic this very short sharp brutal crisis and albert is facing is has made things worse. He's talked incessantly about out. Burdens personal responsibility boasting that we have the free aceh province right now. We've seen other. Jurisdictions implement sweeping lockdowns indiscriminately violating people's rights and destroying livelihoods. Nobody wants that to happen here. In alberta at a time when that message seems to be helping confused people as to what they should or shouldn't do. We were the last province. To have no province-wide mandatory mask mandate although mayors calgary and edmonton have put them in That we can still eat at bars and restaurants. They've had some some shut down. Some of them have been voluntary and some of them have been mandatory but It's nowhere near the levels. He imposed in the spring. And this idea of of focusing on personal responsibility has the province given people any guidance on what that means it's mixed if the messaging is not been very clear. They often talk about what he should stay. Within a certain cohort. You have your work cohort. You have your child's school or daycare. Co workers have sport cohort remember. That a cohort is a group of people who don't have to follow all cove restrictions at all times to enable an activity such as a team sports to take place. This is not the case in most workplaces. I don't think that people will have a real clear sense on what that means as opposed to other provinces where they talked about you know one or two other households in your bubble people you know. Mix that in with fatigue. The competed messaging. And it's a recipe for people to gather at restaurants have parties in their apartments or houses. You know generally violate the good precepts of the pandemic safety is and the only other thing that that that's another side of that. Is that this personal responsibility. That jason kenney has comes with a lack of enforcement.

alberta jason kenny jason kenney albert jason aceh calgary Mi Co edmonton
"alberta" Discussed on The Current

The Current

04:46 min | 5 months ago

"alberta" Discussed on The Current

"Alberta no longer has good data and that they are having to look at the other provinces In order to make their decisions so i'm not sure how they can make smart targeted decisioned without current data. I don't think kenny has any choice. Now to institute some sort of circuit breaker lockdown. Were you thinking as the province. Didn't hear from jason kenney over the last eleven days in cases kept rising and rising and rising to be quite honest all other premier who have been in isolation have continued to show up and make themselves available to press and media He did not the last time. Albertans saw him Was as you said on the twelfth of november And at that time he appeared in the elbert oppressor virtually via either resume caller however he did it so the opportunity was there for him to continue to do so Allegedly he has appeared in fundraisers this week virtually and yet he has made himself available to speak twelve burns. Just before i let you go. What are you looking for in terms of leadership. This is a really difficult moment. Not just for your family but for your province. What are you looking for. Well to be honest if you look at the history of the nineteen eighteen influenza pandemic but governments that were able to make a difference and prevent desks were those who showed strong leadership and who had strong communication about what they expected from their electorate. And in this case I don't think premium kenny has demonstrated leadership and he definitely has not demonstrated strong communication and messaging. And so they they need to come out today when they make their announcements with a very strong message so that all albertans know exactly what to do. I wish you the best. You have a lot going on in your house. And i hope everybody's okay take care of yourself. Thank you so much you as well thank you..

kenny jason kenney Alberta elbert
"alberta" Discussed on Front Burner

Front Burner

03:39 min | 5 months ago

"alberta" Discussed on Front Burner

"Hi jason is so great to have you back on. Thanks so much for coming harder so alberta is certainly not alone here in getting caught by the second wave but it's particularly bad there. Can you pay me a picture of how bad things are in the province right now. Alberta didn't have it as bad as ontario or quebec in the first wave but we had our difficulties We had the large break and canada. Some slaughter houses this video from inside the cargill meat processing plant in high river. Alberta we really half of them eight hundred thirty six have contracted the corona virus. One person has died. We did have a good amount of death more than in more than some of the other provinces out west but at the peak of things in the spring we had three thousand cova cases active. As of monday. We have thirteen thousand active cova cases. The province has basically admitted complete system failure on contact. Tracing the team has not been able to keep up with current demand. This means that there has been a slowly growing backlog of cases over the past several weeks so much so that dr hindi hinshaw chief medical officer of health announced today that they're so backlogged that they want people to know that if ten days of passed since their kobe positive test. They won't get a case investigation. Call so stop expecting one. That backed up instead. These individuals will receive a text message that will notify them to not expect a call and to provide them on guidance. on if win their 'isolation period has ended the have had to shorten the isolation period for health professionals who have tested positive they are having to implement surge protocols at hospitals cancel surgeries like they did in the spring to keep up with capacity especially in the city of amazon. Who's hospitals are full to bursting with icu. Cases and covid cases and the the toll of deaths is just been really extreme. Lately we now have four hundred seventy six dead last month this time. It was about three hundred and in the last week. Just necessarily hits hits home for those of us who realized that it's not just older people who are dying In last week there were three people younger than forty who passed away because of covid nineteen speaking of those deaths There is this photo. That's been circulating of this. Doctoring calgary on his knees in the hospital and he's calling a family to tell them that their loved one has died and he just looks devastated and he looks exhausted. He looked so tired. And it seems like dot picture has now become quite emblematic of the situation in the province right now. Hey absolutely that photo hit me like a ton of bricks. And i think it hit a lot of people that way. In alberta and elsewhere a fact actually made that photo even starker and sadder. And it's that that icu. Doctor in calgary when he was shown that photo couldn't remember in what case it was taken because he's had to make those terrible calls so often and he's so exhausted from having to do that. I think phone calls like this usually at then weekly right and the people that are in the ice you are the sickest people in the hospital although we don't want this to happen it's part of almost a routine and.

Alberta icu calgary cova jason cargill canada medical officer amazon ontario quebec
Tribal Broadband, Keystone Pipeline and Navajo Voting Patterns

Native America Calling

03:59 min | 5 months ago

Tribal Broadband, Keystone Pipeline and Navajo Voting Patterns

"This is national native news. Megan camera in for antonio gonzales a bill that would help a native american communities get more broadband access on reservation lands passed to the. Us senate indian affairs committee. Wednesday steve jackson reports from spokane fcc survey found that thirty one percent of households on tribal lands lack access to high speed broadband compared to seven percent of americans in non tribal areas at a hearing wednesday senator. Maria cantwell spoke about the impact that some washington tribes of experienced because of the lack of service for the caulfield tribe in north central washington. Many of the households don't have access to the internet. This means many of thousands don't have access to emergency service. Notifications connectivity is critically important during fire season especially this year as fires have forced evacuations from homes and businesses. It's absolutely unacceptable for these tribes and many others living on tribal lands throughout the state of washington to not have access to basic reliable broadband. Cantwell cosponsored the legislation. Which would require technical assistance be provided to the under served native communities and set aside fcc and usda funding for broadband deployment. The bill passed in a bipartisan voice. Vote wednesday and now heads to the full senate for consideration for national native news. I'm steve jackson reporting from spokane. A group made up of five. First nations in canada says it plans to invest up to seven hundred sixty five million dollars in the keystone excel pipeline bloomberg reports. Tc energy corporation is counting on the deal with natural law energy to save the controversial pipeline from the incoming administration of president elect joe biden. The pipeline must have a permit from the us government since it crosses the border with canada. The trump administration granted the permit but biden's campaign has said it plans to resend it. Raiders reports the agreement includes the neat and little pine first nations in saskatchewan and the urban skin creation montana first nation and louis bowl tribe in alberta chief alvin francis president of natural energy and chief of nickel neat first nation said in a news release. The deal is a historic one that will create intergenerational wealth. He also pledged that natural law. Mtc energy will ensure the pipeline is quote held to the highest levels of environmental and social responsibility. Natural law energy has until next september to secure financing for the deal in minnesota to people on wednesday locked themselves to equipment used on line three of the end bridge sands oil pipeline to protest permits granted for the project by the state native news online reports. The action was organized by the guinea collective minnesota public radio reports that approval of key water permit for the project prompted twelve members of an advisory group to the minnesota pollution control agency to resign that included white earth tribal member winona luke and bridges line three would transport up to seven hundred sixty thousand barrels of crude oil daily through northern minnesota. The project is opposed by five agip bands. If you look at a map of how arizonans voted in the selection. You'll see several blocks. That don't correspond with urban areas and gibson with arizona public media reports most of these rural precincts are from voters living in tribal lands high country news reports that sixty to ninety percent of votes in precincts across the navajo nation. When to biden and vice president elect comma harris. Allie young is the founder of protect the sacred a grassroots initiative responding to the pandemic and promoting voter education within the navajo nation. I'm very proud Especially tribal communities in arizona for showing the world. That arizona is indigenous. Dna that we re claimed arizona. A map created by abc. Fifteen arizona shows that on average almost ninety. Four percent of votes in the thaw of nation went blue tube for national native news. I'm emma gibson and i'm megan camera.

Steve Jackson Antonio Gonzales Us Senate Indian Affairs Commi Washington Spokane FCC Tc Energy Corporation Maria Cantwell Trump Administration Alvin Francis Mtc Energy Cantwell Megan Usda Biden Joe Biden Bloomberg
5 Canadian provinces see record increases in COVID-19

Hidden Brain

00:51 sec | 5 months ago

5 Canadian provinces see record increases in COVID-19

"And Canada and the number of coronavirus cases continues to climb rapidly. On Saturday, five provinces broke their old records for daily cases. And carpet. Chuck reports that the country's chief public health official is now boarding that hospitals could soon be swamped. Ontario, Quebec, Alberta, Saskatchewan in Manitoba all broke their previous daily case counts on Saturday as covert 19 infections continue to soar. Dr Teresa Time. The country's top doctor says that the current rate, the country could see 10,000 new cases a day by mid December, and other experts warn that Canada isn't prepared for those numbers. Sam says hospitals across the country are already being forced to make difficult decisions about canceling elective surgeries. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau also pushed provincial leaders to bring in tougher measures to curb the spread of the pandemic. Not to be deterred by the economic costs of shutting down

Dr Teresa Time Canada Chuck Saskatchewan Manitoba Quebec Alberta Ontario Prime Minister Justin Trudeau SAM
"alberta" Discussed on MEDIA INDIGENA : Indigenous current affairs

MEDIA INDIGENA : Indigenous current affairs

01:45 min | 6 months ago

"alberta" Discussed on MEDIA INDIGENA : Indigenous current affairs

"Another language. Is English has really clear pronunciation rules either at spill up tough S- pillow does Philip Plow is still cost. That's enough or is that he knows. He knew. All right well, Ken Kim I want to thank you for this. Very special. Edmonson addition. Media and digital. Something thank you so much. I can and ask them to now. I. Thank you. Thank you. It was funny. That's from media and Digital Episode Two hundred, Twenty, eight record the afternoon of October first two, thousand and twenty. Thanks again to Ken Williams Assistant Professor With the University of Alberta Department of drama, as well as to Kim tall bear associate professor in the Faculty of Native Studies at the University of Alberta, and Canada Research Chair in indigenous, peoples, techno signs and environment. This episode was edited by Stephanie would as well as by meet your host and producer Rick Hearth. Thanks for listening. We'll talk with you again soon. Steam is nesting. Bureaucratic. Law..

Ken Kim Philip Plow Ken Williams Assistant Profess University of Alberta Departme University of Alberta associate professor Rick Hearth Canada Research Chair Edmonson host and producer Stephanie
"alberta" Discussed on MEDIA INDIGENA : Indigenous current affairs

MEDIA INDIGENA : Indigenous current affairs

06:56 min | 6 months ago

"alberta" Discussed on MEDIA INDIGENA : Indigenous current affairs

"And join me back at a round table. Once again, our misquakees was sky that is in Edmonton as we say. To Extraordinary Edmund Tonens and I'm not sure what ward he's in but I know his name Ken Williams system professor with, the University of Alberta Department of Drama Can Don say boy Oh, the morning Talarico. Manado egg we. She was GonNa she too is in Alberta capital city. It's Kim tall bear associate professor in the U. OF AS Faculty of Native Studies Kim Hi Rick. I don't know what you guys are talking about. Real basic cre-. Six three basic I i. Hope I started here saying because my pronunciation was way off. I'm an embarrassment to the faculty need to take some. So this was a topic tailor made for the three of us because I lived in that city for almost two years while at CBC and still have a very soft squishy spot for that place so to speak. That's GONNA sound weird. But anyway. So when this came up it, it had to be done can given you have the longer history with the city. And thus have your finger on its pulse. Possibly other spots I thought we should start with you. How did this proposal even come about? Okay. Well, the city of Edmonton regularly like examines its population density in its neighborhoods end look at the boundaries for the wards. Now, for those who don't know Emerton right now currently has a city council of thirteen people one mayor and twelve councillors and there's one counselor Ward. So this is a regular thing that happens right the city's constantly looking to make sure that that award is equal sized to. Has the same at geographic cohesiveness to represent the city fairly so that no one ward has say has fewer people in it, but it's still gets one vote, etc. The redrawing the boundaries, the redrawing the boundaries and did in order to maintain democratic fairness. Okay. This is a regular thing that happens all the time. What was a different? This time was the included a naming committee of all indigenous women to give the city with the new names for the war. So instead of being known by their numbers, they'd be known by names that would reflect the indigenous history of the city. So that's different and that's what's really seem to be causing a lot of the concerns happening right now about the new names for some reason that the shifting of the wards is not is not the issue or the the new boundaries is not are not the issue. The fact that now they have these new names and the old names, the number one through twelve. Okay. It would reflect your I'm in ward six currently the on that was the name of it and that's it, and of course, every Emmett Tony knows exactly which ward there from right? Oh? Yeah. Yes. was because we all pay so much attention to city politics. But Jesus says being super guilty. Of. Now, this this committee, which is called the committee of Indigenous Matriarchs and they're composed of seventeen women from first nations representing treaty six, seven and eight, as well as May t- an inuit representatives. So let me ask you have you heard of any US city proposing a similar thing never mind actually going through the with ward? No I mean you know we Did we did the show on day, mccaw sky the changing of the Lake County right and the lake and the names around the lake in Minneapolis and near downtown Minneapolis and that was such a huge Brouhaha because the white people were all freaked out there. We're going to have to pronounce to duck two words which are a lot easier than these crean black ones. So. Is it Brouhaha Dakota word for angry subtler skip? It's probably it's probably racist. You have to like reexamine all of your own racist or. I don't know. Anyway. So that's the only. Yeah I. Don't I haven't heard of them doing something like this anywhere in the US, but that's a good question. So before we go any further I, think it's important for people to know what these names sound like as Ken mentioned. There are twelve wards. So why don't we go through each one Maybe what I'll do is all I'll be the guy in charge of making sure people here the names, and then we'll alternate between cannon Kim terms of the the tiny little one liner explanation. Alright. So this is this is ward one LAKOTA. CODA east. Kota Go. Okay Kim what's that about? Well. You know I have issues with this being a Dakata and they say stuff strange up here. So like you don't knock like the when they pronounce their tea's like a d we don't do that. So but and then the other thing they say, the indigenous language of origin Assu we don't use that word anymore either the meaning the people, the Alexis knock, knock Kota I would say but they say not quotas Sioux nation is the most northwestern representative of the Sui and language family. So as dot co two, this is a little uncomfortable to me but. I but I don't count as much because I'm not from these parts. I'll adjust I'll just. All right. Let's Let's move to ward too. Because KENNESAW. So in a fluent with nuked, the should be there should be a breeze. Okay. Here we go. Unknown. Are. Akin, what's the deal here? Yeah. This is in reference to the hospitals where of were flown into Edmonson. NASA Charles Cancel Charles Cancel Hospital was one of the very famous what they used to call the Indian hospitals and Yeah. There had a lot of people from there were a lot of people from the north were brought into and unfortunately, and very sadly many were abandoned here. So that's that's the references for and Emerson has one of the largest southern based any weed populations in Canada along with Montreal and Winnipeg is up there as well. And of course, the football team which I think this is going to be the new name for my right yarded here I really the Emerton Anina. No. No No. Not at all. Okay. So that's word to let's go to ward three. This is another word ready for it Kim Yep. The the we know walk best we know Ach that's the we newark..

Kim Yep Edmonton US Ken Williams committee of Indigenous Matria ward University of Alberta Departme Emerton Anina Alberta Emerton Edmund Tonens associate professor Minneapolis Kota Go CBC Jesus professor Dakota Don Emmett Tony
"alberta" Discussed on ONE Energy

ONE Energy

07:34 min | 9 months ago

"alberta" Discussed on ONE Energy

"Can. The show folks today on the show I have an absolutely brilliant brilliant man his name Sean Wagner. is currently the lead writer writer and editor for Burda nuclear nucleus, which is dedicated about promoting and educating and bringing nuclear power to Alberta, but also to Canada and throughout the entire world. He based on his bio on o'byrne nuclear nucleus. He is a lifelong nerd. He has a bachelor of science and masters of Science and Materials Engineering from the University of Alberta. His focus was on materials characterization and production, and before starting a nuclear nucleus, he worked for two years as a research assistant under Dr. Thomas. Stunned that formerly of Oak Ridge National Lab Studying Nano, scale gas flows through porous structures. Yes. That sounds incredibly smart. Incredibly cool and no doubt. Our conversation will not disappoint you. He studies nuclear energy on his own because he says that it takes all of the boxes that are needed for combating climate change and promoting environmental stewardship such as carbon high-intensity, reliable, large scale power generation. And just that it has the ability to bring people to a higher level of their quality of life. Without further delay, enjoy conversation check them out at Burda nuclear. NUC NUCLEUS DOT CA algen that's Berta nuclear nucleus dot ca check them out on facebook twitter instagram. Enjoy the show. All right. Going three to. Irvine. One. And we're live Sean. It's a pleasure to meet you Jordan. Pleasure to meet you too sir. So I interviewed Eric Meyer. I. Don't know about last year you came up. and. Obviously from Alberto and I am from burden once I found out there was another guy promoting nuclear got pretty excited and started following your work so. Tell me tell me about about what you're doing. Thank you. Well I run Alberta Nuclear. Nucleus Limited. It's a nonprofit organization that's working towards benefiting education and advocacy for nuclear projects and Kind of capabilities here Alberda we've. As, most people are probably aware Alberta's pretty heavy set into the oil industry and whatnot. A lot of people are saying he probably diverse. is seeing as how most trying to get off oil. So one of the things that we're trying to say is, Hey, like Alberta's got all of the traits people that are required to build nuclear stuff and we also have a lot of things that could be very useful in nuclear fields. Everything we need is here why don't we diversify into their because that'll take the least amount of retraining to get people ready to work. In it and so that's what we're trying to do. We're trying to talk with people about you know what misunderstandings they have or misconceptions that they might be repeating with knowing, and so we we chat with people about that and try and get them to be like Oh. Okay. So I'd never really thought about that for Nuclear and just get the conversation moving in that way. Right. So what made you start over a nuclear nucleus? I was drinking with a friend of mine on her back Parks Fun Day. I don't know how the topic got onto energy I. Think we were Griping about the pipeline or whatnot. This is like two years ago or something like that and I ended up going on a two and a half hour red at. And my friend was like, okay, you've been dogging for two two and a half. And you haven't repeated yourself. Once you need to give a presentation artist. Oh she got in touch with some people at a a little fun little group called Edmund to nerd night. Okay. Which is basically where people can go in and give twenty minute presentations on whatever topic they want. And people will just the day to come in and they sit around and they drink they listen to you give a speech on whatever's interesting to you so I started writing speech them. and talking with them and kind of halfway through writing the speech I realized. You know I've got all this information, but I can't put it all into. This one speech. So I guess I should probably have like a website where I could put all the extra information. So I made a website and I was like, okay well, now I need like an email and twitter account so that people can. Find a way to get in touch with me after they might have read this stuff. So I made that. was just like, Oh, well, now that I have all this stuff, I need some branding. So I got in touch with a graphic designer branding. facebook page, and then I got invited to a bunch of other facebook pages and all of a sudden I was giving a presentation and I had one hundred followers on twitter and people following me on facebook and whatnot, and I was putting out articles like twice a week for six or seven months and it just. It just kind of snowballed out of control all this time I'm unemployed. So I'm just like doing this out of my basement. That's awesome. So main objective to make sure I understand is you're trying to educate Burton's about why diversifying the nuclear would be very beneficial. That's the fundamental part of it a lot of the other. The. Other parts of it are just kind of like they're things that I liked doing 'cause like you've you've talked with Eric before. Heard about some of the other people who are promoting things like Ben hurt is a fairly technical economic guy. He likes to take the the big money pictures on things and the technical aspects, and he's kind of more focused down in Australia and Kersee Gauguin is you know super into the bright new future talking about how we can make things better how we can make sure that everyone frost and All this kind of big social field good stuff that can happen with nuclear and Shell in Brooker is basically just poking the bear all the time. And we've got eric who is another very social person and he likes to bring it music and get people kind of building a sense of community about things me. I'm kind of like the Tech Guy I'm not as techy as some of the like really really technical people in the field I like doing the like the fundamental tech aspects of things. So like taking the the really basic fundamental science that people were learning in like grade ten grade eleven and being like hey. Like this is the stuff you need to know. And that's it. You can. You can take all the stuff you learned and kind of built and propagate it without adding anything extraneous or new complicated on top of it, and that's how and this will be how a nuclear reactor works and you can figure it out just from this. So like you know back when people are you know backward people in Highschool or saying I'll never use science. How do I have to do for it? Well, it's like this is the stuff you need. All you need to understand how nuclear were right right.

facebook Alberta Nuclear Alberta Eric Meyer twitter Nucleus Limited writer and editor University of Alberta o'byrne Oak Ridge National Lab Irvine Sean Wagner. research assistant Alberda Canada Dr. Thomas
"alberta" Discussed on Pause

Pause

01:36 min | 11 months ago

"alberta" Discussed on Pause

"Hi I'm babs river and welcome to paused at home and Alberta Social Innovation can act podcasts the pandemic and economic downturn this spring have forced many change makers to pause and pivots as we head into summer although our province is experiments with opening some aspects of our lives. We still have a lot to adopt in light of our work. Structures changing on a daily basis. And the pause were home. We've decided to touch base with change makers across Alberta to hear about the new questions and reflections on their minds during this period of systems. Change if the question sparks new thoughts for you at least share in the comments on your favorite listening platform and let us know what you think. As the way we engage with each other ships the way we volunteers changing to what does volunteer engagement. Look like right now. House covid nineteen bringing people together new ways. What does this mean about are shifting priorities and the way volunteerism those even the smallest social needs on today's episode at least Martin Ascii sits down with Daniele Graham dearden and UNICENTER ONI. These three for volunteer. Berta the association that connects volunteer centers and agencies who rely on volunteers throughout the province..

Alberta Social Innovation Daniele Graham dearden babs river Alberta
"alberta" Discussed on T.O.F.U. Talks: #OurNewNormal

T.O.F.U. Talks: #OurNewNormal

04:30 min | 1 year ago

"alberta" Discussed on T.O.F.U. Talks: #OurNewNormal

"WanNa go see a movie I really want to but then on the other end I'm like no it's a terrible idea still I feel like he gets harder. That was one of my nervous. Laughter was for earlier. It's like you know if you're if you're someone who already deals. Are Things diety like that? That is mostly my thing The that I've been working on if you're someone who already kind of shifts towards obsessive thinking or behavior this is something. That's really easy to get fixated on so. Yeah that's what I found limiting my new sources you know a couple of snippets from CBC in the Mornings. If I'm feeling up to it and then you know just trying to do it. You can't today to take care of yourself. I agree I know one of your questions. I don't mean to jump ahead for probably the first thing I would like to do. Public like in the public is go to the movie theater to what movies? What would did you miss that you want to see over the last like well? When did I mean the cinemas are closed now right like Alberta or any in Vietnam? Oh Yeah for awhile now. Probably the last month or so. Why no onward was out. And that was the one that that was no and and someone was like. Oh well it's available on demand or whatever my candidates like twenty dollars in here. I would have gone to see it for like three or four dollars. Like twenty dollars is over my budget. I mean as a family. That's great and I'm yesterday. I know you like to keep up with movies. That's probably our biggest thing to we. Don't drink or do much like outside the house besides like Vegan food and going to the movies. So that's something that we've really really missed and not really something we've been able to like bring home in the same way The last movie we went and saw was a portrait of a lady on fire so I was so happy. I got to like beep quietly movie theater before.

CBC Alberta Vietnam
"alberta" Discussed on Poutine Politics

Poutine Politics

11:57 min | 1 year ago

"alberta" Discussed on Poutine Politics

"Welcome back to Putin politics. Canadian Issue Serve Ritchie skirts. My Name's Adam Mike and Mike. We're GonNa talk about something that happened A couple of weeks ago now or behind the Times. Now what are we GONNA do fall into my cats? Right topic happened like fifty sixty seven years ago. Who Cares Yeah. That's okay we'll get we'll get. We'll get to those topics to have some of those episodes in the backlog. No but I I guess what I wanted to talk about was Bill Ten in Alberta Biltonen built-in Tan. Exactly what is bill ten? Don't know the bill names. I'll get is the Public Health Emergency Powers Amendment. Act of Twenty Twenty Okay. So this bill passed in to To royal assent on April. Second of two thousand twenty now depending on how you feel about legislation. That date is important because the province of Alberta announced their state of emergency on March seventeenth. And there were certain things especially because of the the social distancing and you know where people would be allowed to go and facilities. They will be allowed to use and things like that. During during the emergency during the public health emergency you know and different governments have been doing have been doing this But levying certain fines and and things like that. Say you know if you're caught you know breaking any of these rules than individuals are going to get a fine of X. and corporations could get a fine of why and you know whatever okay but at least from my understanding from doing research about this bill. They're supposed to be some sort of law or provisions in place. Already that would allow government to make these kinds of changes in Alberta. They have a bill. That's called the Regulations Act for instance from from doing the research on this bill of research. I should say from doing the reading on a towards this bill because it really wasn't research. The Regulations Act states that changes to regulations are not valid against persons. Who have not been given actual notice of them and have not been published in the Alberta Gazette so essentially if the government wants to make a change there has to be notification of it For it to be valid makes sense. Yep so I know one of the one of the things that was mentioned in in the articles I was reading. Is that you know. It's like the thousand dollar fine for people for not socially distancing so that was so that was introduced by the Minister of Health Tyler Andro And obviously the Ministry of Health. You're laughing when I mentioned the name. Have you heard? Have you heard more about tyler? San Leandro with the last time I mentioned his name like I said I was a fifty fifty debate. Yeah Okay so so this. This new fine for not following social distancing was created But it wasn't there was no public notice put out it wasn't putting the Alberta's at so it was against the so technically levying. That fine was against the regulations. Act so where built ten comes in. There's a couple there's a couple of parts to it but so I guess the first part that I'll say about bill ten is that it introduces It's kind of. It's kind of meant to give law enforcement more power in regards to how they manage certain situations in a in a public health. Emergency obviously not just not just limited to the current situation limited to any public health emergency in the future right. There's also a provision in the bill that So I guess in the original Public Health Act so they so before what they will do is if there was a law in place they could suspend that law Fokker and so what they added in the amendment was that not only can a current law that exists be suspended but a new can be created with no oversight. No debate at and doesn't even have to be voted on in the legislature cut. Bill Ten was not given a sunset clause. Oh all that now. The government five hours to figure. That was a bad idea. Yeah well that's great. Well you see the difference. The difference is you know the federal liberals are dealing with the minority and that was never that was never gonNA pass the UC P is like. Oh well I mean we have a majority here I wanna give federal herbals liberal or credits that than saying the only reason they they ripped it off. The plate was because of the fact that they were they were they were in a majority situation. They may not have still done it. I'll give them a little bit more credit than that. Ok p the corruption in that. That party is yeah so I mean yes. The bill like this amendment is not has not been given a sunset clause now these new bills or laws not bills. I guess it'd be laws Offenses fines whatever They can be given sunset clauses But yeah the bill. Itself doesn't sunset clause so now some people are saying it's a it's a crazy abuse of power and anything can be passed and so on so forth and it's kind of true but it does also have to be during a public health emergency. So let's say when this situation with covert nineteen is over and the and the and the public health emergency has dropped that provision within bill. Ten doesn't have any effect until the next public health emergency. No like it's it's an original power like you the same issues that I have problems with the liberal government even introducing it the federally where they had Executive power is the exact same reason why I don't think it should be done in Alberta like there's no difference I don't I'm not like because I'm going to be like no notes. Hookah do no. You should never have executive power like we're democracy. You should never have executive power length. Sorry I shouldn't say never. There is very rare circumstances wars. Yeah well with an emergency like the Federal Emergencies Act would come in and Catastrophic Pinta mix not this kind of pandemic influenza pandemic levels will call it now well. I consider catastrophic catastrophic national emergencies. Potentially right yeah not even just not just health not just health issues. Yeah those things more executive powers. I think that's necessary like I. I'll give you know I'll say listen. You need to do what you need to do. Any news with Boston Unite. Like you'll make mistakes but I don't do it. Yep circumstances like that right Were not there we have time to. You know assess and figure out and debate about things and we should in a limited scope of course and you should have powers that make it easier to do things but still limited scope and I mean I know. They're majority coming to pass whatever they want to basically but still what? Yeah so so then. The the icing on the cake with this one is that they passed the bill on April second but they made it. They made it retroactive to March seventeenth. Which was the day that the public health emergency was put in place? So what they're saying. Is THEY RETRACT? Meaning that they can take an effect because the public -mergency was already declared out. You're saying right so that we don't have to wait for the next one that's right. So when so for instance well not only that? But for instance like because even if they had passed it instead well it takes effect April second. I like the day that the bill passed. It's like well under public health. Emergency so this Bill takes effect right away. But by making it retroactive to March seventeenth. They basically made it so that the new state like things like the new fines and levies and things like that that were announced by the Ministry of Health after March seventeenth but before April second were lawfully done. Even though the law didn't exist until April second. Yeah that's not gonNA create any problems. They're not getting losses. No not at all worried about. It's nothing you know all any any any of those penalties fines and things like that that were levied between March seventeenth and April second. Nobody's going to challenge those in court. Not at all no not not going to happen. I don't know what's going to. It's going to be whatever it God. Damnit it's GONNA be fine. How sometimes I just laugh at these EP? I noticed that we have a theme about which provinces we talked about went to forget. We've for not forget we don't talk about it because the they're not messing up. They're not trip. Yeah exactly I mean like. I don't catch one because such went doesn't make mistakes like this. I think I think I think the problem with Scotch win is more so that Kenny is so loud that nobody hears mot sure. I mean I if I really wanted him. Oh yeah but like you know Manitoba. We'd bring up. I don't think we've ever brought up sketch Wan. No well the maritimes I do because I just find it fun. Yeah again to be talking about that. No NAH maybe it's too. It's the two of the four largest provinces right. I mean it Goes Ontario Quebec BC Alberta so we talked about on -Tario Alberta because Antero we live here and Alberta is the next. It's the next province that is prevalent in the national stage right. Everybody everybody's hearing about Berta. That's because they're just comedy gold there anyways power again like the conservative government got broken up because they were too much of cronies. That's by. Create the Wild Rosen exert a party and then Kenny was supposed to unite them to avoid cronyism and since day. One it yeah. That's working out day one. He did everything everything the wrong way like from even getting elected with his suicidal campaign that the other guy did hey stories that have come out. Don't forget we gotta we gotta cut all those We cut all those teaching jobs and health care jobs. And Oh we have seven and a half billion dollars to invest into Keystone Excel. I think the great the greatest thing that's happened is like within a week of him announcing that extra funding for Keystone Excel. There's a there's a judge I can't remember what state it's in that has blocked the pipeline again. Yeah like it's done. It's like I can't see coming back and and and you know again for the people that work in that industry. I feel terrible. Well it's very cyclical like ebbing. Anyone who's ever worked in Alberta in the oil industry they know that there's big ups and big downs and you have to understand this but the thing but is thick and this is what got miss. 'cause I didn't see any news coverage on it really the fact that the most layoffs in one day from like one organization ever occurred was in Alberta. Yeah because they cut twenty thousand jobs in one day. No one has done more effort in candidate like. How did that get missed? How is that not like the most pressing news like? Yeah Copa. Nineteen is big but like these jobs regardless of whether or not Cova nineteen happened or doesn't these jobs are still getting loss and they did it like through a tweet unlike Saturday or Friday but they cut twenty dollars gift to in in in since even since the public health emergency was announced March seventeenth. Cutting the T. Cutting the twenty five thousand teachers and support staff and things like that. I don't I don't think it was all twenty twenty k. Education jobs not necessarily teachers rank but they also passed a bill that took effect on April first and essentially reduced doctors pay.

Alberta Bill Ten Executive Ministry of Health Times Alberta Gazette Twenty Twenty Putin Kenny Adam Mike Tyler Andro San Leandro pandemic influenza liberal government legislature Boston Unite
"alberta" Discussed on MEDIA INDIGENA : Indigenous current affairs

MEDIA INDIGENA : Indigenous current affairs

14:03 min | 1 year ago

"alberta" Discussed on MEDIA INDIGENA : Indigenous current affairs

"Of indigenous studies at York University Brock. Brock era can Our topic takes us to the Alberta Legislature. Where just days ago? The United Conservative government began its spring sitting by introducing a single bill bill one that critical infrastructure defense act and according to a report from wind speaker under the proposed law. Those who shut down rail lines and roadways would each face minimum fines of ten thousand dollars for the first day of Action and then twenty five thousand for each subsequent day. They also face the possibility of six months jail time as well corporations that aid council or direct. The Commission of an offence are also open to fines of up to two hundred thousand dollars win speaker report. Also notes that. The bill's introduction came just five days after a group calling themselves cousins for it so again blockaded CNN tracks in West Edmonton okay. Can you live in that provincial? Capital the belly of the beast speak. So let's start with you and let's start with what reaction has been like and by that. I mean generally among Albertans but also in particular among indigenous people. What are you hearing or seeing The funny thing is about this bill is that it's it's kind of being is has been overshadowed by the new budget. It's almost like they buried this thing underneath like as really horrendous new budget that just passed but going back to bill one. There was actually an interesting split. I found on various social media sites. An I you know speaking of win speaker. I used to work there. So that's one thing I gotta make clear to everyone that I am a former employee and I'm still friends with the publisher of Prophet. So I actually sit on his site and watched a lot of the stuff that goes on there were a lot of. I can trust that. I'm looking at a large group of indigenous people who sort of cross-legged spectrum right. So it seems to be like mostly against the bill But there are some people who are strongly for it so I would if I was like I have no real metrics on this so a but just my initial feel for it now just to be. Honest is just just feel that I got from reading. The sites is that it's kind of like two thirds against the bill versus like I think a strong third of indigenous folk Su Do Support it. Sort a third of indigenous folk support. Yeah Yeah it's it's quite There is there is a body of people People in Alberta who really feel that the their strongly tied to a lesson development oil and gas development. The this put it this way. The blockade out here really wasn't strongly supported to say the one that happened in Saskatoon. Our anywhere else in this country it was up in. It was down fairly quickly. There wasn't a lot of broad support from other First nations people for it in the sense of the way. We've been seeing that kind of physical support that shows up right like the Saskatoon. One like had a lot of support from the local community local districts community who came out. And you know meet. Your everyone was warm. Made sure they had enough food. Made sure the the you know. They're being protected. So none of that existed as strongly out here in. I'm not trying to. It's not a sense of me. Criticizing the blockade. But since I did not see the equivalent amount support I've seen elsewhere now Dot put you on the spot. But I'm going to anyway If we had ven diagram of those indigenous people who were? Let's say supportive bill one and those who work or in some way earned their living through the throwing gas industry. Would we see One circle or significant overlap. Yeah you definitely see largely one circle that would that would be the case This is the industry that drives Alberta and of course first nations people here derive benefit from it when they get employed in it and Up until I believe the eighties nineties. Several bands around Emerton that generated massive amount of revenue from the oil and gas leases. They had on reserve. So it's really quite The this is a very strong Strong very strong pro. Oil and gas feeling amongst the indigenous communities. Here not saying as universal. Yeah Yeah but those who a benefit from it from it how are for it and also here in the city of Edmonton the south side of. Emerton sits on an illegally surrendered. Cree reserved Chase and they've been people who've been trying to get the land claim Set up get their membership back and their chief Carl. Bruno has been very vocal. About being pro pro pipeline. Right you know. He's all about prosperity for his people and he sees it in oil and gas. And you know the Manitoba Matey Federation as come out. Supportive of oil and gas development generally Brock you live about. What is it three or four hours drive north of time to Negga territory? So I don't know the extent to which Maybe your life has been impacted by by the blockade there by by Mohawks in any case the premier L. Berta. Let's get you back. To Berta the premier there is selling this legislation as a necessary response to what he calls. Virtual Anarchy and lawless mockery of our democratic principles. An attack on her nations and our provinces prosperity meanwhile Alberta Justice Minister and Solicitor General Doug Schweitzer Francis as decisive action to end the lawlessness blockades in our province which jeopardize public safety. So there's a lot of elements to to this particular frame. What do you make of it? What what stands out there for you. One thing that stood out right away was that it doesn't seem that this bill is being brought forward with a Mike Universal support even Alberta others the statement from AFN regional chief Marlene Poitras and she ended up pointing out the Essentially that it was unnecessary in she was urging the provincial government. Alberta to withdraw the bill and Y- we also saw af en national chief Perry Bell Guard. Also come out and and Kinda chastise the the premium for for bringing this in and even the the leader of the opposition in Alberta Rachel Notley former premier herself as she came out and said that this was unnecessary that with the existing legislation police already have jurisdiction to enforce an injunction and so essentially the seems like. It's more maybe kind of as Ken mentioned in some ways almost cover a really bad budget a government. That's just desperately trying to look like it still can defend oil and gas and restore the Alberta Economy at a time that Albert Alberta Families. I think in our are struggling financially with relatively high levels of unemployment and then the cancellation of the Frontier Mind Yup. Yup so I in some ways. I think this is You even mentioned the Justice Minister Rick. He had a a kind of a ridiculous response when it was pointed out to him. That wouldn't this. Proposed legislation also have an effect on the so-called yellow vest protest movement that that's very much pro oil and gas. In that case he emphasized that police would have discretion as to whether to apply is where imprisonment. So it seemed pretty clear like this is really just You know waving the flag for oil and gas extraction and Alberto and Yeah and it would be a deterrent for for anybody who opposed oil and gas to try to protest other than in the very restricted way. At the justice. Manage Service was permitting. So he mentioned. Oh you can stand beside the road you can show up the legislature. But just don't get in anyone's way or cause any significant inconvenience. Yeah I have to say I felt that reaction to it Didn't really get at the NUB of it in terms of you know. What is the problem. This new bill purports to solve. What is supposedly missing from current laws on the books as you just so you know well laid out Brockman it. It's it's not clear what it adds except Let me quote more from that. Win Speaker Article Premier. Kenny stress. That blockades were already illegal activities and Coordin- junctions to stop them weren't necessary but clearly the existing penalties and court actions were not having the desired if impact quote we're using the powers that we do have to create summary offenses of this nature with penalties with administrative fines with potential jail time and so he says on the one hand this gives police and prosecutors additional tools to crack down on illegal blockages of critical infrastructure. And we're adding to the disincentive of that kind of lawlessness. With the power that we have under Alberto legislation said Kenny so This is really interesting to me. Because this theory of disincentives usually comes up in discussions and debates around getting tough on crime quote unquote. You know things like murder theft assault and and to me to kind of lump or associate blockades with with those kinds of offenses. I mean I'll stick with brock. I mean there are those who would say this risks. Criminalizing dissent What do you think of that? Yeah I completely agree. And I think it's telling in terms of how can you presented it. But there was a great phrase used that got caught in some headlines or sub headlines about urban green laughed zealots target that quote unquote that. Jason. Kenney blamed for the supposed anarchy. But the amazing thing is. I looked at the the whole quote in. I'm paraphrasing part of it. But what he's actually referring to there is again quote urban green last zealots who appropriate or have been trying to appropriate the cause of first nations but are actually slamming the door shut on their prosperity and so he goes on to say that his vision of this is quote reconciliation through prosperity So he's the way he's messaging is that he's actually trying to heat like he's the friend of first nations. Alberta and presumably elsewhere in the country. That's on side with the extraction industry. I mean that's where it seems like this is a very in some ways. Although it does seem hasty as you pointed out it was only five days after the cousins for wet solids in action. It seems like they're really trying to again. Show show some action. I would probably is it. Pretty frustrating situations seeing the tech bind. Go down and again. There's been the long-standing dispute between BC in Alberta over the construction of a pipeline to tidewater. So he he's promised so much is a relatively recently elected premier. And my mind. This is just kind of More proof of just how helpless he is. There's there's much greater market forces at play and I think what global concern over climate crisis that the his recent budget did nothing to address and he still seems to be a trying to avoid taking meaningful action that would allow albertans to transition to a new economy. Not One based on fossil fuels as I would say. There's another motivation to this law. You know it's not above. His personal ambitions are to be the prime minister and I think he sort of I think he knows this is not really that effective of a love because he can only apply in all BERTA and again. There isn't the kind of broad support here on the ground for any kind of like action yet. You're not seeing it Mellberg the way we're seeing it anywhere else. I kind of see him going. If I was prime minister. This is a kind of law I would pass Canadians. Take note you know that I would do something about this sooner than later. I am struck by what Brock said that. This is actually a sign of weakness. This is a desperate act as opposed to a sign of strength and machismo. Oh Yeah Yeah I agree I did. I don't disagree with that. I think it makes but I'm also saying there's another motivation to that. He probably knows it's not not an effective law and not when he's really gonNA have to us anyway it's just I think he's firing a broadside at at Trudeau Trying to show off what kind of leader he would be if he was the prime minister. Now the focus of the legislation can is on pipelines oil and gas production refinery sites highways railways dams bridges electric gas water facilities and telecommunications lines. That's quite a big quite a big list. It's in keeping with Type of Scope that is laid out by the federal government through the Public Safety Canada. And if you go to its website and look at what it considers to be critical infrastructure. It includes health food. Finance Water Information and Communication Technology Safety Energy and utilities manufacturing government transportation. Starting to think of might have been easier to list. What isn't considered critically district man now and and.

Alberta Brock Edmonton Alberta Legislature prime minister York University Brock Saskatoon Justice Minister CNN Alberto United Conservative government Emerton L. Berta Public Safety Canada Albert Alberta Families publisher Rachel Notley
"alberta" Discussed on Front Burner

Front Burner

05:42 min | 1 year ago

"alberta" Discussed on Front Burner

"Hi Sharon Hi Jamie. First of all I I know this project is a big one but how big put this into perspective for me. Yeah you're right. This is a big project it didn't it has a long lifespan. So this is a project just to give you some context. It'll be northern Alberta. I'm just outside of Wood Buffalo National Park and it's a proposed major the investment in Alberta oil sands and do before we talked about the mine itself. I think it's important to talk about the oil sands and what a substantial part of Canada's oil production they represent Um so the oil sands accounted for over sixty percent of Canada's oil production in two thousand eighteen That's a lot. That's according to actual resources Canada so in the oil sands ends. There are already seven open. Pit Mining Projects Albert them. Those would be the more famous names. You may have heard of the secret and SUNCORP YUP FRONTIERS TECH project. Wants to be the next. And it'll be as you said one of the largest if not the largest oil sands open pit mines ever proposed in Alberta Right. And how long is it. Projected to operate for the. The proposal says that they'll have their first oil producing twenty twenty six. It will operate for forty years and it will take about another twenty years for them to clean it up so we're looking got cover most of the century long term and we save. His mind is big so you know. I think it's supposed to be like double the size of Vancouver. Is that fair yes. That's about twenty nine thousand hectares. That'll be that'll be footprint. And that is about double the size of the city of ink. Hoover would produce about two hundred and sixty thousand barrels of bitchy everyday everyday at its peak. Okay so the future of this project is as as I mentioned at the top of the show in the hands of the federal government as we speak and it got there with the recommendation. Tation of a joint panel of federal provincial regulators. WHO found this project was in the public interest though they conceded that there would be significant adverse effects? And I want to get to the adverse affects with you in a moment but first why did they find this project in the public endorse. What's what's the benefit here? I mean put it simply the benefit is money yeah The panel took techs projections of how much money this project will bring in in the long term so over around seventy billion and economic mkx benefits In terms of royalties and taxes to the various levels of government. They also are talking a lot about job creation so the mine would according to the company Penny create seven thousand jobs during construction require another twenty five hundred acres during operation and they have more estimates that You know lots of billions of dollars in figures are they say that this will contribute two point one billion to Alberta's annual GDP it'll increase household income by another two billion. It's it's just expected to have a a lot of huge economic impacts. Okay I was ahead. I know this is something Alberto premiered. Jason Kenney has been touting. He's a big supporter of this project last month when Alberta's premier sat down with the prime minister. Turn off the proposed tech tear oil sands megaproject was among the first topics discussed. That would create ten thousand jobs. Seventy billion dollars in revenue for for governments to pay for healthcare and education. Okay so let's go back then to those significant adverse effects The regulatory panel mentioned. What are the sort of immediate effects? The building of his mind would have on the environment in this part of Alberta. So as I mentioned it's about twenty nine thousand Hector's that would be its footprint as you can imagine that is currently mostly forested area. That would all need to be removed for it to be an open pit mine. So the the panel found that close to three thousand hectares of old growth forests would be removed for the mind to be built They also said that wetlands cover about forty five percent of the area. They looked at that would be drained and removed and then importantly they also looked at peatland which is seen as an important carbon sink and found three thousand in Hector's of peatland would be destroyed by the minds construction and the panel found that would be an irreversible loss. So that's not something you can put back after you're done producing and mine define nine carbon sink for me right. So peatland is just an important place where carbon stored so when you remove peatland you release a lot of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. Okay and you know you mentioned that this would be a forested area with wildlife as well. I would imagine that would for sure. Yeah there are a couple of Free roaming disease-free herds of wood bison in the area and that's why would buffalo national park has its name Athabasca Chippewa. First nation is concerned served about the Ronald Lake. Bison herd the herd is listed as threatened. Dishes hasn't been touched it. You mean to tell me dot dot dot greedy Goddamn power of money to goon damage dry d environment. They're also Caribou which are in the news a lot lately for being at risk And then a number of other species migratory birds bats Links all sorts of species that would be affected according to the panel the fourteen creed Denny and Matey groups have signed participation agreements with tech resources joining us is Ron Quintal. President of the Fort MCI maintain the fact that environmental aspect of things is is the number thirty I think ultimately slingshot of the foreword wouldn't by way of the community at least one cheap admit signing the deal wasn't easy all the first nations are signing on with tech words. This is leave us out of love to fight but to has to be a time when you have to draw the line.

Alberta Canada federal government SUNCORP Sharon Wood Buffalo National Park Jason Kenney Ronald Lake Vancouver Hoover buffalo national park Denny Ron Quintal Alberto Fort MCI President prime minister
"alberta" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

02:57 min | 1 year ago

"alberta" Discussed on KOMO

"Causing a slowdown from Alberta place south on five still stopping go between one hundred thirty three into downtown Seattle to just about the convention center our next call traffic at six fourteen and the weather outlook on board we have a lot to talk about here in the sand in a tunnel from the cold weather center no one like crazy over the past system getting across the cascades over the next several hours is going to be tricky but it's just as hard to navigate the lowland roads here for the evening commute it's at downpour out there and will continue to be so for the next thirty six hours at times in most locations from western Washington and atmospheric river sterling in our direction so that will keep the steady rain coming today Heiser mainly forties but tomorrow we bump well up into the fifties a sign that the warm part of the storm this year that pushes the snow level up and turn in and seven dumping rain in the cascades too so that starts to come right down the sides of the mountains into our rivers and they're going to start to swell especially those that feet out of the south cascades and the southern Olympics like the show Hey listen to Alec and callous rivers in particular so watch those ones all of our rivers gonna run high as we head toward Saturday the rain breaks partner scattered showers just in time for the official arrival of winter on Saturday night in the coming weather center I'm meteorologist Shannon o'donnell ran over much of western Washington right now heavy in Silverdale moving toward Bainbridge island also over the eastside specifically the cascade foothills like whole bark maple valley and that heavy snow Shannon was talking about change required on so called me Stevens and blew it passes unless you drive an all wheel drive rig come on news time six of six I let's get more on that round of snow that arrived in the cascades come as Ryan Harris reports from snow Kwame passed with what's ahead if you drive east there seven to twelve inches of snow expected at the pass through morning with another couple inches forecast for Friday great for skiers and snowboarders not so much of your driving east for the holidays washed out plus supervisor Kevin Nicholson says they don't do things any differently because of the holiday get away the cruiser in because there's heavy snow it's not gonna be a smooth gone down on a regular every traffic mall next the more difficult but I mean that's why we're here we're here to make sure that people can get to where they're going to spend the holidays with their families Neil is one of those snowboarders who hit the mountain early to beat the storm visions are I can't see anything ten feet in front this time the advice come prepared with chains are traction tires food water extra clothes and blankets a full tank and anything else you need if you have to be here for awhile so call me pass Ryan Harris como news come on news time six oh seven is saying extreme weather is becoming the norm governor Insley is out with a set of new climate proposals income was Charlie harder looks at some of the measures Insley is sending to the state legislature Insley wants right here companies to have certain emissions targets a clean fuel standard a quarter of new cars offered for sale by twenty twenty five to be zero emission and to align Washington state emission targets with the latest science is Lee says the science is clear that's an assertion Republican congressman Mike Conway a Texas recently.

Alberta
"alberta" Discussed on Pause

Pause

01:39 min | 1 year ago

"alberta" Discussed on Pause

"Time and time again one thing I love about hearing from the coalition's is that when they're facing challenges of confusion they stay curious when they're discouraged They find courage and continue the conversation when there's division they are connected and the keep connected when there is doubt the Hi I'm me Mahaffey and welcome to pause an Albert a social innovation connect podcast we invite partners and collaborators to pause from their busy work and sit down together to reflect on what they're learning as they seek to address the root causes of complex problems in their nations when used well they help change makers bring their unique perspectives and efforts together to better understand an address complex problems in today's episode would we hear from three change makers within a province wide coalition called echo the early childhood coalitions of Alberta we turn over the Mike to Janice Kramer One of echoes Coalition Liaisons to host this episode Janice did a beautiful job of summarizing echoes model she also invited to incredible local coalition leaders to sit down with her for reflective conversations about what this work looks like in their communities and what they've learned along the way before we jump into that conversation here's Janice introducing.

Mahaffey Albert Alberta Mike Janice Kramer
"alberta" Discussed on The Big Story

The Big Story

12:58 min | 1 year ago

"alberta" Discussed on The Big Story

"Sometimes the things you think you know about a place when you're outside her. Turn out to be completely false. This is not one of those times the angry and ignored the feeling among the two thousand protesters here frustrated by the enormous discount alberta crude what is being sold for him to the reason for that crisis and this protest an inability to get canadian oil to market due to a lack of pipeline capacity and rightly or wrongly wrongly in this crowd much of the blame for that lies with justin trudeau. If you wanna know how alberta is going to vote in october you ask yourself how the oil and gas industry. We'll be doing by that. Ask yourself if the long-awaited trans mountain pipeline will be under construction by them and ask yourself. How does berta typically feel about leaders named trudell this week. Our lay of the land project dives into canada's conservative stronghold where a good eighty five percent of the writings can be called like right now but that doesn't mean there's nothing we can learn by examining just how trudeau and the liberals else came to be so hated in this province or by looking at what has voters in the few swing ridings that exist still making up their minds or by wondering what if with anything could dent andrew shares chances and this province because as he might be learning from ontario polls right now electing an overwhelmingly conservative the provincial government doesn't necessarily guarantee the federal vote will go that way too. Hello i'm jordan heath rawlings and this is the big story. Jason marcus off is the albert correspondent for maclean's. Hey jason audi as out here how democracy going out now berta. Oh it's always churning in war rooming and going forth we are now at least a couple all of months. You would know better than me removed from jason kenny's big win. How's that going. It's been what since april so that's maybe seventeen months. I think jason kenney any <hes> you know acting a lot of promises. He had a pretty big detailed agenda. It helps knowing well in advance that you almost definitely going to win. So you can basically cle- just put out the manifesto for all the things you are promising you do to do and then you do a bunch of those things set a bunch of them in motion so they've scrapped the carbon tax you know the federal backstop will come in soon lick. It has another provinces but he's scrap. Carbon-tax launched a or announce. He's is gonna launch yet. Another <hes> court challenge against it. He's cut corporate tax. He's done a lot of consultation. I mean the you know as one. Does you put out a bunch of consultations. Do things a bit later whether it be because you just wanna make sure you get all your ducks in a row once you actually have the the books when you're in government ferment or in a lot of what jason kenny's doing he's actually postponing some major decisions including the budget until after the federal election jason kenney being very sensitive to not wanting to upset the apple cart for andrew scheer. He's actually delayed the false sitting of the legislature until october twenty second. That's happening out here on -tario as well. I think <hes> i mean there are two reasons for that. I would i would gather one. One is to make sure that your political staff and m l. a.'s can take some leave and do some campaign work and help the federal cause but also not not paint it yourself as a target jason kenney liked doug ford and ontario has promised to take aggressive action on the deficit and that means a lot of public service cuts and we've seen what's the furor through various service cuts and reforms in ontario. Jason kenney is really trying to keep those out of the headlines headlines until after the election by actually keeping them out period of the public eye. Nothing is decided nothing is happening technically until sometime in late october once we figure wrote who the prime minister for the next four years give or take are going to be well. It's interesting because on -tario i think <hes> in a province that's kind of a swing province. A people are linking king andrew shears candidacy to what they've seen from doug ford's government or at least that's what <hes> that's what the polls are showing but in a province that's pretty much just faithfully conservative police police slingy of us all yes yeah do voters link sheer and kenny that closely like we'll kenny's policies reflect on potential share prime ministership and n._l. Berta maybe i mean it'll keep in mind what's in play in alberta so we have thirty four seats twenty nine of them are conservative for urwin liberal last year which was a high water mark for quite a while and one of them went in dp and those are all urban seats <hes> three in into in calgary and those are really the only seats that are in play in the rest of the province is reliably conservative. Nobody is really going take those two seriously as ones that could flip and because of that what kenny does won't really have any impact on sheer because the loyalties unflappable the support is not going to shift you know unless there's something really astonishing if andrew scheer suddenly behind closed doors making fun of burton's and and now she my skin is gonna rip up all pipeline plans then maybe people would lose faith in him in alberta but i don't really see that happening so much well in the places that are up for grabs them what issues are albertans voting on what could swing those writings one of the big things with two thousand fifteen is a watershed for intruder the liberals they hadn't won anything in this province in the harbor years. They hadn't won anything in calgary. Read the liberals since nineteen sixty eight wow then they picked up two seats a former minister khair downtown and a seat in the northeast in a in a in a writing with a lot of new canadians and they want to an eminent sort of in the same configuration downtown and a separate with a lot of new canadians in those areas the issues will be the same as in the other in the rest of the province pipelines and the economy the alberta alberta economy took a deep dive around twenty fifteen around the time of the last election and never really recovered and a lot of people people blame the whole pipeline carbon tax issue for that <hes> some of which is justified some of which is certainly played up by conservative politicians. Jason detractors just those policy. He's bought the pipeline <hes>. He bought the trans mountain pipeline but you know. I don't think he's gotten any much credit for that. People saying thanks justin trudeau. We're going to give you more years because you're saving our pipeline. That doesn't really count to play people in this province have decisively turned against justin trudeau and only in the most liberal areas where there are concerns about andrew scheer and support new canadian communities for the liberals over the conservatives. Do they have a hope. It's going to be a scrape for these seats for the liberals very much. My next question was going to be about the pipeline because again as a a casual observer from outside of the province. It doesn't seem like there's been a lot of movement since the liberals purchased it and presumably the point of purchasing it was to get moving and bring jobs to albert and and and keep albertans or at least a small pocket of albertson's <hes> approving of the liberals so what has happened well shortly after they purchased it in the spring of two thousand an eighteen they had the hard hat photo ops and people digging shovels and they were starting to do work on it then came the federal court of appeal ruling in favor of a number number of first nations communities n._b._c. saying that they didn't consult properly the same wrap that the conservatives had for northern gateway that wind up scuppering that pipeline plan so they've had to go back. Do more consultations get a new approval that happened in the spring just last week on on wednesday. The federal pipeline company announced that they're going to be moving forward on starting construction in september which means that there will likely maybe some photo ops a new hard hat for the liberal government more hard hats more shovels more smiles and in the last case eight invited the the provincial government then under rachel notley to don those hardhats with them. They were very eager to thinking that this was they were driving confidence. They were saying that look our compromises work with the liberals working <hes> they're on our side. They're moving forward and we're getting results. Jason kenney is not playing that game with things nor as much of the oil sector in part because they've been burned in the past. They know that if you don that headline that hard hat you can look pretty funny if in a few months later there's another court ruling right saying you didn't consult enough still go back to the drawing board or if there's a lot of people are expecting a lot of civil disobedience and activism to visit among indigenous activists and environmentalists trying to physically block some of the construction zones in british columbia and and the other factor of course is that jason kenney does not want to give a lot of credit any credit really to justin trudeau for things so what they're saying is. We're going to hold our celebration until the pipelines ashi completing oil flows nats <hes> twenty twenty two. What are the chances that shovels actually end up in the ground for real before the election and i don't mean i don't mean for a photo op. I mean work really starts and if so does that change anything <hes> about albertson's opinions minions of the liberals this announcement was that they're going to start hiring people and and they will be in a position to start work at various points in the pipeline route through d._c. And starting in alberta as of september so there will be actual won't be ground move but they'll be putting things in place they'll be getting doing some land clearing and whatnot they'll be photo ops for things that are not just announced but things that are actually going to be happening but that doesn't instill much confidence now because that puts the pipeline in the same place that it was in the middle of last year and then people saw what happened. There's a lot of skepticism skepticism concern <hes> any confidence is very reserved and you also still have jason kenny and a lot of people in the oil patch gotcha who are the advocacy ed keeping on kudo much more criticism not for what he did with trans mountain for what he's done with everything other everything else in terms of pipelines lines so people are in alberta and what the conservatives have tried to engineer in large part are much more likely to blame him for the things he's done that would limit future pipelines than what he's done on positively on the current pipeline. Is there any point and maybe this is a dumb question but is there any point or anything anything that the liberals could even try to do to reach out and court. Some of those voters or is the split deep enough that it's probably a a waste of campaign resources. They're going to devote some tauruses to albert and part of that is because you don't want to be seen as abandoning alberta right. There's already that myth out there and has been very aware of that ever since he started his leadership campaign back in. I think it was only thirteen for. I got elected. He was coming to calgary in alberta on a regular basis having covered harper all this time. We've never in recent years prime minister. Come this often too alberto. They've made a lot of investment safe right to say. We're not giving up upon you. We have your back. They're trying. Are they going to vote a ton of resources. Are they going to do anything serious to expand their footprint. No they'll try to keep the three empty seats. They half half if things look really bleak if they seem like they're really really hard up. They may shift resources out but liberal crowd a lot thinner than they were four years ago <unk> at upper events. Do we know how the general populace of alberta feels about climate change because this is one of the issues. That's come up repeatedly as we've. We've asked people in other provinces and asked pollsters about you know the top voting issues. Alberta is the province that believes at least in the immediacy of the climate change crisis in the country in terms of lack of faith in climate change science.

alberta jason kenney jason kenny justin trudeau andrew scheer calgary Berta prime minister jason audi Jason marcus albert Jason canada jordan heath liberal government doug ford
"alberta" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

02:04 min | 3 years ago

"alberta" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

"Thousand square feet in the jasper national park in alberta jasper right okay so i mean like the queen is she stayed there before apparently think is hilarious because who doesn't want honeymoon where you're graham has been real time any like one time my family went up to trout creek because my dad's like we went here as kids and then we got to the hotel we're this is haunted and we will die even my dad is like we are leaving at six in the morning home because this is this is the this is the exact same hold on and this is a nightmare to you why are you calling this one of your goods because listen we're all very thirsty to connect the royal couple is in any way shape or for are we i mean i think there's been like if you just google megan markle tronto a million interviews and by million i mean the same one where she's like canada's like my second home so i think there's that connection and also we love tourists marketing strategy so i mean that's it doesn't hurt to have canada under the spotlight for something ridiculous i understand what you mean i'm from newfoundland on north ever mentioned that before but i feel like they shut all the tourism commercials on the one nice day we had all of them we got one day in the middle of july to take this to convince people to go and better than i think everybody that i've ever met outside of canada's like don't you all live in cabins and it's like no rich people have kept what's your band okay so my bad is i can't another repeat topic talked about the sport to before while amazing i don't know if you've heard about this movie it's called solo solo you can't hear you yeah hey i was going to say like you know somebody's guitar seen on a whatever this is the new making jokes this is the new star wars movie based on the story of huntsville correct so here's what happened i made one hundred million dollars at the box office it was expected to make three hundred million dollars at the box office and long story short lucas in lucasville disney or freaking out issuing statements saying they're going to reassess their strategies they've like learned from this.

jasper national park alberta jasper graham canada lucas lucasville disney trout creek google newfoundland huntsville three hundred million dollars one hundred million dollars one day