36 Burst results for "adobe"

Fresh update on "adobe" discussed on Texas Financial Advisory Show

Texas Financial Advisory Show

00:38 sec | 7 hrs ago

Fresh update on "adobe" discussed on Texas Financial Advisory Show

"Be kind of clunky. And then there's also Adobe Photo Express. Okay, uh, this is also the free version of Adobe Photo shop. But it's not the full photo shop, but it's actually really easy to use. And finally I've talked about this show or I talked about It's been in the program. A lot on the show is called camp. And if you are looking for a full adobe Photoshop replacement, that's the one for you. It does have that steep learning curve. I just wanna warn you for laced all five look no further than the official home page of the Kim Commando show that's komo indio dot com and hit that link that says Kim Show way more phone calls coming up. So stay right where you are here with Kim commando show. If you haven't end depth technical problem That's.

Kim Show Adobe Official
Big Tech, Antitrust, and Democracy

Exponent

04:59 min | 2 d ago

Big Tech, Antitrust, and Democracy

"I James. I'm doing. Okay. How are you? Good thanks. All Things considered I'm busy. Tell You I've complainer this on multiple guess at this point. But what's another one I feel like? Because no one is traveling or going anywhere what is usually the slowest months? August is just insane like stuff happening constantly it started off where it got very slow in March. I was walked down people don't know what to do and were nervous. I was over whelming sense of doom and the weird thing. Is Obviously, it's not that stuff has changed that much but we talked about this on the last episode people have adapted, and now they're like making up for lost I but they're just like news coming out everywhere right a no more so than in the capital. That's right. So last week last Wednesday the editor subcommittee of the Judiciary Committee in the House had a hearing with the four tuxedos Apple Google facebook and Amazon Microsoft was notable by its absence, but it was clearly a. Focus on consumer tech. In the reason I say that this was clear is not just because such. Adele wasn't there but it became pretty clear through the questioning that Tim. Cook was only they're Kinda wanted to say that they got all of them because they were not prepared to ask him questions at all. It's clear that all the work of the committee has been mostly focused on I would say first and foremost Amazon they had the most detailed stuff there they were pretty detail. About Google, they were somewhat detailed about facebook, but you could see sort of the quality of questionings really starting to come down there, and then they didn't even know what the percentages were in the APP store. You is kind of embarrassing. They would ask cook a question and let him just talk because they didn't know what to ask next wherever else interrupt because they wanted that points to make et Cetera et Cetera and I've thought that difference in the quality of questioning per company. was pretty striking. Yeah. It's interesting. The New York Times ran a tally of the questions and I thought that in itself was interesting and it looked pretty evenly spaced and then apple was dislike fifty percent of the other three frustrating in a way because obviously I've been sort of fixated on the APP store for literally since the beginning of attack relate what am I I set of articles back in two thousand thirteen was trying to understand what how is doing such a crappy job. Imagine the APP store and one of my conclusions there was there. So scarred from their near death experience in the nineties when they had to beg adobe and Microsoft to continue supporting the Max can remain viable and I wrote this is back in two thousand thirteen that they would never allow themselves to be in that position again and well. So interesting about that is the way that has manifested is that again, this is a long running things that they've really had kept productivity APPS. In particular, it's hard to make money. You can't charge upgrades is really important sort of business mile away. It's worked on other platforms white the internet which Tim Cook Pretends doesn't exist also testimony they jumped straight from brick and mortar to the APP store. There's no intervening period there where you could buy stuff on the Internet. It's funny because when you read his testimony, you don't notice until someone points out she's like Oh my word. Yeah. You just kinda skipped fifteen years of distribution. So I didn't watch it old but I did watch part of it, and the only thing that I can remember is someone was questioning him around he has complete control of which APPs and he's like I'll well, if the native APPs that's true except Web apps so think he's not to the Internet was like little buttons that you create insofar which by the way are totally handicap progressive lobster totally handicap on IOS in wipes away all their cookies and settings after a week in. Where are the interesting things about this is because apple was held captive by productivity APPs in the nineties all of their sort of onerous APP store terms in my estimation have mostly affected would be productivity APPs in your abyss situation where you get no great innovator of APPs on these platforms in part because much risk like maybe you're going to build something in apple's not gonNA prove it or there's no business model it and it just doesn't make sense to make a new sort of productivity after the most difficult in-depth after build from a physical. API's on the device or perspective and what actually has come to dominate are. All these network based APPS that are mostly API driven and what's interesting is because apple is not a social company I message notwithstanding that they kind of weren't paying attention to that and what happened was we talked about this China where we chat actually became the exact sort of dominant APP that I think the APP store was designed to limit. But because they weren't sort of paying attention, they ended up the exact same situation as a nineties is the apple as a company is much stronger than back. Then it's not even remotely comparable but the fact that we chat is more important than your phone is definitely the case you. Like Oh we trade the same well then why is it? We have a mini APP store for on purposes and no one else has allowed it like one of the most obvious examples of APPs not being treated the same and it's not true the same because we chat as more important than the IPHONE.

Apple Tim Cook Facebook Amazon Microsoft Google Judiciary Committee The New York Times Adele Editor Adobe China
Adobe, Twitter, NYT Launch Content Authenticity Initiative

Techmeme Ride Home

01:35 min | 6 d ago

Adobe, Twitter, NYT Launch Content Authenticity Initiative

"There's a new group whose members include Adobe Twitter and the New York Times that has released a white paper detailing an open standard for media authentication that could be built into both hardware such as cameras and smartphones and software programs like Photoshop. In other words, this new body called the content authenticity initiative wants to do battle with deep fakes quoting axios the system would record a digital signature when a photo or video is taken, and then again each time it's edited in any way, users would be able to see that. Record of the injuries origin and any changes that have been made to it. The idea is a flexible standard aimed at protecting privacy and safety photojournalist. For instance, tag themselves as the crater of a photo and Geo tagged to a specific location. The system could also simply authenticate that photo was taken with a standard compliant device without buying who took it or where the group views authenticating images from their creation to the time they're seen online as a more promising approach than trying to detect deep fix once they're already in circulation. Even the best entry in facebook deep fake detection challenge was only able to detect them sixty five percent of the time per results. The company announced in June. That's only slightly better than a coin toss sure Hannah true picks vice president of Research and Development and Co author of the paper told axios. Instead of all of us trying to get to where we can detect what's fake we should prove what's real and quote. Drew picks by the way is a c. a I member, which is already in the business of digital authentication.

New York Times Vice President Of Research And Adobe GEO Facebook Twitter Hannah
Big tech CEOs testify before Congress

The Vergecast

48:04 min | Last week

Big tech CEOs testify before Congress

"So, this hearing just going to say it, it was six hours of chaos. So. So many things like individual moments of pure chaos happened this hearing. But because every member of Congress was only given five minutes to ask the questions in and they moved on, no one could process the moments of cash. So here are some things that happened during this hearing. Jeff. bezos just started eating nuts on his call. That was just a thing that you started snacking for the first ninety minutes. It appears that basis had tech issues was operating in some kind of delay. So we didn't hear from him. They just answer any questions and they'd take a ten minute break Jeff. bezos could fix his computer. Amazing. Jim Jordan, who McKenna pointed out. On the show last week is always sort of chaos element. Try to talk over several members of Congress got yelled to put his mass back on floated. Just elaborate conspiracy theories. was when I say was chaos I. Don't know if there's any other way to describe it. I. Think that led a lot of people to think the hearing itself didn't accomplish its goals, but I think in many ways it did. But Kennedy you WanNa Kinda go through what the committee was trying to accomplish the themes they were pointed at in. How hearing played out, right. So okay. First off. Harkening back to last week I mentioned Jim. Jordan's mountain dew obsession. Definitely drink a handful those throughout the hearing I took notes in screen shots. So, I, called it. But regardless of their pores soda choices, there were a lot of lawmakers who definitely did their homework and I think that was really apparent throughout the entire hearing and when I look at. The picture that they tried to paint I think that became really clear in chairman Sicily's opening statements. So this is the guy who liked. And spearheaded the entire investigation from the beginning, and in those opening statements, he pointed out that yeah Apple Amazon Google facebook. There are different in a lot of ways and they exhibit anticompetitive behaviors potentially allegedly and a lot of different ways. But what they tried to pull together and was a story, and it's really hard to tell a story and five minute fragments. But what happened yesterday was Sicily. Ni, and a lot of the Democrats on the Committee wanted to point out that these companies they become bottlenecks for distribution whether that's information or just like APP stores marketplace's they control what gets distributed in how what was really key to the investigation was how? How they survey competitors. If you have so much control dominance over a market or a specific part of the tech industry, you have a lot of insight into your competitors and you can do a lot of dangerous things with that, and then lastly, after that dominance has gained, it's how they abuse it. Right? How they abuse it to make harder for small businesses in competitors and I think that's exactly what Cellini pointed out in the beginning and I think they did a poor job that storytelling throughout the process. But I think that's also our job. Right is to pull that evidence together and tell that story for them in a way that isn't like. Yes, no yelling at CEOS and like stopping them and I think by getting that in the evidentiary record doing all this questioning, I think they really did achieve their goal in the end. Yeah. I mean, I think the thing that happened sort of next to the hearing was that they released a bunch of documents from these one point, three, million documents of clutch. Over the past year, they released pretty targeted selection documents for every company showing some of this stuff, Casey, I wrote a story about. facebook. INSTAGRAM. My I'm going to frame this email or mark Zuckerberg. Literally one sentence, no period. The Andrew says I need to figure out. I'M GONNA buy instagram like I would love to just be in a place were sending that email like super casually like I got this thing to figure out and it's not like am I gonNa buy the model of the car. It's like instagram. I've been thinking of the text messages where so and so says that Mark Zuckerberg's didn't go destroy mode on instagram ever since they got that up. Case she this to Kevin and right that text was. Yes. Well, it was Kevin. System was talking to an investor and Kevin said to the investor. If we don't sell well, mark, go into destroy mode on us and the investor side probably. Of course, stray casual. So there's just a lot of documents and I think one of the functions of hearing was to get those documents into the official congressional record to make the CEO's account for them. That did not seem very successful to me. Is like a takeaway people should have from this hearing, right? No. I think a lot of people that go into these hearings are expecting like these big Gotcha moments and expecting like a lot of news and all this stuff. But it really, it wasn't oversight hearing. You know it wasn't. They didn't come. They came at this like in a report last earlier this week that they came out at as investigators. They didn't come at it to make a big show horse and pony show out of it, and yet I think the CEO's didn't. The record well enough to the extent that they could have. But there was definitely, I was expecting them to do a lot less evasion and I expected a lot less room probation with the documents, but it's just the process of a Congressional hearing. It's. It's hard to do that in a congressional hearing. But if you put those documents out there, you get the CEO's on the record a little bit who does excite this excites the FTC. J, and that's who can take this next and then it's also congress. You know they can't break up a tech company, but they can regulate going forward and it's those three key themes that I pointed out earlier that they could regulate. You know what I mean. They could legislate to forbid companies from surveying competitors and things like that, and that's where this goes. So the format of the hearing, every member and five minute chunks, it seemed very clear that the Democrats had some sort of coordinated evidentiary strategy, they would start and. And they would say, I, want to read this email to you. What did you mean by this email and then Jeff bezos would say something like I have. No idea is on works. I. Was real pattern that developed was basis really not doing or claiming he definitely knows claiming not really no way Wayne is under the thing they did or they would ask sooner Pichai about the very granular add deal google made by an ad product, and soon I, would say I'll get back to you, which is basically all responses. So the Democrats seemed like they were coordinated to move through their documents. The Republicans seem to be doing something else that also seem coordinated intentional, but what was their focus because that seemed clear split my takeaway from Jim Jordan who? We got into earlier, he he was interviewing. As if they were all Jack Dorsey. And as we talked about like, yeah, he invited Jack Dorsey to testify, but he doesn't sit on the antidote subcommittees. Anything. He says, it just doesn't matter. So it sounded to me as if he prepared questions Jack Dorsey and then it was like, oh, he's not coming I'll ask Tim Cook the same questions. Another completely crazy moment that happened just seen by and five minute chunks is that. Represented Sensenbrenner from Wisconsin Dear Sweet Wisconsin. Definitely. Asked Mark Zuckerberg why the Donald Junior was banned from twitter and mark. Zuckerberg was happening on twitter facebook and there was just like a moment of confused silence, and then he tried to move on and that just sort of floated by in the river of chaos to tell you how much chaos there was kneeling. When you started to tell that story, I thought you were going to tell the story about when Jim Jordan asked him cook if the famous one, thousand, nine, hundred, four, Apple Super Bowl, AD was actually about twenty twenty cancel culture, which is another thing that really happened. I think that's out of context. He didn't ask him. He said clearly, this is. That's definitely what Steve Jobs was thinking IBM is canceled culture and Apple's going to break it with hammer and Jeff. Bezos said that social media is a nuance destruction machine and all this crazy stuff from that. It was a wild will that that particular question when Jim Jordan asked, do you support the cancel culture mov, you could see the CEOS like. 'cause they went in order. He asks them all in order. So First Tim Cook just like basically muttered nothing. Here's like I don't. I support speech whatever. The iphone a keyboard like that was his answer. Sooner per child also, just like muttered, right? He's like Google has always supported free expression Zuckerberg like saw the opportunity and took it and the forces of liberalism I rising I, and then basis was like I cannot. I cannot do in like went for it, and that was just totally insane moment. But it also seems like the Republicans were intentional to try to create their own moments where they were yelling at CEOS about bias on platforms is obviously something cover a. At. You were paying a lot of attention that case you're paying a lot of attention to it. Do you think that was effective in creating because you know there's like a parallel conservative Universe Jim? Jordan was on Tucker. Carlson. Last night like was that effective or d think that the CEO's were able to sort of tamp down on interesting the Tucker Carlson pointed out that Google and other companies are all big donors to Jim Jordan another folks. So that is a weird side, but I think it was actually besides the moment where they mixed up twitter with facebook I. Think this was much more effective off. Off Topic yelling about technology than we usually see like are genuinely issues that like they are upset about that, they could point to largely around like cove nineteen misinformation and they could at least like pick those topics and stick to them rather than kind of asking vague questions about like, why is my phone listening to me? Well, they're definitely asked questions about why are my campaign emails getting filtered by G mail? Yes. I should. I should mention that they have really and they have all of these cases where they ask about extremely specific one off incidents that anyone who has used social media knows happens constantly. And, then turn them into a sinister pattern. But I think they managed to come off as sounding more like they understood what they were talking about the unusual. I think that was a real theme of the hearing, Casey. What did you think of this sort of bias side show that occurred? Well, I mean the the idea that conservative voices are being suppressed is foundational to the conservative movement and is behind the rise of conservative talk radio. It was behind the rise of Fox News. Now that social media exists, we have seen it in this new form, but it is sort of being presented as extra, sinister and worthy of. Some sort of legislative intervention what frustrates me about it is that much more than newspapers or or cable news like Mark Zuckerberg Dorsey. These people benefit hugely from having all possible voices on their platform. None of them is incentivized to drive conservatives off their platform. What they are incentivized to do is have rules that make the place safe and welcoming. So that people want to hang out there and so to the extent that there are issues on the platform, they've largely come because these platforms have rules. And you know you would think that a bunch of free marketeers would realize that the alternative to the system that they're so mad about would be creating a new system, but they don't seem at all interested in doing that. So I just sort of dismissed all of them as charlatans I actually thought it was interesting that the opposite track came up, which was the Stop Hey for profit campaign I kind of wasn't expecting that. The representative Raskin I believe asked facebook. Basically, why aren't you kicking more hate speech off. I forget who else asked like look is the point that you're so big. You don't care about advertiser boycotts I. Mean, you know it will here. Here is a fact that the number one complaint that facebook gets from its users, the thing that users. About. FACEBOOK is that it removes too much content and so if you're running the place, you do have to take these complaints seriously in a way. Right? It might not be you know that you shadow band conservative whatever that even means on social network in twenty twenty. But the fact that you're removing content is really upsetting people. So you can't dismiss that idea entirely, but I still don't feel like we're having that intellectually honest conversation about it. So this was definitely I feel like you can connect the you control distribution. We're GONNA show the abuses of power narrative. We got other. Democrats. With the you control distribution. You're banning conservatives right like I. Think what's Sensenbrenner Again, cups and conservatives are consumers to is that people don't realize that like fifty percent of the population in many ways. But facebook has like famous conservatives working its highest levels Kevin. We last week, we're talking about Kevin Roose keeps sharing the list. List of the most engaged content from crowd tangle. It's all conservative content, and that's so problematic for facebook that they're. They're pushing back with other metrics and graphs of their own, making the facts just aren't there, but it doesn't seem to be convincing. Brett Kevin is being asked to recuse himself from facebook case because he's like best friends with facebook I, AP I wrote a column almost two years ago. Now, arguing that conservatives were trying to redefine. Any conservative identified person having any unwanted outcome on a social network, right? So bias is your name was higher than mine in search results. Bias is used suggested that I follow a Democrat and not a Republican right, and if you take action on your policies that apply to everyone against me a conservative that is biased against conservatives, right. So and by the way I have to say this has been hugely successful because we've talked about it. How many minutes now and the longer that these discussions. Discussions. Go on. They just sort of refi people's minds. The idea that there really is a vast conspiracy to silence conservative speech because he's networks are so big millions of conservatives are having experiences like this every day, and now there is an ideology that is basically a religion for them to attach to, which is although Silicon Valley liberals are out to get. Reason I wanted to talk about the conservative side show, which in many ways was a circus is it feels like the notion that we should be punitive to the companies or mad at the company's. Bipartisan, right we were. We were not looking at a hearing where the Democrats were on the attack. Republicans are saying we love. Apple. We're looking at hearing where they were. Everyone was mad. There are a couple of exceptions to that. There were a couple of I think sensenbrenner and a few other folks were like look we want to be clear. Big is not bad. We just WANNA make sure we're not punishing you for your success, but you were like almost entirely, right? Yeah. I. Mean I. think that's it's important to. To capture that mood like Jeff Bezos Mark Zuckerberg, Tim, Cook soon. Darpa, try they usually get to finish whatever sentence they start saying. Right. They're not used to being interrupted. Their thoughts are usually like you know they get to live in complete sentences and people take them seriously here in five in intervals, they were interrupted almost every time they started speaking to be told that they were wrong that they were filibuster at one point Sicily said stop thinking is for the questions. We can just assume they're all good questions. They. Were getting yelled at and they're going yell that about a variety of things that were pretty specific. So you kind of in your kind of structure here. The first one was controlling distribution. What did you hear as a hearing went on the indicated to that? The committee had a case here? I think the apple's APP store is one thing you know charging thirty percent cuts on certain things is just controlling an APP store. It's the same thing with Amazon's marketplace. They can inherently in control what gets placed and what gets sold and you know if they want to play with search results on Amazon, they can do that, and then on facebook and Google, it's not just like products and software that's information. And it could be information when it's like Google. Google. Stealing yelps, texture views right in putting those in its little info boxes in search queries in facebook if facebook is just like an. Mation, distribution platform and. It can decide Algorithm Mickley. Knowingly. What people get to see this bution was very keen to the committee's hearing yesterday and they pointed out different aspects in which you know each company exhibited that kind of behavior. So the one that will you bring up apple? We wrote about this, say there's much emails. Apples document production is just one hundred and thirty pages of unrelated emails and whatever order see it's like scan through it. So there's a lot of little stories in there. There's one about right to repair and apple realizing it needed to repair. By watching PR people operate by reading their emails journalists. Very entertaining. They're like we had a break like here's our strategy. Here's we're GONNA. That's all in there. You can look at it, but there's a lot about the APP store itself and how they're going to use the mechanics of the APP store to control their platform, and it started at the beginning like the first emails in this production from twenty, ten there. From Phil, Schiller Steve Jobs saying, are we GONNA? Let Amazon Sell Books in the kindle store. Store, it felt like I saw an Amazon ad was hard to watch this hard to watch this ad where a person's reading a book on an iphone in the kindle APP in the pick up an android phone keep reading. He's like literally like it was hard to watch like Schiller's at home like pain what a customer is having an experience that good it really just. Heart and so he's like it was hard to watch. You fours Steve Jobs. They're like we gotta shut it down jobs is the bookstore will be the only bookstore on the APP. Store. That's the way it's going to be everyone's gotta used to it. We know that restricting payments will hurt other things, but that's what we're doing and they started there in two thousand ten and they pulled it out, and then that ladders up into everything that we've seen with, hey, ladders up into the analysis group showing up to. Apple, can pay them to say that there's independent study has revealed. Everybody has a thirty percent cut. It has landed up into Tim Cook, forwarding. He gets a letters from developers that are in this direction. It's like apples breaking my heart and he just like Ford's it. Tim, Cook forwards that email to filter credit eighty, just as thoughts like amazing like they are constantly thinking about the APP store as a mechanism of control for the platform in the leverage and other deals. So the other one was apple is this Amazon one which I have very mixed feelings on saying that this is bad or legal I'm curious for all of your thoughts famously. Did, not have the prime video APP on the Apple TV and all these other places apple, Amazon came to a deal. There's an entire presentation in this production like the slide deck of how the deal is going to work. Apple got to be the preferred seller of its own product. So third parties cancel. Apple. Products, Amazon pages, they got. They have a custom by flow. They've custom product pages, all the stuff in return. Amazon got a lower commission on the APP store and gets to Selatan products which no. No like you can rent a movie from the Amazon APP on the Apple TV, no one else gets to it in one world. This is just pure platform collision, right? Apple cut VIP deal for big companies because it wanted something and you could say this is legal in another world. It's like this is how deals work apple something valuable. Amazon s something valuable and they came to a conclusion wherever made more money and quite frankly the consumer experience platform has got better. How do you read that? Casey? That is good and fair analysis of it. I. Think I did read slightly more scandalous. Tones into it in part because apple would never acknowledge that some developers are more important to it than others even though if you assume that that's true, I think maybe one of the things that's frustrating about it is there is no transparency accountability around which developers get sweetheart deals is that once you hit a certain threshold of revenue will cut your price. Why couldn't they extend that deal to everyone right? Or is it just if we withhold something that seems particularly valuable, we can eventually drag you to the table. Table, which is sort of what seems like happened here. I think in all cases, what I'm always looking for is the accountability, right like and some sense of of equitable treatment of developers and I understand the guys are always going to get the best treatment, but it can that be publicly visible. Can it be acknowledged and there'd be routes for others to achieve that same level of success and treatment, and that I'll just seems missing here. Did you buy Tim Co? He said it twice. It was obviously A. Glimmer, of sympathy for all four CEOS. There is a lot of reporting that they had spent months preparing for this hearing like being grilled there, they'd hire outside law firms. They. Practiced they all clearly had soundbites memorized in none of them. Got To say him because it kept getting interrupted. Tim Cook had this one where he is like if we're the gatekeepers, the gates are open wider than ever. We've gone from five hundred. APPS to one point seven, he said like. A whole speech. and. The thing is there's fierce competition for developers. They don't like our store can do for android the windows. For xbox and PS. Four. Which I was like the idea that adobe is going to be like we don't want to be on the IPAD. Here's PS. Four Photoshop is insanity to me. I'm going to build a spreadsheet. APP. For the five. That's how frustrated with Tim Cook. To that ring. True to you I. Mean, there's no, it does not ring true. There is a, there is a duopoly. In the United States when it comes to smartphones, iphones have majority share in the United States and you can't say, well, you know there's there's a rogue fork of android in Malaysia that you could go develop for if you really wanted to and have that come across as a credible argument to Americans. Right it is. Natural for any monopolist to spend most of its time, arguing that it is much smaller and much less consequential as as you think it is and they're essentially always asking you to ignore what is in front of your face, which is that they are the giant. They are in control. What they say goes, and it doesn't matter which small businesses get hurt along the. The. Way I would point out that the contact and we're gonNA talk about earnings eventually. But the context for that is apple had its biggest third quarter ever this month, their revenues went up eleven percent year over year, they're making obviously making billions of dollars in their services revenue, which is a lot of the narrative around the APP stores increasing that services line. Also went up. I think it was thirteen billion. So you're right. They're very big in their earnings the day after the hearing did nothing. To reduce that impression. I want to switch to Amazon a little bit McKenna. You really focused Amazon was basis first time up there. They came at him a lot about marketplace. How did you think that went I think it went pretty good. I. Think. John Paul specifically was just like killer her questions with breakout star. Yeah. She was just like killer and she's the representative for. SEATTLE. So this is where Amazon is right. So she just like killed it and. And I think there were a couple of instances in the documents and in questioning yesterday that really pulled important things out there was like testimony from one bookseller who was like, yeah. We just can't sell a category of books and we don't know why Amazon doesn't let us do that just like testimony like that or even when it comes to like acquisitions, the ring acquisition especially, I wrote about that today through the documents and how. They said, this is for market position. This is a for technology, your talent or anything. We just bought this and that's something that base said again, yesterday he was just very clear. It's like, yeah, we do buy things market position, which is like so insane just here like the richest person in the world. But like, yeah, we're buying market position. It's just what happens. That's another one I have mixed feelings right, and by the way, people should read McKenna story because those documents have just a very funny breakdown like the pros and cons of buying. Buying ring in many of the cons like what if this turns into nest, which if you're just the verge cast listeners like it's just like the Keyword Bingo, but it's fine to say, we're buying market position like this isn't the best product out there, but it's the category of video. doorbells is not huge, right? So to by the the market leader in video doorbells is maybe the most rational use of the money. What is the problem that you think the committee was trying to show an address sense of we're just going to market position. Pointing out, they can just do whatever they want and how casual it is, and there really isn't. It's really funny to read an email like that, and we could buy it or we could just copy it or are. We could just watch. You know that was one of the emails that base from someone. Those are just three options you know and it's like just pick and choose you know. Pointed out like a lot. Just that email itself really pointed out just how easy it is for them. They used a lot of that time history to talk about copycat behaviors and to talk about just like you know buying up competitors and it just seeing that all in one little e mail having to do with the ring was like really i. think it was really kind of I opening and especially like useful for the committee. So Amazon got hit a lot for the data collection side of it of copying competitors. bezos did not seem to have great answers there. Right. So that's the. The thing they got in trouble with this. There is that Wall Street. Journal article from like April where employees were literally like, yeah. We dip into data and we use that to guide our own private label products and everybody was like Whoa and Amazon basins. Yesterday said, well, we do have a policy that bans that but giant pointed out yesterday. It's like, okay. So what's your enforcement look like you can have the policy, but like if you don't enforce it, then it's like meaningless. And then yesterday I. Think Paul was like, can you give me a yes or no answer? Do you dip into data and he's like I can't I can't give you. Yes or no, and we're just like we're looking into it. The story had anonymous sources. So that isn't very helpful to us. You know what I mean. So that was one of the main things and that Wall Street Journal article and I think it's the same kind of examples in the committee's documents. They point out specific examples like car trunk, organizers of all things. It's like weird little products like Amazon's like this is a little hot. Maybe we should do that. So I, I think. I, think they made a good case yesterday. Yesterday on that. Yeah. I mean bezos brought up that Wall Street Journal, Article himself twice, and he was like, well, your policy against it. But I can't guarantee never happened. Then there is a strange just didn't come across clear I. Think I know what the committee was trying to get at their like US aggregate seller data when there's only three sellers and then only to sellers? Yes, I. Think what they're getting at is when you're down to the aggregate data of two companies, you heard effectively looking at individual data. What is the problem? They're like the I get what you're doing. You're just reducing the denominator to get to one, but like it, why is that particular problem? Right? Well, none of these. Dipping into individual seller data and looking at aggregate data. That's not a legal. There is no law. This is all voluntary of Amazon. So they have a voluntary policy where like we can't do individual seller data, but they say nothing against aggregate and aggregate what you're getting at eight. Here you is. Does the same thing if it's just like some goofy little product they. They bring up pop stock. It's all the time before pop tops in a moment. Right? There's only like one pop. So company like you know pop soggy, it was kind of an innovative product. It's like well, if there's only two of them and use the aggregate data, you you you have everything you need to know you know about that product line looking aggregate. If that's what you decide to qualify as do you as you're looking through the other Amazon documents and other stuff. So anything jump out at you is something the committee was trying to prove or get at. The questioning seemed very focused on. Like are you using the state at a copy products? Are you buying things? You shouldn't buy. There's one question which I did not understand why came up about DMC. Take downs on twitch and Jeff as just had this look of panic in his eyes. He's like I don't know man I bought Wedge because my kids want to. Do something like that was like the side show stuff, but the real focus here, it just seemed like it was definitely in the marketplace, right? Amazon, everyone came at Amazon for the marketplace. That's what everybody knows him as like they have all these little sides. They got rain. They got Alexa Alexa was one thing too. That was kind of interesting. It's like. Are you buying things like ring to put Alexa into and dislike expand your like Titan Ism as like an Internet Internet connected home. Thing and make that more closed off and walled gardening. That was one thing. But no, it was just focusing on how much power they have to kind of change. What happens in the marketplace to kind of decide what companies in what products are able to come up on the first page of results. You know that's also something that they dug into Google and in something that one of those like themes that kind of ties everything together. We should say they all spend a lot of time talking about counterfeit goods, and why is it Amazon removed? Fake stuff from the platform and how much is it profiting off of you know selling pick rolexes? Is it surprising? The whole foods didn't show up at all they're. Like that is a really massive thing. Amazon owns that. Is it moving into a huge new product category? I think whole foods is not an online marketplace, which was the title of the hearing, not that that restricted anybody from doing anything except that, one of the things Amazon says is we have lots of competition from offline marketplaces, right? Brought up kroger a lot I mean, this is the case he's point. They all made. It seem like they were beset at any moment. They could be crushed by the likes of stop and Shop Right? Like I think the point though was really on the. Digital. Experience Consumers have and like I, don't know Ho-. Foods fits. Into that narrative, especially, because it is itself not dominant like they bought it because you needed to grow in their. Good at that at my question for you on the Amazon stuff was when you think about, we talk about two thirty a lot right like you and I in particular spent a lot time to thirty, which regulates with the platform can do with content. There's not really an equivalent of two thirty for goods on store. Right like there's some case is out there saying like you're liable for what what happens on your online store page, but Amazon doesn't have that like second order of like Messi nece around it that twitter and facebook to with two thirty, I. Mean, it gets invoked a lot for marketplace's, but it's way messier. Well, I just wanted to like this question at counterfeits question about ranking the store like they are even more free than any twitter is to to sort tweets algorithm. Algorithm clear to modern like it just their store. Do you think that they're like that Algorithm transparency? Your wire things ranked. Did you catch a sense that that's where the regulation is GonNa go. So much of the conversation around Amazon really felt like it was individuals sellers being wronged for reasons of Amazon being unresponsive or stealing. It's data. So I don't know it didn't. It didn't seem like a really big focus of the hearing, but it is a huge deal. Yeah. The, digital marketplace frame of this, which is where we have talked to. Cellini. That's where he's going right like facebook and Google very digital. They have like they don't do physical goods. Really. Apple is the APP store. It's all digital goods. Amazon is the one where it's. Front to a lot of physical things, and that is the only place where I can see this regulation needing to make some sort of like major meaningful distinction in I. Didn't see it in the hearing, but I was curious of you caught a glimmer of it. I'm not positive that they have to make a huge distinction there like depending on what they come up with because. So much of this is about their companies and whatever product they produced. The issue is more or less whether or not they're being surveilled and unfairly by targeted and crushed by that data surveillance. All right. We have gone for forty minutes. We should take a quick break. I said I wasn't going to go by company and it happens. So we should come back and talk with facebook Ango. We'll be right back. This is advertiser content. When I say utopia what comes to mind. Birds Chirping lush natural beauty dialed up and vibrant technicolor. Is it within reach. Your world world. World. explained. You are an essential part of the perfect social body. Every Body Matt Place. Everybody happy now while the peacock original series, brave new world takes place in a scientific futuristic utopia. A concept is nothing new Sir Thomas more. I introduced the theory five hundred years ago. But we keep looking for that community identity stability of aldous Huxley's Utopia and not finding it Americans are the unhappiest they've been in decades, and we're increasingly lonely whereas in a utopia. Everyone belongs to everyone else. In nineteen forty-three, the psychologist Abraham. maslow's developed a theory of Utopia. One that allows total self determination in basic terms. maslow's theory says that in Utopia, we decide for ourselves, what we need and how we're GONNA get it in Huxley's Utopia citizens always get what they want and don't want what they can't get. Sounds. Pretty good. Right. Then why can't we make it happen? For a Utopian Society the work we might need to disband some of the things we hold dearest marriage government privacy individualism even family. See for yourself. If a Utopian world is as perfect as it seems watch brave new world now streaming only on peacock. These are really difficult crazy stressful times, and if you're trying to sort of cope, it could be helpful to find something that gets beyond like doom scrolling and like obsessive worried. But digs into what is really going on underneath the surface, and that's what the weeds is all about I. Matthew Yglesias. Weeds podcast here on the box meeting podcast network. This is podcast for people who really want to understand the policy debates and policy issues that shaping our world. We've seen now more than ever like how relevant policy is to our actual lives, but so much in the news isn't focused on really understanding and explaining detail way if that sounds good to you, join us for the weeds, every Tuesday and Friday to find out what's going on why matters and what we can do about it. You could download the weeds on apple spotify or wherever else you get your podcasts. Tracy. When it comes to facebook I turn to you. FACEBOOK is patience consumer of startups as what we've learned. Yeah. But you said something to me yesterday was interesting, which is everyone else's problems are forward looking and it feels like facebook's problems are actually in the past break for people explain what you mean. Yeah. So when Congress is looking at any trust with respect to these four companies for three of them, it's It's sort of about the marketplaces that their operating right now with facebook, the question is much more about should we have allowed it to buy serum? Should we have allowed it to buy WHATSAPP and most of the antitrust conversation that was around facebook yesterday was all about that. What did Mark Zuckerberg know about Instagram, and when did he know it? We wrote a story based on some documents that the house released yesterday. In which facebook has clearly identified instagram as a competitor. In at least some ways and wants to go after it and knock it off the table, and so that's kind of where the focuses their facebook and Burke did get a lot of other questions yesterday, but it tended to be much more about content moderation and things that don't have a lot to do with antitrust. So there was weird section where they asked the face. Face Research APP in the novel, Vpn? Any kind of got lost well, explain what happened and I'm curious reactions. Yeah. So facebook has a bunch of nifty tech tools to figure out what's trending which APPs or the kids using, and so that can essentially have an early warning system if it needs to consider acquiring something or more likely in these days, go out clone it. and. So Zuckerberg was asked about the way that the company uses these systems and if they are anti competitive I, think you know traditional antitrust law probably would not say copying an APP feature is anti competitive, but could lobby written in the future about it shirt I. Think the one that caught me was I mean, this is what I'm. McKenna's points from earlier is like one of the themes here is, are you so dominant that you can collect data that's unfair and then use that to crush or killer competitors, and definitely bought the Inaba VPN to do it. That's true. Now, when I've asked executives at facebook about this, what they'll say is they don't get surprised anymore. When you have three point, one billion people using your apps around the world. You know what links they're sharing, you know what they're talking about. And so you're not going to need some kind of specialized tool to know that WHATSAPP is really taking off. Right. So they would argue that, yes, these tools were useful to them, but you know at their scale, they know what's popular now, which doesn't really seem like addresses, the problem is reached. The fact that we're so big that we're all knowing is maybe not the defense that they sometimes presented as so here's what I didn't get. I thought, Zuckerberg I want to the instagram. What's about who's issues, but on the facebook research front, the data front, they him about this APP facebook research, which you were giving to teens. They were deploying with an enterprise certificate that story broke apple revoke the certificate, and all of facebook's internal APPs went dark, and this is a scandal story after story about it, they went on for two days. So I can I, don't recall that APP? Just how he you know, he remembers the day that all facebook's internal APPS went down and people couldn't go to the cafeteria. I would agree I found that answer. Extremely, ed? Persuasive. that. Do you think that was like actually strategic for him to be like, I, don't know and then come back later and correct the record I do remember when that happened I. Mean. I really don't know I mean also you know during a six hour hearing, it's also possible that you just you get flustered or you miss here something or or something because. Yeah. As as you say, I'm sure he remembers the day that apple turned off their internal APPS I mean. Honestly. Seems like an opportunity to talk about apple's market power, and the fact that you know a day of work canceled at facebook because apple got mad. But I think most of the CEO's didn't go into yesterday a wanted to pick fights with each other. It was kind of sad that they didn't. I was Kinda hoping that Tim Cook take a shot at soccer burger. Point that the other two APP platforms I was expecting it. It was there. It was. There was all there. So cellini ended and he ended the whole meeting with closing statement. He said, some of these companies didn't get broken out. They all need to get regulated in the off too much power that some of them I. don't these breaking up apple. What sort of break. Right like. The division get sent into the corner thing about what it's done. Right. Does should spin out the finder team I've always wanted to. A clean is always that they want to. They want the APP store to be separate from the IPHONE. Basically, that's the thing I always hear. Can't break I. Think you can write some strong regulations but not playing you're on store, right. But like Elizabeth Warren's point was it's cleaner if it's two companies, but it's still a gigantic remedy that I don't think there's a lot of like like consumer or public opinion is going to walk into an Apple Cup I think you'll radio at marketplace. It seems very clear that we says some of them she broken up he is talking about facebook. I have a twenty percent conference level. He might be talking with Google and Youtube as well. But if he's going to say some of the need to get broken up like it's facebook, did you hear anything yesterday that supported that conclusion or Saudi stocks I? MEAN HE I don't remember which Republican it was, but he was like the Obama FTC looked at this and they said it was minding love. Obama. Right. Like. Why would we go back in time to relook at I? Mean, there is a belief and I mean. Somebody who thinks there could be a lot of benefit in instagram and WHATSAPP being different companies from facebook. And the reason you ask. So many questions about that acquisition as you're making the case that it never should have been approved in the first place, and so now you need to remedy it. So that was actually like the entire thrust of the argument against facebook yesterday. I think, you could probably make just as good a case that Amazon after spin out aws, but lawmakers chose not to make that case. Yeah. I think that also gets into. Politics of the acquisition of the time. To his credit is like nobody knew instagram would actually be a success like we made it a success. It didn't happen by itself. I, don't know if the lawmakers. By award, these guys said, but I don't know that he actually made that case very persuasively. and. Who knows I mean? That's like anything could have happened. Right? Cram could've stayed independent and rapidly grown and overtaken facebook like that's something that could have happened. It could have kind settled into a middle zone like snapchat or twitter seems more likely to me although I think probably would have been bigger than those two but. You're never going to know I mean it is true that facebook gave Mike and Kevin it instagram enormous resources. A lot of the reasons why Mike and Kevin sold was because running tiny startup that's blowing up is absolutely exhausting Mike. Krieger. was dragging his laptop all around San. Francisco. Because the servers were melting at all times of the day whenever Justin Bieber. Posted like the site stopped working and they really we need help. Finding a person who can quickly fix this? So we don't have to like that is the reason that they were entertaining these offers and wanted to sell it. So that is also thing that happened. Do you think that that same kind of argument or approach can apply to what's up? What's up basically did not come up yesterday and all the focus on Instagram, but that's the other one, right? Yeah, and we know weirdly a lot less about that acquisition I. Think it's because people in America just have so much less love for what's APP generally. That, it's never seemed as important. What happened to WHATSAPP as what happens to instagram even though WHATSAPP, is used, you know way more, it probably has way more engagement even than instagram does so I don't know why that didn't come up as often. We know there was a competitive bidding war for that as well. Goule. Wanted it as well. You know Mark Zuckerberg made them an offer, they can't refuse. Do you think everyday Google's we should've spent more money on what's whatsapp like this could have been solved. Should have, but Google has been placed under an ancient curse that prevents them from ever making the right decision about any social product. So it was doomed never to happen. It's fun looking through the documents and watching them casually say they should buy facebook dot com. Yeah, that. Point. That is how they talk like the window into these executives just casually being like we should just this thing or maybe not, or we should just copied ourselves and kill it before it gets any traction like it's repeated over and over again last facebook question. This one is like harder to parse because I. There's a chance, it's October is just joking around but. But. He's in many of these emails. He's like the thing about startups, as you can always buy them, which I think the committee thinks is a smoking gun, right? Like facebook's entire plan is to buy the competition to get the data from wherever they get it to say, oh, man, this apps popping, we just buy it and kill it before it competes with us. I. Think he actually said at one point. That's a joke. Yes, he did and I believe that you know it was two thousand, twelve, right? He was probably still in his mid twenties. At that point, the company was a lot smaller like people were joking around like there's more loose talk when companies are younger and I do think. It was it was part of that. I think the more interesting question becomes. Let's say facebook is telling the truth about everything. Let's say they thought it was going to be a successful acquisition, but they never knew it was gonna big as it became today and they invested in it and it got super big. Okay. Well, now, it's as big as it is. Should they be allowed to keep? Keep it or should they be forced to spend it out and if you're GONNA force them to spin it out. What's the argument that you'RE GONNA. Make about why one question that I have a lot is clearly the referral they're gonNa make, and it seems like if you don't have some other reason, we've heard hints that there's some other reason, the FTC scrutinize this that will eventually be revealed. But what you're saying is the antitrust standard at the time, the Consumer Hartman stand, which is still our standard. Says, you have to prove prices will go up both products for free. You're screwed. Right? There's nothing to review because you're not gonNA prove prove that free products are gonNA get more expensive. I think it's pretty unfair if you change the standard and you go back in time and say you missed that standard. So I think there has to be something else there. Well, what was the standard by which at and T. was broken up? Right? Like presumably at and T. didn't used to be that big, and then it just got really big and then they broke it up at least. That's the thumbnail understanding I have of that break-up. Well, yeah. But then reformed itself. Right. But because of lax antitrust regulation, right? Like it wasn't a naturally occurring phenomenon that all those APPS got back to the other or was that just sort of like inattention to capitalism It's like in the seventies and eighties. This is Tim moves book the cursive bigness in the seventies and eighties Robert Bork I can't talk about Robert on this podcast. Are we doing this right now. Robert was very influential judge Appellate Judge Federal Appellate? Judge. And basically moved the antitrust law to the consumer harm standard as part of a movement called and economics. A whole thing Robert. Bork. Mostly famous because he was not appointed. He was nominated Supreme Court by Reagan but they leaked video tape rental history, and then he didn't get nominated and that is where the expression getting bork's comes from. This is all true Netflix's still has to abide by videotape data privacy act is a whole. This is all true when facebook and Netflix had some partners, Nansen? Partnership. To. Automatically share your net flicks, watch history to facebook. They're like pending the change of this law which we are working on Robert Bork. He haunts us all. I'm sorry, I can't believe this much. Yeah I. think that's just like the law changed in the in the seventies and eighties, the standard change. The conversation right now is a very much about changing it back months and months ago, pre pandemic, we had an economist from I. Think it was Nyu Thomas Philippon came on the show, and he was like look you have this natural ab test going on in the world where the European Union when it formed was like, how do we get an economy like America's? So, we'll just take their competition policies pretty good, and at the same time we changed consumer harm standard. So everything you're seeing the EU is basically our old competition antitrust standard in. You can see how active they are in everything. Here's a new consumer welfare standard. Whether you believe, this is actually a functional Ab test given. The state of both governments is up for debate, but that was his point I thought. It was spare can say.

Facebook Apple Amazon Mark Zuckerberg Google Tim Cook Instagram Jeff. Bezos Tim Co Twitter CEO Casey Brett Kevin Cellini Jeff Bezos Jim Jordan Sicily Mckenna
Selling the Brand Name

Android Central Podcast

06:21 min | 2 weeks ago

Selling the Brand Name

"This week it was revealed that Mark Levin who used to run Google, the pixels camera program, the of H plus computational photography at at Google. Search for the person who brought the Pixel name into the mainstream when it came to great photos, has he left's? You left a few months ago. We didn't know where he went and we now know that he ended up at Adobe to build. What is essentially the next generation of Adobe Computational photography APPS? Adobe has a lot of photography APPs. We spoken about this on the show, but they recently came out with the dedicated adobe photo. APP, and it was. It's basically a way to. Bring realtime effects filters to your phones. It runs surprisingly well on android that well as obviously on Ios, but. I think the move was interesting. Because lavoix brings so much of that legacy, science and Authority to Adobe. Where he's GonNa Build, Cross Platform. Products so. Andrew. This was a big deal when Andrew when mark left. It's an even bigger deal now that we know where he ended up just giving nobis. A. Massive massive influence in the in the industry. What do you think about this? And why do you think it's a big deal? And now that he's there? It makes a ton of sense I mean I i. don't I don't know we didn't really do a lot of speculating. When it was revealed that he had left, and we kind of just assumed he was going to go back to doing a lot more research stuff and continuing to be just focused on the things he was doing at. which he was doing can concurrently with his position to Google. So. It makes a ton of sense that he would go to adobe, but I was just happy to see that adobe set like their official statement was. He's GonNa work on a universal camera APP. He's not just going to go work on some like color science inside photoshop or something like that disappear. I think he's clearly too important to be kind of just put in the back. Behind the scenes for adobe. Obviously. It was much more excited until jerry crushed everybody's dreams with his follow up editorial mine, which was you know appreciated I? Suppose I like being checked on my enthusiasm, but the idea that hundreds of millions of android users could have more access to pixel like. I'll say pixel adjacent camera features. is just really enticing. I mean having it locked up inside. Google was great for the Pixel and great for pushing the industry forward from Google's perspective, but you had to buy a pixel in order to have access to that not. Just install an APP, but now I handed over to Jerry. Tell me why that's not possible. It's. Because of the way, Camera APPs work now. they use. Hardware and software inside each individual model, so there will never be a great universal camera APP. It's just not possible, and we know that this this has been a pain point for so so long of you know didn't give proper if he is even to access low level camera hardware. And then they tried a little bit harder, but is very clear that when you install a third party camera, APP, even if it does the the right things I'd still doesn't have the low level access that the default camera. APP does right and that's. Google didn't do that from the beginning, so that forced companies like Samsung and LG to build their own, and now they don't want to abandon that. That's yeah work they've done and. They depend on. You know the way they interface with any image processing hardware. And that's not open. Ye Adobe can't just say well okay APP, check and see which camera it is and then decide. which hardware you want use to help build a great picture, and that gets more complicated now with multi camera arrays is well. I assume right YEP. It's a you know I I don't WanNA crush. Crush. It's going to be a good APP I'm sure it's it's going to be you know cream of the crop for third party camera APPS, but it's not gonna be near as good as the APP that came with your phone. If you bought you know A. Flagship android phone. Yeah, the one thing I can. I can hear everybody screaming right now is well side load Google Camera APP on my Galaxy S. nine and takes amazing photos. Yeah exactly and this is. This is perhaps why people have a little bit of optimism for this because. The thinking if some random person on day, or whatever can reverse engineer this and have it run pretty well on just your most high end, qualcomm chips, then surely the guy who had a central role in bringing that whole system to be in the first place, surely He. The most he has of the cloud that adobe has potentially would be able to work with qualcomm to come up with something relatively universal, even if you know of chips, exodus and and stuff a little bit of extra challenge on top of that she'll they can all work together and based on common platform. Most android phones have with with QUALCOMM DSP. Surely they can, at least do something special in the way that maybe you'll built in. Maybe a building smartphone camera isn't necessarily as good, but maybe dysfunctions in a different way and is better at certain things. It's what it's not gonNA. have any access to the machine learning stuff that all companies use. That's where the sticker is because. Nobody including Google as an open machine learning platform inside their phones.

Adobe Google Qualcomm Mark Levin Jerry Andrew Lavoix Engineer Samsung A. Flagship Official LG
The man who made the Pixel camera so good joins Adobe and already has a task to complete

Daily Tech News Show

00:27 sec | 2 weeks ago

The man who made the Pixel camera so good joins Adobe and already has a task to complete

"Adobe announced Monday that Mark Lloyd. The researcher who led the computational photography technology used in Google Pixel phones will join adobe with efforts quote centered on the concept of a universal camera APP. Now wd offers the Photoshop Camera App the light room. APP also has a camera inside as well. So, ray remains to be seen, but it sounds like there are big plans in the works Lavoie will report to Adobe CTO Abbaye,

Adobe Mark Lloyd Researcher Google Lavoie Abbaye CTO Photoshop RAY
Natalie Portman among A-listers bringing pro women's soccer team to Los Angeles

KNX Midday News with Brian Ping

00:43 sec | 2 weeks ago

Natalie Portman among A-listers bringing pro women's soccer team to Los Angeles

"With an All star roster of owners. It's a star studded who's Who of celebs and women's soccer fans that are behind the announcement that Los Angeles is being given a national women's soccer league team that will start in 2022. Actress Natalie Portman and venture capitalist Karen Northman or atop the list of investors who were being joined by actors Eva Longoria, Jennifer Garner, Jessica Chastain, America Ferrera and Ouzo Adobe. They're joined by Saree. No Williams, her husband, Alexis Bohanan, and their daughter, Olympia, who has to be the youngest investor ever in a sports team. She's too gaming entrepreneur Julie Urman is the president of the team. It's working name. Angel City, Randy cartoon can extend

Julie Urman Natalie Portman Alexis Bohanan Eva Longoria Ouzo Adobe Soccer Jessica Chastain Los Angeles Jennifer Garner Randy Cartoon Karen Northman Angel City America Ferrera Olympia Williams President Trump
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Ubuntu Podcast

00:47 sec | 3 weeks ago

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"Recently. Evince wasn't doing it and I had to make a way a of. Adobe Acrobat Reader from twenty eleven work on up into twenty, Oh full I had to make that work in order that we could. Submit School Homework. It's entirely possible that if I were to see what it looks like in Adobe Acrobat, we pleasantly surprised and think Oh. Wow, why did I use this and? The experiences awful I mean experience great like. some of the fields don't line up properly a table of fields, and sometimes they're a bit out of Kilter, so you end up having to leave double spaces between stuff and so. It's a bit clunky,

Adobe
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Ubuntu Podcast

00:47 sec | 3 weeks ago

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"Recently. Evince wasn't doing it and I had to make a way a of. Adobe Acrobat Reader from twenty eleven work on up into twenty, Oh full I had to make that work in order that we could. Submit School Homework. It's entirely possible that if I were to see what it looks like in Adobe Acrobat, we pleasantly surprised and think Oh. Wow, why did I use this and? The experiences awful I mean experience great like. some of the fields don't line up properly a table of fields, and sometimes they're a bit out of Kilter, so you end up having to leave double spaces between stuff and so. It's a bit clunky,

Adobe
GANs Can Be Interpretable

Data Skeptic

06:17 min | Last month

GANs Can Be Interpretable

"My name is Eric Cadigan a master student at Visual Computing Group in Aalto University in Finland, and I recently did an internship with adobe research, and this papers also in collaboration with them very neat wire to begin with. Tell me a little bit about your graduate studies. What types of problems are you interested in rats I've been involved in computer. Graphics Allot so physically. Physically based rendering recently during my internship I also started working with generative model so I'm still a masterson finishing up my studies so i. don't have a vast experience in the field, but I'm getting started on this really interesting problem so eager to work on this in the future, one of the drawbacks to this being an audio podcast is that people can't enjoy. Enjoy some of the amazing visual aspects of your work. I will be sure to include a link to to the youtube videos in the show notes for this, but for those you, maybe the the visually impaired. Can you give us a quick description of what are some of the in my own opinion, rather stunning effects, you can produce with the research you've been doing. Doing right so generative adversarial network organs in general, they've really skyrocketed in image quality, so we can generate human faces are other photos of landscapes are objects that can look almost photo realistic. It might be hard to realize that they're actually generated by a computer, but it's hard to control. These models with our method were really giving the controls to the user to. To like change the identity of the post and the expression of human face, or the apparent gender or the hairstyle, or maybe move around car, rotate a car in a C- In our move a dog around make it bigger smaller change background on the clouds in the sky, and so on one of the first exposures I had to. These ideas was when Google released. Released deep dream which I. Guess is sort of primitive here. It's some of the earliest work that lead in directions like this, even though I'm not sure if they use Ganz or not, that was not gambling. Their results were always kind of trippy like maybe they'd be good for a music video or something seems like the results were seeing now the state of Of the art are much more photo realistic. Are you aware our car companies using some of these technologies or anything like that that you've heard of or do you think we're not close enough for that? Maybe I think for car commercials specifically. We're not quite yet there. Because the image quality expected in a commercially super super high, but I think for some of these. These more creative fields, where for example, if you're designing clothes or shoes or artwork digital artwork, it might make sense to kind of prototype and look at new possible products are paintings or stuff like that image quality is really improving steadily steel so one day I can see against being used in stock, photography and stuff like that, and maybe even in commercials i. I know you've looked at a lot of these. You've produce them, so maybe we can assume your eye is better trained than the public. Do you think you have a talent for spotting gins or spotting the output of I guess? I should say there's a few giveaways usually. If you're looking at for example face, the background is often not quite consistent or realistic might. Might be too simple or there might be patterns that Don look quite right and I think in general practitioners in the field know how to spot some of these typical features or artifacts, but I really think a few years down the line. It's not gonna be possible anymore, so most of my experience playing around with these myself somewhat limited certainly compared to your. Your experience, but it's that the again I might want use I've trained it up or I've acquired it from somewhere. Maybe extended it and I want to transform images. It's kind of a throw of the dice for me. You know I can tweak some things randomly, just kind of guessing and flipping weights here and there and I'll get some interesting results, but I feel. Feel like I'm the dark and I'm blind. Just reaching around has that historically been what style transfer and techniques that have been like before? Some of the research you've been involved in was getting, too. I would say hey. There's been a few different approaches to controlling generative adversarial networks, so one approach might be just label a bunch of your training data that you. You feed to the model during the trading face. You're looking at training data, and you're finding some attributes that you consider to be important, and then you label your date until the model. Hey, police, learn these things because this is what I consider to be important, and recently some research has shown that even just labeling one percent of your trading day might be enough. Enough to get a muddle where you can change some aspect in a meaningful way, but you still have to retrain your model, which is a very custody thing to do, and also just it's very time consuming manual label the data also, you're kind of limited by what you expect. Your data said to contain if you have some abstract data set where you're not. Not Quite sure what the important directions of change our it might be hard to label, and then the second approach would be detained pre-trade generator, and then just hope that he tasks learned something interesting, and then you have a hypothesis that maybe has learned about the post of the head or something like that, and then you can verify this by generating a bunch of. Of Images and then labeling them and try to identify a direction in the input space that this effect, but again you're kind of limited by your own imagination on what you can come up with, and you could even use an existing attribute detector that knows how to identify the gender expression face, but you're relying on something that someone has made before you so. Really just is more exploratory and we ask the model to show us what he has learnt. So we the other way around instead of verifying policies, we add the model to show us. The largest are the most important directions of change, and then from these we can extract controls, so that's really the difference, or we're not looking for anything in particular we're. We're just asking the model to show us what there is, and it turns out that there's lots of interesting sliders to find in this space. Yeah, it's break into those sliders. A little bits I before reading. The paper didn't necessarily have a bias either way. It could have been in my mind that the ways in which the model learn things were exotic. I've done some principal components analysis in my past and similar to like burt vectors or any other embedding. They're just numbers that happened to work really well. I can't explain why it's thirty seven minus seventy year. Whatever these numbers are so I wasn't sure what again was gonNA. Give us in that way. What did you guys find? Are they're kind of human interpreted parameters in there? Yes, so in general PCA, orders the components at fines orders them by the various that they explain so if there's some aspect, the various a lot in the generated images that's going to be explained by the first few principal components, and in general, we find interesting behavior where the principal. Principal components have a style content separation in data sets. Where if we have a data set to where there's a lot of geometric change that change is going to be captured by the first few components, and then the components after that because they're orthogonal, they're going to contain that information, and then instead they're gonNA explain some other variants, so the first few components are really quite geometrics. Head might be rotating. The dog might be moving left to right or up and down or zooming. Then the later components might explain more style properties of the image, so you might get different color, slight morphing of the geometry, but nothing major us in the first few components.

Principal Youtube Aalto University Finland Masterson Eric Cadigan Adobe Google Visual Computing Group Ganz DON
Oculus Gone - DTNS 3808 - burst 1

Daily Tech News Show

01:05 min | Last month

Oculus Gone - DTNS 3808 - burst 1

"Adobe publicity new support page on its website. That flash player supports is ending on December thirty first twenty twenty, but it on your calendar bucks. It does plan to release security updates until then users should uninstall flash player software on their devices before the end of the year, and the company plans to give users lots of notifications about support ending as well so it shouldn't be a surprise to you anyway. Also most browsers already limit flash player, functionality and plan to remove support for flash late this year or early twenty, twenty one to flash cheers years old. Hold that because fast company reports that segue will retire the SEGUE PT and stopped production. July Fifteenth Twenty one employees will be laid off twelve. On temporarily to handle warranty repairs in on the Segue, and have a right that have already been sold apologies, five employees working on site. Wait segue discovery scooters will remain the company. The first two wheeled segue was released December, two thousand and one for five thousand American dollars.

Adobe
Has ON1 Figured Out the Connected Experience?

The Digital Story

08:15 min | 3 months ago

Has ON1 Figured Out the Connected Experience?

"So starting this June you can subscribe to a complete photo capture management editing sharing system that works on Mac. Os Windows IOS and android devices. It's called on one three hundred sixty degrees and there's quite a bit to unpack with it before you even get into the new stuff you know on one has been building a block by block a pretty good argument for being your photo management and editing solution. They've been working hard. The latest release of the one that it wasn't too long ago was photo raw and it's it's very nice and it rolls up a bunch of stuff. They have been working on before but now I really feel like they're pulling the whole thing together by adding this connected services cloud service and very importantly launching a mobile APP. Okay so you have the mobile apps for both I less than android. You have the desktop software for both Mac and windows and then you design a clever cloud based system to sort of help. You connect it all together with some pretty neat features. I'm GonNa talk about and then you do so at a competitive price. That's really what they're after here. That's argument and I have to say there's a lot to it really is okay. This service automatically keeps track of photos that you choose to access from any of your devices so that includes the Meta data and where you want to store them. The desktop and the mobile APPs share the same processing engine and I think that's important. Gazeta enables non destructive editing settings to remain in sync as well. So we've experienced this before right. I mean this isn't brand new with white room creative cloud. We can work on an image on her IPAD and you know get saved back to light room on our desktop computer in photos for Mac. Os allows us to do the same thing so it really isn't like this hasn't happened before I think the real appeal for those that are going to love. This will be in the details on how they do it and how much they charge you to do it right and you know sooner or later you know. We have to have the price discussion right and we're going to have it today as well. So let's start with some of the features so you have all the powerful editing features of photo raw and Federov. Their image. Editing application has been evolving very nicely over the last number of months. So you have that okay and those of you that that already have photo raw. What will happen in June is? They'll be an update available to it that will allow it to connect to the cloud. Service the on one three sixty degrees. Now you get to choose which photos to sync between devices and this is somewhat similar to light room desktop that allows you to choose a folder album a collection a collection. You have to remember. Which APP am I talking about collection? allows you to choose a collection that you can share of the creative cloud and then access it via your tablet or your phone on one takes us approach to so they don't take the all or nothing that you know everything that you're working on has to go into the cloud or anything like that. They want to give you as much flexibility as possible. Your original files. Wherever they happen to to be they stay there. Okay they stay in that location so if your original files are on your desktop computer and you decide to share you know the say album of images you know through the cloud service to your mobile devices into other computers. Your originals don't travel up to the cloud they stay on your computer all right so and and I think that's a pretty important feature what what on one does is that. It creates sort of a compressed raw file version of it. And those that you choose to share. And that's what they upload to the cloud service. Now they're compression. Option is four times smaller. They say than than the raw file itself but a very high quality so in a sense is probably fair to say that it is a compressed raw file. And we're seeing cannon do this we're seeing other folks do this so you know. This is something that that we know works and that can be quite good. Here's a feature that is going to be competitive with the service for one license. You get five desktop computers and five mobile devices. That's pretty strong. One of the the walls that I slam into a lot with my Adobe creative cloud subscription my photographer subscription it gives me light room mobile and so on and so forth is that is only for two machines. I regularly work with three machines and so I find myself always having to disabled one in order to enable the other and you know do all that kind of stuff so so this five machines. I liked that five. Machines is a nice uneven number. That's perfect for probably most folks. Five machines will work for me quite nicely and then they give you a flexible pricing plan. What THEY WANNA do is if you want to own the application itself photo raw you can do that you can buy it or you can rent it and roll it into the cloud subscription. Which is you know. Three hundred sixty degrees. What they're calling. So you have an option so you can either. You know. Say Hey I want to own the software and then you know all subscribe to the cloud service as I needed or as they don't need it or you know however you WanNa do that you have a couple options within the cloud service or you can say hey I just WanNa rent the whole kit and caboodle and You know just have them take care of everything and the pricing depends on what you're going to do and we're actually going to cover pricing in this segment. Now I want to read you a little something from their site. That explains what they're doing here. Is I thought that the copy was pretty good and I thought it made a lot of sense. At least I understood. Okay on one pulls off this magic by creating a temporary version of the photo under the hood similar to a compressed raw file and storing it in the cloud. The photo maintains the tone in color of the original photo while using only about twenty five percent of the cloud. Storage Space Atypical. Raw file uses for those who demand the full raw file at all times and don't care about the storage space uploading and editing. The raw photo itself is also an option. So you can go either way however I think to save money. Most people will at least give this a try. This compressed Rafal approach. Now as I mentioned before your original photo files stay. Put right where you keep them. Your original photos can live on any of your devices including external hard drives and file servers again. I think that's that's a pretty important point. You can choose to upload copies of your original photos to on one three hundred sixty degrees as well if you need to access the full original file remotely.

Cloud MAC Adobe Cannon
Books, alcohol, pajama sales spike due to coronavirus lockdown

KCBS 24 Hour News

00:35 sec | 3 months ago

Books, alcohol, pajama sales spike due to coronavirus lockdown

"Books and brews apparently that's what we need to survive shelter at home orders adobe reports that since the World Health Organization to clear the corona virus outbreak a pandemic on March eleventh book sales are up one hundred percent and alcohol sales are up seventy five percent meanwhile very casual at your home office pajamas sales soared one hundred forty three percent in sales for pants are down thirteen percent online grocery which had been a small part of the massive food industry has seen sales more than

World Health Organization Adobe
Discipline and Determination

Enterprise NOW! Podcast

07:24 min | 3 months ago

Discipline and Determination

"First of all let me just say thank you so much for taking the time out to talk with us. I certainly do appreciate it. Thank you for having me. I appreciate you having that the second thing I like to do is to ask you to tell us about yourself now when I say that. Many feel free to go all the way back to when Benny I started all as you can start more current day. Tell us about yourself born and raised in Detroit. Michigan will actually outside Detroit. You know a couple of years from places to Middle School. And Grosse Pointe Mosul elementaries who rose point in moved out the Southfield and went to Detroit Country Day high school where I played three sports basketball for a ranch ride one to eight inches and buy raw and one in track championship. Long Jumper graduated from there might style ship offers to play for Bond College and chose to go to Michigan State University. Where but there for five years by four years leading receiver on in junior and senior there on the Rose Bowl in twenty thirteen one of the best teams initials state history when we went thirteen one. Nedley to seminated professionally. That did not get drafted. I'm currently wanted to my season in the NFL won the Super Bowl and Denver in two thousand sixteen play my first four years in Denver for the last two years. I've played in New York last as Peyton Manning. The plane would be lamenting though nine and author. And you know that's just a little bit about me. I am a brother team. Want rather than two. I have two parents and step mom so I had a great people around me and I've been able to do things in my life with the help is a family friend fantastic. I don't even know where to start. We're GONNA take a quick left turn and learn a little bit more about you. What's your favorite thing to do now for you? I'm going to say outside of football. I enjoy things. I enjoy travelling. Recently you know taking a couple of trips to Mexico I would agrees go to. La Lived in New York to travel. Highlights been time with family and friends love being around my friends and you know guys that I played with friendships that I've grown throughout the year. I do enjoy reading. That's why also why I wrote a book enjoy learning from April. I and I really movie out will love data. What's your favorite movie right? Now I would say green book. I really like an movie of all time. You know you got any denzel movie really this one. The greatest actors of all time so American gangster within her faith a thousand disgrace got it so talk a little bit about your journey because a lot of times when people think about athletes we all understand how hard it is and how you have to be disciplined and Yadda Yadda Yadda talk a little bit. About what it takes to be successful not just athletically but in general you gotta work hard wood. I'd like to tell people is that success doesn't happen in a day. It happens every single day. When you say you have to be disciplined after that the right at the set goals that you really want to achieve like a new one to be a professional athlete. I didn't know if it was going to be for baller basketball but every single day like I was working towards that and our talented anybody out there. Yes be disciplined is very important but being persistent stand persisted toward your goal like Adobe Wall Time It took me twenty two years and come a pro athlete. Isn't that something happened overnight or happened. After a couple years at Michigan state not had been working for this pretty much. Whole Life. Now always consciously gone toward something but once. I started at Age Fourteen. Fifteen years old like all right. I WANNA be a professional athlete. I'm working towards that every single day. So success doesn't happen in a day. It happened every single day goal. Said you gotTA break in long-term goals down to your short term goals and your short term goals in T- long-term wills data. Thanks this so talk a little bit about your book. Why a book reflection reflection of where I met in my life and that things that I've been able to accomplish as a team as an individual and also the people that have been arrived around so great players and I've learned a lot of grey base of why not share those things with the world. Does I know with certain books have done for me in my life. And that's why I wrote one and why not inspired me. So that's why I'm so when people pick up and read it. What are they gonNA take away from it? This is like a self help. Books like self actualize books. And they're going to realize that they have all the power in everything that they have that they want to achieve their goals or dreams right inside a woman. They'll just Meyer Goldberg from a semis stories. But some of the people that I have in the book like my brother or Draymond Green Dr Quiz demarcus ware also has some fringe were entrepreneurs or in the book as well because connected. One person in the world is Allie. I want them to also learn from friends who still have the same doubts fears and insecurities still were able to overcome those things. There are ups and downs in life if you really want something. You're going to have to stay precision discipline and go after it. And that's what I just want be learning. I want people to take away from it. Give us some insight on one of the time because I know I'm in a season and in time in my life where I have had the thought. Okay I want to give up. I don't WanNa to do this anymore. What about you have you ever had a time in your life or in your career where you wanted to give up? You wanted to quit. But you didn't and help US UNDERSTAND. What made you continue on? I don't think I ever wanted to give quit. I would always tell myself dot to give up or quit in. Ireland will just know that. I would have a lot of regrets if I did give up to quit so I don't think I've had very cut moments like man. I don't WanNa feel this pain or I don't WanNa feel dizzy or fear a life. I've always told myself like you're going to regret this. If you don't go back out there or try so I don't ever want to give up but I just like everybody else. I've had my fears. That's an insecurities but I'll always tell myself. You gotta go for the asked. You knew each yourself up. If you don't get it was was one of your biggest failures if you describe it that way personally. I don't consider anything that I don't achieve as a failure but talk a little bit about some of those moments for you. What was the biggest moment in your life where he thought? Wow Man that Dingo will. I have moments like this every year but the first time. I've really felt a big failures. Probably my Richard Junior year at Michigan State. That'd be twenty twelve and I dropped. Touchdown passes on a big nationally televised game on ABC. And now that was the first time where you know they gain was really on my shoulders. I mean only happened in the first quarter. But you know you know. Lose game first quarter but I like that play could have made by different game. That was the first time night. They'll those fears and insecurities all that nervousness said. That's when I really got into understanding the mind. How strong the MY IDEAS? I can care of your mind. How IMPORTANT MODEL

Detroit Michigan State Basketball New York Michigan Denver Country Day High School Michigan State University Grosse Pointe Mosul Benny Middle School Bond College Peyton Manning Southfield NFL ABC Denzel Mexico
Local Masks

She Podcasts

07:30 min | 4 months ago

Local Masks

"Hello Hello Welcome to sheep. I guess I am just a cup for many of you are watching or listening for the first time. That's me this. Is She podcast? Episode to sixty four with my co-host. Lc as Khobar and our producer. John Jim Ingo. How are you guys doing today? Not to ridicule any news whatsoever about anything at all. I mean podcasting but like other like personal stuff. Well Easter was exciting. I did a drive by dinner. How while because I went to my ex this house and then because I'm not going in because they go to work and everything they brought dinner out so the kind of we set like six feet apart and they talked and I had dinner and it was weird. It was really weird. Bonnie says it's a facebook privacy thing about stream yard. They can't see your name unless you grant them permission right and I guess people just don't do it right so no or do they want in that point. A lot of them don't wanted grant permission right so but see. This is a facebook private group so we can see them in here anyhow. This isn't GonNa go. This video is not going anywhere I get it. It's not a big deal. Oh so elsie. So yes Jessica and I figured out something today that I can't believe I didn't think of this. Oh God Jessica has the adobe suite so she has adobe audition okay so one of the things. We've always had problems with his she uses quicktime and some so. She has adobe audition she can record right into addition and we've never used it in two hundred sixty four episodes. Why is that that is so card yet? Dum Dum Dum Dorky. It's Kinda Dorky. Right Kinda dark. You must have known that I've had it though right. No I wouldn't have put to do together because the thing is though just you wanted to break up with adobe suite so many separate times true and not one of the Times that. We've had a discussion about your break-up the possible break-up with adobe suite has audition ever come into the conversation that's never part of your everyday. It's just you know photoshop. Right so we use that to record her instead of quicktime and it would be so much easier and so much better and we would always know that the Mike correctly picked all the good stuff. I am so happy. Yes and we can also add to the track. We can also add compression because just could really her voice can really use compression so that you can do all of that. Pre like Yes prefixed prefixed. For her right so right now on excited like like a kid right before. Christmas. Because I'm excited because when we get off here we're going to make an appointment. We're going to go through this thing. I'm sure there'll be a lot of yelling and hollering there. Yes probably I noticed that I do have an issue when I'm trying to describe and do things when I can't see. It frustrates me when I can't see the other person's what they're doing. It frustrates me and I've been doing a lot of that lately for different clients and stuff as they set up to record in their home. Oh okay yes I need. I need to calm down. I need to be able to breathe through that. I need some kind of yoga breathing. Technique to center my Chee. Said what are you Senator Senator? Something we can just give you just can send Isaac. I can send may May and you can get through them. Then you'll find yours end. You know it's like a living. We'll be like here deal with her for a bit and then leave work through. That had four under the age of four. I know but you haven't. When was the last time? Oh well that's true. This is what I'm saying. It's like there's a practice I know when I'm in I'm in my sixties or seventies and somebody tells me how to deal with a four year five eight year old. I'm not I'm not going to be adapted. I've been like you know. Been out of it for awhile. I'm over. Yeah it's like it's forgotten like I don't even want to think about when they were infants. I don't I know Yeah No. I don't really like the idea of taking my clients and comparing them to eight year old child. I just. That's not the way it is that feeling. Oh the tenseness in the chest and the tightening in the chest he so we have some like communications. Lets say why. Don't we just acknowledge the folks and just to let everybody know that we are as of now for the past few episodes? We as in the sheep. Podcast team has been recording directly into the sea. Podcast super squad. Which is our Patriot community. So you guys can kind of watch. Us Record live in there. We're going to do the show as always Joe. Johns GonNa do post production and everything but we do have a live chat so we have some people there. We have Bonnie and we have Masai Lena. We have tiffany Humboldt who. She just actually posted that. She's. She wore her flower crown from she. Podcasts live during during the Hardcore Mermaid. Show on Friday. That's amazing that's so cool. And then she. She's asking him. What version of Stream Yard? We are using John. This question is for you. Well stream yards a web application. So you don't have to update it so I don't know what version I know what? She's talking about tiffany. You can only record stream yard if you're a pro client pay for that So in order for you to to be able to record and download your files you have to be if you are not a pro then all you can do is stream. So you have the capability to stream. I don't know how many hours for you know. I don't think anybody needs more hours to stream. But that those are all pro functionalities one of the things that Justin I also wanted to do was to do a double streaming stream to hear and to the podcast main group or to the podcast page. And we can't also can't do that unless you're pro so if you're a pro you can. I think you can Cross post to two places at once. We have done that and if we ask. Yeah have the option of two. Yeah Yeah if you're did you upgrade it Ogden profile? I've been down. No I know I know John Is. Yeah but you know I didn't know. Yeah Yeah you can only do the same time. Yeah no no basic no base. It used to be. I think way back right. John like right windstream yard. I started loud. Yeah they allow for yet when it was in. Beta. That's right. They did allow for for recording and downloading but once they opened it up. Then that's what you pay for. May GotTA STAY IN BUSINESS. Somehow and you want him to be able to stay in business. I mean it is an amazing platform. Yeah we're streaming. You know I'm telling you right now. Once they decide if they can record audio as separate separate tracks right they will be a force in podcasting. I don't know if they ever get there yet but still

Adobe John Jim Ingo Bonnie Facebook Johns Jessica Producer Senator Isaac The Times Windstream Tiffany Humboldt Chee Patriot Community Mike JOE Justin
What are Kenya and Somalia really fighting about?

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

05:25 min | 5 months ago

What are Kenya and Somalia really fighting about?

"For obvious reasons the idea of an old fashioned cross-border dust up between two neighboring nations seems right now almost quaint and perhaps the kind of thing likely to prompt replies in the circumstances along the lines of at this point who cares or not now leads where a bit busy nevertheless despite the best efforts of covert nineteen the world will keep turning and its constituent countries will continue to but against each other from time to time in East Africa in recent days. Somalia and Kenya have gone very close to going to war with each other and may get close. Astill the battlefield is jubilant. One of Somalia's five semi autonomous states. It lies just across Somalia's border with Kenya. Kenya regards drew ballooned as a vital buffet. Between it and Al Shabaab the fanatical Islamist militia which wreaks most of its havoc in Somalia but has also been responsible for large scale outrages in Kenya including the two thousand and thirteen attack on the West Gate Shopping Mall in Nairobi and the two thousand and fifteen attack on a university campus in Garissa accordingly Kenya has cultivated friendly relations with Jubal lands regional government and with jubilant president. Ahmed Mohamed Islam known colloquially as adobe Kenya has trained Madonna obeys militia and has troops of its own stationed injury bowland as part of the multinational African Union mission in Somalia and is also believed to have many more still camped under Kenya's own flag. This is a continuation of sorts of the invasion of Somalia Kenya undertook in two thousand and eleven in order to chase al-shabaab further north. Can US troops injury ballooned are not seeing as style occupiers? However indeed President Mugabe's regional government seems to get on better with Nairobi than it does with Mogadishu. The most recent unpleasantness appears to have begun with fighting between drew balloons own forces and Somali government troops the jubilation soldiers retreated over the border into Kenya and the Somali troops followed them. At which point. Can you took an interest? The fighting appears to have centred on the town of Mandera a town wedged between the Kenya. Somali border and the Delaware River which delineates Kenya's border with Ethiopia attorney casualties on both sides left people. Each data to save bullets. Were one succumb today. A diplomatic exchanges between Kenya and Somalia. Since have been terse verging on abrupt. Kenya has jumped about an unwarranted attack on its sovereign territory by foreign soldiers and so forth. Somalia has retorted to the effect that this is a bit rich coming from a country with thousands of its soldiers parked more or less permanently on the other side of its border. Kenya's desire to put physical distance between itself. And the PESTILENTIAL MARAUDERS OF AL. Shabaab is reasonable enough but it may not be the only or even the main reason why relations between Arab and Mogadishu have deteriorated as far as they have excitingly for fans of obscure maritime territorial disputes and. Come on who isn't the two countries are also at odds of a sea border. Exactly is the area in contention the border of the two countries when it comes to the seats and the only way to explain where the disputed portion of Indian Ocean is without incurring angry correspondence from either Kenya or Somalia. Although to risk inviting saving emails from both is to say that it's either off Somalia's southern coast all of Kenya's Northern Coast. It will come as little surprise to listeners that the stretch of Ocean in question abounds with oil and gas deposits. Nineteen outbreak may focus Kenyan and Somali attention elsewhere and or it may offer a party to this argument what it perceives as cover for decisive action. There has been some suggestion. That Kenya has consented actually annexing portions of southern Somalia both to deter Al Shabaab and to further its claims on the ocean of what is presently the two countries shed coast or there may be the option of mediation by Ethiopian. Prime Minister and Nobel Peace Laureate Abby who has facilitated talks between Kenya and Somalia before I also accept this award on behalf of Africans and citizens of the world for whom the Rim of peace has often turned into a nightmare of war. Today I stand here in front of you talking about this because of fit I call them my way to pay through the dusty training so four years ago or international justice may yet prevail. Somalia has for some years been seeking an adjudication on the maritime boundary from the International Court of Justice in The Hague the I. C. J. is presently due to rule in June. But that like just about everything else may. Now be

Kenya Somalia Mogadishu Nairobi Indian Ocean Somali Government Al Shabaab President Mugabe Ahmed Mohamed Islam East Africa International Court Of Justice Mandera Adobe West Gate Shopping Mall Delaware River AL Garissa African Union Shabaab Prime Minister
Jason Lemkin Clip: Why now is the best time to start a SaaS company

Equity

10:57 min | 5 months ago

Jason Lemkin Clip: Why now is the best time to start a SaaS company

"A few weeks ago I had the opportunity to chat with former founder. Active venture capitalists and driving force behind. Sastre Jason Lincoln. Jason Zoster a community for Sassan cloud founders also organized the annual Sastre Conference in San Jose. That now attracts five figures. Were the folks each year. We spoke with Jason before the novel. Corona virus had evaded containment efforts affecting domestic markets after upending their counterparts abroad the current community since dacians forced Jason Deport. Sastre back a bit. But that doesn't mean that our chat with him any less timely in our forty five minute conversation we covered a ton of stuff from the potential for cloud slow down to how founders should use or not use venture debt to Jason's outlook on SAS consolidation. And even half asked. He's writing checks today. We're sharing one of our favorite clips here. The rest is over on techcrunch for excellence subscribers we're GONNA get into VC's lately that have been talking about the beginning of cloud. Slow down and I I. This is a very specific thing. What they mean is cloud is no longer an upstart phenomenon. Saas LONGER NASCENT. We've now seen a large percentage of the inner voice software world move over to SAS and nine means that the growth rate will descend as the actual aggregate basis larger and critically. They think that this might lead to income and squeezing out startups from certain spaces in the Saas market. That might have been attractive before. And this is from Alex over at scale venture partners recently and I thought it was interesting hypothesis. I don't see why wouldn't be correct. But I want to get your take on. I know your cloud optimist. You've always been a believer in my experience. So when you think about the maturing of this ass market does that leave less space for starts in as you look at the the overall landscape. Well let's see. I think there are two different points. I have two different perspectives. If you look at data from Gartner which is imperfect. But at least we haven't you. Can you can say that. Maybe thirty percent of old school on Prem type software has gone to SAS thirty percent so the pollen of user seventy percent left but the flipside is. That's a lot of market penetration right. It actually starts approach forty fifty percent. You should see a slowdown this secular trend into SAS. When when even when you started doing sas certainly when I started doing it was risky. It was quirky. It was weird. It was it disliked. It was it was not trust about two thousand sixteen through about Twenty Sixteen. Maybe even a little later at the first astronaut. Aaron Levy came one week after the box roadshow and asked him what the public markets. He said they're starting to learn about it. They're starting to get comfortable in two thousand fifteen. That's that's only twenty five years ago so we are so that thirty percent was probably eight percent right and so there is so there's so so there's a the good news is seventy percent left. The the risk is like you know there's only so much of this crazy growth and another thing happened. Which if you look at any Gartner or whatever this and this no one anticipated more of. It went we all knew there would be a substitution that of however you define it a trillion three and there's different metrics how much infrastructure include. We all knew that like the old the old on Prem Safra would go to sas we didn't realize that it would. It would take up thirty to forty percent more of those. It budget so they used to so we got an extra boost. People are spending more on software. No no one from scale no one from anybody realized we would spend more on business software because of SAS but has physical limits. It budgets are only be so much of global two thousand budget so these Amazing Trans created many many Saas companies. Doing a billionaire are billionaire are but but they're gonNA hit headwinds there. There's no question those headwinds that's different from whether that's going to box out startups. By the first half of the apotheosis there is going to be a slow down as we just forty fifty percents over the next five years. Yes there has to be and as we stop putting more and more of our fixed. It budget into SAS. These are two great trends and they will reach saturation. Got It okay. Now on certain point and and being boxed out using more skeptic I think this is the best time to start a startup time. Tell me why because all the SAS leaders are billion. Two BILLION COMING UP ON A billionaire. Zenda shop is the hub spots. They don't have taught they don't have time so if you're a billionaire and they're all growing like a weed growing thirty forty percents shop advice. Going fifty percents off. But they're all growing. They're all growing with a few exceptions. They're all growing north of twenty percent. All the leaders true. So let's imagine you're in a building air which now they're like twenty of these companies. How much do you have to add this year? Two hundred even three hundred. Maybe a lot you're thinking about non-organic time to compete with your little startup. That was just on tech crunch. You know ten years ago. Five Years Twenty fifteen. When when Aaron came from box Aaron would see a startup. Doing five millionaire. Get a little worried. I mean not literally worried but they. Hey this may disrupt me. Is that right Stewart. Butterfield doesn't have time he's GonNa read it. He's all over social media. He's an incredible founder but slack doesn't have time going to a billionaire to worry about someone that did five million has got to worry about. Microsoft has gotta worry big guy so that means you have a lot of air cover to get not just to a million before your competed with by maybe one hundred million owes underneath the. We'll just ignore you because they have to focus they have to hold it and adobe turning around now and everyone from fig on down is competing aggressively with them. But why because they're stupid of course not? They're very smart. Sap there they were busy. It's too small. It was too small right and there's too much growth in creative cloud creative cloud fuel the dobies text market cap growth. So they just. It's not that they don't watch what's happening with web flow and figment everyone. It's just too small until it's nine figures in revenue because figure has become materialists. I don't know how they're all super successful and it's not because anyone was dumb. It's just because you can't compete when they were small you just can't. You're too big. You're they've grown too quickly so it sounds like instead of this problem. It's actually there's there's more freedom because become now too busy to kind of mess with you get up to ten fifteen twenty million a are before they even begin the guns on your ship and because cloud got so big. These niches got big. Every niche. That used to be a millionaire NECC- now can be one hundred million Monday dot Com. Where you're talking about who we needed another project. Management for Non Tech folks that went from one hundred twenty million in four years. But that's a that's a piece like ten years ago. That would be a two million dollar business going to two hundred million so let's whole years one hundred times bigger. This little niche that Monday found and they're going to do a billionaire art. So let's talk about Vertical Saas. Jump ahead my question because this is what I wanted to get. Borough Ready It seems like you're thinking about Vertical Saas than isn't that this is GonNa be constricting idea but inside these these these takes on like the dentist industry or whatever and building software for those could be enormous because the niches have gotten larger to your points. I presume your a bowl on vertical sats. I've always been a ball. I would say even more simply. Look at any company to billionaire. Look at his desk job. Okay which is already two billion. That means they're gonNA keep growing. That means they're going to get to five or ten billion. My rough math is there's another billion vertical version of that so there's another billionaire could be more and that means there could be ten UNICORNS. One hundred million ten verticalised desks right And doesn't even have time to meet with them right. I Investment Company gorgeous which is like a vendetta ECOMMERCE. They're almost all on shop. Affi- it's very niche right. They're gonNA be growing three. X Ten million error. Is that tune it? People thought this company was to NICCI twelve. Apparently it's not nine. Three hundred percent honest has an offering it as a great product but all they do is make sure your fulfillment from instagram to shipping. That your contact center works magically. Which is good enough. Note is enough. It is enough to build a three hundred million Arab business. But it's just a niche today. That's so big because cloud is look how shoplifting. Today seventy million dollars in two thousand fifteen it was worth eight hundred million so these niches have grown astronomically and that means these vertical SAS things. We've like gorgeous and others. You turn around. And how could we do be a unicorn? Well it wasn't four or five years ago right when I met I met the founders only twice twenty fifteen. They were great but it wasn't clear it could be as big today but cloud. Gubbay point about Zen desk in there being room for ten unicorns underneath the desk at one hundred air. The implications vertical sights will still generally smaller companies than the original broader. Sass play so to me even smaller than salesforce. That's an example I don't Viva is a Pharma. Sierra Viva is the most successful verticals ass company so the CTO salesforce left salesforce a decade ago founded VIVA. It only raised three million dollars from emergence plus. It's now worth twenty billion dollars. Today he was also in my class. Like everyone did better than me in my bye-bye on the show but you should just get out. We should bring Peter Gassner. He's like a hundred times would have been me and vivas was twenty something billion and then how to products and he. He said look sales versus a great horizontal play I WanNa do Pharma and there. There is a legacy vendor in the space and it's big. It's a big space and all their deals are seven figure eight figure deals. But it's still. It's still a thirty billion dollar company and salesforce is one hundred fifty billion so I can't think of a vertical SAS that is bigger than its horizontal play but it may well it may well exist but thirty billion still outcomes. You're at three million dollar investment. Even if they are smaller by definition you know there's going to be enormous your general point about the client it's up it's becoming growing the high antigone larger piece of the overall. Everyone seems to be very hot. Verticals ask these days. So that's why I wanted to ask because they like it because the cloud got bigger and because competition is simpler the amount of domain expertise you have to do to build a viva is. It's rich compounds on itself and there aren't going to be twenty startups out of y Si. They're going to build that. But but and so there are these verticals because finally they realized they can be three hundred air business and then they can actually millionaire and they realized look it actually works. I can like I. Invested in in a SAS company just for environmental compliance called map history right. They disclosed their first. One million dollar deal okay. They have like no competition not in the whole space but in what they do they can have a few bumps and they can get through it. They have time they have times. There's not ten other players in the exact same thing. We've guys may disagree. But they had like one or two competitors and their original competitor was I think. Ms Dos based in offices. So you have time and so like this because you just. You're you're overwhelmed with the competition. You're overwhelmed with everyone. Wanted to take on snowflake and data dog and and there are many great apm companies. But it's exhausting. How do you know what's the next day doc?

Aaron Levy Salesforce Gartner Founder Jason Unicorns SAS Jason Lincoln Jason Zoster Techcrunch Dacians Prem Safra Jason Deport Sassan San Jose Adobe Microsoft Alex
Introducing Deep Dive  After Hours with the Pro Group

The Futur

08:47 min | 5 months ago

Introducing Deep Dive After Hours with the Pro Group

"This is after hours and I'm joined by some incredible human beings and in case you're wondering what happens everybody. Like how do we get so big and diverse? Well this is a very unique group human beings we call them the pro members. And they're all here we. We just got back from Adobe Max and we're just continuing the content loved the livestream and we've just been producing so many things. I'm not going to introduce everybody. There's so many of you guys and is so great to see you. My only regret is that people who were who were here yesterday. No longer here. I mean they're still alive but there's just survive. This is after hours with the programmers and the pro members are basically people that are part part of our exclusive coaching community. There's two hundred eighty of US. And we run from all different. Sizes shapes. Want Solar Printer freelancer student. People have really multimillion dollar agencies part of it and it's just this community that makes what I think what we have so unique and precious so there's no agenda. We're just going to have a conversation we're GONNA go and there was like a robot voice thing that's okay so I think we're just kind of at the end of one conversation so this'll be the beginning of the next conversation. So what's hot? What's on your mind? Let's get. Let's get real conversation. Who WANTS TO START? I feel like there's been a lot of discussion people. That are already in a really good place with their business. But they can't see that they're in a good place and they're concerned about what's the next thing that have to do to make my business better versus just doing what's necessary to get more clients and I think I'd like for us to talk about that. Because this past week I've been learning so much from other people And seeing other people's work but hearing them say that I need to do this before I can get clients. I need to do this before I get climate. It's like do you not see how amazing what you're doing is already like. You're you're in a perfect position to already get clients. And maybe that's because I'm not inside the bottle as they say and I'm able to see their work for how great it is. So can we talk about that? We can there's this phenomenon that happens and on our walk back from tacos powerful voyeurs today. I should just turned to how do you? How do you do that so fast? Like how do you take me from here and bring me down here and she asked me this question and I had to think because you know still short walk? I was thinking because think most of us look at problems with a magnifying glass. We're up so close to or studying every single detail. We're studying everything that we can do. All the things that make us annoyed things that make us scared. And this is all we have to do is to gain some perspective. You've heard that expression before and I mean literally gains in perspective by stepping six eight ten twelve hundred feet back and looking at the problem from afar and I think that gives us context an example. I gave to her. Was If you're sitting there and you're waiting for a parking spot and you've been patiently waiting and somebody pulls out of that parking spot and you're about to go in and some a-hole some D. bag scoots in that gets it. You've got steam ears finding you lowlife key the car all these dark thoughts are going through my like. Why why are humans like? Why can't we treat each other with kindness and be generous? Why can't we do that? Some courtesy goes a long way. But that's you looking through the world through your eyes through that magnifying glass. But if you were just pop back a little bit maybe even just into the back seat and look at yourself looking at the situation and observe the witness to it. You might say okay. Here's a woman waiting for a parking spot. And somebody else may or may not have seen that. She was waiting and took an opportunity. Who knows but this woman has her health. Has a wonderful family is in a car that she owns. That's insured really. What is the big deal? There's another spot a few miles away and if we can get kind of perspective that distance I think it changes how we look at things. So Mo- you looking at anybody else here can see their problem so clearly. You're good enough or tweet this line or talk about a user benefit instead of talking about yourself. It's so clear and they can just as easily turnarounds. A Mo- is your problem. Here's your challenge and you need to overcome it. How do we do this ourselves? How do we get this kind of clarity? Now Ashes Ready. She's primed ahead a little coaster. Mike Yeah I like that metaphor icy now very clearly. I used to have that in my family values like you see very positively in every aspect of your life especially teaching. My kids are just we are alive. Today that's best blessings is what you should see him get up in the morning. Thankful you are alive today and you can get to do so many things but I was not implementing the same thing in my business. So today's session we. I was looking at a bigger problem where I want to reach. It was like hundred doors away from me just for that I was not taking. I was not dead it for the tenth door or I was not able to see that. I'm talented I have worked ready. And the canvas is ready to paint. I just need to go brush in hand and start painting Ed so I see that metaphor now from my personal life to how to implement in business and enhance when you told me that car parking exempt you thank you. You HAVE INCREDIBLE CLARITY. When it comes to your children you can see them and you know that if they just changed a little bit they will have more happiness and success and everything will work out but right when it comes back to us. It's like wait a minute. Different rules apply and now hopefully if nothing else. Try to insert a little pause between catalysts and reaction. Something mixture react. Just stop amid kind of observe. What's happening in your mind? And then you can choose how you want to react. Sorry I just wanted to jump in real quick. I was talking to Alex earlier. And he was talking about everything that he failed on and he was saying that his man I was following Chris. And the following moe in this is that referring to you and he's like and they're killing instagram and they're doing all these things and I'm sitting here and I'm struggling and I'm just falling behind. And he got super caught up in his failures and four second pause and he was like but then I thought about it he was doing so much other good stuff in other areas and have been so hard myself when it comes to this one specific thing and that's what a lot of us I feel I do. We get caught up in the bad because the good is so abundant because the good is the norm. Like we're you succeeding and we're used to Kinda having good days or at least average days but the bad sticks out so much because it's so rare that we don't really know how to cope with it and we give it a lot more attention than it should have An S. That was what he was saying to me earlier and he was like. I just took a step back and changed my perspective on it and was like I may have not one in this one area but at least it gives me a chance to go back and succeed again. And that's how cabin framing the things that we've been doing here even though we haven't done the best before is still gives us the chance to reframe and you know try again. I have a different take on that. I think that was excellent. Chris all done if you sit there and you replay the memories in your childhood and we did a lot of this yesterday and we created two columns. We're GONNA do the two column conversation again credit to columns and we asked ourselves how many times you remember the people who you love the most your parents who took care of you. How many times a day praise you for doing something right? I make a list. Just just follow through the thought experiment and then put that list away for second and then the second list ask yourself. How many times did they tell you you did something wrong. And Am pretty sure. That list is in multitude longer than the other lists so we've had a lot of training finding the things that are wrong. We've had not a lot of training in pointing out the things that are right in fact when you think that you've done something right. What is the response you get? Don't let that get your head getting too big for your Britches. Stay humble be

Chris United States Adobe MO Mike ED Alex
The 7 Best Marketing Conferences 2020

Marketing School

03:47 min | 5 months ago

The 7 Best Marketing Conferences 2020

"Welcome to another episode of Marketing School. I'm Eric Su and I'm Neil Patel and today we are going to talk about the seven best marketing conferences to go to in twenty twenty. I will start with the first one. I'm always looking at content marketing world. I think that's a great one because you have the best content marketers in the world talking about the Trans and the content marketing means not just konta marking. We're talking SEO as well. We're talking about how demand generation fills in with that too. We're talking about social media too so I think that's always a good one to take a look at number two traffic and conversion summit San Diego. Now they're trying to do events on the east coast as well in different states or countries. The reason I like traffic and conversion summit as you got marketed from all types of industries like INFO copywriting ECOMMERCE SAS and. They're sharing different tactics that they're using so most conferences out there. You'll see segments. Small businesses only or only enterprise fortune one thousand companies. But the reason I like. This is the variety of size of companies and the industries gives you a very broad range of new marketing tactic. style that you may have not heard about before. Yup That's plus one on that one. The last couple of years on three good so number three inbound inbound is put on by hub spot and actually become a really big congress. They actually have really good keynote speakers and just learning a lot about inbound marketing strategies in general so. I think the conferences. Maybe I might be wrong here. But over. Twenty thousand thirty thousand people or so. It's become really big. Neil yes a huge event number four so if you WANNA get into marketing or do while you may not have the to spend a ton of money paid ads. You may not have the time for. Seo So what other option do you have? I love performance based marketing specifically affiliate marketing. And you can check out affiliate world. Affiliate world has a ton of affiliate conferences throughout the world. Whether it's in Asia or Europe the. Us version is affiliate summit. And at this event. You'll not only need a lot of people that can grow your traffic also learn about Philly at tactics but the reason I liked the event is more so you can meet people who will promote your product or service for you and only charge you a fee. Every time they drive you lead or a sale all right so this is number five. I think so. Gartner Marketing Symposium. That's happening I think it's June and basically I mean Garner's while no research firm but the talk about insights top on new technologies strategy all that kind of stuff all marketing cool stuff and I think it's in San Diego Neil number six marketing school. Eric and I are marketing school. We have an event. It's in San Francisco March eighth ninth and Tenth. Which is actually very soon. You can learn more about marketing school dot. Io Slash live and we have really unique speakers and education that you can't get anywhere else. For example we have like the guy who grew facebook twitter Gora Talking about growth strategies that most of us have never heard of we have people talking about pricing. And how you can optimize the price of your pocket or service or SAAS APP and generate extra fifteen percent per year in revenue. So we have very specific speakers that a healthy solves problems in your business that you can see immediate growth. Plus we have an event also New York that's July thirteenth fifteenth. And then another one. Beverly Hills that one's November ninth through the eleventh. But we're trying to keep the group purposely small so that's another thing around it. The last one I'll put in. Here is the adobe summit so adobe is really good at just kind of all things around design but have a whole kind of creative cloud as well. This has about twenty thousand. Attendees I believe and they do this one in Vegas so you can have some fun. There eat some good food as well

Marketing School Neil Patel Eric Su San Diego Adobe Beverly Hills San Francisco Vegas Facebook Philly Garner New York Asia Europe
"adobe" Discussed on The Vergecast

The Vergecast

10:41 min | 6 months ago

"adobe" Discussed on The Vergecast

"Have really entrenched workflows enlightened classic and we just did enough diligence in developing our strategy to know that that's an important product and it's very important base of customers and that's okay. They both have called light room but yeah classic it implies like it means it's not gonNA change a lot. I mean it means that we're not gonNA screw with. You is really the message. We're trying to send with that brand. It's like we know you have an established workflow. We know you want it to work a certain way. We're not gonNA like flip a switch on you and change it drastically and I think that's an important promise to make the customers so it's funny. None of the questions we wrote. I know I can't help it. But it's interesting thing about like adobe having these two sets of very different customers where you have the professionals we're using Like classic and then you have people like me like who don't really know how to edit photos but just kind of grew up with like instagram. These programs that do it for you and it seems to me like adobe is kind of going in this new direction and introducing these new software like Arrow and Photoshop camera. That's designed for people so they don't have to learn coding to do things and it's like what do you make of like adobe strategy for this new class of users? Well I think you know two things I would say. One is the mission of our business creativity for all and the sort of the ethos. I continually repeat is. Let's make sure that our products are powerful enough professionals but accessible to everyone now of course you know. Some products like after facts are premiere pro. We shouldn't try to make that product accessible to everyone because you will dumb it down so much that. And so there's a there's a professional set of workflows. We must respect however the desires of people to do to achieve that level of outcome output or to create something in video or something in motion with something like after-effects. I think it is part of our mission to anyone to do something like that. Maybe with a different product. And so what? You're seeing now for example with Photoshop Camera. Which is something that we're still testing in iterating. But the idea there was there are a lot of people out there who just don't have the desire nor the time nor the skill set to open photoshop and replace the sky or do something crazy with an image. Let's let them do that at the point of capture leveraging. Some of the team. Same Technology as Photoshop. I won't use the term real the real deal or but you know it's not it up into the camera but it is about enabling people to do something creative that photoshop could only do you know at the point of capture and so that's that's the strategy is to make sure that we are best in class and and and always amping the bar for the power of each of our products but then also making sure that the different segments of customers that are now coming in saying. I WANNA do that too. But I don't have the skills nor the desire to learn how to use that complicated product. What's The answer for me? And that's where you'll see spark You See Photoshop Express. Which by the way has over? I think I can say this publicly but Around twenty million monthly active users. This is a mobile APP I express you have you have of course I am a camera you have all said spark already and you and then you have a rush rush rush doing so Russia's Russia's actually doing pretty well right now it is for the Youtube Creator. The people who like really it's interesting of the Super Super Powerful. Youtube creators out there. They have their own teams are now doing stuff. And they're probably using premium pro. They are using premium pro. But for a lot of the folks that are just getting started but are are actually taking it seriously. They want professional grade title sequences effects. That kinda thing Premium Russia's done very well with that and actually youtube has helped us get the word out to those folks as well. It's funny because premier rush just partnered with talk and others like a tick tock integration. You can publish directly there. But I'm also curious. How does that compare with the the in-app remixing features and like all these new features? That teens are using on. Talk where it's to the point where they basically don't need another video editing up down there means well. Let's talk about because I think you look at instagram. You'll get talk you'll get snapchat you look at all these places. And they're building some of their own native editing applications those to work for everyone but then there's a subset of people who for whatever reason say I want my stuff to look different. I want to do something that people like. How did he do that? How did she do that whether it's a type of font they want in their title sequences not offer it as a default template or they want to import something? That is not the native. Ar Experience it's snapchat offers but maybe they wanna make something on their own and Arrow and then use it. And so there's a subset of this world in every industry that wants to be creative in wants to do something different and we wanna be there for them. Websites like a a big think of an idea and I feel like it's always good to talk to you. Thanks videos take talk is successful. Because obviously has viral distribution platform in an algorithm that works and all the things that it does but it is also a really good video editor like. I'm routinely impressed that the edits people are able to just sort of concoct in talk and they've right after serving leads them through it and make it. There is probably a market people just above that. That's who you're talking about. Yeah but isn't isn't the rise of tectonic or the rise of instagram stories. Isn't the bigger that zone right? They're bringing people into create like into being video editors in a way that no one ever conceived themselves a video editor before. If you think about it I always liked the whole ninety nine one. Yeah view of the world as it relates to the creative desires of general platform of people. And you have ninety people who just want to upload an image or just consumer the People's images and they probably don't make any edits at all. Maybe they apply a filter. Then you have the one percent of the end of the spectrum and these are like the corridor customers right. The one percent of us that are creative prose. That will spend hours and hours to make something exactly. What's in their mind's eye and that's our bread and butter today as a company but then there's this other nine percent of people that are actually coming out of that larger group that are saying you know. I WANNA stand out. I want to do something different. I am willing to have a learning curve. Maybe not the one that requires me to go to school but like we watch hours and hours and hours of training videos but I wanna like I want do something different and when you see a company like tick tock opening up their platform to third party APPS. I think what you're seeing is that they realize the value of these people for their platform. Yeah they want people to do stuff that looks professional that makes people jealous and amazed and humbled and you know and they want that and the only way they're going to do that is by working with partners like us because they can't build that level of complexity into their tools for the ninety otherwise ninety. We'll get confused right. And so that's like I think an opportunity for us as a company so when when I think about instagram right answer has filters you like other people can make filters we've made filters to make some filters But they've got their core and then you know like every other platform they can just look at. What's popular out in the world and there's like take. Yeah do you feel like you're in that kind of arms race is like the creative tool company like people are going to invent some stuff on using your tools. And that's an obvious drive people to you and then one day in ceramic talk is going to make me like man. Everyone's taking their pictures blue. Now it's default and you've lost that market or you. If you look at this go instagram. I mean any of these products. Where did they get a lot of their? Ui for creative editing. They got it from us. Yes because I'm working right and so it was just great by the way. Because then they democratized some of this technology and interface design. That was only made for pros and they made it available for everyone fantastic and And now it's our job to then continued. Innovate on the pro side. And to see where the line is of what what a general purpose platform dot can do for everyone and then how we bring the bar up to make people better and listen every time a new version of android or IOS ships. There are new features for their default camera. Editing and that's great because it's making that functionality. More available to everyone and it keeps us on our toes to say okay but of those people. What will only ten percent of them want to do that? Only they can that only they can do with us. You know. And and that makes us reimagined the future of imaging editing and a are and and how to mix things like motion graphic sequences with things like video and animation character animator just got nominated for an Oscar It's an amazing. Like next generation animation tool that a lot of people are now using and yes. There are a lot of like clunky little APPs out there that do animation. But people want to do something better you know. I think that's our sweet spot dearer. Look do you have like a team that looks at memes and beyond you gotta make we gotta make it easier to make that specific team. There's always thinking about is when they put like fake arms and is on something it's like falling down like what you're talking about thank you. Don't you're not totally old man? We've got a decent collection of crazy crazy stuff. On stock. People use all the time pulling her products and making making some surprising things. And then you know spark which doesn't get a lot of attention but you know we are. We believe that we have a better Solution for the business communicator. Or knowledge worker if you want to call them that the people who are in any company or on social media marketing teams. Don't have designed Skills WanNa make amazing things for social media memes. Whatever it is I like to say that the best brands in the world now are able to think and act in real time just like when the Super Bowl lights went out a few years ago and Oreo within thirty seconds was like you can still dunk in the dark in order to do that. What has to happen first of all there had to be people empowered to come up with something crazy and creative and do it. Within thirty seconds the needed to have access to the brands source of truth assets and the logos and the right fonts and whatever else stock photography that they could use. They were authorized us. I mean there's a lot of plumbing behind the scenes that enables someone to do that in thirty seconds versus going to design team or even worse going to the agency and waiting for a cycle of work to be done in order to do that. You need a product spark and you need a connection between the social media marketing product and a product like Photoshop on ipad. Or phone to something quick and you need access to your company's designed system and creative cloud libraries you can grab late US brand.

Photoshop adobe instagram Russia youtube editor US Ar Oscar
"adobe" Discussed on This Week in Photo

This Week in Photo

01:34 min | 1 year ago

"adobe" Discussed on This Week in Photo

"You got you got your vision to wear yup you have all that stuff of going to say that <hes> much like life learning photoshop is can you could probably chuck it up to being a series of frustrations followed by periodic periods of Piff Unie. Enjoy you know as you figure it out. I you like how do you do this. This looks like crap. Yes Oh and now you got it. Now you move onto the next thing right and like you said you know our goal is to remove the the frustrating parts that that shouldn't be frustrating. It can be hard enough to get your creative vision out there and articulated and that should be the hardest thing about being being creative. <hes> is is <hes> refining that that your own vision and and getting it to where you want to be <hes> so you know like we were discussing Photoshop and adobe very interested in reducing the friction and the creative barriers are your stat that are encountered on that journey love it live Joel Bear. Thank you so much for coming on. I appreciate procedure today. You know grabbing me a yeah. No no pledges off mind if I if any of the like the memories stories from Adobe when I was working there are the same. You probably have another. What ten meetings today that you have to get a few but this is the best one good good? I remember my calendar looking like a like. I was losing a game of Tetris as with my calendar..

Photoshop Adobe Joel Bear Piff Unie chuck
"adobe" Discussed on The Tech Blog Writer Podcast - Inspired Tech Startup Stories

The Tech Blog Writer Podcast - Inspired Tech Startup Stories

23:01 min | 1 year ago

"adobe" Discussed on The Tech Blog Writer Podcast - Inspired Tech Startup Stories

"Out while I'm here, there's a company called and Sierra celebrating its hundredth anniversary and the secret to that success is leveraging best in class technologies such as adobe to help brands orchestrate personalized and contextualized customer engagement to drive superior business results. I also discovered it they one of a handful of companies that have earned three adobe specializations from an analytics, experienced manager and campaign. So I wanted to find out little who book elope and hold on tight. So I can is all the way to Vegas. So we can speak with Kelly Joe sand. And Suker Ma mature who's going to tell us all about and Sarah. So massive warm. Welcome to the show. Can you tell the listeners Alabama who you are? And what you do. Absolutely. Will. My name is Kelly Joe sans. I'm on the executive team at in Sierra. We are a marketing services and technology firm that really used technology like adobe to help her size contextualized orchestrate and building customer experiences for our brands and clients with Aaron customers, I'm a Sukumar with Yellen. So I work in lead of the marketing technology team within cajoles organization. I have a team of technology strategist audience, we help our for our customers Bill technology solutions and implemented on this Lucians Televisa's, not facial laughing should wish you a happy burst night because I believe I'm sorry. Celebrate his hundredth year anniversary is marketing services firm continue little bit more about your history and the role of technology, and he's continued success. Absolutely. I will be a hundred. Years this year just kind of amazing to think about about one hundred years ago. It was a family owned business. How we started. And if you remember the days of like madman is how I describe it to my friends at events such as the tear sheets where advertisers would run out in the newspaper. We're over indexing. No EM auto as vertical for us. So you think back to those days of Ford ran an ad in the newspaper. They'd have to prove the dealerships have to prove to the end that that ad is run that it was compliant meant brand standards that it actually was run in the newspaper to the specs that they get reimbursed funds for. So our firm started really as a tear sheet company tearing, you know, advertisements out of newspapers to prove to brands advertisements were run to release this op dollars into the channel and their partners. So I'm over the years, we've definitely diversified and expanded our service offerings as technology grew as marketing just in general and transformed. Our service offerings did as. Well, so we had a number of different acquisitions going from a private family owned business through the years. We're still a product would be back, but a very different mix of services and offerings. So leveraging technology like adobe to continuously kind of reinvent our service offerings and how our clients engage their customers. So what is she? If you mentioned adobe their way is your relationship with OBI various specializations in adobe products, which is adobe analytics at obese experienced major and adobe campaign vegeta- feud on our absolutely. So I'd always a great partnership for us definitely falls into what we call the strategic alliance here and of the partnerships that we have in Sierra on if you think back even ten years ago, as we were kind of growing as an agency really looked at the technologies that are brands and our clients used how to augment that how to integrate that very rarely did you find a client that had an all in stock, and as the marketing clouds of evolved, and as they started kind of their activity in buying other technology companies in the marketplace leaders emerged on Salesforce adobe oracle IBM, they all kind of formed their own marketing cloud. And so as we really looked through the years to narrow in on our strategic partners adobe is hands down one of the top tier for us. A lot of our clients have a lot of their tech. So that's nice be. They are just very innovative company. So there continuously pushing their products forward. And so as you leaned into that we looked at kind of the core components of what really drives customer engagement in at the core of it. It's data. It's content. It's you know, insights and kind of this were now in the machine learning aspect of it. But it's really that intelligence layer that you put on top of it, and then the outbound engagement so the channel kind of aspect to whether it's a website or an Email or an SMS or push message. And so as we started to look at activating our practice over the past couple of years, we really honed in on these kind of core components within the experience cloud, and we're really excited about this. Brief specializations we have who's very unique in the Martin marketplace indefinitely within the partner network for people out Sean of marketing listening all over the world. How do these specialized? Nations that help you to help runs orchestrate personalized and contextualized customer engagements actually drive business results accurately, so the adobe technology, very innovator. It's best in class. Absolutely. In a lot of a lot of the activation of the platform. Sometimes lay in the details of how the brands are going to use them in the end. So the specializations for us do a couple of things it definitely kind of validates our agency. Our technology kind of chops. If you will in the technology that we're talking about more implementing so that it's installed correctly. But more than that, it's configured and activated in a way that will really help brands realize the vision, and the the plans of student plans that they have that they want that technology to enable so the specializations for us really kind of activate our our resources so that they're certified both in the technology and the application, and then the specializations layer top of it the agency. Proficiency to implement the technology configure and ultimately drivers outs for clients emotional freshener, inbound juice, how much technology is Trump's full the world of marketing over the last full via shook you tell me a little bit more about how you'll mock gene technology teams of expertise in disciplines, his data integration events on a logistics technology enablement and customer experience. Yeah. Absolutely. I think, you know, the the whole marketing technology industry is just growing rapidly many many fascinating place to be in. If you just see the marketplace in general in the last five years just the solutions has grown over sixty seventy percent component annual grocery, so which means customers have lots and lots of options to choose from. You'd think of anything within marketing that is a solution. That's available today. Right implementing those solutions people have done it. And they've done it in independent silos. So the true marketing success Israeli allies. By collecting all this data together. And making sure that venom of the customers are interacting with the brand in many many channels. So we should be able to collect the data. So we have to have that expertise built within the organization to be able to integrate collect the data not only in in the batch Mawr. But also in real time as the interactions are happening. I'm collecting the data, and then I should be able to actually consolidate data build intelligence in the data. Right.

adobe partner Sierra Kelly Joe Sukumar Neal Hughes Tecnel ROY Bill technology Sarah Vegas writer Suker Ma Alabama Ford executive WI
"adobe" Discussed on Security Now

Security Now

02:14 min | 1 year ago

"adobe" Discussed on Security Now

"Eleven dot anything these updates. Resolve a critical vulnerability that could lead to arbitrary code execution in the context of the running cold. Fusion service adobe is aware of a report that that this CV e twenty nineteen seventy eight sixteen has been exploited in the wild at turns out that an independent consultant named Charlie our heart discovered this when he found it being used against one of his clients. Yeah. After figuring out. What was going on Charlie reported the flow to adobe along with the proposed solution to their credit and doubtless due to the bugs extreme severity affecting all appropriately configured, cold fusion based websites ever adobe had the fix ready within just a few days. So Bravo for them, you know, getting on this immediately bleeping computer interviewed Charlie who they quoted saying quote getting folks to implement this fix is of critical importance. Oh, and Charlie did not disclose any dishes. Details at the attack since he didn't wish to help any attackers. However, he did tell bleeping computer that he believes that a skilled attacker will be able to connect the dots from adobe security bulletin and find a way to exploit the glitch. So. Knowing knowing the that, the key is up finding a site that a lot that will accept an execute -able upload there is now away then to generate an HTTP query of some sort which will execute that. And so, you know, cold fusion has been around for a long time, it one of those things that refuses to die like everything else. Then that adobe except you know, PDF's we liked those. But everything else.

Charlie adobe independent consultant
"adobe" Discussed on This Week in Photo

This Week in Photo

04:16 min | 1 year ago

"adobe" Discussed on This Week in Photo

"Launching style dot com. A website for vogue and w way back in the day. I think that was in two thousand and then I've worked across digital and prints editorial and branded up until I came to Dobie about a year and a half ago. So my work was stock was has. Been daily, and I know the ins and outs stock as well as probably anyone going from a Bloomberg to a time to recently refinery twenty nine as their executive director photography so many brands many looks many types of togr Affi all types of Dogerthy. And I remember exactly where I was when I found out that adobe launched stock collection. It was like this kind of a Hommant I was out refinery twenty nine in a friend was like, oh, maybe we should try Nobis stock, and I said what adobe has stock and it was just like like sting rainbows. That's really, that's the most brilliant thing. I've ever heard of their in edible incredible creative resource. And now, they have visual content. And how did I know? I didn't know obviously that I think within maybe a year year and a half I would be here working with clients and helping strategically build out the stock collection. So. It really felt kind of like his to be honest that it's like many creatives. I had such a long standing relationship working on creative projects through the Dobie, creative cloud, and like so many creatives it was so such like the last puzzle piece of what the creative cloud needed. So that you can work on these creative projects within the critic cloud, and then pull in your video, your illustrations your photo. So it really just a happy place for me to be because I feel like I can work with clients in credence as a former client creative seems like it seems like a natural evolution of of Brinda from where to where you are in. I would imagine this is not the last sort of Evelyn. You're you're sort of midway on the evolution scale there. Thing. I mean, it's I think hindsight is twenty twenty and that when you look back at feels like a straight narrow path, but you know, things organically Volve, and this is such a a great place for me to be build adobe scaled so quickly so creatively. And so am bishops Lee. So it's it's an exciting place to be an exciting place to build and for me. I'm kinda middle person between clients adobe and creatives though for me. I just feel very lucky that it's such a kind of a three sixty three sixty place where I can help lead creatives, but I also help lead clients, and we'll talk about that later when we talk about the visual trends program that I spearhead definitely want to get into all the before we do that. Let's for the folks that are like, okay stock have heard of creative cloud client. And I know it's there, but I haven't touch clicked on that pallet yet. I don't you know, I'm afraid of it because they're going to charge me to demystify. By what that is for for the average everyday working for tiger for them. You're gonna -cational need for stock. What does this? What is this this program mean for those folks? Yeah. Stop the tiger. The is simple. Yet, vast doc, the Taga fee are are visual assets that you can license for any project that you're working on where you need a visual. Maybe you need something very simple in quicken chief that would be micro stock, and that's what we call it adobe heart of the core collection. It's workaday vast quantities of imagery across all industries, very very affordable. Maybe working video that would be video. But maybe you are working on a really special project where you need top tier best quality imagery that Simon quality the fee, and that would be like its name at adobe stock premium the premium collection the best available in the marketplace. So stock is just millions of.

Nobis stock adobe Dobie Brinda executive director quicken Bloomberg Simon Dogerthy
"adobe" Discussed on Tickets

Tickets

07:40 min | 1 year ago

"adobe" Discussed on Tickets

adobe Scott Belsky founder Andrea Rosen New York City Bahamas NBA Starbucks Zanu John Burgerman Howard Lincoln center founding editor chief product officer apple Dobie Jocelyn cake
"adobe" Discussed on Accidental Tech Podcast

Accidental Tech Podcast

02:26 min | 1 year ago

"adobe" Discussed on Accidental Tech Podcast

"They're so tiny, understand, like it's it's well our next topic, but the most of of the thing it goes because they're in it for the phone, but it's actually a surprising amount of ram. I don't think it's that terrible device for the constraints that has. I just don't really understand what would make somebody purchase one, I understand the pitch, but realistically, nobody is going to do that. Exactly. A bunch of people are going to do 'cause there'd be intrigued by the idea, but it's it's. It's too much of a downgrade from their actual phone that I don't think that will be a viable substitute. I don't know, right. She said that that was the segue into our next topic. Tell me more. So this is about adobe announcements at their, they'll be max conference as a bunch of them. Maybe we'll talk about some of the other ones later, but today, the main one the the highlight is Photoshop c. is coming to the ipad in two thousand nineteen. And this may not sound like much because like already been Photoshop for the ipad, like who cares whatever. But the important part is that this is an adobe words and all the PR. Thanks. This is real Photoshop on the ipad. It's not a new application that's kinda like Photoshop. It's not a brand new application that can also read PSD file. Sometimes this is full fledged Photoshop on the ipad, no ifs, ands or buts about it. And they emphasize that it's the same code base and that it's compatible. And obviously, especially in the being, there will be some features that are only on the desktop, but I'm sure they'll show. Yup, those gaps, but this is adobe. Finally. You know, I don't know jumping in like apple has wanted pro applications I've had for a long time. And for the longest time, adobe has been like, we'll make some apps the I've had. We have some ideas of cool things we can do, but Photoshop, desktop app. Sorry, it's you, you can't have them yet, and now you can cross compatible. They have their cloud stuff where you can put the document in their creative cloud cloud. I don't know if they repeat club and work on it on your desktop and work on the same thing. And it also read some cloud drive and dropbox, and it's just a battle. You make a document on desktop. You can open up your bag. You make a documentary. Documenting ipad. You can open it on desktop just, you know real Photoshop and that's obviously adapted the interface. It's not the same as it isn't. A stop is a bunch of things touch affords is and some interesting new tools in there. But I thought this was..

Photoshop adobe apple
"adobe" Discussed on Daily Tech News Show

Daily Tech News Show

02:43 min | 1 year ago

"adobe" Discussed on Daily Tech News Show

"So the processing power is there but debatable to edit on the fly. Starting my desktop take was me and my ipad and keep going on my phone. I think there's something there for the onto gold influence her entrepreneur in to kind of get away from that computer because the sides editing. I don't need my laptop to do this. Oh high. But other than that, I, I don't. You know, I, I don't use it for for that much more than just web stuff. Yeah, for the ten dollar individual plan gets you premier rush hundred gigabytes of cloud storage. Adobe fonts, adobe portfolio and adobe spark. That's it. So if you need anything else besides that, you're going to have to be paying a lot. And that was what I wanted to look that up. Because if you're paying a hundred twenty dollars a year and you get a bunch of a Dobie stuff in involved, like, you know, maybe some access to Photoshop and stuff like that, then maybe it's worth it. I'm not sure if fonts portfolio and spark are enough to justify, but maybe an especially if you if like you, Sarah, if you're spending thirty bucks a month in, you're like, I'm not sure I need all of that this. This could be a great option. The last thing I want to say there's craters I've talked to who use premier who find it and they use it for years. They look like it, but they find it awfully buggy because they can. You know, they can just keep pushing updates. There was one update happened a few months ago. My friend said that. Save like it was. It was a book that permitted you from saving what one of the cornerstones things of of of editing software so that that's the one hesitation I have. What adobe products is. I hope you know, even I, I ran into a problem today with a baby buggy side. I'm hoping there's some stability naked, make it worth it for you paint s restriction for each month and it's an ongoing conversation about subscription software, but it is the way it is the way I'll everything is going now and buying something for download and use without paying for it. An ongoing basis is becoming the rarity. It's becoming the thing companies do to keep their base happy, but if you wanna make sure you've got bugs squashed fast, you're always up to date and secure. You wanna be updating all the time anyway. So if you pay a little, you're not only just updating all the time, but you're also getting new features as they come along. So I don't know, it's it's just a new way of doing things. I guess. Good enough, was them? Yeah. I'm looking forward to it. I will definitely be giving at least rush aid, a spin. Talk about it on our show at a later date. Hey, thanks..

adobe Sarah Photoshop hundred twenty dollars hundred gigabytes ten dollar
"adobe" Discussed on Security Now

Security Now

04:05 min | 1 year ago

"adobe" Discussed on Security Now

"Microsoft ultimately wins the battle of the windows versions by not supporting the older OS on the newer hardware, which of course they announced some time ago. Okay. So. Adobe and FOX. It need to understand that this is not a competition last Tuesday on. Yeah. Last last Tuesday of this month. Adobe released security updates for windows MAC versions of acrobat and reader, including forty seven, critical vulnerabilities and thirty nine that were merely important forty, seven of the forty seven critical vulnerabilities. Forty, six of those allowed for remote code execution. One allowed for escalation of privileges, whereas the thirty nine important vulnerabilities or information disclosure. So am remember that in the case of a PDF document, which reader is reading. That there's never been brought? Well, it's probably safe to say there's never been an interpreter as as troubled and incredibly complex as of as a PDF interpreter. So I, you know, and we know how difficult it is to get an interpreter to work. Right, but they haven't yet. And so forty, seven critical vulnerabilities, forty, six of them remote code. And this means if you've got your web browser configured to use adobe reader as its reader, which I don't think anyone should do anymore. You know, use the built in PDF yours. But if you did and somebody sent you a deliberately crafted PDF they could run code of their choosing on your computer. So it is a huge, huge attack surface for for for days machines. However, that was. Not the largest number of PDF problems not to be outdone FOX. It needs to be updated too. So of you have left the adobe train and our and switched over to FOX it. I'm using nitro as mine I did when I switched to my when I rebuilt this new system after my wind x. p. machine died as we'll remember few months ago I had to and it took had acrobat there and it was a fully purchased licensed one, but I, but there's no way to recover the license and adobe wanted, you know, I just didn't want to go with them. So I ended up choosing nitro PC I looked. I looked. I looked at like twelve, right? And many of them are nice, but they, they do not produce small PDF's. They produce big lazy blobby PDF's. And so no, nitro a shit art because this morning when Google announced its new pick. Missile slate NS and it comes with adobe acrobat. And. Oh, really? But it is a problem on chrome OS to do PDF. So maybe they handed, yeah. Yeah. Anyway, FOX, it there. Update fixes one hundred and sixteen vulnerabilities. Cow I know. Is there something inherent in PDF rendering? It's just really, really, right. Yeah, it's an interpreter and and it is I and it's probably I mean, like something like FOX, it is probably based on old go script ghost script code, right? Which they grabbed and then they they took. They took in-house and go..

Adobe FOX Microsoft Google
"adobe" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

01:45 min | 2 years ago

"adobe" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"On adobe flash I hear this. Voice welcome to keep her the most started cursing like you can't believe biggest idiot, in the world I tried to stop the installation I shut down the computer I merely restarted it started on, re Hong I tried? Starting up in safe mode I started up, in the recovery but nothing worked, I have a. Bricked computer But. I also have I drive I'm backed up I did not lose any data in the process of this every and and of course this made it, perfectly fine in the long term, but I cannot tell you how I was mad at myself I can't tell you I'm not supposed. To fall for this stuff I should've known I, had the right version of adobe flash I should have ignored it but you're just in the. Habit something a new. Computer got up the date that upgrade this you just do it you do it because you wanna finish it and, get? On, with using the computer and. These clowns running the spyware malware no it Yes it can even happen to me. I'm telling you folks having an drive. Bootle backup is. It means I haven't lost anything I'm going. To be able to get, another computer or if I want to take this computer and have it fixed I don't want. This computer anymore as. Far as I'm concerned missing is corrupted I don't care what anybody tells they've done with it I don't want any, part, of, it I. Do not I don't want any part of this thing. Is is just it's filthy it's it's It's infected with Russians who knows what's in this thing I don't want any part of. It here but I'm. Telling you I, drive..

adobe
"adobe" Discussed on KNSS

KNSS

01:57 min | 2 years ago

"adobe" Discussed on KNSS

"And operating smoothly if you ever see anything, related Matt keeper do not put, it on your. But you won't it's. Disguised the minute I hit the installed button. On adobe flash I. Hear this voice welcome to keep. Her the most. Josh started cursing like. You can't believe I felt like a biggest idiot. In the world I tried to. Stop the installation I shut. Down the computer I merely restarted it started. On re Hong I tried starting up. In safe mode I started up, in the. Recovery nothing worked I have. A bricked computer But. I also have I drive I'm backed up I did not lose any data in, the process of this every and and of course this made it. Perfectly fine in the long term but I cannot tell you, how I was mad at myself I. Cannot tell you I'm not supposed to fall for this stuff I should've known I. Had the right version of adobe, flash I should have ignored it what you're just in the. Habit something a new. Computer got up the date that upgrade this you just do it you do it because you want to finish it and, get, on, with using the computer and. These clowns running the spyware malware no it Yes. It can even happen to me I'm telling you folks having. An I drive Bootle backup is it. Means I haven't. Lost anything I'm going to be able to. Get another computer or if. I want to take this computer, and have it fixed I'm not I don't I don't want. This computer anymore as. Far as I'm concerned missing is corrupted I don't care what anybody tells them they've done with it I don't want any, part, of, it I do not I don't want any part of this thing. Is is just it's filthy it's it's It's infected with Russians who knows what's in this thing I don't want any part of. It here but I'm. Telling you I, drive..

adobe Hong Matt Josh
"adobe" Discussed on PetaPixel Photography Podcast

PetaPixel Photography Podcast

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"adobe" Discussed on PetaPixel Photography Podcast

"Make your software available on mobile devices. Otherwise, you're going to be left in the dust. You know, things are getting to the point where people are getting a lot more done with their smartphones and their tablets, and they're doing things that they once had hop on a computer to do you expect to be able to do it more mobile these days. You don't hear people wanting to buy a computer that sits in a particular room in their home as much as used to. We want the device to be wherever we are. An adobe knows that you either head in that direction or you become irrelevant. So Bloomberg reports that we're going to see a full Photoshop app and the I tunes app store for the ipad sometime next year, also known as twenty nineteen, but they're going to be announcing it this October at the adobe max conference. Now I've been invited to go and may just attend. We'll see, you know, personally, I want to see some of that AI action inaction. That's exciting stuff right there Photoshop for ipad. Not so exciting. Cool. Just not exciting. Now, adobe strategy of course, is to bring all these things together and become a force multiplier and have all these things work together across all compatible devices. Now, adobe creative cloud CPO Scott Belsky is confirmed the development of a cross platform Photoshop, as well as other creative cloud apps telling Bloomberg quote, my ass for Asian is to get these on the market as soon as possible. There's a lot required to take a product as sophisticated and powerful as Photoshop and make. That work on a modern device like the ipad and quote, I can't even imagine it's.

adobe Photoshop Bloomberg Scott Belsky AI
"adobe" Discussed on Are You Real

Are You Real

02:36 min | 2 years ago

"adobe" Discussed on Are You Real

"I'm curious i have to ask because i've heard you bringing up a couple of times the dobie houses are be huts what did those look like can you describe that to us yeah so they're usually it's a one room house and four walls made out of mud so what happens is the man there they make these bricks out of mud and they create this house in there's usually a space for adore and then like one or two windows and the roots usually depending on the family sometimes they're made out of corn husks in sometimes they're made out of steel like metal metal sheets so they're usually just one room houses and so what we have to remember that families over there are typically very large so their families that have thirteen children seven i mean very large families living in these one room adobe houses ios soon so where do you think i'll sleep on the floor yet on the floor they do yeah they put down blankets or do they have a map or something they sleep on yeah if they have them they will but if not they'll just they'll sleep right there on the floor some families depending on what the father's job is and how good their income is the have they might have to room adobe houses it just depends on the income of the family okay now what are some typical four these bothers are has been that was a typical job that they would engage in so up in the mountains usually the fathers are farmers or they create the adobe houses construction workers lots of things like that but also what a problem that we're running into that we're seeing very present every day or is that a lot of the fathers even some of the brothers in the family that younger men are moving legally to the states and so a lot of them are they go to the states and they find a job in their sending money back to the mother the wife in the family and she is getting the house taking care of getting the kids to school they can afford just naked still and then once there is enough money that the father will come back to the home earn but a lot of times either the father will die in transit trying to get to the states or.

adobe
"adobe" Discussed on Digital Production Buzz

Digital Production Buzz

01:55 min | 2 years ago

"adobe" Discussed on Digital Production Buzz

"People anywhere in the world bill their own studio using infrastructure in the cloud so few magin human i would like to work on a project together form our own studio we wouldn't need to go and buy a whole bunch of computers software and you know put all those things together in order for us to get started with eero we could just log into the web and build ourselves our own little company and we invite people from anywhere and start start doing work this owns a great deal like virtualization like your virtually all foreign storing mcleod yeah that's absolutely a component of it reverts realizing the software virtually ising the workstations were virtually ising the storage virtualization a lot of the aspects of what it takes for people to work together such as setting permissions and roles in the reporting virtual is in all those things is really important but what we find has been really critical to the customers we talked to his making it really seamless in making sure all of those abstractions together in a way that doesn't mean any extra complexity or you know administrative overhead for people to just kinda jump in and get started in use their talent adobe tried the same thing couple years ago and finally abandoned what is it that makes you feel this is going to be successful yeah that's a really great question i actually think what adobe did there was a really inspired idea i suspect you know in the fullness of time they'll probably come around to something similar in the future i think it's really compelling for folks to be able to use their software just about anywhere adobe of course spinning incredible pioneer in the application cloud to make it super simple for people to get their their software from anywhere so i think that's been a greatest peration and i think we're kind of building on that in trying to invent the future for what that means for visual effects.

adobe
"adobe" Discussed on Motley Fool Money

Motley Fool Money

01:52 min | 2 years ago

"adobe" Discussed on Motley Fool Money

"If only well i'm glad it isn't only adobe systems only one who thinks pdf's when they hear the name adobe i know definitely not i think many people do i think that's maybe why the shares have surprised many people last few years since two thousand fifteen or so revenue has jumped from four billion to now nearly eight billion ish it's headed towards the company is doing extremely well chris with its dobie creative cloud which is subscription service for creating managing sharing digital content and as well as the adobe digital media branch which includes the acrobat the reader the sign and scan documents that that's all doing very well but it will be also has advertising management cloud software analytics and marketing management cloud so they've moved to the cloud they're allowing you to manage your whole digital presence from creation to communication to collaboration and so a lot of businesses a lot of individuals students are all using this and eight percent of revenue is of a recurring nature so it's it's a powerhouse earnings grew more than sixty percent stock trades at thirty three times for its margins are exceptional it's a it's a very strong business coming up snap and blue apron battle it out for the title of most questionable business decision of the week stay right here you're listening on the full month welcome back to motley fool money chris hill hearing studio chasing moser david kretzman and jeff fisher dropbox the cloud storage companies gearing up to go public drunk dropbox pricing there at the low end of the range jason moser does that a little more interested no no.

jeff fisher jason moser adobe motley chris hill moser david kretzman eight percent sixty percent
"adobe" Discussed on Motley Fool Money

Motley Fool Money

01:52 min | 2 years ago

"adobe" Discussed on Motley Fool Money

"If only well i'm glad it isn't only adobe systems only one who thinks pdf's when they hear the name adobe i know definitely not i think many people do i think that's maybe why the shares have surprised many people last few years since two thousand fifteen or so revenue has jumped from four billion to now nearly eight billion ish it's headed towards the company is doing extremely well chris with its dobie creative cloud which is subscription service for creating managing sharing digital content and as well as the adobe digital media branch which includes the acrobat the reader the sign and scan documents that that's all doing very well but it will be also has advertising management cloud software analytics and marketing management cloud so they've moved to the cloud they're allowing you to manage your whole digital presence from creation to communication to collaboration and so a lot of businesses a lot of individuals students are all using this and eight percent of revenue is of a recurring nature so it's it's a powerhouse earnings grew more than sixty percent stock trades at thirty three times for its margins are exceptional it's a it's a very strong business coming up snap and blue apron battle it out for the title of most questionable business decision of the week stay right here you're listening on the full month welcome back to motley fool money chris hill hearing studio chasing moser david kretzman and jeff fisher dropbox the cloud storage companies gearing up to go public drunk dropbox pricing there at the low end of the range jason moser does that a little more interested no no.

jeff fisher jason moser adobe motley chris hill moser david kretzman eight percent sixty percent
"adobe" Discussed on TechFan

TechFan

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"adobe" Discussed on TechFan

"Okay it's pretty cheap right but if you have a home business there's three of you you know occasionally you just had twelve bucks is told bucks i can deal with it then okay office three sixty five ten dollars that ten or something i can deal with it okay now i gotta go adobe twenty five dollars a month photoshop okay or whatever it is i don't know the numbers these days and by the time i'm done i'm spending three hundred dollars a month in software but she's is money and the issue is he he can't budgets get eat you've have difficulty then saying right we'll if i stopped paying for adobe but that obviously still working that means and what looks away it is a real problem and there are alternate tips they're all file compatible tentatives to all of these products so yeah that's the other thing is us i think the will be a drive towards people using a big one for for us companies acrobat yes yeah and this this acrobat is the is the pdf editor so you can create pay for easily on most systems nowadays if you actually want to make changes to it where you wanna use some of the events features like the the different levels of encryption and stuff that built into the pdf stan to you need to use acrobat or they used to need to use acrobat and to get a paid subscription for a dobie what is out is on i forget what it is it's cheap look it up while we're talking but i couldn't find acrobat of you pricing plans.

adobe editor stan three sixty five ten dollars three hundred dollars twenty five dollars