39 Burst results for "administrator"

Fresh "administrator" from WTOP 24 Hour News

WTOP 24 Hour News

01:15 min | 1 hr ago

Fresh "administrator" from WTOP 24 Hour News

"But it's clear some things are not quite ready to go. In the D. C Council oversight hearing on health and vaccines. Assistant City Administrator Jame Elder said the city hasn't selected a vendor yet to host the system. We've had Microsoft working on that solution. We also have a censure. Working on a solution. We want to make sure that when we would do transition to a pre registration system, but it's the right one council member Elissa Silverman said She's also concerned the new system won't provide transparency into who's eligible to get the vaccine. I'm worried that it causes divisiveness and the last thing we need in the city is that over such an important health issue near Lord Unstained W. T O P News, an American University student, has died. In an investigation is now underway. The body of Eli Weinstock of Columbus, Ohio, was discovered by a roommate. On Wednesday He was a sophomore studying at the School of Communications. American University announced his death and the letter to the school community yesterday. They said he was a person of great talent and promise D. C. Police are investigating. Still ahead. We go to Florida and check in on the national spring training. It's 806. You like it Iced You like it Hot. You like it? Sweet. That is why we have so much coffee way are 7 11 and we might know you better than you know yourself. 7 11 Always open sea 7 11 After participating US doors for 60 years, the innaro has been the nation's eyes and ears in space, collecting critical intelligence from places no human can reach headquartered in Virginia with locations around the globe. The innaro develops, acquires launches and operates America's spy satellites. The.

Eli Weinstock Elissa Silverman Virginia Wednesday Microsoft Florida 60 Years D. C. Police Columbus, Ohio Yesterday American University D. C Council School Of Communications Jame Elder News United States One Council W. T O P Administrator America
For Every School District In Georgia, A Vaccination Plan Of Its Own

Clark Howard

00:38 sec | 10 hrs ago

For Every School District In Georgia, A Vaccination Plan Of Its Own

"Superintendents about their plans and their excitement to get teachers vaccinated from covert 19 from Cherokee. We're gonna do it Arena style vaccination next Thursday and Friday to Henry. We have really gone through all of the process to actually be the administrator of the vaccine or our school system to Douglas County's. We feel like we can easily accommodate 800 vaccinations. Day 800 on Friday, 800 on Saturday. Georgia's school superintendents are beginning vaccinations in their districts as early as Monday. Several say that if there are any allergic reactions, teachers won't have to use sick days while recuperating Veronica Water is 95.5 WSB. Gwinnett County's longtime school

Cherokee Douglas County Henry Georgia Veronica Water Gwinnett County
Fresh "administrator" from Morning News with Hal Jay & Brian Estridge

Morning News with Hal Jay & Brian Estridge

00:35 min | 1 hr ago

Fresh "administrator" from Morning News with Hal Jay & Brian Estridge

"Uh, nothing still being stars? Nothing beats a story. How that we had. Remember, I told you about the when I When I got my forehead scan with the hand held one. Yes, And they said Go. Yeah, you're low going in. Remember that? Because the suit check your oil, it said low And so I went and told the guy said, Hey, just just f Y I Those folks that are screening out there told me I was asking them, you know, because then I said, Hey, what was it And she said, Well, it's in Celsius. I said, Well, I can convert it. Remember that? Yeah, And then I told the administrator I said, Hey, listen, by the way, she said, my temperature was low. And that's in that didn't give her a number. He goes all the battery's low. That's what that that's tremendous. That's a draft right now. Coming batteries. Little coming appeared six years 20% Mr Restaurant, Exactly and dropping. Yes. Joe Biden's got a problem at the border. We'll get into that after we get into this with money that problem on I 35 the North and the keys to Boulevard, the roadway shut down because of the crash there. The backups are now stretching back toward Laurel. And you've also got an issue on the Bush turnpike on the south outside right before you get down to 1 83 roadway is shut down there because of a crash that's already heavy back toward North Cape. The one we had I 30 Spanish Carrier Parkway finally cleared off with shoulder wghp first traffic on the ones I'm money could brought to you by cumulus, Texas Information Network. Your day starts out early. Your professional sales pat this new business development you adapted in 2022 huge changes, and now it's time for a fresh start. Cumulus sales is hiring at cumulus media dot com slash careers. Brad Barton in the W B A P Weather Center. We have a few Sprinkles off to the east of the Dallas What were there this morning and a cold front up in Oklahoma. But all this is really minor stuff. We'll have some clouds.

Brad Barton Oklahoma 2022 Joe Biden Laurel North Cape Six Years I 30 Spanish Carrier Parkway Mr Restaurant Cumulus W B A P Weather Center 1 83 Roadway Texas Information Network Bush This Morning I 35 The 20% Cumulus Sales ONE Dallas
The Biden Relief Bill: Who Gets What

The Indicator from Planet Money

06:18 min | 1 d ago

The Biden Relief Bill: Who Gets What

"Okay. Who is getting. What in the biden. Bill perio first up is what most adults in. The country are going to get a one time payment of up to fourteen hundred dollars. This is the single biggest part of the bill. And here's where the bill stands. Now if you made less than seventy five thousand dollars either last year or the year before you will get the full amount fourteen hundred bucks beyond that if you made between five thousand and eighty thousand dollars you get a smaller amount and if you made more than eighty thousand dollars you will not get one of these checks for married couples who file their taxes together. The cutoff for getting a check is a combined. Income of one hundred and sixty thousand dollars in these checks are both the biggest and the most universal part of the bill. The exact amount of money that your household will get does depend on a few things in addition to your income. Like whether you have kids or other dependents but even so roughly eighty to ninety percent of all households in the us are gonna get checks for some amount of money and the hope is that people will spend that money to help boost the economy so next step people who are getting money in the stimulus bill. The unemployed four hundred dollars per week on top of what they would normally get from their state in unemployment benefits when there isn't a pandemic and that extra four hundred dollars. A week will last until nearly the end of august and there's a lot of people still claiming unemployment benefits each week almost nine times as many people as a year ago right before the pandemic started. That's more than nineteen million people claiming those benefits right now and a big part of the reason why there are so many is the government has expanded the range of people who can qualify for these benefits during the pandemic and the reason unemployment benefits matter for the overall economy. Is that the allow people to continue spending money while they are between jobs paying their rent buying groceries buying school supplies for their kids yet without the extra four hundred dollars. Unemployment benefits would only replace less than half of a workers lost income on average but with the extra four hundred dollars from the stimulus bill. These benefits will be replacing more than eighty five percent of the lost income for the average unemployed worker up state and local governments. What they're going to get from the bill so tax revenues for a lot of state and local governments have just deride pandemic and some of them have been forced to cut back on services that they typically provide like garbage collection law enforcement mental health and addiction treatment services and a bunch of others state and local governments have also had to lay off one point three million workers especially a lot of workers in public schools teachers administrators janitors. It's one of the hardest hit sectors of the labor market so this bill provides three hundred and fifty billion dollars for state and local governments. And actually that might end up more money than state and local governments lost during the pandemic three hundred and fifty billion dollars is above the range of estimates for how much money state and local governments will have lost through next year. But it's also true that some states and local governments are in worse shape than others and so one of the big debates in the senate is over just how to allocate this money between different states and cities. And we're gonna pass here for a second because if we stop right here just right now out of the cost of those three things that we have discussed the checks that go out to almost everybody. Stimulus checks the bigger unemployment insurance benefits and the money that goes to state and local governments. That is the biggest part of the bill. Roughly half of it around a trillion dollars is going to go to those three things combined yet and there's all kinds of interesting and important stuff and the rest of the bill to so. Here's a few more that we definitely think are worth mentioning. Starting with what parents are gonna get. Yes so parents are going to get an extra fourteen hundred dollars for each of their children and this includes adult children who parents list as their dependence. Yeah so if you are. A family of four people say to spouses and two kids. The total amount. You're gonna get in those one time. Checks is up to fifty six hundred dollars. But that's not all. The bill also increases the size of the child tax credit for one year. So parents will now be able to offset their tax bills by thirty six hundred dollars for each kid under the age of six the really young ones and by three thousand dollars for other kids who are not yet adults bottom line take that same family of four and let's say both parents make less than seventy five thousand dollars each year and let's say their two kids are very young. They're toddlers that family could get a total of nearly thirteen thousand dollars in checks and tax credits because of this bill. Okay and now. Let's look at what schools are going to get kindergarten to twelfth grade. Schools are gonna get roughly one hundred and thirty billion dollars but maybe what's most interesting is what that money is intended for. Yes so this money is not for textbooks. It is for things that make it easier for schools to reopen and operate during the pandemic. So things like improving ventilation buying more personal protective equipment and even changing the shape of a classroom so that social distancing between students is easier next up. The bill includes tens of billions of dollars for loans and grants to businesses and the industry. That's going to get the single biggest amount in grants. So that's money that does not have to be paid back is bars and restaurants yup bars and restaurants. They can prove they lost money. Last year will be eligible for up to ten million dollars each in grants and the bill has set aside a total of twenty five billion dollars for eateries and watering holes and restaurants. And though that is the most any industry is getting in this bill. Some perspective is important here last year. Bars and restaurants lost about a hundred and forty five billion dollars sales from the year before. It's a twenty percent decline and there are still nearly two and a half million fewer jobs in bars and restaurants than before the pandemic and this year knock on wood will not be as bad because people are getting vaccinated. Covid cases are coming down and more of the country is reopening still. That is a huge hole to dig out of

Bill Perio Biden Government Senate United States
Fresh update on "administrator" discussed on Atlanta's Morning News

Atlanta's Morning News

00:53 min | 1 hr ago

Fresh update on "administrator" discussed on Atlanta's Morning News

"Talk. We'll talk about it. I 85 red alerted the cab County our next traffic update in less than three minutes at 7 39 WSB temperature is 44. Superintendents around the state make plans to get teachers vaccinated from Corona virus from Cherokee. We're going to do it on arena style vaccination next Thursday and Friday to Henry. We have really gone through all of the process to actually be the administrator of the vaccine or our school system to Douglas County's. We feel like we can easily accommodate 800 vaccinations per day 800 on Friday, 800 on Saturday. Georgia school superintendents are beginning vaccinations and their district says early as Monday. Several say that if there are Any allergic reactions. Teachers won't have to use sick days while recuperating Veronica Water is 95.5 double USB two million coronavirus doses are now being administered each day in the U. S double the amount from just a month ago. The country's well on its way to surpassing President Biden's goal of 100 million doses in his 1st 100 days in office. Atlanta based CDC says more than 54 million people have now received at least one shot from either Fizer or Madonna. Johnson and Johnson's one dose vaccine is just now being rolled out. Some Catholics continue to turn down the Johnson Johnson covert vaccine, Like many vaccines, J and J's was developed using fetal.

Madonna Fizer Cherokee Johnson Monday 1St 100 Days Saturday 100 Million Doses CDC 800 Vaccinations Atlanta Two Million One Dose U. S A Month Ago 44 Douglas County President Biden Less Than Three Minutes Georgia
Stolen password leads to loan company hack

Cyber Security Today

05:06 min | 2 d ago

Stolen password leads to loan company hack

"Citywide home loans. Which lends money in. The united states is now notifying people that it was. The victim of ransomware and data theft attack in november information on a number of employees and customers was copied according to letters filed with several states and attacker got hold of employees log in credentials for the company's virtual private network. It isn't explained how that happened. One possibility is vpn. Software was hacked in the past twelve months. The software of corporate vp ends of at least two manufacturers have been cracked to expose user names and passwords. These are being sold on criminal websites. There have been many warnings so. It administrators recently to install the latest vpn security updates and have users changed passwords in order to fight this other possibilities. Are the loan company. Employees password was guessed or they were tricked into revealing it no matter the method experts say the proper use of multi factor. Authentication is a good way to add extra protection to log ins now. The next to items take a bit of explaining so please be patient organisations. Worry that personal data of customers and employees can be violated in two ways through a hacked by outsiders or abuse by an insider but who is an insider an employee for sure but it also includes employees of partner contractor or supplier firms with data access and as an article this week on the new site data breaches dot net points out. It can also include the subcontractors of contractors the author gave the following example. An american health insurance provider fought risk management software and services from firm. Alcohol company to this firm subcontracted some work to affirm call company three one of company threes employees with access to the insurers data had aside business training people how to do data coating. This person was using the insurance company's data for training material with those people without permission so unapproved people. We're seeing patient data. That's the data breach so far just under one thousand people have been notified. Their personal and medical data may have been involved. This incident raises a number of questions. Why didn't the insurance provider anonymous is. The data sent to company too so the risk of compromise was if that wasn't possible. Why didn't company to anonymous the data. That was by company three. What other security measures could have been used to prevent company three employees from seeing real data and did the health insurer realize all the risk it was taking opening. Its data to several companies as the author notes organizations can force employees of contractors and subcontractors to sign business associated agreements the cover the proper data handling and privacy however compliance with those agreements has to be regularly policed. Finally crooks have been manipulating the results of search engines like google for years to spread malware. The idea is to get a high result of a search to be an infected website. A security company sophos said this week it recently found a gang using one of those techniques. Not only for spreading viruses but also ransomware. It works like this. You ask the search engine to find the answer to a specific question that the crooks think people are likely to want answered high up on the list of returns our links to what looks like legitimate companies. Click on a link and you go to a forum with a message that offers a file downloading with the answer to the question. Download that file and you get like similar. Search engine scams crook start by secretly placing code on the websites of unsuspecting companies. So their site will call them up high enough. Search that fools people because they'll trust legitimate-looking web address in one example. The report says the question was do. I need a party wall agreement to sell my house. The first on the list of search engine responses was the website of canadian medical practice underneath. That address was linked to do. I need a party wall agreement to sell my house.

United States Sophos Google
Fresh update on "administrator" discussed on WTOP 24 Hour News

WTOP 24 Hour News

01:19 min | 10 hrs ago

Fresh update on "administrator" discussed on WTOP 24 Hour News

"Served his congressional bodyguard the Senate in session. Despite security concerns, though, the House is not on Capitol Hill, I'm Mitchell Miller. Asian Markets are down about. 2% is parts of Wall Street have now gone negative for the year, Eddie Murphy and Arsenio Hall returned in coming to America a sequel. It's a good way to spend your weekend or maybe not so hot. We'll have a review. Lots of basketball tonight, including the Wizards, who barely got past the Clippers. 10 31 start with the pandemic. As we learned the DC's new pre registration system for covert vaccinations that was supposed to launch next week does not yet have a vendor in the D. C Council oversight hearing on health and vaccines. Assistant City Administrator Jame Elder said the city is still choosing between Microsoft and extension. We have Microsoft working on that solution. We also have a sense you're working on a solution as well. We want to make sure that when we would do transition to a pre registration system, but it's the right. One. Council member Elissa Silverman expressed concern in the series of tweets saying You read correctly, we announced launch of a system we haven't committed to buying. A decision on pre registration system hasn't been made between Microsoft and a censure, when asked for a firm long stated, would not be stated when asked how the system will prioritize residents, it could not be answered. Bad. That's a tweet from Elissa Silverman wt. Opie's Christi King has more now on how this pre registration system will work. If and when it's finally set up free. Registering next week doesn't mean you're in line ahead of someone who might sign up later in the day or week. Wait until D C health makes a determination that you're a part of a group that will be asked and invited that Lyndsey Parker, director of octo that's doing the DC system says When.

Eddie Murphy Arsenio Hall Mitchell Miller Lyndsey Parker Elissa Silverman Microsoft Capitol Hill Next Week D. C Council Clippers Wall Street Senate America Tonight Wizards Jame Elder Christi King About. 2% D C Administrator
Seattle to open more permanent COVID-19 vaccination sites in Rainier Beach, West Seattle, Lumen Field Event Center

KUOW Newsroom

04:52 min | 3 d ago

Seattle to open more permanent COVID-19 vaccination sites in Rainier Beach, West Seattle, Lumen Field Event Center

"Been reporting how seattle is turning some of its testing sites into permanent vaccination sites starting today the rainier beach side is prepared to give about two thousand shots a week and so is second location in west seattle. Kyw's josh amac nickeled visited the rainier beach vaccination clinic today joshua high and describe this vaccination site for us well like every other side. It's open to people who are eligible. Mostly that means seniors over sixty five but there are a few other categories to like home health workers anyway. Everyone who shows up here has an appointment and they walk up and they check in at a table and then when it's their turn they passed. They passed through one of several shipping containers on a train or on the back of a truck and inside there is an administrator in a little booth. And there's someone from the fire department and that person gives you your shot and then you walk out the back of the shipping container into an outdoor area and then you hang out under a tent for like fifteen minutes with a view of the lake all right well. Did you get to speak to anyone there. Yeah i spoke to a lot of seniors there in the recovery tent. And they told me before today trying to get a vaccination appointment was a real chore. Roberta bird right said she couldn't sleep. She wanted an appointment so badly. Given times i wake up you know in the morning. Three o'clock two o'clock in during the throughout the day. And then of course the site that we look. It's like places. Like well up in tacoma and you know really far out. And i'm not going to those places so i just kept looking and looking so now opened up so she also got on wait lists at pharmacies and they told her they'd call but they never did and then she heard from a friend that the southeast seattle senior center was helping seniors make appointments and so she called. They called me back right away like within a few days and schedule being. I'm here bird right. Told me that she had concerns about the safety of the vaccine so it was reassuring for her to go through a community group. Yeah that's good news that roberta got her shot. And just you know. We've been hearing stories about grandkids helping their grandparents schedule. An appointment you know for a variety of reasons you know. Maybe the grandparents don't have a smartphone or computer or maybe like roberta's case the the grandparents are trying to just striking out but in this case it sounds like the senior center is stepping in. Yes and that is the strategy here. They're still far more demand for vaccines than there is supply and so these new vaccination sites are favoring referrals they're working closely with community groups and those groups are doing the outreach. Linda green runs the southeast seattle senior center. That's the group that helped this person earlier. Find their appointment and she says she got her staff spending all their time. Basically going after vaccination appointments for seniors. But it's hard because there just aren't enough vaccines so she said it feels like a competition. Well it's a competition because now we're have folks who are competing you've got the folks who are seventy five years old and older. We've got the sixty five year old. We've got those folks who are under fifty but are also caretakers for those who are sixty five and over or seventy and over. And i know that we have to start from the top the most vulnerable and work our way down but it still is somewhat competitive as to. Who's going to get it first. So all of those those areas we still have to define but we are of the opinion that the goal is for everyone to get vaccinated so whomever we can fit into that classification. That's what we're doing. Yeah and in that competition for vaccines. It helps to have a community group to help you get an appointment. But eventually officials tell me the problem will cease to be a vaccine shortage problem and will become a communication problem. You know trying to get enough people to show up and use all the vaccines right. And we're hearing. There will be more and more vaccinations slots opening up later as well and and another thing. We learned today. Josh was later this month. There's going to be another max. Vaccination site opening up in seattle At the former centurylink field now known as linfield yes and with that site. They're going to start small in the middle of the month but as soon as enough vaccines are on the way that site will be able to push out twenty one thousand vaccinations per day. They told me yeah. That sounds like a lot of shots. When is that going to be. They wouldn't say for sure. Only the it'll happen as soon as possible. And if you're a senior and you want to be proactive linda. Green at the southeast seattle senior center says give them a call. And they'll help you. You don't even have to be in seattle proper anywhere in king. County is fine and then of course you can also use the washington phase finder website. Which helped at least one senior here today.

Seattle KYW Josh Amac Nickeled Rainier Beach Vaccination Clin Joshua High Roberta Bird Rainier Beach Roberta Southeast Seattle Senior Cente Linda Green Tacoma Josh Linda Washington
Wife of drug kingpin "El Chapo" ordered to stay in U.S. jail

KYW 24 Hour News

01:06 min | Last week

Wife of drug kingpin "El Chapo" ordered to stay in U.S. jail

"Radio Mexican drug kingpin Joaquin Guzman, known as El Chapo, convicted by US jury year and a half ago now his wife is the newest suspect this in the effort Break up. The Sinaloa drug cartel and Emma Cornell was arrested at Dulles International Airport in Virginia on Monday. CBS's character in Heritage reports that the U. S. Officials want to use her to bring more of El Chapo's partners to justice documents charge that Cornell worked with Guzman sons and a witness who is now cooperating with authorities to organize the construction of the underground tunnel. She was clearly exposed to all of the things that chopper was in control of the movement of narcotics across the border into the United States, and obviously the flow of money back. Jack Riley, a retired assistant administrator for the DEA, directly tracked El Chapo for about 20 years, he says Cornell is cooperation could lead to more arrests. Including Guzman's suspected second in command, currently running the scene. A lower cartel's operation. So has been sentenced to life in prison. Back in

El Chapo Kingpin Joaquin Guzman Emma Cornell U. S. Officials Sinaloa Dulles International Airport Guzman CBS Jack Riley Cornell United States Virginia DEA
Welcome to Shondaland

Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

05:19 min | Last week

Welcome to Shondaland

"Tonight. We're talking about shonda rhimes. Who is like she's a total boss. Queen television absolutely all right so first. We'll talk a little bit about shonda. So shonda rhimes was born in chicago. Illinois in january nineteen seventy. She was the youngest of six children. Her mother vero was a college professor and her father. Eilly was a university administrator. And she'd said that she exhibited an early affinity for storytelling early on in her life. She attended marin catholic high school and served as a hospital volunteer which inspired an interest in hospital environments. She majored in english. And film studies at dartmouth college and she graduated in nineteen ninety-one at dartmouth the black underground theatre association. She divided her time between directing and performing in student productions and also writing fiction and after college. She moved to san francisco and worked in advertising but she moved to los angeles a little bit after that to stubby screening at the university of southern california. She was ranked top of her class at usc. And she earned the gary rosenberg writing fellowship. She obtained a master of fine arts degree from the. Us's school of cinematic arts. And while at usc rimes was hired as an intern by debra martin chase who was prominent black producer she also worked at denzel washington's company monday entertainment so after she graduated rimes was actually an unemployed script writer in hollywood and to make ends meet. She worked various jobs including as an office administrator. And then a counselor at a job center during this period rhymes worked as a research director documentary. Hank aaron chasing the dream which won the nineteen ninety-five peabody award. One thousand nine hundred. Eighty eight rhymes made a short film called blossoms. Unveils which starred. Jada pinkett smith and jeffrey rate. This is actually only credit as a film director. So that's nineteen ninety eight short film blossoms unveils new line cinema purchased a feature. Script of hers It ended up not being produced at that time but she received an assignment shortly thereafter to co write the hbo movie introducing dorothy dandridge in nineteen ninety nine which earned numerous awards further star. Halle berry. get out. I didn't realize that she colorado so interesting. Oh wait till you hear the the plethora of things that she's worked on. Oh no after grad school rhymes sold her first screenplay called human seeking same about an older black woman looking for love in the personal ads. And that film wasn't produced. But you have heard of her next project in two thousand and one rhymes wrote the debut film of pop singer. Britney spears the starring zoe saldana and taryn. Manning crossroads everybody. I didn't know that she wrote that. Get out up saying. I feel like it's been really it was really panned by the next but maybe for them. Okay no sometimes. It's it's sometimes you just want a nice story about friendship road trimming going on a road trip and having a nice time and may be hitting up a karaoke joint. Heck yeah and singing. I love rock and roll. That's all i'm saying is that maybe it's for them. I think lauren has actually seen crossroads. I have felt you know. She wrote that and then the next thing that she worked on in two thousand four was the sequel to the princess. Diaries called the princess diaries. Two royal engagement. Get out. yeah. I didn't realize that she was so like a dummy. I just assumed like shonda rhimes right out. The gate was grey's anatomy but apparently she was introduced are obsolete reduce. So she's working on all these film things in two thousand three. She actually wrote her first tv pilot. Abc it was about young female war correspondents but the network. Turn it down. You know what they didn't turn down ask project. So here's where sean hillen comes in sean. Billion is the name of rhymes production company shine million and its logo also referred to the shows that she has produced an also to rimes herself. So when we say shaun d land. It's like interchangeably sean. And her production company. Yeah and like the. Because i do remember like i think it was. Abc or nbc. I forgot what what channel she's on but it was. They were like girl a sorry But it was like thursday nights. Is sean the land. Because it was like it was like back to back to back to back shadowland shows. We'll talk about that. You have a basically they. They tried to rebrand thursdays. Like tgi. T thank goodness thursday because that its native shot in the land. I mean people are gonna watch no matter what they didn't need to need hype it up so The name shawn lane was stylized as capital s shonda capital l. Land one word from two thousand five to two thousand sixteen but since two thousand sixteen is all stylize lower case everything is lower case. It's always very recognizable font so you might often see in print as actually all lower case letters.

Shonda Rhimes University Of Southern Califor Eilly Marin Catholic High School Rimes Black Underground Theatre Asso Gary Rosenberg Debra Martin Chase Jeffrey Rate Shonda Vero Dartmouth College Peabody Award Dartmouth Jada Pinkett Smith Hank Aaron Dorothy Dandridge Illinois Chicago Halle Berry
United grounds Boeing 777 planes after engine explosion

On The Edge With Thayrone

00:46 sec | Last week

United grounds Boeing 777 planes after engine explosion

"Boeing 7 70 sevens with a certain type of engine or grounded for inspections after an engine blew out shortly after takeoff in Denver over the weekend, forcing an emergency landing here in Denver were passengers on that flight. United 3 28 saw the engine known as a Pratt Whitney 4000 failed. The NTSB is investigating the possibility to of the end. It's hollow fan blades played a part. Boeing recommends all planes with this engine be grounded in. The FAA administrator says inspections of the 777 will be increased. What's really incredible is no one in Broomfield, Colorado was hurt. That's the Denver suburb. The plane was over when the explosion happened, Folks there say metal just came raining from the sky boxes. Alicia Konya

Boeing Denver Pratt Whitney Ntsb United FAA Broomfield Colorado Alicia Konya
Investigators trying to figure out what caused United Airlines plane’s engine to explode

Understanding Your World

00:23 sec | Last week

Investigators trying to figure out what caused United Airlines plane’s engine to explode

"Steve Coming. The FAA is ordering new inspections of Boeing 7 77 engines after this weekend's engine failure in a plane flying over Colorado. FAA Administrator Steve Dixon said new or stepped up inspections of some Pratt and Whitney engines will likely result in some planes being removed from service. Ah United flight was heading to Hawaii when it suffered an engine failure shortly after leaving Denver International Airport yesterday. The plane

Steve Coming FAA Steve Dixon Boeing Ah United Flight Pratt Colorado Whitney Hawaii Denver International Airport
Marshfield vaccination site, SE of Boston, reopens after shipment delays, bad weather

WBZ Morning News

00:44 sec | Last week

Marshfield vaccination site, SE of Boston, reopens after shipment delays, bad weather

"Vaccination site site at at the the town's town's fairgrounds fairgrounds back back up up and and running running yesterday yesterday after after shipment shipment delays delays and and some some bad bad weather. weather. WBC's WBC's Mike Mike Macklin Macklin spoke spoke with with town town officials officials about about their their effort. effort. They're They're back back in in business business and and March March field field after after a a vaccine vaccine supply supply shortage. shortage. First First the the vaccination vaccination clinic clinic at at the the town's town's fairgrounds fairgrounds to to shut shut down. down. Town Town administrator administrator Mike Moresco says a shipment of the vaccine arrived on Friday in 2020, half minutes. We filled 1170 slots divided between society and Monday after that, the town hopes to get another vaccine shipment Tuesday or Wednesday. Otherwise, it could be looking at another frustrating shutdown of the vaccine clinic like

WBC Mike Mike Macklin Macklin Town Town Mike Moresco
Weather delays delivery of vaccines to Marshfield mass vaccination site SE of Boston

WBZ Morning News

00:44 sec | Last week

Weather delays delivery of vaccines to Marshfield mass vaccination site SE of Boston

"Vaccination site site at the at town's the town's fairgrounds fairgrounds back back up and up running and running yesterday yesterday after after shipment shipment delays delays and and some some bad bad weather. weather. WBC's WBC's Mike Mike Macklin Macklin spoke spoke with town with officials town officials about about their their effort. effort. They're They're back back in business in business and March and March field field after after a vaccine a vaccine supply supply shortage. shortage. First First the vaccination the vaccination clinic clinic at the town's at the town's fairgrounds fairgrounds to shut to shut down. down. Town Town administrator administrator Mike Mike Moresco Moresco says says a shipment a shipment of the vaccine of the vaccine arrived arrived on on Friday Friday in in 2020, 2020, half half minutes. minutes. We filled We filled 1170 1170 slots slots divided divided between between society society and Monday and Monday after after that, that, the town the town hopes hopes to get to get another another vaccine vaccine shipment shipment Tuesday Tuesday or or Wednesday. Wednesday. Otherwise, Otherwise, it it could could be looking be looking at another at another frustrating frustrating shutdown shutdown of the of vaccine the vaccine clinic clinic like like

WBC Mike Mike Macklin Macklin Town Town Mike Mike Moresco Moresco Society Society
CA school district's board resigns after unknowingly talking about parents in virtual meeting

WGN Programming

02:19 min | Last week

CA school district's board resigns after unknowingly talking about parents in virtual meeting

"School board in California resigns over there. Negative comments about parents during what they thought was a virtual private meeting. News nations. Felicia Boulton joins us from the newsroom. Now, with a look at some of the video that captured that candid conversation Felisha, where debate those board members were caught slamming parents on a meeting that they thought was private. It was public. The video is now drawing backlash from the community. Are we alone? Yeah. If you're gonna call me out, I'm gonna you up party. That's just me. Has happened during the Oakley Union School District War beating last Wednesday. During the conversation, the board's president was heard ridiculing parents who wanted their Children to return to in person learning. Here's more of what was that? They want to pick on as because they want their baby sitters back, right? Evade e totally hear that because My brother had a delivery. Yeah. My brother had a delivery service for medical Maybe one of them clientele. We're parents with their kids in school. Uh, so when you guys well, you got your kids at home. No more fighting no more. Yes, Malala. The letters. Her family's three on the board members issued a statement saying, quote as trustees. We realize it is our responsibility to model the conduct that we expect of our students and staff and it is our obligation to build confidence and district leadership. Comments failed you in both regards, And for this. We offer our sincerest apology. They went on to say Please do not let our failure and judgment cast a shadow on the exceptional work that our teachers Administrators and hardworking employees are doing for the students of this district. They deserve and will need your support as you move forward. The district superintendent says the school board openings will temporarily be filled by members of the county Board of Education, new members will either be elected or appointed. However, that might take some time.

Felicia Boulton Felisha Oakley Union School District Malala California Board Of Education
Biden says he plans to visit Texas and declare major disaster

Michael Berry

00:14 sec | Last week

Biden says he plans to visit Texas and declare major disaster

"Biden made come to Texas next week. But that's not set in stone by and says he's spoken to the FEMA administrator and asked him to speed up the request for dessert. Declaring Master major disaster in Texas, he pointed out. FEMA is already on the ground in Texas, helping residents

Biden Fema Texas
Are Tiny Homes a Solution for COVID Evictions?

Tiny House Lifestyle Podcast

04:51 min | 2 weeks ago

Are Tiny Homes a Solution for COVID Evictions?

"Lindsay would welcome back to the tiny house lifestyle. Podcast thank you eat and it's great to be here. Love love what you do out there. I follow your podcast and listen to it. Often thank you. Yeah and i love what you do Tiny home industry association has just really been moving and shaking in the last year or two. And i know you're really involved with what they do. So thank you for that work as well absolutely. It's been great to connect to all the builders out there and also people that are really passionate about advocating or legalizing tiny house. Yeah so You reached out to me about a month or so ago. And said hey. Have you done a podcast episode about any houses as a solution for covert actions. And i said no about about you so you know. Let's just start there. you know. We're talking on january twenty sixth twenty twenty one You know what. What's the current state of things and You know how how connected to this problem. You in the tiny house movement. Thank you yes so. Of course when i was seeing all the moratorium i feel very housing secure because we have a tiny home. We also have the ability to stay in my parents house every winter when they travel elsewhere so we are in that nomadic reality on that we've got options but for other people on namely a friend of mine out in the east coast is is very much looking daily and trying to figure out his best way to stay in his home for him and his family because he is one of those people where he actually got covid and he's in a situation where his industry just lost a lot of revenue and he wasn't able to make up the rent payments and now he's facing eviction moratorium on evictions are really critical in keeping people in their houses. One of their pieces. You know when it all started. Ls relate okay march of last year. Almost a year into this that you know of course be moratoriums for months will now. We're just in that rolling. You know things are starting to expire in the negative extended and then they expire and then they get extended like right now as this recording. We are january. Twenty six and the cdc is supposed to have the expiration on the thirtieth like. We're talking in a matter date and if you're one of those people that could potentially be evicted without that moratorium or any kind of save cards. You're hoping that gets extended right and naturally something right now. President biden has pushed for but once again does that mean. It's going to come right right. And so i guess i'd never really thought about this like i. I knew that there had been a moratorium on evictions and i kind of assumed that was evictions due to inability to pay rent You know because so many people have lost their sources of income because of the pandemic but does that also apply to for example. Someone living in a tiny house in backyard that gets flagged by zoning administrator like are those different though you know because once again that definitely falls into that realm and i love how much you've covered this you know angle of it lake. Obviously a big reason why the tiny industry association so focused on legalizing around the country. I mean at this moment. I mean a year ago. We didn't during covid time. We had the city of san diego county of santa clara city of san jose and humble county. All amended approve their homes and backyards. Now that's not like any home villages and cottage industry. What we call tiny homes in. That's that's the next frontier but it's at least a step in the right direction for people that want to live legally now. They have so many more options. Of course they've gotta find and connect with a single family home back to this kovin moratorium reality in oh state by state. It's different like state of california has extended would other states. Don't and then they fall to the cdc because now they can go to more of a federal support bananas. Even you know and also heard where landlords are being able to like their ways around it. I mean you know. I have have compassion for the people that have mortgages on their property and the banks aren't really saying sorry. You don't have to pay your mortgage this month because what's going on so we're all connected and yet. It's the renter at the end of the day that gets told to leave.

Tiny Home Industry Association President Biden Lindsay East Coast CDC Santa Clara City Humble County San Diego County San Jose California
NASA's Perseverance rover closes in on Mars

Anna Davlantes

00:31 sec | 2 weeks ago

NASA's Perseverance rover closes in on Mars

"Say all systems are go for their most sophisticated rover perseverance to land on Mars later this week. Associate Administrator Thomas Your book in says this new technology is a game changer. And now we're at the advent, often entirely new phase returning samples and aspirational goal that has bean with the signs community for decades. Perseverance is expected to land on the surface of Mars. This Thursday around three in the afternoon.

Thomas Your
NCAA finalizes COVID-19 safety protocols ahead of basketball tournaments

Mo Egger

02:53 min | 2 weeks ago

NCAA finalizes COVID-19 safety protocols ahead of basketball tournaments

"Tournament format the nc double a. Announced that any team personnel traveling to the tournament and coming into contact with participants which is players coaches staff and administrators must have seven straight days of negative test results before they even traveled to indianapolis. So you're going to have conference tournaments. Which right now are scheduled to end the saturday or sunday before the ncaa tournament begins the ncaa tournament. Against the first four on thursday in the first round starting on friday. If you're trying to steal your team is in the tournament are you can play in the big east tournament. I mean. I know there's still a lot of differences of opinion on cove in nineteen how it should be handled. How it should be mitigated how it should be treated but given what we know about cove in nineteen you tell me what's better knowing that your team has to test negative for seven straight days before they even go to indy. What's better flying to a neutral site playing at a bunch of games consecutively or staying on campus being a bubble like environment and not going anywhere until it's time to leave for the ncaa tournament if you're travis steel. Are you taking your team to new york playing. Who knows how. Many games being in hotels being on a plane or hanging out at going into a bubble quarantining working out on your own mitigating risk. And then going up seventy four indy. I know what i would do. The whole whole seasons being played so we can have. Ncw tournament and it's cool of an event as the big east tournament. Is i would apply the same thing. Here to ohio state. i could use other schools. Kentucky's not gonna the ncaa tournament. Without winning the tournament. You see is not going to the ncaa tournament without winning the as he tournament to me. This question is more about if league. Tournaments happened if conference tournament. Take place and you've got a team that's in. We're good we're in. we don't need you know. Maybe you're playing for seating but that tournament the conference tournament is not going to determine whether or not we're in are you can apply knowing what the rule is. A kid can't play on friday or saturday of the ncaa tournament if he hasn't had seven consecutive days of negative tests. Where are they more likely to pick up over. Nineteen staying on campus being in a bubble quarantining being with just their teammates or jumping on a plane staying in a hotel and playing a bunch of games in consecutive days.

Ncaa Travis Steel NC Indianapolis New York Kentucky Ohio
U.S. Cyber Weapons Were Leaked — And Are Now Being Used Against Us, Reporter Says

Fresh Air

05:34 min | 3 weeks ago

U.S. Cyber Weapons Were Leaked — And Are Now Being Used Against Us, Reporter Says

"The precipice of cyber catastrophe and everything is vulnerable, including our government. Our nuclear power plants. Elections power grid. Hospitals and our cell phones. How we went from having the world's strongest cyber arsenal to becoming so vulnerable to cyber attack is the subject of my guest. Nicole Pearl Roth New book. This is how they tell me. The world ends the cyber weapons arms race. She's a cyber security reporter from The New York Times who has broken many stories. Her book describes how U. S cyber weapons were hacked and used against US. In ways we were unprepared for Lately, she's been covering the latest massive cyber breach in which an adversary assumed to be Russia hacked into federal agencies, private corporations and the U. S infrastructure. Attack was launched in 2019 and went undetected until the fall and what was described in her reporting as among the greatest intelligence failures of modern times. Corporal Roth. Welcome to fresh air. Let's start with the recent massive data breach that was discovered in the fall that is still being investigated, described the extent of it. Well, The biggest problem is, we really don't know the extent of it. We know that it came in through software that's used by some 18,000 agencies. Corporations on guy that actually, they did not hack all 18,000. They sort of picked and chose their targets. But in the United States so far, what we know is That this thing has hit the Department of Homeland Security, the very agency charged with keeping a safe the Treasury, the State Department, the Justice Department, the Department of Energy, some of the nuclear labs, the Centers for Disease Control, and the problem is that they were inside these systems for so long. That the chances are very likely, if not guaranteed that they planted back doors. And so it right now we're just understanding that they were inside for this long. We're still trying to figure out where those back doors are. And that could take months. If not years to get to the bottom of for listeners not familiar with the term backdoors. What are they? Backdoors. They're just code that in this case, we assume Russian hackers planted that just allow them a foothold to come back at another time, and they can be in the network. They could be stealing an administrator's password. They could have planted code in software and another application that lets them come in at a later date. They may have had black start. Which is the program for how the U. S plans to restore power in the event of a catastrophic blackout. So that means if they did hack that that if Russia causes a black and they could also prevent us from restoring the power grid. Um, I don't have that right? Yes. Oh, Originally, when this hack was discovered, one of the bright spots was that they believed that the hackers had not made their way into classified systems. But what I kept hearing from security researchers and people who worked at these agencies was just how much vulnerable data was in outside these classified systems, and one of those things was black starts. So black starts just a very technical document that it's essentially a to do list if we were able to have a major power failure, it says. You know, we're going to go turn on the power here first. Then we're gonna move out over here and do this. And with that document in hand, that could be very valuable for an adversary because it would essentially give them the perfect hit list to make sure that the power stayed off. This story that you're describing about how many places were hacked by by Russia? Um, this is very dangerous. This is this'll leaves us really vulnerable. It shows how vulnerable we are, and they could have done so much more. The story's been reported. You've been reporting on it. Should we be a lot more upset and worried than we are as a nation? Well, one of the things that people have said to sort of caveat the extent of this breaches. Well, you know, this was designed for espionage. It really looks like they were after emails and documents. They weren't looking to exact some kind of sabotage. The problem with that argument is they can use the same exact access they have right now for other purposes, and they have done that again. And Ukraine. Ukraine has sort of been Russian hackers test kitchen for a lot of these attacks. And you know the last time they pulled off a similar attack to this, where they came in through legitimate software. They used it to pull off an attack that essentially decimated all of the data in Ukraine on government networks, but also kept people from taking money out of 80 ends kept people from going to gas stations kept shipments. I'm from reaching their recipients kept paychecks from getting to their recipients and even at one point got into Chernobyl, Theo old nuclear sites radiation monitoring system, So we know what they're capable of with this kind of access. And that is the worst case scenario, but

Nicole Pearl Roth Corporal Roth Russia U. The New York Times Department Of Homeland Securit United States Justice Department Department Of Energy Centers For Disease Control State Department Treasury Ukraine
The Problem with California's Ethnic Studies

People of the Pod

04:53 min | Last month

The Problem with California's Ethnic Studies

"A controversial curriculum for teaching ethnic studies. In california's public schools will face a final vote in march. Since the first draft of the curriculum came out in two thousand nineteen a coalition of jewish organizations including the american jewish committees. California team has worked together to fine tune the content to be more inclusive define anti semitism and avoid perpetuating the stereotypes that put jews endanger here to talk about the debate surrounding the california curriculum. And why it matters to. All of us is rabbi serena. Eisenberg director of ajc northern california serena welcomed people of the pod for having me so exactly. What is california's ethnic studies curriculum. A start back in two thousand sixteen when the california state. Legislators passed a law. Mandating that the state department of education developed a guidance document for the teachers and administrators so they could implement ethnic studies courses and schools and the reason was because in california students of color account for the majority of the population in our public schools. They speak about ninety different languages so the goal was to prepare pupils to be global citizens with an appreciation for the contributions of multiple cultures. Ajc supported that effort. We believe that k. Through twelve students across california should be able to learn the role of ethnicity race and religion in the life of all of the citizens including maybe even especially those groups have been largely left out of other textbooks and so high quality. Ethnic studies courses can help combat bigotry. He'll some of the really difficult. Racial and ethnic divisions we are facing in this country so whereas we support an inclusive and balanced approach to ethnic studies. What some might call multicultural or constructive. Ethnic studies which focuses on the contributions and challenges of a broad array of ethnic cultures. What happened with the california curriculum. Was that state. Department of education appointed a small advisory committee of teachers who are committed to something called critical ethnic studies. The critical studies association was formed in two thousand eleven with a specific goal of radical resistance. It was anti-capitalist anti-imperialist somewhat neo marxist ideology and this group was what guided the development of the very controversial first draft of the curriculum which was released in two thousand and nineteen. What was controversial about that first draft. The first problem was that it lacked balance running through the entire curriculum. The goal was promoting this narrow critical. Ethnic studies ideology the los angeles times. Editorial board wrote that the curriculum talks about critical thinking but usually offers one side and one side. Only it's more about imposing predigested political views on students than about widening their perspectives. That was the los angeles editorial board. So a second problem was that it was an inclusive. We talked about more multicultural approach which looks at the diversity of olive our california population but this curriculum actually left out a lot of groups including sikhs hindus. Korean syrians armenians jewish americans. It had a very small focus on particular groups and because of that. Ajc formed a multi-ethnic coalition with a number of other ethnic groups to ask for a more inclusive curriculum one lack balance to not inclusive. but three. and. I think what was so outrageous. It really contained a lot of offensive material. There are some examples of antisemitic material the material and even more so material that wasn't even included for example a really extensive glossary in a curriculum. That's designed to combat discrimination didn't include a definition of anti-semitism. This was released just after the shooting and powei so the jewish community was particularly eager to see that anti semitism was going to be taught about in an ethics studies curriculum for california. Was there any kind of explanation as to why anti semitism was left out of the first draft. This paradigm of critical ethnic studies sees the world through a lens of people of color and whites oppressed and oppressors and in that paradigm jews are considered to be white and of course we know jews have a complicated identity managers of color. Many jews meese rothley were middle eastern origin huge number of persian jews in california and so unfortunately the curriculum just consider jesus whites and focused only on four groups of people of color that would be african. Americans latinos native americans and asian americans.

California American Jewish Committees Rabbi Serena AJC Critical Studies Association Eisenberg Serena Department Of Education Los Angeles Editorial Board Los Angeles Times Powei Meese Rothley
Clinicians fear NFL's concussion settlement program protocols discriminate against Black players

Nightline

05:46 min | Last month

Clinicians fear NFL's concussion settlement program protocols discriminate against Black players

"Tonight. Just days away for football's biggest night. The abc news investigation shining a different light on the nfl to black former players. Showing the league accusing it of racial discrimination in concussion related settlements revealing stunning allegations in their first tv interview. Here's abc's ryan smith. Stop your yes we all did. This is the morning routine for former. Nfl defensive lineman keven. Henry crippled with pain from his time playing in the league. My wife used a waste meal. Then when i wake up Usually throbbing so she'll she'll massage me for about an hour. Sometimes i stumble war. I made them fall. Henry and his wife pam say life has become a constant struggle marked by depression. Memory loss and bellsa bangor all symptoms associated with dementia related illnesses which henry believes stem from repeated blows to the head. Football doesn't give you an expiration date. You just expire both ankles. Both knees both elbows both rhys. All my fingers been broken. I've had ten concussions or more. I've had lee seventeen surgeries seventeen. And i'm still getting them. Did you feel like you had some sort of impairment from playing football. I'm not myself. i'm not myself. Henry was further devastated after his claim for compensation to the nfl's settlement program was denied it now for the first time on camera with abc news henry and another former player nausea davenport are talking about their lawsuit accusing the nfl of avoiding paying head injury claims based on a formula that discriminates on race that formula assumes that black players started a lower cognitive level than white players. Critics say the practice widely known as race. Norman makes it harder for black players to qualify for compensation the league caused the lawsuit entirely misguided. I just want to be looked at the same way as a white guy. We bust chops together bro. It wasn't white or black team. We lost together. We won together for henry growing up in small town mississippi. The nfl was his ticket to success after attending mississippi state university he was drafted in nineteen ninety-three by the pittsburgh. What was it like the play in the nfl. It was hard man. i ain't even lie. It was easier to get there in the state there. You have to do whatever it takes to stay healthy and still nephew henry in there for the injured ray sales. That's a good clean. Henry played for eight seasons making fourteen career sacks even going on to play in super bowl thirty but at the age of thirty three. The bright lights of the stadium and the roar of the crowds came to an end and like many other former players. Henry struggled in retirement. Battling what he suspected where the long term effects of the concussions. He sustained on the field. I get a lot of headaches every morning. I have a headache is just a number of things. Man that that that A player goes through man after football. Football this is not fun is not fun. Who live by it's horrible. It's just sad to see. Is his breaks my heart. It really does unable to work and concerned about his family's financial future henry and his wife turn to the landmark two thousand thirteen nfl concussion settlement program which paid eligible former nfl players suffering from the lingering effects of multiple head injuries. In two thousand seventeen. Henry went into get a battery of tests to measure as cognitive functioning assessing language learning. And memory this doctor said that he believes there there is something going on and he was gonna turn report in. He was saying in so many words like his life. There is something wrong. A doctor determined that henry was suffering from cognitive decline consistent with mild dementia. And it's part of the process submitted a claim to a settlement administrator. What was the result of the claiming file. I was denied. The administrator rejected. Henry's claim questioning whether his performance on the tests were valid and asserting that the doctor quote used inappropriate norms. Henry's docker did not use that race warming adjustment. we're to function in our daily lives like normal human beings without any disruption and not become conceited. For two years later henry says with health worsening. He went in for another evaluation with a neuropsychologist. This clinician used that. Nfl recommended formula. That took into account among other things. Henry's and this time. The neuropsychologist found that henry didn't qualify at all. Every time the ball snapped is a car crash for me. And there's no white black thing and that they'll hit me less because on black or hard because i'm black. It's the same thing

NFL Henry Lineman Keven Abc News Football Ryan Smith Rhys PAM Dementia ABC Mississippi State University Headaches Nausea Depression LEE Norman Mississippi Pittsburgh
"administrator" Discussed on TechSperience

TechSperience

02:19 min | 2 months ago

"administrator" Discussed on TechSperience

"With that it's a wrap things again guys..

"administrator" Discussed on WEEI

WEEI

02:46 min | 1 year ago

"administrator" Discussed on WEEI

"We don't administrator dot come and live in studio joining us in here for the next hour you know I I always love the talk box and here's a man who is a former boxer a great documentary filmmaker an academy award winning caliber actor and one of the best standup comedians out there a very very funny man and Dan and green thanks for coming down the I mean Dave I would say right now if I had you as my hate me I wouldn't be living in van Nuys the mobile Sherman oaks man thank you so much Dave good to have you ma'am will thank you for having me I mean well you know what I love you you of just finished off a documentary film yes we finally finished about boxing in Philadelphia and went off you get you know back in the day and I don't know if it's the same today but back in the day the wars in the Philadelphia gyms and all the great fighters they get out in the sixties seventies and eighties yeah there's no town like Philly when it comes to buying and you come up with a great documentary yes yes first what I want to thank you because you've kind of follow the journey with me I can honestly really say that for about almost the last year and a half two years and right now we finished the documentary we got the trailer done our PDF file presentation package is done we we entered it in the number of film festivals we what we've submitted it we got accepted into and one of my one of water ready water recognition for the impact doc awards at a little you California and I just got to you I just got into doctors without borders in out of Delaware I just got into that Film Festival and what's the name of the film the film is called the executioners we all had a chance about a these two men in Philadelphia the start of the gym call the executioners to get boys off the street and one of creating one of the most phenomenal Amager danger friend there when yes I did I traded for like two years before I had to move my mother passed but I stayed in touch with the guys because you know being from Philadelphia and so we knew each other we got to touch I wanna boxing outside of Philly I would end and in non Ohio and then you know I just came over it is you know I ran into my old trainer again after years spoke to one phone in you don't actually know you decide to do the documentary all right when we come back when you get into this today okay we're gonna get some boxing you're gonna tell some funny joke I'm a tells a funny joke and I'm not going to charge and I'm going to come up with my top ten heavyweights of all time top ten fun and they're all white dot then yeah I don't know of a duty for the I don't know it was you're looking at one we need some radio message and data rates may apply please don't text while driving if you've been in business more than twenty minutes you've probably printed your logo on all kinds of promotional products we all know logo's work because they're on everything from the top of skyscrapers to the bottom of shoes ever wondered why or how to best use.

dot administrator
"administrator" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

02:46 min | 2 years ago

"administrator" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"Everyday is dependent on space the way, we communicate the way we navigate the way we produce food the way we produce energy the way, we do whether prediction and understand climate the way we do national security and defense the way we do disaster relief banking regulate flows of power on the on the on the the power grid. All of it is dependent on space. And and all of those capabilities are available because of a trail that was blazed by NASA. And and for the very small budget that NASA has we have enabled a a human condition that is far beyond. Anything? Anybody would have imagined agreed completely mass as one of the best invest investments that that citizens make for you know, pennies and dollars relatively speaking. As are a no the weather service and others as well. I have one more question before I do that quick update. Because I know I set to is going to be going up soon. Everything going okay with that. Yeah. We're on. We're on schedule for for ice at two. And and it's a obviously a critically important mission for the United States to understand, you know, the the these sheets of ice in the Arctic that that people are concerned about where are they going and understanding our hydrogen fear, even even better than we already do. Yeah. No. We're looking forward to that. Final question. As I mentioned earlier, I spent twelve years at NASA and one of those years, I actually did a detailed down at NASA headquarters. And so got to look at the agency from that perspective as well. In your time at NASA, so far what has surprised you most about the agency the people there. The culture. I'll tell you the raw intellect. The smart people. There are the raw. And they're like I'm working in an agency where I know that everybody here is smarter than me. And that's a that's a good thing. And and I and not only that, but they're all opinionated. And that's even better. There's there's no shortage of people here who are willing to speak their minds and tell the administrator exactly what they think the administrator needs to hear. And so that's a very positive thing for NASA and for our country. Yeah. That that's the that's it is amazing. You know in the science culture there. You know, we can disagree and challenge each other and tell people how we feel, you know, at the end of the day, we go, and, you know, share drink across or do whatever we do. That's that's what I enjoy about the science culture and particularly NASA administrator brightens now, I really wanna thank you for joining us here on the weather podcast. And we wish you continued success in your current role in for your continued service to this country. We thank you. Thank you, Dr shepherd. I appreciate it. Thank you very much. And that's the way. Geese podcast. Thank you for joining us..

NASA NASA administrator administrator United States Dr shepherd Arctic twelve years
"administrator" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

02:46 min | 2 years ago

"administrator" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"Everyday is dependent on space the way, we communicate the way we navigate the way we produce food the way we produce energy the way, we do whether prediction and understand climate the way we do national security and defense the way we do disaster relief banking regulate flows of power on the on the on the the power grid. All of it is dependent on space. And and all of those capabilities are available because of a trail that was blazed by NASA. And and for the very small budget that NASA has we have enabled a a human condition that is far beyond. Anything? Anybody would have imagined agreed completely mass as one of the best invest investments that that citizens make for you know, pennies and dollars relatively speaking. As are a no the weather service and others as well. I have one more question before I do that quick update. Because I know I set to is going to be going up soon. Everything going okay with that. Yeah. We're on. We're on schedule for for ice at two. And and it's a obviously a critically important mission for the United States to understand, you know, the the these sheets of ice in the Arctic that that people are concerned about where are they going and understanding our hydrogen fear, even even better than we already do. Yeah. No. We're looking forward to that. Final question. As I mentioned earlier, I spent twelve years at NASA and one of those years, I actually did a detailed down at NASA headquarters. And so got to look at the agency from that perspective as well. In your time at NASA, so far what has surprised you most about the agency the people there. The culture. I'll tell you the raw intellect. The smart people. There are the raw. And they're like I'm working in an agency where I know that everybody here is smarter than me. And that's a that's a good thing. And and I and not only that, but they're all opinionated. And that's even better. There's there's no shortage of people here who are willing to speak their minds and tell the administrator exactly what they think the administrator needs to hear. And so that's a very positive thing for NASA and for our country. Yeah. That that's the that's it is amazing. You know in the science culture there. You know, we can disagree and challenge each other and tell people how we feel, you know, at the end of the day, we go, and, you know, share drink across or do whatever we do. That's that's what I enjoy about the science culture and particularly NASA administrator brightens now, I really wanna thank you for joining us here on the weather podcast. And we wish you continued success in your current role in for your continued service to this country. We thank you. Thank you, Dr shepherd. I appreciate it. Thank you very much. And that's the way. Geese podcast. Thank you for joining us..

NASA NASA administrator administrator United States Dr shepherd Arctic twelve years
"administrator" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

04:01 min | 2 years ago

"administrator" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"That that's a that's a good point. Are wh what can you tell our listeners about Nasr's plans for the Mars and the moon? We're going back to Mars anytime soon. We well. We we are we've got a we've got a emission on its way to Mars right now insight, and in fact, we're gonna we're gonna use insight to understand Mars quakes. We're going to try to get a three D image of the interior of Mars. So that we, you know can understand not just whether or not, you know, how active the the geology is. But every time an asteroid impacts Mars. We're going to be able to detect it because. Yeah. So it's going to have a size monitor on there. And we're gonna. Understand that the temperature of Mars deep down. So all of these different instruments are on the insight project, and we're going to be landing insight on Mars thanksgiving, which is going to be a great day for NASA. Yo this is interesting Marshall, there's only one nation on the face of the planet. That's ever landed successfully on Mars one and it's the United States of America. And we've done it seven times. And this will be our eighth time. You think about that achievement? I it really is amazing that that that, you know, think about NASA being created in nineteen fifty eight and here, we are all these years later, sixty years later, and we're still the only country that can land on Mars and do it over and over again, successfully is the point of pride for this country and for the world because NASA through all of its partnerships with international partners and many of these missions are actually in partnership with other countries as well. I think it's NASA still is considered one of the sort of. Crown jewels of American. I know you're you're proud the lead that and I wanna use this last few minutes here to kind of get some big picture thoughts from you fast forward twenty years from now you look back on your time at NASA. What do you hope to accomplish your what do you hope had been accomplished at NASA under your tenure? That's a great question. Well, we wanna make sure we're heading back to the moon that that's happening. We're going to do it in a sustainable way. In other words, we're going to take advantage of reusable systems. We all have seen. What happens when you re re rockets the cost of access to space goes down, the the access to space goes up for more people when I say people, I mean hardware equipment, and we want an entire architecture between earth and the moon to be reusable now is all of that. So so tugs to be reusable between earth orbit and lunar orbit Landers to be reasonable from from from moon orbit. Lunar orbit to the surface of the moon. We want we want all of it to be reasonable. We want it to be replicable at Mars. We want to take advantage of the hundreds of billions of tons of water ice that we now understand is on the surface of the moon. We wanna use use that not only for life support. In other words, human activities on the surface of the moon. But also we want to use it for propulsion hydrogen oxygen is in fact, rocket propulsion. So all of that. Now is that going to happen in my time as the NASA administrator? No, but well, we wanna do is. We want to get that well underway. So that in in in years in, you know, my children will grow up right now there are kids graduating from high school knowing that their entire lives. We've had Americans living and working in space on the international space station. We want to make sure that when my kids kids grow up there growing up in a world where there have been people living and working in orbit around the moon and on the surface of the moon their entire lives. We want that sustainable architecture that uses our international partners, use our commercial partners. That's what we want to develop. And it starts right now with the president space policy directive one, and then the other thing that I hope I can accomplish a lot of America is still not aware of how dependent we are on space every single one of us..

NASA America NASA administrator Nasr United States Marshall Landers president twenty years sixty years
"administrator" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

04:01 min | 2 years ago

"administrator" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"That that's a that's a good point. Are wh what can you tell our listeners about Nasr's plans for the Mars and the moon? We're going back to Mars anytime soon. We well. We we are we've got a we've got a emission on its way to Mars right now insight, and in fact, we're gonna we're gonna use insight to understand Mars quakes. We're going to try to get a three D image of the interior of Mars. So that we, you know can understand not just whether or not, you know, how active the the geology is. But every time an asteroid impacts Mars. We're going to be able to detect it because. Yeah. So it's going to have a size monitor on there. And we're gonna. Understand that the temperature of Mars deep down. So all of these different instruments are on the insight project, and we're going to be landing insight on Mars thanksgiving, which is going to be a great day for NASA. Yo this is interesting Marshall, there's only one nation on the face of the planet. That's ever landed successfully on Mars one and it's the United States of America. And we've done it seven times. And this will be our eighth time. You think about that achievement? I it really is amazing that that that, you know, think about NASA being created in nineteen fifty eight and here, we are all these years later, sixty years later, and we're still the only country that can land on Mars and do it over and over again, successfully is the point of pride for this country and for the world because NASA through all of its partnerships with international partners and many of these missions are actually in partnership with other countries as well. I think it's NASA still is considered one of the sort of. Crown jewels of American. I know you're you're proud the lead that and I wanna use this last few minutes here to kind of get some big picture thoughts from you fast forward twenty years from now you look back on your time at NASA. What do you hope to accomplish your what do you hope had been accomplished at NASA under your tenure? That's a great question. Well, we wanna make sure we're heading back to the moon that that's happening. We're going to do it in a sustainable way. In other words, we're going to take advantage of reusable systems. We all have seen. What happens when you re re rockets the cost of access to space goes down, the the access to space goes up for more people when I say people, I mean hardware equipment, and we want an entire architecture between earth and the moon to be reusable now is all of that. So so tugs to be reusable between earth orbit and lunar orbit Landers to be reasonable from from from moon orbit. Lunar orbit to the surface of the moon. We want we want all of it to be reasonable. We want it to be replicable at Mars. We want to take advantage of the hundreds of billions of tons of water ice that we now understand is on the surface of the moon. We wanna use use that not only for life support. In other words, human activities on the surface of the moon. But also we want to use it for propulsion hydrogen oxygen is in fact, rocket propulsion. So all of that. Now is that going to happen in my time as the NASA administrator? No, but well, we wanna do is. We want to get that well underway. So that in in in years in, you know, my children will grow up right now there are kids graduating from high school knowing that their entire lives. We've had Americans living and working in space on the international space station. We want to make sure that when my kids kids grow up there growing up in a world where there have been people living and working in orbit around the moon and on the surface of the moon their entire lives. We want that sustainable architecture that uses our international partners, use our commercial partners. That's what we want to develop. And it starts right now with the president space policy directive one, and then the other thing that I hope I can accomplish a lot of America is still not aware of how dependent we are on space every single one of us..

NASA America NASA administrator Nasr United States Marshall Landers president twenty years sixty years
"administrator" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

02:29 min | 2 years ago

"administrator" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"And we are back on the weather beaks podcasts with NASA administrator, Jim Breitenstein. We're talking about sort of NASA and his evolution on climate. And so he gave you some perspective on sort of some of the statements. He made for about climate in the past. This gets me to something that you started talking about earlier in the podcast. And you know, after NASA made this very important announcement of the new NASA, astronaut corps, and that's so important. I want to talk a little bit about that. I saw people saying oh Nastase back the space program is back. But I pushed back and said, well, it never went anywhere. We got the, you know, the Parker pro and we've got the GPS satellite. We got. I sat to coming up. What do you think that people just see NASA as the mand program, which is critical, by the way? But why do you think we the citizens just see NASA? And what we do is just the man to program, and yeah, yeah. I think it's because of the drama around it and the. The prestige of it. It just seems to get more more attention. All that being said, you're absolutely right. Nasa has amazing missions going on all the time. In fact, we recently launched I think, you know, when when you. The last time we launched American astronauts from American soil on American rockets was back in twenty eleven and I think when when people remember the space shuttle's, they it's it's it's nostalgic. It people remember how impressive it was. And the all of it. And and I think because that is so emotional. That's that's what people think of when they think of NASA. Right. And of course, people think of Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin landing on the moon, and and the the five moon missions that came after that. So all of those all of those things are what people think about because I think that that that's the most salient piece of NASA. But you're absolutely right nostril does so much more than that. When you think about the science mission directorate, and planetary science and helium physics and earth science. We we do astrophysics deep space exploration. We do all kinds. Of things that aren't necessarily tied to human spaceflight, and the people that the people that follow that. Of course, are the scientists and people that are enthusiastic about exploration. But not it's it doesn't get the drama on national television the way human space. Yeah..

NASA NASA administrator Jim Breitenstein Neil Armstrong Buzz Aldrin
"administrator" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

02:29 min | 2 years ago

"administrator" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"And we are back on the weather beaks podcasts with NASA administrator, Jim Breitenstein. We're talking about sort of NASA and his evolution on climate. And so he gave you some perspective on sort of some of the statements. He made for about climate in the past. This gets me to something that you started talking about earlier in the podcast. And you know, after NASA made this very important announcement of the new NASA, astronaut corps, and that's so important. I want to talk a little bit about that. I saw people saying oh Nastase back the space program is back. But I pushed back and said, well, it never went anywhere. We got the, you know, the Parker pro and we've got the GPS satellite. We got. I sat to coming up. What do you think that people just see NASA as the mand program, which is critical, by the way? But why do you think we the citizens just see NASA? And what we do is just the man to program, and yeah, yeah. I think it's because of the drama around it and the. The prestige of it. It just seems to get more more attention. All that being said, you're absolutely right. Nasa has amazing missions going on all the time. In fact, we recently launched I think, you know, when when you. The last time we launched American astronauts from American soil on American rockets was back in twenty eleven and I think when when people remember the space shuttle's, they it's it's it's nostalgic. It people remember how impressive it was. And the all of it. And and I think because that is so emotional. That's that's what people think of when they think of NASA. Right. And of course, people think of Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin landing on the moon, and and the the five moon missions that came after that. So all of those all of those things are what people think about because I think that that that's the most salient piece of NASA. But you're absolutely right nostril does so much more than that. When you think about the science mission directorate, and planetary science and helium physics and earth science. We we do astrophysics deep space exploration. We do all kinds. Of things that aren't necessarily tied to human spaceflight, and the people that the people that follow that. Of course, are the scientists and people that are enthusiastic about exploration. But not it's it doesn't get the drama on national television the way human space. Yeah..

NASA NASA administrator Jim Breitenstein Neil Armstrong Buzz Aldrin
"administrator" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

03:23 min | 2 years ago

"administrator" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"Here's the other thing that's important to note and Marshall, I'm sure, you know, this like right now in the United States, the average person who lives who lives in Oklahoma. The average person gets thirteen minutes of lead time on a tornado. Right. That's not very much. Yes. Not. And when you think about the fact that that's the average has an improvement from what it used to be. But still probably not enough. That's absolutely not enough, especially if the average is thirteen minutes that means half, the people are getting less than less team that absolutely. And so, you know, you think about the person's getting five or ten minutes of lead time, and maybe they're not they don't have the TV on or they're in a part of Oklahoma where they? Have sirens. You know, the the it it becomes a very serious threat to their lives, and we should be well past that we should be giving people over an hour of lead time based on technology that already exists. We just need to feel it and part of fielding requires us to do these observations system simulation experiments, and so we put that in the Bill as well. Are we what is your home? Sorry. I wanted to pick up before you move on the wooded share thought on some out there in our community and in the social sciences community that say that one hour lead time or too much lead time actually also has its problems too. Because people be maybe let their guard down a bit too much. I'm curious about your thoughts on that. I think that is absolutely wrong. I mean, I can't tell you how wrong the had a, and I'm gonna tell you from personal experience. More lead time is better. We have to understand people are smart, if if people know an hour ahead of time, then they're going to do the right thing. And if they don't do the right thing, at least, it's not because they didn't know. Right. And and and so we have an obligation. To increase that lead time. But you're absolutely right. I heard people tell me when I was a member of congress that we don't want to give people too much lead time because then they might play a video game and not and not move out of the way or might not take cover. And you know, I think that that is that is social experimentation that we don't wanna play we want to give people the information they need and then allow them to make good decisions. Now, if they're not making good decisions, we can do things to increase, you know, their their decision making capacity. If necessary we can warn them as to you know, what the end result is if they don't do the precautions that they're being told that they need to take. But but the last thing we want to do is restrict their information because they're not smart enough to make the right decision while I wanted to just whether geeks of your listeners how many NASA administrators or congressmen have you heard talking about Mexico models and data assimilation and Aussies. Clearly. A NASA administrator in person that understands our community. So it's a pleasure to be to have the administrator on whether geeks. I want to shift back around to the NASA world now and kind of transition because NASA desert sciences, I again, I was a scientist at NASA Goddard Space white center for twelve years was involved in the global precipitation measurement or GPS mission. Would you say about Nasr's role in studying planet earth because there's some that say why is NASA doing that? Why is it? No are USGS doing that. What what's your response to people that say that? So that's in Nastase mission set, and it always has been and it always will be..

NASA Oklahoma NASA administrator NASA Goddard Space white cente United States Marshall USGS Nastase Nasr Bill congress Mexico scientist thirteen minutes twelve years ten minutes one hour
"administrator" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

03:23 min | 2 years ago

"administrator" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"Here's the other thing that's important to note and Marshall, I'm sure, you know, this like right now in the United States, the average person who lives who lives in Oklahoma. The average person gets thirteen minutes of lead time on a tornado. Right. That's not very much. Yes. Not. And when you think about the fact that that's the average has an improvement from what it used to be. But still probably not enough. That's absolutely not enough, especially if the average is thirteen minutes that means half, the people are getting less than less team that absolutely. And so, you know, you think about the person's getting five or ten minutes of lead time, and maybe they're not they don't have the TV on or they're in a part of Oklahoma where they? Have sirens. You know, the the it it becomes a very serious threat to their lives, and we should be well past that we should be giving people over an hour of lead time based on technology that already exists. We just need to feel it and part of fielding requires us to do these observations system simulation experiments, and so we put that in the Bill as well. Are we what is your home? Sorry. I wanted to pick up before you move on the wooded share thought on some out there in our community and in the social sciences community that say that one hour lead time or too much lead time actually also has its problems too. Because people be maybe let their guard down a bit too much. I'm curious about your thoughts on that. I think that is absolutely wrong. I mean, I can't tell you how wrong the had a, and I'm gonna tell you from personal experience. More lead time is better. We have to understand people are smart, if if people know an hour ahead of time, then they're going to do the right thing. And if they don't do the right thing, at least, it's not because they didn't know. Right. And and and so we have an obligation. To increase that lead time. But you're absolutely right. I heard people tell me when I was a member of congress that we don't want to give people too much lead time because then they might play a video game and not and not move out of the way or might not take cover. And you know, I think that that is that is social experimentation that we don't wanna play we want to give people the information they need and then allow them to make good decisions. Now, if they're not making good decisions, we can do things to increase, you know, their their decision making capacity. If necessary we can warn them as to you know, what the end result is if they don't do the precautions that they're being told that they need to take. But but the last thing we want to do is restrict their information because they're not smart enough to make the right decision while I wanted to just whether geeks of your listeners how many NASA administrators or congressmen have you heard talking about Mexico models and data assimilation and Aussies. Clearly. A NASA administrator in person that understands our community. So it's a pleasure to be to have the administrator on whether geeks. I want to shift back around to the NASA world now and kind of transition because NASA desert sciences, I again, I was a scientist at NASA Goddard Space white center for twelve years was involved in the global precipitation measurement or GPS mission. Would you say about Nasr's role in studying planet earth because there's some that say why is NASA doing that? Why is it? No are USGS doing that. What what's your response to people that say that? So that's in Nastase mission set, and it always has been and it always will be..

NASA Oklahoma NASA administrator NASA Goddard Space white cente United States Marshall USGS Nastase Nasr Bill congress Mexico scientist thirteen minutes twelve years ten minutes one hour
"administrator" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

02:21 min | 2 years ago

"administrator" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"And we are back on the weather. Geeks podcast. I'm Dr Marshall shepherd from the university of Georgia. And I have the pleasure to be joined by the NASA administrator, Jim Breitenstein, I wanna now this is weather geeks. This is a show powered by the Weather Channel. And we're let's talk a little weather. You many people may not realize this. But you were one of the most significant figures behind the weather research and forecasting innovation act along with colleagues. Why was weather so important to you that you push forward? One of the most significant pieces of major legislation and weather in the history of the country Marshall, I just want to say this. You're an amazing PR guy. We need to hire you, and I need to have you go everywhere I used to work there. But I'm quite happy in university world. But you know, I give credit where credit is due. And I'll I'll I'll poke and criticize where it is the duty as well. But this was a signal. I was the president Jim of the American meteorological society AM in two thousand thirteen. So there you go much involved in some of the as this was coming about. So I know it's difficult. So why why why was it so important you so I I was representing the first district of Oklahoma, which is Tulsa, Oklahoma. And every year, I was in congress. I had constituents that got killed in tornadoes every year except for one year, and in two thousand thirteen there was a a massive tornado in Moore, Oklahoma, which is not in my district, but not too far from my district and that tornado hit a school and it killed twenty one people, and it devastated, you know, lives are gonna forever be changed and not for the good because of that horrible horrible event. And I resolved at that point to try to figure out how do we move to a day where we? Have zero deaths from tornadoes in the United States of America. We have the technology. If you think about the airplanes, I used to fly we have in the nose of those airplanes, we have something called a phased array radar where we detect and track and eventually target aircraft on the horizon, a classified number of miles away. And then, you know, you take that same technology in the nose of an airplane, and you put it in you put it to work on a cloud. And so instead of detecting and tracking tiny little targets on the horizon, namely airplanes. Now, you detect and track.

Dr Marshall shepherd Oklahoma Jim Breitenstein NASA administrator university of Georgia congress United States Tulsa president Moore America one year
"administrator" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

02:21 min | 2 years ago

"administrator" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"And we are back on the weather. Geeks podcast. I'm Dr Marshall shepherd from the university of Georgia. And I have the pleasure to be joined by the NASA administrator, Jim Breitenstein, I wanna now this is weather geeks. This is a show powered by the Weather Channel. And we're let's talk a little weather. You many people may not realize this. But you were one of the most significant figures behind the weather research and forecasting innovation act along with colleagues. Why was weather so important to you that you push forward? One of the most significant pieces of major legislation and weather in the history of the country Marshall, I just want to say this. You're an amazing PR guy. We need to hire you, and I need to have you go everywhere I used to work there. But I'm quite happy in university world. But you know, I give credit where credit is due. And I'll I'll I'll poke and criticize where it is the duty as well. But this was a signal. I was the president Jim of the American meteorological society AM in two thousand thirteen. So there you go much involved in some of the as this was coming about. So I know it's difficult. So why why why was it so important you so I I was representing the first district of Oklahoma, which is Tulsa, Oklahoma. And every year, I was in congress. I had constituents that got killed in tornadoes every year except for one year, and in two thousand thirteen there was a a massive tornado in Moore, Oklahoma, which is not in my district, but not too far from my district and that tornado hit a school and it killed twenty one people, and it devastated, you know, lives are gonna forever be changed and not for the good because of that horrible horrible event. And I resolved at that point to try to figure out how do we move to a day where we? Have zero deaths from tornadoes in the United States of America. We have the technology. If you think about the airplanes, I used to fly we have in the nose of those airplanes, we have something called a phased array radar where we detect and track and eventually target aircraft on the horizon, a classified number of miles away. And then, you know, you take that same technology in the nose of an airplane, and you put it in you put it to work on a cloud. And so instead of detecting and tracking tiny little targets on the horizon, namely airplanes. Now, you detect and track.

Dr Marshall shepherd Oklahoma Jim Breitenstein NASA administrator university of Georgia congress United States Tulsa president Moore America one year
"administrator" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

02:40 min | 2 years ago

"administrator" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"The way we do whether prediction and understand climate the way we do national security and defense the way we do disaster relief banking regulate flows of power on the on the on the the power grid, all of it is dependent on space and and all of those capabilities are available because of a trail that was blazed by NASA and and for the very small budget that NASA has, we have enabled a a human condition that is far beyond. Anything anybody would have imagined agreed completely mass as one of the best invest investments that that citizens make for, you know, pennies dollars relatively speaking as are a no in the weather service and others as well. I have one more question before I do that quick update because I know I sat to is going to be going up soon. Everything going. Okay with that. Yeah, we're on. We're on schedule for for ice at two, and and it's a obviously a critically important mission for the United States to understand, you know, the the these sheets of ice in the Arctic that that people are concerned about, where are they going and understanding our hydrogen fear even even better than we already do. Yeah. No, we're looking for the final question. As I mentioned earlier, I spent twelve years at NASA and one of those years I actually did a detailed down at NASA headquarters. Gotta look at the agency from that perspective as well in your time at NASA so far, what has the prized you most about the agency? The people. They're the culture. I'll tell you the raw intellect, the smart people. There are the raw, like I'm working at an agency where I know that everybody here is smarter than me, and that's a, that's a good thing and and and and not only that, but they're all opinionated. And that's even better. There's there's no shortage of people here who are willing to speak their minds until the administrator exactly what they think the administrator needs to hear. And so that's a very positive thing for NASA and for our country. Yeah, that's the it is amazing. You know, in the science culture there, you know we can disagree and challenge each other and tell people how we feel, you know, at the end of the day we go and you know, shared drink across or do whatever we do. That's what I enjoy about the science culture. And particularly NASA administrator brightens. Now I really wanna thank you for joining us here on the weather podcast, and we wish you continued success in your current role in for your continued service. To this country. We thank you. Thank you, Dr. Separate I presented thank you very much, and that's the weather geese podcast. Thank you for joining us.

NASA NASA administrator administrator United States Dr. Separate Arctic twelve years
"administrator" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

04:08 min | 2 years ago

"administrator" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"Yeah, that's, that's a good point. Are wh-what can you tell our listeners about Nasr's plans for the Mars and the moon? We're going back to Mars. Anytime soon we well, we we are. We've got a, we've got a a mission on its way to Mars right now insight. And in fact, we're gonna we're gonna use insight to understand Mars quakes. We're gonna try to get a three d. image of the interior of Mars so that we, you know, can understand not just whether or not you know how active the the geology is, but every time an asteroid impacts Mars, we're going to be able to detect it because yeah, so it's gonna have a size Mamata on there and. We're gonna understand that the temperature of Mars deep down. So all of these different instruments are on the insight project, and we're going to be landing insight on Mars thanksgiving, which is going to be a great day for NASA. This is interesting Marshall. There's only one nation on the face of the planet that's ever landed successfully on Mars one. And it's the United States of America, and we've done it seven times and this will be our eighth time you think about that achievement. I, it really is amazing that that that you know thing about NASA being created in nineteen fifty eight. And here we are all these years later sixty years later, and we're still the only country that can land on Mars and do it over and over again successfully is the point of pride for this country and for the world because NASA through all of its partnerships with international partners and many of these missions are actually in partnership with the other countries as well. I think it's NASA still is considered one of the. Sort of crown jewels of American. I know you're, you're proud, the lead that and I wanna use this last few minutes here to kind of get some big picture thoughts from you fast forward, twenty years from now, you look back on your time at NASA. What do you hope to accomplish? What? What do you hope had been accomplished at NASA under your tenure? That's a great question. Well, we wanna make sure we're heading back to the moon. I mean that that's happening. We're going to do it in a sustainable way. In other words, we're going to take advantage of reusable systems. We all have seen what happens when you re reuse rockets. The cost of access to space goes down the the access to space goes up for more people. When I say people, I mean hardware equipment and we want an entire architecture between earth and the moon to be reusable. Now, all of that. So so tugs to be reusable between earth orbit and lunar orbit Landers to be reasonable from from from moon. Orbit lunar orbit to the surface, the moon, we want, we want all of it to be reusable. We want it to be replicable Mars. We wanna take advantage of the hundreds of billions of tons of water ice that we now understand is on the surface of the moon. We wanna use use that not only for life support in other words, human activities on the surface of the moon. But also we want to use it for propulsion. Hydrogen and oxygen is in fact rocket propulsion. So all of that now is that going to happen in my time as the NASA administrator? No, but we want to do is we want to get that well underway so that in in in years in, you know, my children will grow up right now. There are kids graduating from high school knowing that their entire lives. We've had Americans living and working in space on the international space station. We wanna make sure that when my kids kids grow up there growing up in a world where there have been people living and working in orbit around the moon and on the surface of the moon. There. Tire lives. We want that sustainable architecture that uses our international partners use our commercial partners. That's what we want to develop. And it starts right now with the president space policy, directive one. And then the other thing that I hope I can accomplish a lot of America is still not aware of how dependent we are on space. Every single one of us everyday is dependent on space. The way we communicate the way we navigate the way we produce food the way we produce energy..

NASA America NASA administrator Nasr United States Mamata Marshall Landers president twenty years sixty years
"administrator" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

02:49 min | 2 years ago

"administrator" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"I'm still part of the NASA family in some ways masses willing to take those risks on a new radar that can measure thunderstorms in a hurricane or send a probe to the fun and and that that really is a little bit different than an operational mission. And I wanna I wanna pause here for one moment. And we are back on the weather spot cast with NASA administrator, Jim, Brian Stein. We're talking about sort of NASA and his evolution on climate, and he gave you some perspective on sort of some of the statements he made for about climate in the past. This gets me to something that you started talking about earlier in the podcast, and you know after NASA made this very important announcement of the new NASA astronaut corps, and that's so important. I want to talk a little bit about that. I saw people saying, oh, Nasr's back the space program is back, but I pushed back and said, well, it never went anywhere. We've got, you know, the Parker pro. We've got the GPS satellite got I set to coming up. What do you think that people just see NASA as the mand program, which is critical by the way? But why do you think we the citizens just see NASA and what we do is just the man to program. And yeah, yeah, I think it's because of the the drama around it and the. The prestige of it, it just seems to get more more attention. All that being said, you're absolutely right. NASA has amazing missions going on all the time. In fact, we recently launched, I think, you know when when you. The last time we launched American astronauts from American soil on American rockets was back in twenty eleven. And I think when when people remember the space shuttle's, they, it's, it's, it's nostalgic it people remember how impressive it was and the author of it and and I think because that is so emotional, that's, that's what people think of when they think of NASA. Right. And of course, people think of Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin landing on the moon and and the the five moon missions that came after that. So all of those all of those things are what people think about. Because I think that that that's the most salient piece of NASA, but you're absolutely right now does so much more than that when you think about the science mission directorate and planetary science and helium, physics and earth science, we, we do astrophysics deep space exploration. We do all. Kinds of things that aren't necessarily tied to human spaceflight and the people that the people that follow that, of course, the scientists and people that are enthusiastic about exploration, but not it doesn't get the drama on national television, the way human space..

NASA NASA administrator Brian Stein Nasr Neil Armstrong Buzz Aldrin Jim
"administrator" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

03:50 min | 2 years ago

"administrator" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"I'm sure you know this like right now in the United States, the average person who lives who lives in Oklahoma, the average person gets thirteen minutes of lead time on a tornado, right? That's not very much. Yes, not. And when you think about the fact that that's the average and has an improvement from what it used to be, but still probably not enough. It's absolutely not enough, especially if the average thirteen minutes that means half the people are getting less than less team that absolutely. And so you know, you think about the person's getting five or ten minutes of lead time and maybe they're not. They don't have the TV on or they're in a part of Oklahoma where they don't have sirens, you know the the, it, it, it becomes a very serious threat to their lives, and we should be well past that we should be giving. People over an hour of lead time based on technology that already exists. We just need to feel it. And part of fielding requires us to do these observations system simulation experiments. And so we put that in the Bill as well. What are we? What is your home? Sorry, I wanted to pick up for you. Move on the woods, your thought on some out there in our community and in the social sciences community that say that one hour lead time or too much lead time actually also has its problems too, because people be maybe let their guard down a bit too much. I'm curious about your thoughts on that. I think that is absolutely wrong. I mean, I can't tell you how wrong that hit. I'm gonna tell you from personal experience, more lead time is better. We have to understand people are smart. If people know an hour ahead of time, then they're going to do the right thing. And if they don't do the right thing, at least it's not because they didn't know. Right. And and and so we have an obligation to increase lead time, but you're absolutely right. I heard people tell me when I was a member of congress that we don't want to give people too much lead time because then they might play a video. Game and not and not move out of the way or might not take cover. And you know, I think that that is that is social experimentation that we don't wanna play. We want to give people the information they need and then allow them to make good decisions. Now, if they're not making good decisions, we can do things to increase, you know, their their decision making capacity if necessary. We can warn them as to, you know what the end result is. If they don't do the precautions that they're being told that they need to take. But but the last thing we want to do is restrict their information because they're not smart enough to make the right decision. While I wanted to just whether geeks of your listeners, how many NASA administrators, congressman. Have you heard talking about Mexico models and data assimilation and Aussie's clearly a NASA administrator in person and understands our community. So it's a pleasure to be to have the administrator on whether geeks I want to shift back around to the NASA wh. World now and kind of transition because NASA desert sciences. I again, I was a scientist at NASA Goddard Space Flight center for twelve years involved in the global precipitation measurement or GPS mission. What would you say about Nasr's role in studying planet earth? Because there's some that say, will wise NASA doing that? Why is it? No. Are US GS doing that? What? What's your response to people that say that? So that's in Nasr's mission set, and it always has been and always will be. I mean, there's still so much. We don't know about our own planet and it's changing all the time. You know when I was a member of the house representatives. You're right. Some people suggested that I was a climate denier I, I heard that and and you know, all that stems from speech that I gave back in, oh, it was two thousand thirteen. In fact, it was after the Moore tornado, I, I had all these folks Twenty-one. Kids get killed in a tornado in Moore, Okla. Homa not just kids..

NASA Oklahoma NASA administrator Nasr NASA Goddard Space Flight cent United States Moore Bill congress congressman Mexico scientist thirteen minutes twelve years ten minutes one hour
"administrator" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

04:09 min | 2 years ago

"administrator" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"We're excited to welcome Yuli confirm NASA administrator, Jim Breitenstein, Jim hails from Tulsa Oklahoma, where he became all too familiar with extreme weather. So he understands the importance of improving our forecast capabilities will discuss the major piece of legislation. He helped past port expansion of weather research and forecasting. Plus we'll hear about the Evelyn of his on climate change and how the work at NASA can further our understanding of its impact. If that's not enough, we'll also get Jim dots on the future space exploration could include a visit to Mars. It's all next on the weather Deeks podcast. I'm Dr Marshall shepherd from the university of Georgia. Thank you for joining us. Well, thank you for having me. It's good to be here. I want to jump right in with some science because NASA just launched a. Really interesting mission. The types the sun. Why is that important? And why? Why should all Americans be excited about that? And why is it important for us as citizens? That's a great question, and it's an important one. And a lot of people don't realize just in fact how important it is. So when you think about the sun, the sun actually creates what we call solar wind. So the sun is actually very responsible for what we call space weather. And of course, people are familiar with solar flares. Some people are maybe not so familiar with what's called a coronal mass ejection. So what happens is inside the sun, you know, it's, it's a nuclear fusion going on inside the sun hydrogen fusion, and from that charged particles are released. And of course, in some cases, they're released in the form of a solar flare, which means you got charged particles moving at a at a high rate of speed and another cases you can have. It's called a coronal mass ejection, which means there's a whole lot of charged particles moving at, you know, at a very, very rapid speed, almost the speed of light if you will. And so in this particular case, what happens is the the, the, the solar radiation, the radiation that comes from the sun can be very damaging not only to humans and other words astronauts that could be in deep, split deep space or could be on the international space station and lower orbit, but also very damaging for our our satellites. So when you think about how important the satellites are to to to to us as a civilization, the way we predict whether the way we understand climate the way we do disaster relief and national security, the way we do communications, we've got, you know, an entire architecture in geostationary orbit for over the horizon communications. Fact, many of your viewers might be listening to this on a on a podcast. They might download it on the internet. They could have internet from space. They could be getting it. You know, from from that architecture for communications in in geostationary orbit, the way we do navigation. When you think about GPS and how important that GPS timing signal is all of these satellites and that that GPS timing signals important for banking, it's important for regulating flows on the power grid and a whole host of other infrastructure, critical pieces of infrastructure for the United States and for the world. So all of these things are dependent on space, and when we have a coronal mass ejection, those things all be, they can all be put at risk. In fact, they could ultimately go away. They could be permanently damaged. And of course it's not just that. But you know if the lights go out on earth or our cell phones, quit working things get really ugly, really quickly as. Ashley, if they don't come back very fast. So what the what Parker solar probe is doing. It's going to help us understand how the sun works so that we can better predict those solar flares and those coronal mass ojection ze. Yeah, this is important stuff. When you hear the term space weather when I often mentioned it to people, I think they think, oh, a thunderstorm on Mars or something..

Jim NASA Dr Marshall shepherd NASA administrator Jim dots Tulsa Oklahoma Jim Breitenstein United States Ashley university of Georgia