6 Burst results for "addison research"

"addison research" Discussed on Podcasting Essentials

Podcasting Essentials

01:55 min | 4 months ago

"addison research" Discussed on Podcasting Essentials

"Has had a huge impact on the white. We've worked and leave the more than a year. The what has it meant for audience. Consumption habits frances. We speak to larry rosen. President edison research about the results from the infinite doll twenty twenty one australia survey and he explained how podcasting fade over a very unexpected last twelve months come. There's this old expression takes thirty days to make a habit of these new behaviors. Were well over a year into and so those are well developed habits at this point. It's not just this temporary thing. So new habits have been formed and unformed them reverting to the lives. We lead in two thousand nine hundred. I think is extremely unlikely. I'm nick sure. Burger managing director of audio agency sound cartel. And this is podcasting essentials. Welcome to episode seven of season five and joining me. He's producer and co host nicole goodman. Hello there nick. Good to be back for another episode now as we get into the interview with larry. It's worth reminded that along with triton digital and commercial radio australia. This is the fifth year that the infantile australia survey has been produced by. Addison research yes. It really has become a trusted and go to reference for our industry. It's such a comprehensive study of digital media behavior tracking developments across online audio radio income or your streaming services smart speakers and of course podcasting and for a snapshot of where australia podcasting is at. We can actually pull out a few stats. that show podcasting has thrived during the pandemic isn't really deed. Put casting awareness jumped to ninety one percent here in australia ahead of the us which increased idei percent it really is still anomaly in the stats where strategy leads the us although keep in mind that eighty percent in the us is a.

nicole goodman larry rosen eighty percent ninety one percent thirty days fifth year two thousand nine hundred more than a year nick larry Addison australia frances President Burger triton digital over a year episode seven twenty one infinite doll
"addison research" Discussed on A Biography Podcast - Life Histories of Successful People

A Biography Podcast - Life Histories of Successful People

08:18 min | 7 months ago

"addison research" Discussed on A Biography Podcast - Life Histories of Successful People

"Incident we can beckham's unimaginable. Amount of knowledge will power and fame and change the course of history. Rabidly don started ordered. They will welcome the is. What can you learn from the lead stories. Get antics to always ripping cushions by listening to this podcast. So it's now get access to future episodes. Alexandra gonna humble was made it the only person not the first person to come up with the idea of the telephone halwa. He was the first person to solve the problem of converting sewn into a variable electric current and the transmitter and converting the same variable electric into song at the receiver the experiments he conducted on the phone autograph and electrical induction. Help him formulate a deary. According to his theory magnetized that they bleed. You should produce a variable electric current at the plant. This electric current could then be transmitted through a wire to receiver at the receiver and electromagnetic would the incoming military current into pulses that would vibrate a diaphragm and produce zone. That's alexander graham bell. Had it all planned doping theory hallway. He had no knowledge of electricity. So he hired. Thomas watson and expert electrical se not a mechanic to help him build mission on june second. Eighteen seventy five alexander and watson. We're doing an experiment could transmit multiple telegraph messages over a single telegraph where they had built threes transmitters and receivers in different rooms for this purpose when watson plugged read because it was stuck to an electromagnet. The read started vibrating. This version was converted into an electrical which reached the electromagnet in alexander's room. That vibrated the read attached to it this reproduced original sound which was made when watson plugged so alexander able to hear the reproduced sound in another now. Alexander was sure that he's idea would walk so he rushed to the patent office and applied for a patent. the patent was titled improvements integral alexander. Graham bell the patent on march seventeenth. Eighteenth seventy six. It will go on to become the most profitable payton in the history of invention. Meanwhile alexander watson built telephone with the transmitter and receiver in two different rooms. The transmitter even had a mopus onto which alexander could speak three days after the patent was issued alexander tested. The telephone had built. He said the words mr watson. Come here i want to see you through. The telephone watson who was in another room could hear it very clearly. That's on march eighteen. Seventy six alexander created the first working telephone over the next few months alexander and watson improve upon invention the tested by increasing the distance between the transmitter and receiver to several miles until the telephone had only worked a one way communication so they built a transmitter receiver at both end to make communication possible the distant the first two way communication with the telephone on october ninth eighteen seventy after distinct. Two communication alexander played to sell the patent for the phone to western union for one hundred thousand dollars. The western union was a company that ruled the telegraph market in the usa. So alexander graham bell taught that you could make a huge sum of money by selling it to western union howa the president of the western union that the telephone was only a kid's toy that nobody would want so he did not the patent two years later. The telephone became such a valuable invention that the western union couldn't have bought the patent even if they had offered twenty five million dollars in just two years. The monetary value of the patent for the telephone had risen by more than two hundred and fifty times falling the successfully mentioned on the telephone alexander father in law gardiner greene hubbard helping him. In establishing the bell telephone company in eighteen seventy seven after a series of mergers. It became the american telephone and telegraph company. Which is known as yeti in short even alexander had invented the first working telephone. He wasn't the first one or the only one to concede the ideals so the bill company has hundreds of court cases that challenge patents but alexander had a habit of writing letters to his father consistently in these letters. He had explained the concept that even today led to the invention of the telephone. This let us pulled that. Alexandra had indeed come up to the contracts himself and help the company. Defend its patents. After founding the bill telephone company in eighteen seventy seven married mabel together. They had four children daughters and two sons in the months that followed alexander made public demonstrations to introduced telephone to the public duty. His efforts the telephone became a widely used gadget in the usa but the eighteen eighty six hundred and fifty thousand people in the usa had telephoned. The telephone is a very important in mentioned in his. So it earned alexander several awards big prize money but alexander. Graham bell was a man of varied interests. So he's joni. Scientists did not end the as he continued to invent other devices in eighteen eighty alexander and his assistant in winter. The photo phone. The phone is wireless telephone. That could send human voice over. The beam of light would become the forerunner to the fiber optic communication that would become famous one hundred years later. Alexander also invented include russian of a metal detector on september twenty eight hundred. Seventy seven after watching the seagull. Flying alexander decided to build a flying mission so he drew a sketch of a flying mission in eighteen ninety one. He started to build a flying machine from the sketch. He conducted several hundreds of experiments. Most of which failed in the eighteen ninety s while conducting experiments on aviation alexander predicted that the problem of aviation would be solved within ten years. Just like here predicted. The right does made the first successful flight in one thousand nine hundred a few years later in one thousand nine hundred seven alexander formed the aerial experiment association at the insistence of his wife. He hired young men to help him since he was already sixty years together. The convicted more than thousand two hundred experiments over several decades. In one of these three months they even used gunpowder for propulsion. The plans to build a tude several feeds like winning the scientific american profit for flying over a kilometer to a total flying distance of more than thousand miles and making the first light in canada. Moreover alexander also contributed to addison research by providing funds to yale experiment association due to his obvious contributions to the world. The world is alexandra. Humble a curious inventor and the successful scientists however he saw himself as a peter about everything else after all what is modern wife the two most important menace life so he wanted to make the world a better place this therefore he improved upon his father system physical speech to reach the best doc. He also dismissed. The idea of death pitches topping the list because he believed that only people who are native mute not deaf could understand visible speech perfectly and teach it to the alexander. Graham bell also genitals contributions to the zabi throat. His life in eighteen eighty. Someone alexander met the famous death mutant blind goal. Helen keller humane a friendship with the killers for the next thirty years and he created a fund for education. Helen's father brought her alexander if he was alexandra. Helen keller to the puck institute for the blind institute sent and even repeat helen. Keller and sullivan completely transformed helen. Keller slave if you want to listen to helen. Keller biography episode of our podcast alexander's life. Literally benefited the same difficulty has elicited death community on august. Second nineteen twenty.

march seventeenth one hundred thousand dollars canada sixty years sullivan october ninth eighteen seventy twenty five million dollars march eighteen Helen Keller four children Alexander two sons Thomas watson august Alexandra more than thousand miles helen ten years more than two hundred and fift
"addison research" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:01 min | 1 year ago

"addison research" Discussed on KQED Radio

"15th of October. Good as always, to have you along everybody a lot of big numbers with which to begin the program today. And then a much much smaller number. And arguably, it's the smaller one. That is more of a problem. One is definitive about the political machinations surrounding the American economy. Right now, those negotiations over a relief bill one is definitive at one's peril, but we seem to have arrived today at the proverbial line in the sand. By way of refresher Speaker Nancy Pelosi and House Democrats want to spend $2.2 Trillion on relief bill, the White House, the president, United States and Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin. They say they're good with $1.8 trillion Senate Republican leader Mitch McConnell today in Kentucky, though, said this You're correct. There were discussions going on 20 days turned in the speaker about higher amount. That's not what I'm goingto McConnell is going to put on the floor, he said. A $500 billion package that'll be next week sometime. So those are the big numbers. The smaller number is $250 just to 50 no extra zeros. And it's one of the key data points from the latest edition of the Marketplace Edison Research poll. We're going to be digging into it. For the next couple of days and today as well. But the upshot is that all is not well. Once you get past the economic headlines, one of the questions we asked people was, if you had an unexpected expense of $250.250 bucks. Would you be able to pay it 47% of people? Almost half of Americans? Said. It would be somewhat or very difficult to come up with that kind of cash. Since the pandemic. It's been We haven't really had much expendable income. That's Ashley's ENTs. She's 27. She's a first grade teacher in Monterey, California At the beginning of the pandemic, my boyfriend was laid off from his cooking job, and so Now it's kind of just My Salary and then the little bit of benefits that he gets, which covers you know, like rent food, but only barely like there's there's not much else. One reason why there's not much else. Those expanded unemployment benefits the extra $600 a week we told you so much about They ran out almost three months ago. She also negotiations over those big numbers that we started with. When he had the federal benefits. At least we had, like a little bit of wiggle room where it was like, Okay, if something happened, it wouldn't be like the end of the world right then. But now that that's gone, that's also kind of not there anymore actually sense one of the respondents to the 10th edition of the Marketplace Edison Research poll out as I think I've said Today. We threw some new questions in the poll this time cause pandemic and some of those questions were about kids and parents and working and school in from home. Those are among the biggest challenge is millions of people in this economy you're facing And his marketplaces Megan McCarty, Karina reports. It is mostly women who are facing it. Normally Emily Smith supplements or job as an heirloom vegetable farmer in Ohio with a part time winter job, But this year, she's got a lot going on at home. Her nine year old son is doing on again. Off again. Remote school It changes week by week, according to infection rates in our county, I have to be here. He's not really old enough for me to, you know, go anywhere. One time while he was in class. She left to run a quick errand down the street. I come wrong and it's like, he said in front of the TV with his computer right of them like no. Smith's husband works full time outside the home, so she's in charge of school time. Our marketplace, Addison Research poll found a stark gender disparity in who's primarily responsible for supervising remote learning. 63% of mothers said they were compared with just 28% of father's thes. Disparities have kind of already been there, but they're really getting exaggerated by how the pandemic has kind of taken away. A lot of the scaffolding that makes working families tick. Darby Saxby directs the center for the changing family at USC, she says before the pandemic, women in heterosexual dual income households were already doing Mohr Household labor, despite the fact that Dad's have tripled the amount of time they spent taking care of kids over the last 50 years. Now, with childcare hard to find an extracurriculars cancelled its mothers who are mostly picking up the slack. You know, women are generally socialized to kind of be more the managers of their kids development and education. In our poll, roughly equal shares of men and women did say they had made career sacrifices to care for family during the pandemic. Or had cut hours at work to deal with remote school like vain Young in Philadelphia, who's juggling his job with studying for his B A and helping his five kids at home. It's definitely taking away from anything else that I would have otherwise done, and that type otherwise would be consumed either with my career. Or my own education, Dan Karlsson at the University of Utah has found. While Mom's are more likely to be in charge of remote schooling, dads have stepped up to take a more equal share of routine housework and child care during the pandemic of men hadn't stepped up the way they did, it would have been even worse. So it was not enough to stem the tide. You know, it's like a finger in the dam. The latest jobs report from the federal government found more than 800,000 women had dropped out of the labor Force four times more than men. I'm Megan McCarty, Carino for Marketplace. On Wall Street today. I guess the deal is traders are OK with no relief bill, Or maybe they're just looking.

Megan McCarty Edison Research Emily Smith Mitch McConnell goingto McConnell Nancy Pelosi Senate federal government United States Kentucky Dan Karlsson Addison Research Monterey Ashley White House California first grade teacher Steve Mnuchin Darby Saxby
"addison research" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:54 min | 1 year ago

"addison research" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Off again. Remote school It changes week by week, according to infection rates in our county, I have to be here. He's not really old enough for me to, you know, go anywhere. One time while he was in class. She left to run a quick errand down the street. I come home, and it's like, he said in front of the TV with his computer right of them like no. Smith's husband works full time outside the home, so she's in charge of school time. Our marketplace, Addison Research poll found a stark gender disparity in who's primarily responsible for supervising remote learning. 63% of mothers said they were compared with just 28% of father's thes. Disparities have kind of already been there, but they're really getting exaggerated by how the pandemic has kind of taken away. A lot of the scaffolding that makes working families tick. Darby Saxby directs the center for the changing family at USC, she says before the pandemic, women in heterosexual dual income households were already doing Mohr Household labor, despite the fact that Dad's have tripled the amount of time they spent taking care of kids over the last 50 years. Now, with childcare hard to find an extracurriculars cancelled its mothers who are mostly picking up the slack. You know, women are generally socialized to kind of be more the managers of of their kids development and education. In our poll, roughly equal shares of men and women did say they had made career sacrifices to care for family during the pandemic. Or had cut hours at work to deal with remote school like vain. Young in Philadelphia, who's juggling his it job with studying for his B A and helping his five kids at home. It's definitely taken away from you. Anything else that I would have otherwise done, and that time otherwise would be consumed either with my career or my own education, Dan Karlsson at the University of Utah has found. While Mom's are more likely to be in charge of remote schooling, dads have stepped up to take a more equal share of routine housework and child care during the pandemic. If men hadn't stepped up the way they did, it would have been even worse, so it was not enough to stem the tide. You know, it's like a finger in the dam. The latest jobs report from the federal government found more than 800,000 women had dropped out of the labor Force four times more than men. I'm Megan McCarty, Carino for Marketplace. On Wall Street today against the deal is, traders are OK with no relief bill or Maybe they're just looking past the election. Don't know we'll have the details when we do the numbers. It's 30 weeks in a row. Now, 30 weeks that more than 800,000 people have made fresh claims for unemployment benefits or Maybe a clearer way to say that is that every week for 7.5 months in this economy more than 800,000 people have lost their jobs. That was the number out this morning. For most of those people, they've lost their health insurance as well since March, According to one study. Almost eight million people have lost jobs that provided coverage for them and their families. So we sent marketplaces into Euler looking at the risks that that presents during a pandemic. That data on exactly how many people have lost their employer sponsored health insurance is just an estimate. But Karen Pollitz that the Kaiser Family Foundation says we know because there's so much job loss and so much income loss that there are people who are certainly at risk for losing their coverage. If they haven't actually lost it already. But if that's your situation, there are some other options, depending on where you live..

Darby Saxby Kaiser Family Foundation Addison Research Megan McCarty Dan Karlsson Karen Pollitz federal government Smith USC Philadelphia labor Force Mohr Dad University of Utah
"addison research" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

06:00 min | 1 year ago

"addison research" Discussed on KCRW

"Everybody a lot of big numbers with which to begin the program today. And then a much much smaller number. And arguably, it's the smaller one. That is more of a problem. One is definitive about the political machinations surrounding the American economy. Right now, those negotiations over a relief bill one is definitive at one's peril. But we seem to have arrived today at the proverbial line in the sand by way of refresher Speaker Nancy Pelosi and House Democrats want to spend $2.2 Trillion on a relief bill, the White House the president, United States and Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin. They say they're good with $1.8 trillion Senate Republican leader Mitch McConnell today in Kentucky. Said this You're correct. There were discussions going on 20 days turned into speaker about higher amount. Um, that's not what I'm goingto McConnell is going to put on the floor, he said. A $500 billion package that'll be next week sometime. So those are the big numbers. The smaller number is $250 just to 50 no extra zeros. And it's one of the key data points from the latest edition of the Marketplace Edison Research poll. We're going to be digging into it. For the next couple of days and today as well. But the upshot is that all is not well. Once you get past the economic headlines, one of the questions we ask people was, if you had an unexpected expense of $250.250 bucks, Would you be able to pay it 47% of people? Almost half of Americans? Said. It would be somewhat or very difficult to come up with that kind of cash since the pandemic. It's been, um we haven't really had much expendable income. That's Ashley sense. She is 27 years old. She's a first grade teacher in Monterey, California. At the beginning of the pandemic. My boyfriend was laid off from his cooking job. And so now it's kind of just My Salary and then the little bit of benefits that he gets, which covers you know, like rent food, but only barely like there's there's not much else. One reason why there's not much else. Those expanded unemployment benefits the extra $600 a week we told you so much about They ran out almost three months ago. She also negotiations over those big numbers that we started with. When he had the federal benefits. At least we had, like a little bit of wiggle room where it was like, Okay, if something happened, it wouldn't be like the end of the world right then. But now that that's gone, that's also kind of not there anymore. Actually, since she's one of the respondents to the 10th edition of the Marketplace, Edison Research poll out as I think I've said already Today. We threw some new questions in the poll this time cause pandemic and some of those questions were about kids and parents and working and school in from home. Those are among the biggest challenge is millions of people in this economy you're facing And his marketplaces Megan McCarty, Carino reports. It is mostly women who are facing it. Normally Emily Smith supplements her job as an heirloom vegetable farmer in Ohio with a part time winter job. But this year, she's got a lot going on at home. Her nine year old son is doing on again, off again remote school It changes week by week, according to infection rates in our county, I have to be here. He's not really old enough for me to, you know, go anywhere One time while he was in class, she left to run a quick errand down the street. I come Rome, and it's like he said in front of the TV with his computer right of them. Like No. Smith's husband works full time outside the home, so she's in charge of school time. Our marketplace, Addison Research poll found a stark gender disparity and who's primarily responsible for supervising remote learning. 63% of mothers said they were compared with just 28% of fathers. These disparities have kind of already been there, but they're really getting exaggerated by how the pandemic has kind of taken away. A lot of the scaffolding that makes working families tick. Darby Saxby directs the center for the changing family at USC, she says before the pandemic women in heterosexual dual income households. We're already doing Mohr Household labor. Despite the fact that Dad's have tripled the amount of time they spent taking care of kids over the last 50 years now, with childcare hard to find an extracurriculars cancelled its mothers who are mostly picking up the slack. You know, women are generally socialized. To kind of be more than managers of of their kids development and education. In our poll, roughly equal shares of men and women did say they had made career sacrifices to care for family during the pandemic, or had cut hours at work to deal with remote school like vain. Young in Philadelphia who's juggling his it job with studying for his B A and helping his five kids at home and to definitely taken away from you. Anything else that I would have otherwise done, and that time otherwise would be consumed either with my career or my own education, Dan Karlsson at the University of Utah has found. While Mom's are more likely to be in charge of remote schooling, dads have stepped up to take a more equal share of routine housework and child care during the pandemic. Of men hadn't stepped up the way they did. It would have been even worse, so it was not enough which is stem the tide. You know, it's like a finger in the dam. The latest jobs report from the federal government found more than 800,000 women had dropped out of the labor Force four times more than men. I'm Megan McCarty, Carino for Marketplace. On Wall Street today. I guess the deal is traders are OK with no relief bill or Maybe they're just looking.

Megan McCarty Emily Smith Nancy Pelosi Mitch McConnell goingto McConnell United States Edison Research Senate federal government Steven Mnuchin White House Kentucky president Monterey Ashley Darby Saxby first grade teacher California
"addison research" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:15 min | 2 years ago

"addison research" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Younger generations tend to unfairly get flack for not being as hard working as their elders these days older, workaho, Alex chide, millennials for not wanting a life of uninterrupted grind today. We have some data to support the millennials do approach working different way, a marketplace Addison research poll found workers eighteen to thirty four were more likely to rank flexible schedule and remote work opportunities as important in a job, then workers, thirty five and older from the workplace culture desk. Marketplace's Megan McCarthy Carino looks at how younger workers are changing the equation for work life balance. Jennifer follow has a lot going on in her personal life, these days, high matey. What do you do in? Want to get your kitty. The Thirty-three-year-old Boston marketing manager has a one year old at home. So that's where she often needs to be. She works remotely two days a week and keeps flexible hours, the other days, it's very important to me. I do plan to stay right. Am for for quite a while because of that. It's a big shift from her parents. So she says, we're always at work, the Jenner, and her young peers are increasingly prioritizing work-life balance, Dan, Shaba with HR firm future workplace says the firm's research shows young workers prize flexibility above all other employer benefits, including health care, if a company wants to work, long hours for no additional pay. There has to be a give, as digital natives. He says young people have come up in an always on work culture, fueled by mobile devices and instant communication. Oh my God, there's no nine to five anymore. It's a free for all your work, and life is integrated if young people are going to bring their work home with them. He says they also want to bring their home life to work. That includes taking care of their wellbeing on the job, says thirty four year old Sean Callaghan, finish he's a college recruiter for a fortune five hundred company in Tampa, Florida and says young people have higher expectations for wellness benefits, like onsite fitness, and meditation classes. There's a lot more awareness, you know, growing up with the internet and social media. I think that's a loud younger generations to be more in tune with health. This generation has also.

Sean Callaghan Alex chide Addison research Megan McCarthy Boston Jennifer Jenner marketing manager Florida Tampa Dan Thirty-three-year thirty four year one year two days