26 Burst results for "adaptions"

You Cant Always Believe Your Brain

SoberSoul Recovery: Addiction, Sobriety, and Beyond!

07:43 min | Last month

You Cant Always Believe Your Brain

"Haze over Seoul's. And doing. It's really nice here where you know I'm coming from Peachtree City Georgia I voted yesterday. So that's a big thing off of my agenda have y'all made your plans yet I hope so. It's going to be an exciting year and I hope all of us will feel some semblance of relief at. The passing. Election. Day. I'm not convinced but hey, one can hope today I'm GonNa. Talk about one of my favorite subjects. And that's the brain. I WANNA give you some skills for retraining that goodall brain of yours. So so important when we are filling our lives with the automatic responses based on what our brain our thoughts are conjuring up and spewing to us on the daily in our sub conscious and our conscious mind every single day. Most of us are leading our brain bully us because of Neuro plasticity this scientifically. Proven ability of your experiences, your behaviors and thoughts to alter your brain. You are sculpting the physical form and a function of your brain every single day with every single thing you do in your life. Most of the time narrow plastic changes happen. I'm the down though in that subconscious region of your life. And this is as a result of a thought pattern and habitual behaviors that we have adopted over time in our lives that flow on autopilot. So if you're sitting out there listening feeling overwhelmed or feeling out of control about what's happening in your life. Let's get busy and figure out become more aware of what you're thinking what that inner critic is telling you about your own damn life. He she or they are bullies each and every one of them. They don't mean to be. They came up with this fascinating idea of trying to help you stay invite flight or freeze to stay safe. But most of us mel adapt simply meaning we form bad habits in adaption to. Our environment we are funding for ourselves were little bitty babies with little bitty baby minds. If you remember what was talking about last week and we take all this in and we're trying to problem solve without a whole lot of problem solving skills, and then over time we see that some of these maladaptive patterns work really well because these patterns of behavior are glorified in the work environment overworking perfectionism putting yourself last praise seeking. Seeking of south from external circumstances. The very makeup of our self confidence which can feed a little bit into our self esteem but mostly just makes us miserable if we don't at the same time build up that what I call the self. Esteem Baby. That wonderful authentic soul inside of you that needs nurturing. Even today in adulthood, I would say especially today in adulthood. We know you Equitas we. In the BIZ. Understand have steadied and recognized that this constant chatter of thoughts beliefs values and memories were are mostly negative like ninety nine point nine percent negative come from your childhood. This material is usually below your conscious awareness and can't be directly measured or retrieved, and it is very real and a has a humongous impact on your life, your behaviors in your happiness, these messages, these repeated subconscious messages, and sometimes conscious messages. Are Vicious and they cycle in such a way that creates this really nine energy in our

Seoul Peachtree City Georgia
Larry Kramer, playwright and AIDS activist, dies at 84

AP News Radio

00:40 sec | 6 months ago

Larry Kramer, playwright and AIDS activist, dies at 84

"Please write an aids activist Larry Kramer has died at the age of eighty four his husband David Webster tells The New York Times Kramer died of pneumonia I marquees are a letter with a look at creamer's career Larry Kramer earned an Oscar nomination for his nineteen sixty nine screen play adaption of the DH Lawrence novel women in love he also wrote the screenplay for lost horizon and the plays the normal heart the destiny of me and sissy scrapbook Kramer and his friends founded the group gay men's health crisis in nineteen eighty one to address the aids epidemic before it was even known as aids in nineteen eighty seven he founded the aids coalition to unleash power or act up a group that pushed for policy changes to help people living with aids

Larry Kramer David Webster Pneumonia Creamer The New York Times Oscar Lawrence
A History of Seduction

The Book Review

15:04 min | 10 months ago

A History of Seduction

"Clement. Knox joins US now from London. His new book is called Seduction History from the enlightenment to the present Clement. Thanks for being here so your day job. I want to start there. Because you have a book oriented day job you work as a nonfiction buyer at waterstones which is of course a major British bookstore teen. What's your job like there? What do you do so their tour of managing nonfiction and about two hundred and eighty stores? My job really is just to get the the right books and the right stores. I'm responsible for history philosophy politics Papa. Johns I mean about nine categories overall and so. We do a lot with the publishers booksellers as well. Did you get to pick which categories you're responsible for? No when I got the job I was just assigned and then they'll kind of a reshuffle if he has got a few more categories as well they kind of work perfectly because it more or less alliance with what I'm interested in reading and what I'm interested in writing see you're deciding which books go into waterstone's the chain into which stores and how many copies are ordered exactly that to you. So that's a very powerful position. It's very structured is a very fair how we how we do it and is a constant communication publishers stores and sometimes even the authors as well we very even-handed brushing away and there's no kind of mysterious. What would probably shooter who understand. What's your typical day? Like a lot of meetings a lot of looking at science because a lot of reading of publicity plans and back and forth people. He wants us to buy their. Berko by book or by even more so. Are you living months ahead of time looking at? What are the books coming out this fall? Oh Oh yeah. We're tasked with trying to look as far as possible. So wig about to start. Looking at the timber Tiber November on average would normally thinking three months ahead of the east. And what happened with your book? The decider like we're going to order a hundred thousand copies of seduction. Yeah I I wish it was it by my boss has taken over that completely and utterly redeem. Oh look thing I try and pretend you know having to stay in a total of ignorance about one's own buck. I agree. Yeah but let's talk. Let's talk about your book. This may seem like perhaps a silly question but let's define seduction exactly. How is it action separate from courtship? How is it different from something? Maybe more creepy and less mutual like sexual harassment. Like what is seduction? I think the crucial aspect is selection. It's psychological and fumes kind of like confrontation between the minds and the passion of two different individuals in English law. That was a whole body of law do seduction discussing in some detail and wish would later it was. It came to America with with the mayflower that was developed in an extraordinary way and in those laws there was a distinction made between between rape which is obviously a What is coercive violent and seduction was seen as distinct from rape and she assumed that consent had been obtained that consent was in some way vitiated or somehow degraded by the techniques by which it was one so seduction carry that burden. That somehow someone's being over and perhaps the method used to win them over the Underhand but that's only one definition. There's a whole other definition which would say you know. It's just about courtship and game playing and it's fun and this is dawn which is dawn sexual freedom. Did you focus on that fun? Dance in this book or did you cover the full gamut the way the book is kind of structured is the. There's like a dialectic. Going on and one half of the history of seduction is about people worrying about sexual freedom worrying about things going wrong about the collision desire empower the capacity for abuse and wrongdoing. That is one of the history and the other half is about sexual freedom being this exciting enjoyable thing which which is buried lighthearted and people Is The insurance of the church. Will the government so the book kind of structured around the kind of dichotomy and not conflict between our two years of war sexual freedom is and what that means deduction your subtitle is history from the enlightenment the presidency? You're focusing mostly on the modern era. But let's start just briefly with that premodern era talk about what our earliest ideas of seduction were. Maybe perhaps grounded in with Allah G. And then how that changed as you moved into the Judeo Christian era the reason I start in the enlightenment. There's no because seduction didn't exist before seventeen hundred is because that's when seduction narrative as we understand it was born and the book is about this very powerful strange and modern thing seduction narrative which was basically invented in the eighteen th century and the product of a response to a whole new wave of ideas about the human mind about what we now think of. Feminism will prototype eminem and also about the discovery of sexual freedom as part of the blue celebrating our freedom and the enlightenment and before then you had a situation where sexuality was heavily pleased. It was subject to legal and religious interrogation and you know in America. Of course you had The puritans were very big on sexual policing but also in and the rest of Europe as well and over the course of the eighteenth century that whole value system changed. By the end of the Eighteenth Century Sexual Freedom was for granted and to be cleared. Sexual Freedom for them was not the sexual freedom that we now cherish worry about. That really meant that women go to choose. Who They married. That's where the foundation sexual freedom was not explains basically every Jane austen novel for instance. That is the undependable. The plus. They're out of plenty other novels besides and then more generally a kind of increasingly faraji towards male sexuality in particular so you see the rise of the double standard would be in spectacularly bad behavior of the rates of London and Paris Venice. You say that there were three modes of thought that really gave rise to the modern seduction narrative liberalism materialism and feminism. Let's talk about liberalism for example. How does that bring us? But we consider to be seduction as it is today in John. Look Letter of colouration. He He makes us interesting comment race. Is that basically? Everyone is going to have to look after their own. Their prospects of their own souls so liberalism is no longer going to tell people how to live their lives and what to do and instead they're going to have to have their own moral accounting and if in the religious view if they'd be living badly that we dealt with in the off the world it's not gonNA dealt with by the government and the President and obviously if you think about it back then because up until that point they'd be bathing policing sexuality quite a lot and sexuality was once you're saying okay. Everyone's GonNa look after their own moral well-being and the government's going to step out of it. The second and third order consequence of that include a increasingly hands off attitude towards sexuality and basically people are left to make their own decisions and see how how ends up so. It's not that people sat around in the late seventeenth century and said we're going to invent liberalism and one that includes sexual freedom sexual freedom flowed quite logically from this this view that we're not going to try and make everyone lived where he wants them to and that's because they tried that in Seventeenth Century. Europe and being horrific bloodshed and wars and everything else and they wanted you to move beyond that how it's addiction flow from materialism again because we'll be philosophers like like Locke and hume. They were kind of operating on the assumption that we're living in a godless world and they they were very careful how they frame that and Voltaire as well. Then we're castle how. They framed that because of course you won't read out to be an atheist but once you get to the position where we're saying. Okay they're not angels and devils and there's no Holy Spirit brought in the world and instead it's just individuals with brains achieving reality once you make those leaps you can move from new Ford away from this moralistic view of sexuality and towards an idea and that's like psychological view of reality and that's seduction narrative dramatize is this internal monologue about reason about passionate about desire and not basically the entire genre of the novel possible. And if you read these early novels like Richardson who had discussed at some length. Those books now in the more or less unreadable right ABBA time now. If you're named Pamela centrally forced to read Samuel Richardson so you know it comes with the you've read it that I have read and Shamanov so yes so been down that unfortunate path. To what extent is the history of seduction also a history of power and power dynamics? One way of looking at it is that it's not a matter of about power. One way of looking at it is that in fact sexual freedom is empowering and people who practice sexual freedom or taking control of their lives and our free liberated individuals and not seeing a strain and food since the Enlightenment Henry Fielding Mary Wilson Kroft Plus He Shelley Mary Shelley Khatri at all the way up to the present where people you know saying well. People shouldn't be telling me how to live my life. So I'm not I'm not part of it. Basically rejects the idea that seduction is about power and it says actually selections about about freedom and choice but obviously power is a complex thing to discuss. But I root it's about coercion and seduction it about agency. And as soon as our collides with especially in situations where you know that sexual inequality economic inequality there's racial inequality very quickly. We can see how adoption courtship can shade into something daca. You go into issues around race and seduction and in particular America's laws and attitudes around race in the book talk about those parts of the book America in the nineteen. Th Century developed this very extensive body of state laws placing seduction and eventually America how to federal law. The man act which was essentially a seduction Laura in everything but name and in the American south. Clearly it wasn't just a question of the law there were lynchings and these lynchings were often justified by reference to alleged sexual assaults or you know interracial relationships happening not not as true all the way up to an until so. It's not just that was seduction literature. Racial is clearly that was a very serious and horrifying epidemic of racial violence. Often had a sexual subtext. But in the case of the laws the laws designed to empower kind of racial scrutiny of sexual relationships and the mind acts was used to in California was used to prosecute lots of Japanese immigrants who had interracial relationships in the northeast and the Midwest where there were lots of Jewish immigrants or Polish German immigrants. It was used to kind of put further scrutiny communities and then the story. I tell about Joe Johnson who was the first black heavyweight champion of the world it was used to basically hound this man who they couldn't lynch or there were several attempts to do so until they tried to to get him in the courts. Did You keep the book focused on heterosexual seduction or do you cover sex relationships as well? I mentioned overseeing the enlightenment though. Is this on Abrasion of sexual freedom. I should have a code of that. Which obviously it was a celebration of heterosexual. Freedom of sexual freedom was not tackled until the nineteen sixties and seventies and beyond. So I do keep a focus on on heterosexual relationships but the simple reason is that that's deduction narrative of itself was born about this new idea of celebrating sexual freedom without sexual freedom did not include the same sex and curious about the origin of this book. Like is this something that you began before you were at waterstones is the nonfiction or a one of the nonfiction buyers or did this kind of evolve. Why hasn't anyone written about this? And getting all these other books about these other things but there's no good history of seduction. The funniest seed of this book was what I was living in America just finished Grad School in DC. And I was just reading novels like dangerous liaisons and a hero of our time and I kind of kept on coming across this theme of the Seduction Narrative. And it just wouldn't go away and it kind of knew it away me for several years and I kind of this whole history of the seduction laws which I find well fascinating and weird and then of course in in our own time. A lot of things have happened. The rise of the pick up this online dating or the rest of it. I had this of intuition that there was a story And it was the story larger than just what was going on now that it had a history and yeah. I was pretty much convinced that every day. Open the newspaper and someone in Britain the book but they never did give it a go. Well this segment is going up on Valentine's Day so it feels appropriate to ask you about your favorites seduction narrative. Dangerous liaisons novel is is is absolutely amazing. I would recommend twenty one I. It's incredibly that it was actually written two centuries ago and there have been several great adaptions of it and they were to the nineteen eighty s and then those cruel intentions made out of it in the ninety s which I think is fantastic film still. I mentioned briefly a hero of our time by lemon of again. I think everyone should read that book. And it was an incredible and the Russians were really heavily influenced by the English narrative. They will read some Richardson. They'd read Palmer and Clarisa. Bridgeton is name checked in Eugene Oregon. And of course they wrote obsessed with Byron who was a kind of mythical seducer lifetime and so the whole Russian tradition wouldn't really exist without those two figures and he said in London. Tolkien postgame also tolstoy as well all right well. I guess plenty of people to read over Valentine's Day maybe not moves people's chosen activity and this particular day but if if you are alone with book those are the ones to pick up in addition to of course deduction clement. Thanks for being here

America Samuel Richardson London Europe Johns Clement United States Waterstone Clement. Knox Eminem Jane Austen Rape Seventeenth Century California Harassment President Trump Eugene Oregon Midwest Britain Paris Venice
Madrid climate talks end with slim deal

THE NEWS with Anthony Davis

01:41 min | 1 year ago

Madrid climate talks end with slim deal

"Democracy and not something we can turn away from simply because the Republicans in the house refused to do their duty and continuing to put the person of the president above their personal obligation from from the beginning of the inquiry trump has tried to cost it as a purely political effort by Democrats to undo the result of the twenty sixteen election representative. Steve Jerry. Nadler's stressed. The Democrats were not viewing impeachment as political. We should not be looking at those things he said. This is the defense of Democracy Marathon. UN climate talks ended on Sunday with a slim. Compromise is that sparked widespread disappointment after major. Polluters resisted coals for ramping up efforts to keep global warming at bay and negotiators. Cat postponed debate about rules for International. Carbon markets. For another year organizers kept delegates from almost two hundred nations in Madrid. Far faubion Friday scheduled close of the two-week talks in the end. Negotiators endorsed a general. The greater efforts to tackle climate change and several measures to help poor countries respond and adapt to its impacts. UN Secretary General Antonio Gutierrez said. He was disappointed by the meeting's outcome. The international community lost an important opportunity to show increased ambition on mitigation adaption and finance to tackle the climate crisis. He said we must not give up. And I will not give up. The final declaration

Secretary General Antonio Guti UN Nadler Steve Jerry Madrid President Trump Representative Two-Week
"adaptions" Discussed on The Intermittent Fasting Podcast

The Intermittent Fasting Podcast

02:03 min | 1 year ago

"adaptions" Discussed on The Intermittent Fasting Podcast

"A thirty day trial, and with that you get your first audio book for free, so you could get that Kito fast book where he gets something else, but I really like that one, you also get to audible originals for free. So there's a lot of stuff to pick from there. The way that works is every month, you basically get credits and they do roll over which is nice. If you don't use it right away. But you can pick any book every month from their vast library, which has every genre. You could think of I mean, you doesn't not just nonfiction. Obviously. They have fiction. They have all the different genres. It's really, really amazing. So you get one every month if you don't like a book can also return. Which is a really nice perk. You also get unlimited access to more than one hundred audio guided, fitness and meditation programs. And as you know, I am kind of obsessed with meditation. So yes, I'm such a huge audible fan and I'm super duper excited that they actually are sponsoring this podcast today, but I would have told that anyway, so, yeah, gin do you have any thoughts? I do love audible. Even though I don't listen while doing other tasks just because my mind wanders that on, like, what did I just hear? I do like it when I'm driving because apparently I can focus and drive at the same time. So I don't know what that says about my safety on the road. But I love listening to audio books and audible while driving. And now that I'm driving to the beach all the time. I do see that. I'll have some more audible in my future. Good audibles, always in my present and my future. It's always there are. Right. So we've already talked about a lot of stuff, but shall we jump into our listener questions for today? Yes, let's get started. All right. So to start things off. We have a question from Amanda. The subject is Paris. Sympathetic nervous system and digestion. And Amanda says hygienic Melanie, I love the podcast and I've been listening for about a year. I've learned so much ima, healthier and happier person. Thanks to the lifestyle changes. I have made from this podcast..

Amanda Kito Sympathetic nervous system Paris Melanie thirty day
"adaptions" Discussed on The Intermittent Fasting Podcast

The Intermittent Fasting Podcast

01:34 min | 1 year ago

"adaptions" Discussed on The Intermittent Fasting Podcast

"App so that you can keep all of your podcasts in one place, and listen to all the things because as listeners know, I'm always listening to other podcasts. But I listening to an amazing episode today, Jin. Oh, what wasn't yet? So I added it to because we have a playlist and Himalayas it's called intermittent fasting podcasts stuff. We like, soap Italy to that and the show notes. But I put all the episodes there that I really liked from other podcasts and today, I was listening to the body mind empowerment with leeann podcast, have you heard of that one gen? No, I have not he's really into intermittent fasting and he has a lot of really good guests. So today I didn't know it was going to mention intermittent fasting. But I was listening today to an interview with Christmas, John who is amazing beyond belief if anybody is familiar with him, which made listeners probably. We are basically the entire last quarter of the episode was all about intrinsic fasting by Christmas. John, he made I don't know. He made a lot of really really good points about the health benefits, obviously, of entrant investing in benefits, you, but the thing he was really emphasizing that I liked was that 'cause he was saying, how intimate fasting as a way for you to really clear out your body. You know, do a deep cleaning how if you're always adding adding adding to your body, even if it's like nutrition and all good things. It's kind of like leads to, you know too much an excess doesn't really help so you saying how it's really important to cycle between times of lack where it's forcing you to clean out your closet, so.

John Christmas leeann Italy
"adaptions" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

09:28 min | 1 year ago

"adaptions" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Of fourteen is addicted to something, and whether you're a victim yourself, or, you know, somebody a family member or friend who is it's a topic that has a lot of moving pieces, and the part that I'm going to talk about tonight is how the brain of addicts might be different than the average brain. And how we might overcome addiction based on apart. What we know about it. Doctor griselle is a PHD behavioral neuroscientist with expertise in pharmacology genetics whose research focuses on determining the root causes of drug addiction. She is the author of a really fine book called never enough. Welcome to the show, Dr Judy. Hi, how are you? Hi, karen. I'm fine. Thanks for having me. Very nice to have you write the book very very quickly this this week. And it was it was a great book because it gives you a lot of detail about the brain without it. But it's readable which is very good because it's very complicated. It's brain surgery if you will. It is located in. That was Michael actually I thought after sailing to solve it with my own research and about twenty five years of working on the problem. I thought it was the least I can do is try to explain what we do understand in a way that everybody can understand it. I think so often the scientists are off at their lead benches working on really important problems. And then people are wondering basic questions that there's not much of a sometimes between the two goal is to make a bridge or part of it anyway, and you did a good job in one. Interesting fascinating fact, is that you yourself were a serious addict. Can you tell our listeners briefly, and and the point of this is you bring this into the book, and you kind of juxtaposed your own personal experiences with the stuff that you know, now about how the brain works, and how the brain gets people addicted and keeps people addicted tell us a little bit about the issues. You had. By the time. I was twenty three I just turned twenty three actually been using about ten years. I I started with alcohol, and then now wanna stimulants and. Basically, everything I could get my hands on for ten years. I used as much as often as I could until at. Twenty two had been homeless and kicked out of three schools and pretty hopeless and long, and when I ended up in treatment kind of steak I thought I was actually going to a spa this is in the nineteen eighties. So it wasn't so widely. Understood I guess I didn't know what I was doing that. I ended up in treatment with with nurses and not pedicurist for sure I learned that I had maybe a disease of the brain. And that. I was going to destroy myself as I kept using. And I thought. Understandable determination, efficiently like me. And now that you know, try to take away my drugs. I thought there's no way I can live without the chemicals because this is all this worth living for anyway. So I thought well. So. Which is really hilarious to me now because I was so arrogant and naive, but I somehow. But managed to get into my undergraduate, which took seven years in total. And then I graduate school for another seven years three year post doc at anyway. All of that was focused on understanding the mechanisms of addiction to what I really wanted to know. And I still want to know is what's different about the brains of people like me. Before we ever pick up the drug and then during the time, we're using and maybe even afterwards that make us sponsor differently. And I don't I thought if I could understand what's different about the brain. Then I could fix it. So we do understand quite a lot about what's different. And that was the purpose of the book. We we haven't been able to fix it. Yeah. But we'll see how that goes. You're listening to Dr Judy griselle who's the author of never enough about how the brain effects addiction and those issues again, you know, these are very complicated issues. And I'm not sure we can explain all of them on the radio you'd have to read the book to really get a good understanding. But there's a thought that I always had which is that people who are depressed and people who are anxious use drugs and alcohol is sort of a self medication. And that's how the addiction comes into play. But having read your book, that's really not the issue at all. Is it? Well, I don't know. I would say people who let me back up. There's many reasons, and there may be as many reasons to become an addict is there are addicts or alcoholics, I think it is complicated. The head of the National Institute of alcohol is alcohol is is George Kuban. He says a funny thing about this. You said you can either be born alcoholic or drink a lot. So I think we there people, and I was probably wanna be too hot to have a genetic predisposition there kind of prone that way the way we respond to drugs in the very first time. We try them. This may be different from other people who are less prone, and sometimes that might take the form of depression or anxiety for sure anxiety is a predictor of alcohol use disorders, but. Or using alcohol lot. Also makes you mine. Just so it's kind of a vicious circle. And I think I think there is some evidence that depression and anxiety and addiction are kind of three sides of the same coin. However, anybody can become an addict if they use enough of any substance. So I think there are many reasons many pathways part of those are biological part of our environmental a lot of what you talk about. We only have a few minutes before we take a break. Here is the adaption that the brain active qualities of the brain. So that your brain is always adapting to what you're giving it in what you're exposing it to and that has a lot to do with addiction. If I can really simplify it. And there was one example that I thought was fascinating. And you say if the same person goes to a bar every Friday for ten years, and they know they're gonna have their three. Drinks or whatever it is. That's it. It's almost like they become accustomed to it in their brain sets itself up to do what it likes to do in your brain knows. It's going to happen. Then one time after ten years you go instead to a party rather than a bar. There's an idea that if you go to the bar, you might become more intoxicated with the exact same amount of alcohol because your brain is not going into it same adaptive mode that went into with the routine that you had I'm probably muddling this little bit. No. I think you meant if you go to the party instead of the bar, right? Yes. Rhett more drunk. Right. You were drinking the same amount. You're drinking. You're doing the same thing at the same time, but you're in a different place. Why would your body react differently? Well, probably the brains. Most wonderful attribute is its ability to adapt and it adapt to all trucks, especially abused drugs by producing the exact opposite effects that the drug producers. So like if you're drinking alcohol, MSCI relaxed. He'll tend to feel and maybe this for before you drink if you're interested in and because of the depths. Oh, well, it uses the environmental cues to predict oh, she's gonna have her three gin and tonics now. So I'm gonna get ready by being kind of tension anxious when I get those gin and tonics I feel pretty good. But if I wasn't expecting it because the brain doesn't know the different context, maybe that would it would have a bigger effect. So the the bottom line a corporate that you're talking about is that any drug you take regularly the brain produces the opposite effect, and for that reason, you're tolerant independent and craving. And in this case, you know, the drinking at a party might make you much more intoxicated with the same amount that you'd be you know, less able to drive less able to. Control your emotions. Have reasonable thoughts. Those kinds of very interesting. We're the take a break when we come back room be too hot talking some more with Dr Judy gazelle, the author of a great book, which is never enough back in a minute. Welcome back. We're talking about addiction. The doctor Judy Chris author of never noth-..

Dr Judy griselle Dr Judy National Institute of alcohol Dr Judy gazelle karen Judy Chris depression Michael Rhett George Kuban ten years seven years twenty five years three year
Theodor Geisel, Dr Seuss And Executive Producer discussed on Sean Hannity

Sean Hannity

00:14 sec | 2 years ago

Theodor Geisel, Dr Seuss And Executive Producer discussed on Sean Hannity

"Is over Audrey Geisel. The widow of Theodor Geisel otherwise known as children's author Dr Seuss is dead at the age of ninety seven missiles Geisel recently served as an executive producer on the new animated adaption of the Dr Seuss classic. The Grinch Theodor Geisel died in

Theodor Geisel Dr Seuss Executive Producer
"adaptions" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

03:45 min | 2 years ago

"adaptions" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"The sphere grid, effectively is poke my base, there is a lot of kind of Pok Mon aspects. Yeah, I liked that meets persona because you can then slaughter your spirits and turn them into better ones. You're listening to checkpoint X P E sports and gaming radio. Wanna thank everyone listening on ESPN central Texas, Casey r I n k Tijuana in Waco, Texas, as well as ESPN ninety seven point five in Houston and the horn one zero four point nine in Austin, Texas, we're currently talking about the recently released super smash brothers alternate. So let's get down to brass tacks here. All right. What do you guys think about the controls adapted for the switch now? None of us have the pro controller you haven't had a chance to now you can only pair it through your through which is silly anyway. But like, let's talk about the way that the controls have been adapted for the switch because I have heard the least complaints about the control adaption for this generation. Then I have any other adaption of Malays since. Let me let me just cleared Aaron is right now. Okay. If you are playing smash, and you are complaining about the controls, and you are not a pro player or aspiring plo- pro player. Shut up. Seriously. I pretty tight with conservative. They're actually remarkably going complained about the joy cons, and how they give me like carpal tunnel app. Now playing for do. I'm a smash. And I don't know if it's because I'm having so much fun. But I've literally just completely forgot about it. I've played it, you know, in hand hell mall. I've detach them and played them. None. Chuck Mohana hand-held mode is pretty decent. I think that that translates pretty well. I haven't played it on the television. Have you guys have how does it translate on the TV nice? Yeah. Yeah. North though, even if you aren't appropriate you have the pro controller, and you have the GameCube controllers you can use. There is no real completely. You are not approach shut up. Game controller seriously, but you're saying because it's an option. There's no reason to complain just go get the game because I can understand complaining about having to buy another peripheral to by name supremely annoying in the way, in the way that it was originally intended. But this game was made for the switch. That sounds like it was made for this house intended to be played. All right. Let's talk about spirit mode because this is the another new addition to the game Joe in I know, as we said we've been playing it a lot. Yes. The the RPG additions to it or really really nice. And I think tell I mean, it doesn't tell much of a story, but I don't know. It's more engaging than just, hey, let's work our way up the Rosler master hands. It's all about. At least for me. I think the big thing is every time. I go to a fighting all which gonna get now which character, and that is actually a nice little like carrot to dangle in front of the audience. I think that that's a nice way to do it. And again, then the multiple different ways to be able to unlock characters. I think is a smart idea. And whenever you go into like, the special the dungeon areas that you've got like one where you go into a military base. And of course, it's snake at the end of that base. We have to go fights in there. And like, this is where I I started realizing the difficulty curve, it's all over the map on there. So there there's one fight in that base where you have to fight. It's good. So it's not just me that is struggling. There are some crazy. Wrinkled against doctor wyle and to so to get him. Yes. Fight eight metal mega man. Dr. Mario Soares the airline ashes.

Texas ESPN doctor wyle Dr. Mario Soares Waco Austin Chuck Mohana Casey Aaron Houston Joe
"adaptions" Discussed on Lights Camera Barstool

Lights Camera Barstool

02:32 min | 2 years ago

"adaptions" Discussed on Lights Camera Barstool

"Your super fucking disappointed. Like, where's the bear necessities? Like, this is the jungle book, and so the nicest thing, I can I can say about this movies that eventually ends and you can go on with your life. Give it about a forty five. It is it is in the public domain. I'd actually didn't realize that. That's what they do. They cooked the public domain, the public domain cookers. What else is out there in the public domain? We can take over Pinocchio got to be out there. Right. Robin Hood, Robin. If Robin Hood isn't played by a FOX now hissed agreed. Yeah, I need. I need a FOX with the loot seeing that very specific song that he do. Of of robinhood. So it's like, Robin Hood, but all the animals are played by people in. I I would watch that like a sort of scary movie type adaption or the starving games. Still gotta watch. I just. Say about this movie. It was a movie Ron Howard supposed to do jungle book apparently one point from Warner Brothers run. What what are this movie was in production help because the it was started in twenty twelve in Steve Clovis, Ron Howard interrupt to approach before circus. And then Warner Brothers had the rights. But once Disney released their jungle book, aka day, cuck them in the public domain. They stole them off to Netflix. So it originally was going to be a movie that was going to be released. But either Disney had this going at the same time, which I think a lot of studios do or they're able to get up and running and just completely pulled the rug out from underneath them. I've some actual breaking news that I can deliver on this podcast because I doubt you got into Kevin James or Kevin Smith. We have in studio, and we didn't get into it on the air when we had him on part of my take which is coming soon. I talked about this movie that has been in production help for the last probably eight or nine years. It's based on the song by warns. Yvonne called hit somebody which is basically the plot to goon you remember that. Yeah. So it's about a guy that kid that grew up in Canada, who's really good at fighting, but sucked at skating and passing and scoring and he's like goes through a journeyman career the NHL and he scores a goal on his very last shot on his very last game. There's a song by warns evolved co written by Mitch Albom. Oh my God. That's right. The album the plagiarist Tuesday, Tuesday's with mortgage.

Robin Hood Warner Brothers Disney Kevin Smith Mitch Albom Ron Howard robinhood Kevin James FOX Steve Clovis NHL Yvonne Canada skating Netflix nine years
"adaptions" Discussed on Lights, Camera, Podcast

Lights, Camera, Podcast

02:32 min | 2 years ago

"adaptions" Discussed on Lights, Camera, Podcast

"Your super fucking disappointed. Like, where's the bear necessities? Like, this is the jungle book, and so the nicest thing, I can I can say about this movies that eventually ends and you can go on with your life. Give it about a forty five. It is it is in the public domain. I'd actually didn't realize that. That's what they do. They cooked the public domain, the public domain cookers. What else is out there in the public domain? We can take over Pinocchio got to be out there. Right. Robin Hood, Robin. If Robin Hood isn't played by a FOX now hissed agreed. Yeah, I need. I need a FOX with the loot seeing that very specific song that he do. Of of robinhood. So it's like, Robin Hood, but all the animals are played by people in. I I would watch that like a sort of scary movie type adaption or the starving games. Still gotta watch. I just. Say about this movie. It was a movie Ron Howard supposed to do jungle book apparently one point from Warner Brothers run. What what are this movie was in production help because the it was started in twenty twelve in Steve Clovis, Ron Howard interrupt to approach before circus. And then Warner Brothers had the rights. But once Disney released their jungle book, aka day, cuck them in the public domain. They stole them off to Netflix. So it originally was going to be a movie that was going to be released. But either Disney had this going at the same time, which I think a lot of studios do or they're able to get up and running and just completely pulled the rug out from underneath them. I've some actual breaking news that I can deliver on this podcast because I doubt you got into Kevin James or Kevin Smith. We have in studio, and we didn't get into it on the air when we had him on part of my take which is coming soon. I talked about this movie that has been in production help for the last probably eight or nine years. It's based on the song by warns. Yvonne called hit somebody which is basically the plot to goon you remember that. Yeah. So it's about a guy that kid that grew up in Canada, who's really good at fighting, but sucked at skating and passing and scoring and he's like goes through a journeyman career the NHL and he scores a goal on his very last shot on his very last game. There's a song by warns evolved co written by Mitch Albom. Oh my God. That's right. The album the plagiarist Tuesday, Tuesday's with mortgage.

Robin Hood Warner Brothers Disney Kevin Smith Mitch Albom Ron Howard robinhood Kevin James FOX Steve Clovis NHL Yvonne Canada skating Netflix nine years
This Week in Nerd

Talk Nerdy to Me

05:25 min | 2 years ago

This Week in Nerd

"Dive this week at age of fifty seven. What a lot of people. Don't know. Is this dude had a couple of different degrees? He graduated from Humboldt state university eighty four with a bachelor's degree in natural resource planning and interpretation. He was working at Orange County marine institute. He got the idea that he wanted to start doing some animation. So he went back and say, hey, you know, what I was good another degree in eighty seven. He pursued his degree in experimental animation. At the California is to arts in Valencia and he earned his masters of fine arts ninety two quite of accomplishment. I mean, the dude was very educated. You wouldn't think that watching SpongeBob squarepants? But yeah, I mean, he he had multiple degrees. And he invented SpongeBob squarepants for so. Rest in peace, Mr. hill and Berg and thank you for bringing SpongeBob squarepants to us. Everybody knows Netflix will make a TV series out of anything. Lately, they've been cancelled stuff. We're talking about that later, but they they don't make a series out of anything, and they just ordered some episodes for avatar last air bender. So they're getting more to the anime now of making those series. They just got another one man they picked up cowboy bebop, there'd be making live actually Dapitan of cabinet bebop. It says here there ordered for ten episodes straight to series live adaption, if you're not familiar with cabaret bebop is one of the more prominent enemies out there. These intergalactic bounty, hunters, basically, go around and save save your world for the right price. This could go well or this could go really really bad. Honestly, I've I've kind of liked the live actual life death note. And I liked full metal alchemist alive actions. I don't know a whole lot about Kabbay bebop. But I think they can make this work on a firefly kinda way. Can't wait to see what they do with this. They are making so many of these adaptions now, I don't have a date when this is going to be available for yet net. Flicks is go roll it out. And if they do they always do they'll be the whole ten episodes at once that you can marathon watch it, they'll probably be half hour episodes. So it shouldn't take long. You can do it in a weekend. Get your cabinet bebop fix along with the enemy if you're not familiar with it. Now's a great time to go back and wash the cowboy bebop anime and get caught up. And while we're on enemy this next one is it's it makes sense after I hear it. But I would have never thought of it beforehand dole swim and country, crunchy roll going together to make a blade runner anime. Yeah. I didn't think about, but you know, the whole Bladerunner story leads itself. Very well. The anime in my mind, this Disney the away who. Is the Bladerunner director guy. He is said they optioned. Three stories that were take place between twenty nineteen when the regional Bladerunner takes place and Bladerunner twenty four nine which is the newest movie they put out. One of these was done by Mr. Watanabe. It's Bladerunner twenty twenty two. Blue's called blackout. I watched it a little earlier. It's it's really not bad it. It was pretty good. So those three stories if you Google I'm sure you can find somewhere online this anime series, though is going to be called Bladerunner black Lotus takes place in twenty thirty two. So it's before the events of twenty forty nine you're likely to see some of the characters, you know, making appearances in this anime, which is really cool. Like, I said shoot Chiro what Nabi I'm probably butchering. The name is going to be the creative producer on this series. Guy is great with anime. Can't wait. The Bladerunner story is just I love the whole Bladerunner universe. They had said that they were going to be expanding the blade runner universe. And we haven't seen that. Until now. I mean, they did a comic book that just didn't really take off. We haven't seen any television or or animates until this one. There will be thirteen half hour episodes. They're going Erla dole swim adults rooms going to maintain the worldwide distribution rights for the English dub versions, which means in my mind means they're looking at pushing it out in other countries. Also. So, you know, the Bladerunner universe is getting ready to expand. Again, we're going to be a little more backstory since this is kind of a prequel to twenty four nine but a sequel to twenty nineteen. Kind of weird in the time line there. I believe what Nabis going to do a job with this. I can't wait to see it myself. I love all the Bladerunner stuff. So let's hope that they do this from Justice. It seems lately the trend is for them to take old

Bladerunner Bladerunner Twenty Twenty Nabis Humboldt State University Producer Orange County Marine Institute Netflix California Valencia Disney Google Mr. Watanabe Mr. Hill Director Blue Berg
"adaptions" Discussed on Villains

Villains

04:04 min | 2 years ago

"adaptions" Discussed on Villains

"Which is the the book our science lamps. It's also in manhunter, the the Michelman TV movie adaption where we'll Graham the FBI agent caught Lecter is meeting with him. And he's like, you know, at letters like me and grams like, well, you had certain disadvantages. What were those you're insane? So I guess that is how. Like, he's just so in control don't he's almost hyper sane. You know, he's made the rational decision that I'm smarter than everyone. Therefore, if I need to kill people that is afforded to me because of my higher intellect. Terrifying prospects. Yeah, I think I'm falling around this same categories. Both of you guys. For me was there's two parts to it. Number one. There's just a stillness to him. He looks like a very deep body of water. You just don't know what is in there. And number two. He is an almost all capacities. Just impenetrable. There's no way to get inside to see what he's doing anything that. We see it in the very first seeing that he has with Clarisse she's poking and prodding him in every way, she can think of and it's like she's fucking tapping on a Bank vault with a toothpick trying to get inside. There's just nothing there. Meanwhile, what you're talking about about him being so smart, he talks to her for a total of like, six minutes and within those six minutes, he figures out her aspirants route or motivations and he uses it to just shred her to pieces. You know, what you looking to me with your good? And you. Choose looking at a road. A while scrubbed hustling. Case. But you not more than one generation wide. And. Desperately to shed peo- West Virginia. Comb on the lane. How quickly the buys on? Do you all those TD's fumbling from the banks into 'cause you could only getting? All the way at the end. And for me. That's that's like a central fear of mine. I don't ever want to be the person in an exchange who doesn't know the thing we should both be on the same footing. Here. You should not have more information than me. I'm terrified of that. So watching an entire movie where that guy is just built around that premise is fucking frightening. You pointed out something really interesting to which is his ability to identify where she comes from by the sound of her voice, which is such a unique skill and it gives you that that uneasiness that's sort of like why I'm so disadvantages. He said because of that he he's just such a great character to you do other view. Remember where you were the first time you watched silence. Is there a memory you have attached to it or the movie or a character in there? I can sure. Yeah. Mine which is not. It's not a story of seeing the movie came out. I was not quite old enough to go to the theater to see it. My parents are very particular about not letting me see movies like this. But I had an uncle. Everybody has the my uncle didn't take a movie, but would he would he would do? I would beg him to do. This is he would explain movies to me. He would just sit me down. And he would just tell me the movie from start to finish. And who's a great storyteller? And he had the uncanny ability to paint a picture when he was talking to any was obviously fascinated by Lecter. And I think he may have even read the book, but he had this unique ability to convey, everything that happened in this movie. So he tells me all this it's probably like opening weekend. Because he saw it on the Friday night on the Saturday happened to beat his house. He tells me the story. And then as we know like is this movie goes on it goes on to be an enormous success to huge Oscar film, it became part of this sort of pop cultural lexicon, receive see clips of very famous lines that Lecter would say on television all the time or during award shows. And I think I had a vision of what I thought the movie was going to be before. I saw it probably was not until a year or two after came out that I finally saw it, and we was quite different from what I was expecting..

Lecter Clarisse FBI West Virginia Oscar six minutes
"adaptions" Discussed on The Morning Toast

The Morning Toast

03:51 min | 2 years ago

"adaptions" Discussed on The Morning Toast

"Avengers movie live action adaptions Dumbo Aladdin lion. King and frozen to a sequel to the breakout twenty thirteen. Automated hit. Okay, live action adoption adaption of Dumbo. Like, isn't that just National Geographic? Like, how are you going to bring elephants to life weight? Live action live action is like beating the beast who's gonna say, maybe it's like set in the real world. But just like the elephants are automated, and if they're harming real elephants for Dumbo like I just can't I can't with everyone being so insensitive. I don't even understand how the lion king's going to work. You know? Yeah. But they haven't amazing Kassim. Sure, they figured it out. But it's like they'd be on. So I'm going to be talking real lions. Oh, good call, you know, it's confusing. But like, maybe they'll be like the loom. Linnea balloon air was like an animated candle stick like it was. It was the candidates do not feel it'll stick was real. Right. But the point is that it's talking candlestick. That's crazy. A talking lion is is impossible because no one's gloomy or complaining that entertaining Zing wig had dance after all miss. This is friends and Zoeller here adverse, we're onto different versus go on and live Jomon you phone and then you'll be a guest guest. Anyways. This seems like an opportunity by some stock and Disney because I feel like this is a move. That's in tune with what's necessary. It's evolving with the time disease. Always good stock. Like, I think like as children we were given like Disney stock like for a dollar, you know. Yeah. It's always been a wise investment on our part. Yes. But a. I think so right now, I will update my robinhood portfolio because you know, I put like literally ten dollars in a Robin and just like play around with it. You're going to go for Disney. Yeah. Okay. I'm down with Robyn, man. I'm down with dizzy, I I feel like it. Disney like steel, but they definitely are always innovating and frozen is is you know. It's what's the word like progressive there bobbing with the times realized that some of the things that they used to do our backwards, and they're not sticking to their guns. Victoria's Secret like they have their first openly gay character on one of their new shows Disney. Yes. Yup. I won't be updated. My Robin Hood to include a stock in Detroit secret. Oh, no. Because I don't see if he's your inventory here. But I'll tell my analyst over a Robin Hood. I'm down for Disney. I teach you invest in more. I don't know more corporate. No, no, no, more stable stocks. Just my portfolio was busted open on seems like I feel like now I need glasses and like a calculator in my briefcase to always county I nine. Yeah. No, Robin Hood is is good. And it's legit for someone like me. Who knows nothing about stocks investments, bonds, whatever. But also like knows how to use a phone, but also is hosting a morning show where we are getting into businesses every day and seeing what's going on in the market. It's helpful for us to know what to pick. Right. And so I feel like we actually have more information than the average. Yeah. Yeah. And they don't you commission on Robin Hood, which I love because everyone has their hand my pocket these days and Robin Hood does not look there's no fee associated with the money that they make you like that is dream like that's something. I can trust. Yeah. No. I'm I'm going to go through my stock. Really? Oh, so I wanna look at some stocks that aren't so like mainstream like, you know, the big companies Amazon, right? A spoke note ever, but we need to that's what they called diversifying your portfolio, and I'm going to diversify. It's really easy to use. It's not like difficult, but the charts and the numbers and the percentages. It's just like simple, if we're simple Steed acceptable to understand. And it can be easy for you to understand as well. Because Robin Hood is giving our listeners a free stock like apple Ford or sprint to help. Build your portfolio. You can sign up at toast dot Robin, Hood dot com..

Robin Hood Disney King Robyn Zing Zoeller Amazon analyst Victoria Detroit Jomon Ford apple ten dollars
This Week in Nerd

Talk Nerdy to Me

11:20 min | 2 years ago

This Week in Nerd

"Halloween. Just happened this past week. So of course, everything's going Christmas. There were skipping right past thanksgiving. Netflix has a show coming up called the Christmas chronicles going to be starring Kurt Russell as Santa Claus this premise, it's not a new idea Santa's so used to stay up to try to catch Santa. They actually do catch him the kind of hideaway in his sleigh. And they cause an activist. So the sleigh is wrecked. And they are in jeopardy of not having Christmas presents for everybody by Christmas morning. So of course, Santa uses his Christmas. Magic calls on his elves and his reindeer, and they are able to. I'm sure deliver everything by Christmas morning because it looks like it's going to be a kid show and got to end on a happy note. I looked at the trailer. Trae looks cute. It's something I'll probably watch it. It'll probably be a yearly thing around Christmas. Now. Kurt. Russell is great actor love everything. He's in just about so Christmas carnivals on. Netflix comes out November twenty second day after thanksgiving market on Gallinger, the aero versus having their fall crossover. They're going to bring in a ton. They're announcing a ton of characters are going to be introduced I've already told you guys about ruby rose being bad woman. They're bringing in psycho, pirate a. He used to be a third tier type character. He's god. He he has Medusa mask where he's able to affect your motions. And he's almost like a motion vampire, he can suck your emotions away from you the bringing him in the one I'm really really excited about though is monitor they're going to be bringing in monitor. He was born on one of the moons of owa, you know, from green lantern says the their base of operation, but there's also an anti monitor who deals with anti energy. And he goes around, basically suck and all the energy out of planets in in places and destroying them. Monitor is the opposite. He's he tries to save all these places. I there's no word on whether they're going to have Lila the orphaned, girl, he rescued in. She became a blue harbor jer on of his sidekicks, but they have shown monitor and Marv Wolfman has said that it's a very close adaption to what he wanted in the comics. He's really excited about it. So if the creators excited about it, I'm excited about it. So not only are we going to be introduced to bat woman and monitor psycho pirate. Ross it'll have lowest lane will be introduced Stephen Mellon green guessing are going to be kind of switching roles trigger twins loan. You know, one's green arrow once flashed or kind of going to swap as part of this else. World's crossover is they're doing a lot for this spoils crossover. It's probably going to gather a lot. Attention on a lot of people going to watch. It is going to start on flash December night at eight PM eastern time and continued through on arrow to December tenth APM an end with supergirl December eleventh at eight PM also in the vein of DC comics bat, girl, bird, Berta, pray. We've been telling you about that movie. Lots of great casting for that. We have another update they're bringing in the big villains. That'd be black mask, and they have cast Ewan McGregor to be black mask. He started out as a Batman villain. He's a nother rich guy from GOP him. But he went the opposite way. His batman. He became one of the crime lords. He's used his money and influence to create the false faces society and kind of rule Gotham 's criminal underground for quite some time. He pops up every now, and then and Batman now they're bringing him in bad, girl and birds of prey you McGregor. Great actor. I think he'll do a great job on black mask all union ten does. Switch owners. I know the biggest gripe than tend to switch guys have is. There's not a lot of apps being developed for it right now. That's changing they are going to put out a YouTube app. Sometime next couple of weeks for ten to switch. So you'll at least be able to pull up YouTube videos and watch on the switch since Google owns YouTube. You can bed this not going to be much longer until they have the Google browser. Ready for Nintendo, switch also. So just be patient guys. They are developing apps from the intendo switch. It's it's a popular gaming network not going anywhere shifts going to get bigger. So you early adopters just gonna have to bide your time. But you are getting a YouTube app in the next couple of weeks. We are used to seeing crossovers in comics and even on TV shows like arrow verse I told you earlier in movies even. I this is a new one to me. It's it may have happened before. I don't remember anything like this board game crossover. They're going to have a board game with two licenses crossing over. Stay with me on this one men in black and Ghostbusters. They're crossing over to make a game called Minna black slash Ghostbusters echo, echo, terrestrial invasion. The artwork on this. Looks kind of cool. It's kind of anime ish. Kitty, looking type of artwork the game is these eco terrestrial are invading earth. And it's taking it's more than either black or Ghostbusters can handle on their own. So they're teaming up to take out these invaders. They also plan on having a couple of standalone expansions coming from this also probably with the Minna black and Ghostbusters by themselves. So on your ghostbuster team. You're gonna have Bank men Spangler stands and said more the Minna black team is going to have agent j agent k agent L and said, those are the ones that we know of right now, they the standalone that are coming following auditees may add other characters, but those are probably there arguably the most popular character from each one of those licenses your men in black slash Ghostbusters echo, terrestrial invasion is slated to come out in late twenty nineteen. So you gotta ways to wait for this. But the follow on standalone expansions should be coming out shortly after those okay my action figure collectors. This is a extra figure. I didn't know if I'd ever see but Hasbro is putting out the six armed Spiderman. This comes from the story where expire man was trying to cure himself from having the spider powers. Did he must calculator wrong? Because it just increased his spider powers it caused him to grow additional arms. This six armed Spiderman is going to be a six inch action figures coming out early in twenty nineteen dark horse comics lately has lost a lot of their licenses. They I mean, they've lost Star Wars. They lost buffet a vampire slayer they lost firefly. They're still they're saying they're still doing well. But they did just make a huge sell of a lot of their stock in holdings. CEO and founder, Mike Richardson has said that he's doing this because they're gonna make a big push into films. They want to have their own funded films. I mean, we've seen how well marvel has done funding their own films having their own film studio darkhorse has a lot of great titles. That would translate great film. Also. It's always the problem of getting these films funded. So now, they have an inhouse film funding part of the business should make it easier. So I'm hoping that microchip knows what he's doing with this. And I hope darkhorse starts putting out some big blockbuster movies. And hopefully, the other comics publishers will start following suit and making their own funded films. K last story I have for you today. I thought this was really really interesting. If you've read heroes in crisis from DC comics, where they it was kind of a sanctuary for all these superheroes. And and villains who were having problems dealing with all the violence and everything else in their life. They were sent there as a for kind of therapy. Somebody found out about this place in came in and basically killed everybody that was at this sanctuary. The main culprits. Were Harley Quinn and booster gold. This sanctuary was run by the DC's. Big trinity of Batman wonder woman in superman, they are coming here to investigate what's going on. And of course, you know, it all the size point toward Harley and booster gold. The trinity tracked down Harley they're going to try to bring her in and question her. This is the part is interesting Harley walked through the trinity like they were nothing. She grabbed wonder woman's LASSO use it all Batman and found out the Batman using the LASSO found out he had a piece of kryptonite on him. She grad that piece of kryptonite and used it to get past superman. And then later on in one of the panels superman even mentions it, you know, Harley Quinn is as good if not better than even new Batman men didn't want admit it. He's got a big ego. But yeah, I mean, she just waltzed through the trio that three arguably strongest characters in the DC universe. Harley Quinn, just cake walked right through them and got away. So everybody who was always wondering why Harley was part of suicide squad. You know, how she could survive a little with joker all this time and all the violence if going on she can hold her own Harley Quinn. She is a top notch gymnast, obviously, she was a psychiatrist so she's not an idiot. She can think her way through a lot of these things and strategically and physically she just bested the three top characters in the DC universe. So if you ever you want to argue about who's the best fighter in DC. You can make a strong case for Harley. Now as always thank you guys for watching the video mash that bell econ- to be notified every time. I upload a new video for my auditory. Only friends subscribed to me on your favorite podcast platform. I will see you guys next week with more nerdy news later nerds. Pain that you. You play. In an all each.

Harley Quinn Batman Youtube Dc Comics Netflix Kurt Russell Santa Marv Wolfman Trae Kurt Ewan Mcgregor Dark Horse Comics Google DC
"adaptions" Discussed on She Who Persisted

She Who Persisted

04:52 min | 2 years ago

"adaptions" Discussed on She Who Persisted

"But now that you started quoting it came to mind again, it's amazing love tick toe. When the broke up there was this huge drama. I remember the details. But yeah. But you know. Doesn't that a lot of examples? Right. And the thing that came to my mind, I was Stephen King adaption the Stephen King filmed option Carey. So that's one thing that I want to talk about today. And I thought about both in nineteen seventy six to two thousand thirteen version, you know, there's also a two thousand two made for TV version United States. No, no, no. This is a made for TV movie. That is basically carry it is Keri. But it's was just shown on television, not in movie theaters. So someone came up with a great idea of taking a very successful like movie theater film, making it into shady TV movie as TV movies, go. It's not that shitty. I've watched it because it's valuable if you want if you're in the United States, and you have Amazon prime and you want to stream the two thousand two TV movie version of Kerry. It is available. As is the nineteen seventy six version. Both of those are available streaming the two thousand thirteen version and Kerry to carry two is also very available streaming. I think it's called the terror. I didn't see that. And the the twenty thirteen one you have to branch basically to ninety nine for standard definition, which isn't bad which is. Yeah, that's fine. They kind of make sense that the only examples that came to mind off from from horror films because we live in a culture, and we've talked about this. In a previous episode is to just vilifies ministration Menaka and period blood, and then horror films often deal with things that are considered to boom on stores are abject. And then also generally to show that features blood a lot is horror film. So it kind of makes sense that it also features minster bloods. Yes. So one thing that came up a research was again this connection of menstruation as something similar Tena, Asli terrifying. But also terrifying because it's somehow something magical to its supernatural natural on the same time. And remember what Pliny the elder wrote about menstruation in the fest pot of the series. He. Instructed ministration something magical end this scary. So he wrote that women win the minister at capable of killing like whole. What's it called Lecco beehives? Yes, they they make the earth basically barren. Yeah. They send dogs into a frenzy. You know, the. Dimmed the brightness of mirrors blunt steel take away the polish from IRA swarm of bees, a look to pump ahead will die mmediately. Bronson iron will instantly become rusty and emit an offensive odor. Well dogs, which may have tasted of the Matt's us so discharged us east with madness and the by venomous incurable. So we talked about this in the first pot of menstruation series, which was on period. Shame. We've talked about the construction of menstruation as both powerful and horrible. In our episode abode menstrual, what was called menstruation to booze last time. And we will talk about it today because it comes in carry alone. Again, as a said there is a version from the nineteen seventy six and two thousand thirteen and I think it makes sense to I talk about the vision of nineteen seventy six. And it was directed by Brian depalma and the second one was directed by Kimberly peers, which I think makes difference because the first carry is a very masculine vision of femininity and menstruation and all of that. Sure. I mean, the story itself because it's a Stephen King story, it's necessarily there are, you know, it's going to be tinged by his writing by the way that he perceives female characters, and he has a whole series of books that are about kind of young girls and teenagers coming into their own and the terror that they so like fire starter and carrier two examples of, but it's not just something that is specific to Stephen King. I mean trope that comes up in horror film, and horror fiction and just generally pop culture again, and again just women as monstrous especially coming of a fee. Mail that adjust in touring womanhood in a sense that those seem to be very, very terrifying. And that's a trope that comes up over and over again..

Stephen King United States Brian depalma Kerry Amazon Menaka IRA Kimberly Matt Carey
College basketball American Athletic Conference preseason power rankings

Memphis Morning News

05:59 min | 2 years ago

College basketball American Athletic Conference preseason power rankings

"Your job. Larry Lander joins us on Memphis morning news. Larry, thanks so much for joining us. How are you? I'm fine. Thank you. These office spaces, you know, cubicles we we've seen it made fun of in the movie office space, and and in throughout the last thirty years, you know, in movies, everybody's working in a cubicle. They got their head down. Phone's ringing clicking away on you know, the keyboards, but we're starting to hear and see more and more about open office plans to those really work. I believe they do. I I am an architect and my architecture firm in Houston, we'd be work all over the world. Then it's a it's more than a trend. I think it's something that businesses are really looking at to help people work together and working steams. So you're you're saying that you believe that they they are effective. I could see where I guess, you know, you have that open area where people could could could feel that way. If somebody was a naysayer say, you know, regarding some people like to work in privacy or without much accountability. I guess that kinda you kinda have to adapt. If that's the case, then you there is some adaption, but at the same time, I think a real T is that there's a variety of places to work people do need privacy. Everyone needs it at one time or another got private phone calls. You've got private meetings, and you you need to provide places where people can do that. I think the key is that there's a variety of places to work in a management structure that allows people to get up and move around. Yeah. Yeah. Larry lander. Joining us this morning. I know in US offices. We're starting to see some of that change. I is this something that we're seeing kind of on a on a widespread global basis to. Yes, absolutely. Are are are from PDR in Houston as I say, we do work all over the world. And it's kind of interesting to see the commonalities across many different countries. Telecommuting Larry, I know a lot of people now work from home. Especially with all the apps, and the laptop carry it seems like we're very laptop driven now or even phone driven. And oftentimes, I guess you could work with folks for a long time and never actually come face to face with them. And I guess open plan offices helped kind of eliminate some of that I hate to say antisocial, but you know, what I mean where we lack that interface that personal touch. Absolutely. I actually it. We all have technology that enables us to work anywhere at any time. And really a key is believed. The office space has to be a compelling place to come to work if there's no reason to make that commute or or whatever else your your impediment. Is you won't do it? Because you don't have to do it. So workplaces need to be cool places. Interesting places urban vibe to them create a sense of collegiality promoted business culture, that's a really important aspects of how workspaces design so so take away the walls make more of a workplace village. Then I guess that's a good. That's a good analogy. But still make sure there's some there needs to be private space for people don't recognize their people do need privacy. Sometimes you have to put your head down and get to work and not be bothered now with these open plans. Do you do you? Should you have? Spencer a face mask in case somebody comes in with a cold because I I would suspect you might be more susceptible to catching the flue or something like that with with with fewer wars. We're we're is amused. I'm not a social scientists. I will say that we hear that line a lot. Usually it's from people who are moving out of a private office into office. I I'm not sure the science backs it out. But you know, okay. I'll I'll admit that could be a concern. We'll come on Larry it's harder to make dinner plans. If you don't have your own office. You can't be goofing off on company time. Right. I mean, you know, hey, what do you do opposites on expert? Larry Lander, thanks for joining us. Please don't be a stranger. Good to talk to you here in Memphis. Thank you. I've ever sporting

Larry Lander Memphis Houston United States PDR Spencer Thirty Years
"The Hate U Give" screenwriter dies day before film is released

WBZ Midday News

00:22 sec | 2 years ago

"The Hate U Give" screenwriter dies day before film is released

"A screenwriter dies the day before her movie the heat. You give is released CBS's Dana Jacobson with that Audrey wells died Thursday at the age of fifty eight after a long battle with cancer. While also wrote and directed the movie under the Tuscan sun, the hate you give is an adaption of Angie Thomas bestselling novel about the

Dana Jacobson Audrey Wells Angie Thomas CBS
"adaptions" Discussed on The Fighter And The Kid

The Fighter And The Kid

03:44 min | 2 years ago

"adaptions" Discussed on The Fighter And The Kid

"Guardians of the galaxy director being fired after some like ten year old tweets that he made longtime ago, right? Yeah, ten years they bad though. That's the thing. Did you see his response? He goes, I want apologize for tweets. I made ten years. He said, he won't know. He goes, I want apologizing emphasize goes for tweets that I made ten years ago then of affected my career today. He said he was b. He always wanted to be, for example, and be comical. But so we're just, but what exactly say, here's a bunch of tweets aggregated. So a lot of them are about like little like pedophilia type of things the jokes around about. I got a little bit of a red flag here because I don't know. I know some funny people no-one jokes about that. You don't say, well, it's different environment like, no, no, no, no back then today, thirty years, you'll know jokes about little boys, but this may have been taken out of context little boy, touch me and my place he might have been talking about the, I don't know what he's talking about here. Yes, so that same, they're all out of context, but even looking. At these posts like the expenditures, the expendable is so manly fucked the shit other little pussy boy. Next to me, the boys are back in town. Seattle. His kid is what I call a rather is what I call it. When I get lucky and then he put three men in a baby. They had sex with. Yeah, under magic movies. Are you three or it's all little boys. That's very big Hollywood film adaption of the giving tree with a happy ending. The tree grows back and gives the kid a blowjob about vomit as I'm stuff with suf- souffle and eggplant. I'm Louis Anderson my ass out just the fat, not the little boys. There's a problem. You know what I'm saying? Like a recurring little boy theme that, hey, it's not funny be I don't. I don't listen. I don't know if she lost his job. I don't know enough about the situation. Fucking weird though. Man. So my first Nambla meeting which is North American man, boy, love association. Yeah, it wasn't first time I felt okay being who I am. Some of those guys are still my best friend, so he's, he's, he's being he's trying to be funny about that. And I put very. Meanwhile, a little boys gun to my head, someone that Brennan does. He does. He have some sexual interest in little boys. I tell you get him ahead of, he's got a ton of people like a ton of fans backing up to because he's, you know, obviously everyone loves that movie or that franchise. Yeah, I don't know. Man, that's fucking tricky. He should. He have. His thing is ten years ago and his career like severely jeopardised. That's the big thing now. So he's off guarding the galaxies? Yeah. I don't know how to use like, fuck. I started being silly and funny. So you're saying he was just trying to push the envelope of being funny and nowadays you don't know anyone who tries to be funny like. A little weird boys. Can you imagine if we, if let's say you and I are hanging out the first hour hanging up and I kept making little boy, Joe fucked. I don't think I've got a problem. I'd like I'm just joking. I don't think it's funny. I never have. No, I'd go back like do some fucking on with Brian. You saw my little bully. I don't joke about that. I don't like no one does I get tight lipped about his funny jokes about this? You know what I'm saying? No, no, fucking over and over. It's it's uncomfortable? Yeah, it's four tastes. Should he have long living living in a time where what you said, any time in your life can ruin your career and I don't think it makes the world more equitable and I don't think it makes the world a better place, but that's the reality punishment over change where more incident punishment. And a lot of people are trying to punish because they think it can change the world and make it better. It doesn't. But in some cases it might the guy that got this expose his name is Michael Cerna vich. He's the one that was pushing pizza, get a long time ago..

Brennan director Louis Anderson Seattle Michael Cerna Hollywood Joe Brian ten years thirty years ten year
"adaptions" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:28 min | 2 years ago

"adaptions" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The water and a tiny child's floating ring and managed to save a little baby girl as well who is not her own so it was an extremely traumatic experience to get over she's now been resettled to a snowy well now it's probably not snowy northern sweden village where she's been able to heal with her family and learn swedish and pick up the pieces of her life she's gone on book tour with me she's become quite a public speaker and she's looking forward to the book being turned into a steel berg movie and that's that's looking likely is it yes in fact i had the honor to meet with steven spielberg recently and discuss the film and he seemed extremely enthusiastic he's doing it together with the other famous director jj abrams and the screen play adaption is underway and i think it's it's for me what's really important about this is that in a time when there is such growing zena phobia and hatred of the other being propagated by populous politicians we need these individual stories that really just build compassion and you know this is people who read the book you know tell me that they're you know asked me what can i do and how is doa and so i think if if this becomes in a movie that people around the world can have access to hopefully attitudes will change especially the word you about a story you will have told a few weeks ago that of the royal wedding here in the uk again appetite for it what what was your angle if there was one to pursue that was an interesting connection the mike grant from the us the refugee from joining the british royalty yes the interest was overwhelming and partly of course because of who meghan markle is was before she married into this is strange family and still is and and and all the all the sack of surrounding her that her own totally dysfunctional family and the saga of her father rather sad figure who was clearly exploited by the media in a very unpleasant way and yeah i mean lots many many angles many angles six thirty six gmt syrian national flag is now flying in the main square of dera the southern city where the uprising began seven years ago president assad's forces hoisted it there this week backed by russian airpower they've taken back much of this rounding province in an offensive the un says has displaced tens of thousands of people aid agencies are calling for urgent access but convoys are being blocked at the border with jordan as our middle east correspondent tom bateman now reports is your lori it's been here five days now twenty three four five days you have inside britain met brahim on the dusty frontier road from jordan to syria his lori is among more than fifty we counted.

steven spielberg director jj abrams uk us president assad un jordan tom bateman sweden meghan markle britain syria twenty three four five days seven years five days
"adaptions" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:40 min | 2 years ago

"adaptions" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Cool thanks the first question is your top three fiction novels that you've read all time question too is your top three memoirs you've ever read about time number three question is what movie do you think what's best adapted from a novel and the last question is do you think fahrenheit four fifty one would ever occur and the states in the future so my question well a couple of things they come to mind i actually like stephen king i read a lot and i actually think some of the adaptions of his books that aren't the that aren't the scary ones sort of like shawshank redemption in those i think are credible adaptions from books but there are so many of them in many times it's the movie that makes the book i mean if to kill a mockingbird wasn't the great movie that was would people be interested in collecting the the book so that's a few things personally i like i there's one of my favorite books that i read every single year there's a book that comes out the best sports writing of the year there's a editor named glenn stout and i love it because it's great writing this year's one had a great on tiger woods that i just finished reading but it has sports in it which i love their true in this social so it's almost impossible to just pick the best one the best piece it also depends on the mood urine so you know that's the type of questions that you could go on and we could go on for hours talking back and forth but the main thing is i love reading and i love in a depending on what day it is what mood it is you know what you pick up i think the could change from one to the other but i i like light and then i like very good history i loved doris goodwin's books david mccullough's ambrose you know so i i like historical novel so on and on and on and on yeah i'll give you a sort of a more generic answer if you will i certainly like one of our great local authors william martin yeah bill maher lincoln ladder and he's just coming out he'll be with us by the way a later this month he's in writing just about to release.

stephen king editor glenn stout doris goodwin david mccullough william martin
"adaptions" Discussed on The Russillo Show

The Russillo Show

01:43 min | 2 years ago

"adaptions" Discussed on The Russillo Show

"The way he runs around like he's that's not what's going to make him a great nfl player so have you seen enough adaption i guess our adaptation by nfl coaches that we saw with shawn watson we shot with bill o'brien do you think you now have a better time projecting what some of these guys are going to do when these offenses to the nfl is the nfl still little behind adapting to the quarterbacks it's hard to say with him right because like you say he's not a great athlete he's not in that you know even the percentage i mean he's average athletes gonna four forty four six or below he ran a four eight four he was tracked down in georgia game when those athletes in that second half made their halftime adjustment in that georgia games you saw him get stung number one got hit hard and he wasn't the he wouldn't put the ball precise ball placement was not there in the second half i went back and watch that is that okay defense a lot of great athlete he after the great i and he came back to earth quickly and that's when you find whose best team is you know they're just want the tom landry landrieu said hey we play the first half but the only halftime make your judgments the second half was when you truly find out who the best team is and in that game you know georgia was the better team and georgia had an answer for baker mayfield and baker mayfield played in the conference where you have all day to throw run around four eight four time look i if you think about it right he didn't look like a four eight four guy whether you get some of those things he was playing against and there's defensive player she thought man he's four six guy when he ran the forty they tested out to be very average so this guy no here's a classic overachiever ten that type of quarterback six foot and a half making the nfl.

shawn watson bill o'brien nfl tom landry landrieu georgia baker mayfield six foot
"adaptions" Discussed on Through The Ringer

Through The Ringer

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"adaptions" Discussed on Through The Ringer

"The name philip k dick is widely known as a brand the author of tales that have become someone most famous film and now television shows in science fiction the man himself in the actual stories he wrote or a ciphers let's take a brief look at pk de the man the adaptions which made him a brand name in science fiction new yorker's adam gopnik in his masterful two thousand seven essay on dick's life and works title blows against empire wrote as an adult reader coming back to dick you start off in a state of renewed wonder and then find yourself thumbing ahead to see how much farther you are going to have to go at the end of a dick marathon you end up admiring every one of his conceits in not a single one of his sentences that's brutal but having read last night the stories that would become impossible planet in the commuter it is fair it's fair harsh but fair harsh would fare personally i've always had trouble with dick i remember reading do androids dream after for seeing bladerunner i'm being like men it's kinda sucks guys dick stories many of them written under these way of titanic quantities of illicit substances including pcp speed lsd in sodium pentothal ak truth serum veritas zero yes our spartan fractured tales bursting with endless ideas most of them on fleshed out dick's great talent was his ability to take wild premises mine reading humanoid androids communication with the dead victoria's nazi space colonies among many others and burnish them with the veneer of everyday banality quote gopnik again quote the typical dick novel is at once fantastically original in its ideas and dutifully realistic charting their consequences dick and his twin sister jane born six weeks premature in nineteen twenty eight the eve of the great depression in chicago illinois is that why all these stores take place in chicago yes right what you know they say this okay jane died less than two months after their birth dick's family eventually moved to san francisco bay area dick coincidentally attended high school with fellow science fiction icon ursula kayla gwyn where my earth.

philip k dick adam gopnik lsd chicago jane illinois san francisco two months six weeks
"adaptions" Discussed on Binge Mode: Game of Thrones

Binge Mode: Game of Thrones

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"adaptions" Discussed on Binge Mode: Game of Thrones

"Shared visions and psychic powers unsurprisingly john lennon ends harvard intellectual come acid guru timothy leary were interested in tapping it for the screen 1968 stu androids dream of electric cheap surely dick's most famous work forms the basis for the 1982 ridley scott from 'bladerunner 1960 nines kubik about corporate employed psychics on the moon is considered by many dick heads did you coin dick ads i really are united after all the out deputies say there's no way in yes that genius who coined the dick heads ahha dicketts and proud to know your it truly am led grossman author of the magicians and a cultural critic for time magazine named it one of the one hundred best novels of all time all time saying dick pens a deeply unsettling eggs essential horror story a nightmare does never be sure you woken up from in 1974 frenchproduced director jeanpierre goeran higher dick to write the screenplay for potential film adaption dick then fully under this way of sodium pentothal and slipping into mental illness after faded visit to the dentist turned the script in a month later but the film was never produce this as far as i can tell is the only dapitan of his stories at dick actually worked on in 1998 cry of interactive entertainment released philip k dick rubik described as a tactical action strategy video game for the playstation a pc and this marks again as far as i can tell the first time dick's name was use specifically as a marketing device flow my tears the policeman said was published in 1974 and this is the only dick novelty nominee both for hugo and a nebulous nebula is the scifi fantasy award that's chosen by fantasy writers and is generally considered the more prestigious of the two it's about a genetically enhanced singer and reality survey finds himself in an alternate reality where he never existed in two thousand four utopia pictures and television acquired the film rights to three dick novels for my tears along with dick's tortured and personal opus vallis more in that in a bit and radio free alber move then in two thousand nine the housing company produces of turn.

timothy leary dick ridley scott time magazine playstation hugo john lennon harvard grossman director jeanpierre goeran sodium pentothal
"adaptions" Discussed on AM 1590 WCGO

AM 1590 WCGO

02:09 min | 3 years ago

"adaptions" Discussed on AM 1590 WCGO

"Agreement at one point said a resolves to enhance the provision version an adequate finance technology and capacitybuilding support by developed country parties which is us in order to enhance the level of ambition of pre 2020 action by the parties and so the the in this regard strongly urges developed country parties to scale up their level of financial support because one hundred billion dollars wasn't quite going to do it and they really wanted more money and they wanted a roadmap to achieve the goal of jointly providing usd one hundred billion annually ford mitigation and adaption the heck does that mean adaption while significantly increasing adaption finance what i guess what i'm trying to say the segment last 'as you know there's a lot of wealth there is nothing wrong with wealth of it comes to us via honest capitalism right but what's interesting about this as there are a lot of people i think protected making a lot of money not only of course in oil you've got dick cheney was january in in uh uh syria and you've got all kinds of different players making bank right in a lot of these people are really the people that run the country and and a lot of regards i think trump's trying to do what he can do and i think there's a lot going on behind the scenes of that we might not understand and i i really concede to that because of some of the things that are going it always seems sometimes that there are a couple of steps ahead the administration on on what's coming out and they do let things sort of role a and and i it will be insured that's why i always said give it some time because this is such a huge mess that it's going to take some time to sort of unravel all of this and maybe maybe get this giant could ball of protection and take that down this house of cards because as all these people are making money whether it be off of malicious go their child trafficking whether it be off of him off of the transfer of wealth for kliment how does how does that work i'd love to know what adaption means they're putting in one hundred billion dollars and that's just really kind of on the onset of that that does not the.

dick cheney syria trump ford one hundred billion dollars
"adaptions" Discussed on I Think You're Interesting

I Think You're Interesting

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"adaptions" Discussed on I Think You're Interesting

"But every time i came up for error i had some time i had made since check on this project and it was mostly out of curiosity just to think wh you know when it when is it coming down the pike a you know and it turned out of that um i lean had moved on to empire slumming with with for her brilliant djokovic historically the shot tv and them you know she was doing quite well for herself and the project had moved to who which was interesting to me 'em it's always interesting when a project ends up somewhere that what wasn't even in existence when the project began show and uh they it was through mgm and then i had very close relationships with steve stark and lindsey sloan over there that i built up over years i've worked with the before people in hollywood get a bad reputation but almost the the number of people who i've worked with one to ten times in hollywood who consider some of the most upstanding it'll just business partners business years uh that list is quite long and they were on it so i her they were looking for new show runners from into a kind of look at the pilot and see what adaptions had to be made and then to run the show for the first ten episodes to write of him but there were looking for woman now um and i was on their side yeah uh i thought it was a good idea that was a it'll kind of essential um and if i didn't want the job so much i would have been thumbs up great you know a hear some suggestions and so i waited patiently in than i just went in ends when they finally said okay will meet with you i went in the net just ran them through what i was thinking about what things would make it.

mgm lindsey sloan hollywood djokovic steve stark