35 Burst results for "account manager"

How To Create Your Own ROI-Driven B2B Content Strategy

Voices of Search by Searchmetrics

01:31 min | Last week

How To Create Your Own ROI-Driven B2B Content Strategy

"Live in a more distributed world because everybody was forced into their house. It's a more digital age to talk to me about how that is impact. The creation of content and how people are staffing out their content production teams definitely so personally for autho didn't affect us a whole lot and that's because one of the drums banging for a while that i think like the rest of the world has kind of had to light. Come up wake up to a hard way is that i think more marketers sent a focus on like creativity and ingenuity and those things are good because it comes more natural to those types of people. But i think that they need to be more process oriented. And i think about operations kinda hat or the operations might set something that's often lacking and so what i mean by. That is the way we think of content seo and all. This stop is a huge factory. Right where you have. It's like a manufacturing process where you have specialized roles and you have an seo person or a strategy person working with a writer who's also working with an editor who's also working with an account manager designer. And he's i since collaborating a synchronous -ly across time zones and everything else and until you have that infrastructure built outs you're gonna struggle hitting both quality and scale meeting. Most people like for example companies can find one good writer but they can't find like hundred writers or they can't they do ten articles. A month of began do one hundred articles a month and so usually one of those things breakdown when you try to hit longer. Bigger scale usually quality starts to drop. And that's usually an indication of you don't have the processes and figured out you have the team and infrastructure figured out

"account manager" Discussed on Oil and Gas Startups Podcast

Oil and Gas Startups Podcast

04:33 min | Last month

"account manager" Discussed on Oil and Gas Startups Podcast

"That's the only place you need to go to clearly. We know this all information from new so this is like my second podcasts. I'm recording studio. This is bitcoin minor Painting that i just completely admire usually usually like the pot like it's usually like one on one across the table to very open bang. I'm kind of curious about the how you feeling right now. I like it. it's very it's comfort. It is like it's to me. It's comfort. I think i just have to get used to it. No it's it's i mean if you're used to doing it in on a table or desk and you got the headphones on back when you know you're doing was yeah. You sat on kind of like how we are now. Actually with more of a closed was opposed. Yes kind of feels more. Like studio style. What's your what's your set up. Because i know that you're so you got to podcasts yet. The drill down right the flow throw line. Low line flow also though g g n Yeah oil and gas onshore so the only gas onshore is i typically record while here in the canon which this little cannon but in other canon there's these Conference room so. I'll do it in a conference room. So it's like maybe like fifteen by twelve room table. yeah one on one like traditional prep-work before Not much really. I mean the the the person's name name islet gone linked in for a while. And i've like super good at googling and like really just getting to know Like i can look at lincoln profile in pretty much drum up a conversation around that gets pretty easy So it's i mean. I have a method to it. I don't go in with a blank canvas. But i have somewhat of a template that i follow. Do you do the same. Template for both podcast. No totally different. I mean because the the flow line. Podcasts is a is purely an educational platform where we talk about certain drilling fluid topics so it's qna but it's more specific to drilling fluids whereas though the only gas on shores interviews dot com conversation another person it is. Yeah and i mean i. I had you guys on a long time ago which we need to do around to. I would love to do around two. Yeah things have changed. And that's no. We're going to do that. Hereafter this will line up date but Yeah i mean i mean customer to you. 'cause you're what like your hundred deep race or the previous podcast released one hundred three episodes there is three. I didn't release and this one Of released one so far. You've done one hundred plus episodes. You mean you didn't do any prep today. I didn't exactly that you would carry the team will. Yeah no of course easy. Got this like laguardia. I don't know twenty minutes in and you haven't even like you didn't scratch down a single thing on a piece of paper's i would imagine just like you for me i could. I could go into one without any what happens off days. You'd kind of bullshit with someone you're like. I'm like my feeling like it's not always not there like what does that feel like. Yeah it sucks you..

lincoln laguardia
"account manager" Discussed on Oil and Gas Startups Podcast

Oil and Gas Startups Podcast

04:20 min | Last month

"account manager" Discussed on Oil and Gas Startups Podcast

"So what i did. Is i strategically married. An american to smooth process right because for those that are huge fans of energy crew like you. Just i've downloaded episodes have been one of them which is great so i'm batting one hundred percent. You're welcome but your wife is actually going to be released before this podcast. And she came on to talk about wicked holdings yes. She crushed she She's a study jonoski. She's gonna be ciardi is more popular than me. She's probably made a lot more money than me She probably believe me when she realizes the potential she has. And i'm okay. Well yeah. I should listen. No actual why not is twenty twenty one. You should be able to post up. Yeah and speaking of twenty twenty one and awoke we are. Did you know that on passports. Now you can self identify. What do you mean so if you go to get your passport which obviously now i can't because i'm fully american. Can you don't have to prove your identity like whether you want to be a male jason. I feel like jason bourne. Like any of those spies like. This is such a loophole form. Like this is perfect. Not only do. I have like all these like ghost passwords. I can use now now. I have this whole selection of whatever. I wanna identify with passports. Yeah yeah right. I mean it's great for spies. So sneaky man hunter no just a bunch of crazy stuff going on you yourself up and like current events nonstop because like. I can't even sleep at night. Are you seri- no. I don't care where you're bringing up all these issues. I mean this is entertainment. Do these things like actually. Like like pissy. Wa i th i is purely entertainment value. You wanna know something else. That's pretty cool. tuesday missy. Elliott turned fifty million. Yeah what about this. Not being goal. Bill cosby got released. I was not cool wall. I'm staying away from that with justin and everyone. That's a that's a wrap we're done with this we're done with this episode Holy shit okay. Let's i'm going to try to recover. Recover this real quick. See.

jason bourne jason missy Elliott Bill cosby justin
Diversity And Inclusion In Digital Marketing

Agency Ahead by Traject

04:51 min | 6 months ago

Diversity And Inclusion In Digital Marketing

"Okay. Welcome back to the agency ahead. Podcast by trajectory your scared sussman the head. Mark nieto trajectory. I am really excited. We are talking about one of the major topics that that is an ongoing issue in our industry. Which is diversity inclusion like for people who are getting into our industry marketing advertising as well as getting a seat at the executive table. I am joined by two brilliant women Rejoice a jock. who who is the global. Seo account manager at neo media world and will amina davis who is a search engine optimization specialists at reload digital where she just started and both of them are co founders of be digital which is a social platform to really just continue to have this conversation around diversity and inclusion and helping people of color and anyone who is kind of on the outside in how they can get involved with our industry feel safe improve the conversations improve you know just the production and what people are doing. Thank you ladies so much for joining me today. Thank you for having us. I think he this is cool. So this is one of the few interviews that i'm doing with two different guests. But you ladies have a chemistry i wanna know about digital. Tell me kind of what it is. Where did it come from. What are your goals with with your organization the movement. So we've been keiser. We basically i think we me with amina went to the women in tech. Seo conference and we do love that know this problem for women s year in general. But then when we were there. We like to seen as blackie d. You saw that is whether you're the president of the room to an agency michaels. Our there's no law black people here or black women and then i think we're just sitting on just. We should have something. That is promoting black. Pete who are all. I'm full black people to talk about an marketing advertising in general and thus be digital was a both of so we didn't wanna make exclusive. She just wanted to branch out to many different Channels within digital marketing and then we kind of decided what we call the scheme. I think it took us a day so this is what we want. This is how it and then we decided let's create campos. Let's create all of these things and known and i. I don't think we had a concrete crime. I think we like. We just wanna paste haven day information but it picks up so quickly and i remember we'd like we'd the quarterback. Now let's go and we just like we're gonna be we're going to. We're gonna do it and we kind of just us how this was really full. It was just t black gals who just once he goes. A space will other black people to be educated. Inspired and showcase telling shelf mocked into this amazing thing that is now part of this divesting inclusion compensation. That is awesome you know. What are you guys doing. So what how. Are you having these conversations. Where are you having these conversations. And and what are you doing with this momentum so having these conversations across all platforms Jay said let we started. We had no idea we just knew. We had a message and use voices. We had no idea when reach so. We just steidl like instagram Instagram feeds is on twitter and then asking trump house and then Can have this wet platform so all our platforms have been with him every time of presented a new place. When i yes let us spread this message nutshell. We're trying to do. let us know. Let people know that we want to create the space for black people. We once leitner. There's tuesday to help you grow that. You know people like you exist. They are bad. Because that's very important for us. I think is very lucky. I get to say that. I get to grow alongside digital because everything doing i'm still there. I literally started when i start to be digital About four months. So i was very new so just need says. I didn't have anywhere else to go to lender by s year. I didn't know anybody else who acts so. I want people who just let me to have that. I want them to have confidence by the new job. When you're moving even To the clubhouse on house again new jobs so i feel like i'm greg just alongside the digital said kind of like the first hand experience in space to we're trying to de

Mark Nieto Amina Davis Sussman Amina Keiser Blackie SEO Michaels Pete Leitner JAY Twitter Greg
Former Thunder employee charged in US Capitol invasion

Sean Hannity

00:29 sec | 7 months ago

Former Thunder employee charged in US Capitol invasion

"In the January 6 storming of the U. S. Capitol. An FBI affidavit says former co workers of 37 year old Daniel Doyle recognized her from video footage and contacted authorities. Footage allegedly shows Doyle climbing through a window. Doyle worked for the thunder as an account manager. She's been charged with knowingly entering a restricted building, disorderly conduct and violent entry on Capitol grounds. The State House passes a bill to post in God. We

U. S. Capitol Daniel Doyle Doyle FBI Thunder State House
Diving More Deeply Into Diversity

Yeah, That's Probably an Ad

06:24 min | 7 months ago

Diving More Deeply Into Diversity

"Welcome to this special episode of. Yeah that's probably an ad. I'm coat m. your community editor and this week is a really special one. We have some inspiring guests in our room with us as it is black history month and as we continue these important conversations about race racial injustice social justice within our marketing and advertising communities so I'd like to introduce jason. Rosario who is chief diversity equity and inclusion At bbdo worldwide gabriel director of global diversity and inclusion at abercrombie and fitch company and jasmine cruise brand manager at beach. La and head of marketing and brand strategy at in her shoes movement. Thank you so much guys for being with me today I have excited to chat absolutely so before we kind of dive deeply into the conversation Let's start with jason Tell us more about kind of what you do. And what you're trying to do such a question i'll try my best to answer it as distinctly as possible. But i think i'm a jack of many trades but specifically at bbdo. My remit is to lead a global diversity efforts across the network on an enterprise level. And so what that means is to. My job is to figure out how we might be able to apply inclusive principles to every aspect of the organization from recruiting and retention and partnering with hr on kind of core cultural diversity equity inclusion initiatives. All the way through to pot a week rate more inclusive representative Client output in. How do we advise our clients to think through these lenses if you will so Broadly speaking that's my role Outside of that. I'm an advocate for a masculinity in mental health I started a or launched. An agency called the lives of men which uses the conversation around modern masculinity to explore. has implications on diversity equity and inclusion allied ship and the intersection of those conversations and mental health. So that is a sickness. I can put it Thank you for all that you do in the various spaces that you're a part of What about you gabby Where are you at with this new gig in terms of What you're trying to do within nf yet. I've been A diversity equity inclusion blinding practitioner for the last ten years in really this new hampshire with. Nfl has been really really exciting. discussed really the more fascinating part to me In having an opportunity to lead the effort goes beyond just diversity as a practitioner For me it's really all the other parts that keep me up at night The parts that would influence Candidates employees associates to wanna stay within an organization. So it's really around the side of the house that deals more with inclusion More equitable workforce building that sense of cultural belonging in an organization. And that means that are focused. Can't just beyond diversity for the sake of boxes but migiro really is rather to try and influence and create the type of environment where employees associates feel that they can bring their full selves to work each and every day in creating more accessible equitable workforce and in addition to that. I mean you know abercrombie and fitch. It's really really interesting. Time to work in the space where our mission is really been dedicated to amplify engaging in power empowering folk small different backgrounds and really foster in an open environment where folks can come together. Listen learn and really take action to move from conversations toward action and influencing the products that we're creating to reflect our global customer so it's been really fascinating You know i start my career in higher education working in nyu and columbia then pivoted to citi group Leading our diversity inclusion efforts early career talent and then transitioning to the fashion industry which is really really exciting opportunity to make a make an impact end create product that has the opportunity to create social change right across our across our communities in really interesting way. I have so many questions About kind of what you all have seen so far but first jazzman How do you include that d. i. lens as somebody who's on the agency side and also trying to you know achieve more equity in the greater world. Yeah i. I'm just so to be part of this conversation and hearing from jason gabby amongst inspiring folks so I think as an account manager really partnering with clients and but also partnering with leadership in how we infused diversity equity inclusion not just from an internal perspective but so that emanates within How we partner with clients We just ensuring that yes. We're being responsible and that brands are being responsible but also Figuring out how what we can do to not just check the box like abbie said but actually make tangible change. And so i think for me personally. It's just something that i've always been about which led me to Being part of the in her shoes movement A nonprofit base-year l. a. And so i have this unique Intersection where i get to see What does social impact look like from grassroots Point of view but then also in my day job like how. How can we partner with clients in doing this. Great work in continuing this great work especially with brands that wants to create

Bbdo Worldwide Gabriel Global Diversity Fitch Company Jasmine Cruise Brand Jason Rosario Bbdo Migiro Abercrombie Citi Group LA Beach New Hampshire NFL Fitch Jason Gabby NYU Columbia Abbie
"account manager" Discussed on WhyWeWork BrianVee

WhyWeWork BrianVee

05:52 min | 7 months ago

"account manager" Discussed on WhyWeWork BrianVee

"Welcome to why we work with your host. Brian veep as he speaks to people. Like you from all over the world as we together dive deeper into our motivations struggles joys seemingly missteps hopes warnings and advice. Which would be an encouragement to us all to get up. Get going and keep on. Working working stopped working his good. Now here's your host to why we were trying. I'm brian be and this is why we work today. The great pleasure. Speaking with chris judd. Chris is the account manager at 'em kel corporation in canada where his company.

Chris Brian chris judd brian canada today em kel corporation
Revision Host Maurice Cherry Interviews Danny Shaw, Director of Digital Design and Branding at Brandshare

Revision Path

12:01 min | 8 months ago

Revision Host Maurice Cherry Interviews Danny Shaw, Director of Digital Design and Branding at Brandshare

"All right. Let's get to the interview this week. I'm talking with danny shaw design educator located in new york city. Let's start the show all right so tell us who you are and what you do all right. Thanks for having me. I'm danny shaw. I'm a design educator. Most of the time also product manager when need to be a project manager as well and at the co- at the end of the day. I'm still a designer multi multi-disciplined design of course across the digital space. Okay how has twenty twenty one been for you so far. Twenty twenty one i mean. What are we with thirteen days. Then will far personally has been fine. You know but just looking at the world around me. You would be hard pressed to say that right but personally has been fine so far. So i'm grateful for that How was last year. I know you know the pandemic really kind of turned everyone's world upside down to some sort away. How did you get the year. Last year was a lot. I think a lot of people was ally of me personally. A lot of personal relationships it greatly impacted things for instance my grandparents who visit my grandparents all the time multiple times throughout the eddie live atlanta. I have not been able to see them. And that's really been a tough pill to swallow on person aside and not being able to see other relatives so that's definitely been hard but then which is probably roundabout way on the professional side. It's it's been probably one of the most busiest of hat professionally. A lot of business in the landscape changes so fast rapidly where the digital acceleration accelerated even more than the pace that it was already at which impacted my inbox in my email. People me up for advice and counsel and job. So it's been a mixed bag is definitely been a mix. Let's focus on work for a minute here. You're the director of digital design and strategy for a company called brand share. What does brands share. Do all right. So shit is e commerce marketing company in for a lot of people who may not be familiar with that concept and idea. We work with a lot of. Cpg burns consumer packaged goods such as emmons but if a lot of the packaging goods that we see on a regular basis as consumers so we work with these companies in regards to the marketing strategy. Introducing them to the market gaining insights and data on these new products that's being introduced to the market and we partner with them on their strategy and execution and how the scale they are offering to the audience at large in a nutshell. It comes across multiple channels digital in person shipping. We do a lot of experts. You things as well so Touch on a lot of areas with these brands trying to get as far as being the partner between the brands and these new products. That's trying to the market. In services and reaching that specific audience that the china targeting reach for their respective products. How did you first get started there at the time. I was transitioning from a position that i was working. At in north carolina as product manager and at the time there was some organizational changes. And i was looking in north carolina and and doing that and just going back and forth between new york and chronic to get my fares in order and iran ran to the person who became my manager So we just ran into each other. We used to work in the past at time. inca essence. She just told me she was working there. She was she just started. She was trying to build a team. She was looking for some freelance designers and asked me if i would be open to discuss it and i i'm open to discussing. I was just transitioned from the last role and said hey you know this might be something of interest for me. While i'm transitioning to china figure out the next and then it just happened to work out. Well we worked well together. I've worked with the rest of the team. And i'm working on the designs and floor the digital initiatives and then it just kind of kept going from there into full-time role and then may stand with the company and so forth. What does the team. Makeup look like autumn. Agean you've got designers because you mentioned design but do you work with so i work with everybody. We work with everybody. So i have Outside of me to other designers on my team i work with the vp of marketing. A record the bp digital. We're we're not. We're about fifty. I'll not that big. So we're about fifty person staff based in new york and of pennsylvania so i pretty much everybody to chairman of the company as well That the president. It really depends on the project. What's what needs to be done. You get to intimate environment. So i kind of get to work with everybody account managers and so forth as well now given that the company sizes is so small like what's a typical daylight now because i would imagine you all are not able to get together in an in an office or you now while the pennsylvania offices so they are all the way the to set up a lot of the new york office we are. We're all remote right to be clear. And we were based in midtown manhattan midtown manhattan but The pa office depending on the circumstances on what might be needed. Maybe like a photo shoot or something like that. Some members still going to office but for the most part is still pretty much remote as well. So yeah but a typical day. Nowadays is really. Just you know looking at Obviously out calendar in the before just trying to coordinate on the bear. Risk projects and initiatives looking at tickets. You know gotta look at these tickets to see what's to was the status of status meetings just to kind of make sure that we're on track with a lot of things calls a foul benders looking at roadmap. There's a lot of. I would say a lot of time. Put was president planning a lot more so than in the past so so to speak. It really varies. I really wouldn't even know what to say. What did with low but my on a log. I'm pretty much aware of what my day is already gonna look like just because i leave when i log out. I just see what. I have lined up for the next day. So usually it's a mix between meetings. Some our collaborate with the design team once needed as well as account manager for any new requests checking on the status of ongoing projects as well touching base with the vp of digital. For any other items. That might be down the line sometimes. I am checking in with some of our dev engineers team on the status of things as managing few about digital initiatives and ecommerce sites. Yeah it really ranges mountain towns. I'm looking at analytics in number. Metrics is to see if you know some insights in in regards to the strategy. And make sure we're on pace. We're doing the right thing. There's room for improvement in always looking for some wounds improvements as well so it really varies. Throughout the day. Monday tuesday could be two completely different. Days does sound like a lot. Yes it's it's cool but yeah it can vary a lot. Have you had to adopt any sort of new like strategies or workflows over the past year. Yeah sure well. They tend to crack jokes on me. Because i am like the uae. Try to organize one. You know being a project manager and in the past and project management roles a really try to align and keep things as organiz as feasibly possible. So i think i've definitely had been allowed strong advocate for that. Not just for myself but across the team especially during kobe right so that one thing that be really just had to really make adjustments for the communication on big on communication. I think a lot of not just designed problems. I think a lot of problems in general could be resolved if we communicate elopement so readily had to be strategic in how we communicate and open up communications to help foster solutions especially now that we're not all in this together we can't just walk over to someone and so forth so the communication was definitely gonna be safe there and also iguanas when everything for his hidden in in the world changed right before. Is i do think aloud people kind of know what to do right. So we worked in mit working past normal times and things like that and i think for me was at a place where it had to be diligent about. Okay shut off. There's only so much you can do. And i think not just for me. A lot of people had to make that adjustment as well with the state of the world. Yeah i know a lot of think. It was last year right around the time that the that the pandemic happened. Or the the lockdown started to happen. I was talking with a lotta people for the show who they had either just started a new job in like now it's day for and their mentor. Work from home continually or they're having a tough time to transition from being in the office to now having to sort of work in this synchronous sort of fashion right. And i will say to me. Just because i've had roles in the past where i've worked remote merola north carolina. It was a big remote work environment. Culture prior i would go into the office but it was nothing to see a member who was working remote that day for various reasons. It was very flexible. People have kids people have health issues. We worked with teams across the country. Kind of remote teams across the country engineer so it was never never felt like everybody had to be all his so for me. I was comfortable already transitioned into a more remote environment but this has been the most. I don't know if this is the most remote. I just to show. Has there been like one thing that you've gotten that's really helped you make that adjustment pretty. Well bob meditated. On is i. I really got into a meditation a bit more. Just read different philosophies at least for me just trying to make sense of everything that was going on you know i. I don't have the head. Space is the head. Space app was very very helpful. Helped me sleep more consistently in and things like that. We all just trying to figure out what works for us right. I didn't feel i needed. I wasn't really looking for anything. I was going to make me a better employee anyway. On it I think i was more concerned with was going to help me maintain some schmidt to help during all this time. Yeah so like when it comes to working on a new project or with a new client. What does that creative process look like with you being the director strategy. I know you've got the team under you. What does that sort of process look like from start to finish well. It really varies. Because the relationship that we have with declines it changes in some cases we are more or less facilitators and creative may already common just working on a strategy how to execute it for them and what are the proper market in digital media channels so to speak and then other times. We are developing in design in house. And when that happens of course that's when the standard procedures. What's what's the goal was the objectives. What are we trying to achieve was the demographics that research behind it first before we start opening programs right trying to get an understanding of what the client needs. What goes let's the. Kpi was the measurement of success prior to all of that and then basically looking at our offerings the now tools and resources to see how we can best executed across the board. It may not always be digital 'execution it might be exponential execution might be Just some inserts in getting them the scanty oracle's taken you know micro sites and things like that might be a newsletter campaigns and stuff like that so it does vary but i think we start each project just trying to warn just get an understanding of what are the key goals and objectives and. How do we facilitate that. That making sure that we have the right information to go about executing properly across creative across strategy and course execution as well

Danny Shaw North Carolina New York Emmons Manhattan Pennsylvania China New York City Atlanta Iran PA Bob Meditated UAE Schmidt Oracle
Learning to Speak the Language of Your Clients with Kim Doughty

Agency Ahead by Traject

06:45 min | 8 months ago

Learning to Speak the Language of Your Clients with Kim Doughty

"You know. A lot of agencies will have an intake form you know where they're trying to collect the information before they even get to that first conversation. What has historically worked best for you. Do you cheer points. Like i can imagine. The conversation is when you establish that. I'm talking about language sort of thing. Do you have a form that speaks their language as well or do you wait for the conversation and the meeting to really get everything that you need I've seen at work a bunch of ways whether that's Being started out from the sales guy. Who's trying to get that lead and starting those initial conversations to Doing it a giving them. You know forms ahead of time and waiting for them to fill them out and just doing them in the meeting itself. honestly i think that it kind of depends on how your team is organized. So if you have a sales team. That's really attuned to the services that you offer and they have a list of questions that they should always be act asking clients in order to at least like validate the quality of their leaves before they go through with the sales process. That's a great place to start and then You know. Ideally those forms are things that both the client and our agency is able to edit so if we happen to already have the answer we can just put that in there. If there's anything that's left hanging we can ask them to answer. That and sometimes clients are not really good at paperwork or even like respond to emails. You just have to get them on the phone and ask them point blank. What the answer is but You know anything that is left off from that initial sales process. I usually would probably expect to get those answered in the initial meeting when they're meeting that account manager assuming that you know this is a completely new client from the very beginning and that Usually gives us more nuance anyway. You know when a when a client writes down an answer sometimes. Just like oh. I don't know where my goal is to grow. It doesn't always give you the information that you really need to move forward and asking those questions and making them actually think off the top of their head and explain More thoroughly is a lot more valuable than trying to get them to you. Know pull their hair out. Trying to answer a list of questions on google form or just a google doc. At and that's interesting too. Like getting clients to articulate when they might not be either a speaking. Your speaker be like really forthcoming with like not even knowing what they want water. Some of the ways you'll percent like. How do you tease out the information that you need from the client especially if they're not as normally susceptible to to make any details on you so Your question is how am. I getting my questions answered. If they don't necessarily know how to communicate that is that right yet. Essence Sometimes a lot sometimes. It's a matter of giving examples Especially if if you're an agency that kind of has a focus on a particular industry or you've worked with that industry before I've had examples of like. Oh well we have a client of a similar size to you or perhaps a little bit bigger. That has this goal or is doing this or is putting this level of budget towards their marketing. Based on you know the amount of revenue that they get per year And sometimes our i mean at the end of the day like if they really don't know That is kind of our job to give them our best recommendations based on our our expertise having been doing this for other clients for however long. We're doing it so At the end of the day like if they don't know they don't know what they don't know and If it's a matter of giving examples if you think they are on the edge of finding an answer and they just need some help. That's great. If not i always go for will. Here's what i would. Here's what i would do in your situation. Is that a red flag or a green flag for you and do we want to continue moving forward with that. Speaking of red flags and green flags. What are some of your favorite types of clients like when you're meeting them. Okay i'm gonna love working with this individual versus ones where you're like okay. This is i. Just i turn my hair on already in. It's ten minutes in well. I don't want to say what i don't like about clients that our i'll focus on On some green flags so I had a client wants who the first time we ever met him. He brought starbucks frappuccino. Is everyone on the team and he was. I know that's always a good hint when they're like just ready to hang out and be relaxed At the same time being a little too lax sometimes is a client that is difficult to get a hold of and make decisions but generally People who are there because they know they don't know all the answers And are truly looking for advice. is often a really good client to have because it You know assuming that your agency is giving them the best recommendations that you possibly can. It becomes a really positive partnership. Understanding that You know they needed help. And you provided as much as you can And then of course when they're really prompts with providing deliverables or or you know approving of deliverables. Mix our jobs a lot. Easier you know at the end of the day like we're not magicians and i think that sometimes like a thing. We have to manage with clients where they're like. Well you're the you're the seo person like why am. I not showing up when i search this fifteen times a day in the search bar You know understanding that things take time in like understanding that It doesn't appear out of nowhere from from content. That has just been written or anything like that like it's always helpful when Some understanding i mean obviously like a client. That's understanding is usually someone that we like to work with.

Google Starbucks
Why The Industry Needs More Women in Landscaping

Landscape Disruptors

03:08 min | 10 months ago

Why The Industry Needs More Women in Landscaping

"Welcome to today's show. We have a special guest. We have carla bailey on and she's actually one of the loudest strongest voices for women in landscaping. This is ben her mantra in which she's told you know gotten well known for the human resources manager for tlc. But i wanna find out more about what. Carlos concentrating on carla. How are you doing today during rarely while thank you. So can i ask you a straightforward question carla of course what is women in landscaping mean. I mean because it's not like it's closed to women in landscaping so. What is being an advocate for women. Landscaping actually look. Like oh goodness. While i suppose for me i i walked onto a role at tlc landscape in quite some years ago and realized that you look at this workforce and probably ninety percents Are meant nine. I've tried to hire women in get him to come on. And i'm like maybe it's just me i mean i love having women work because i think they do. They pay close attention to detail. They seem to care about it but then a making blanket generalizations which may not be actually accurate. Saw what i think happens there. Is you know as as at sea level or that. The business owner or the manager. Doing the hiring you know looking at how to welcome women into this industry and letting them know that this is a career industry. This is an industry that employs over a hundred thousand people annually. The revenue is in the billions. So making sure that the knowledge is out there that you can have a career. You can have a family and you can be a woman within. This industry is a huge message to send out well and a career doesn't have to look like you are one of the guys on the shovel in the dirt. I mean a career in landscaping takes on a large variety of formulas. i mean there are so many different ways that you can be inside this industry and actively participate without actually being out in the field is much in oil we need. We need to eliminate. I think this model scott view where you're in landscaping you're out in the field. Everyday doing what there's got to be done. I'm gonna tell you right now. I think there's so much potential and opportunities for people to grow but they gotta go through the first steps which is getting familiar with the work before they can go onto the next steps which may be their true calling exactly. It's the asking the questions and then learning. Who do i ask these questions to you. Know if you're going to your high school guidance counselor what today actually know about. The industry ended an industry on whole account. Managers payroll administrators business owners. There's a whole different gamut and their sector within that as well so what you really find interesting. And how do we get to talk to these people and talk to them young and talk to them with their families so that they understand how many different paths and how exciting it really can be.

Carla Bailey Carlos BEN Scott
"account manager" Discussed on Anything But Idle

Anything But Idle

02:33 min | 1 year ago

"account manager" Discussed on Anything But Idle

"You know we want to be able to have the level of security like for example, I can't secure the password database It is sitting in the browser and if you have access to this computer and you're logged into the account, I have access to not only your passwords but everyone else who is logged into Google chrome in the browser that is not into the web instance. But in the browser level all passwords that are in that browser are available to me. I can access all of them and It's very. Easy to crack it and to to access those passwords The other problem is that if somebody infiltrates my computer they've then can go to any website and start logging into things So it's another layer of security plus my ability to go from one device to the device in the world and use my password manager. Of Choice means I'm not tied to Google Chrome I can use last pass across many different browsers log in log out and I know that it's end to end encrypted. Last past doesn't have access to my passwords. It's all done on device, and so I'm able to then have this level of great security plus. Last. Pass if I die, they go to my executor and executor can now unlock my account have access to my passwords. Now I do have that I do have an inactive account manager on my Google Account. So technically, you know after six months if I if I've not logged into my google account or used it, Google will pass that credential along to my executor as well But we want to wait that long you as I'm as tying up my estate, all those other. Things it really is quite a an onerous process and you can make the inactive account manager a little bit shorter, make three months, two months, whatever it is but I just really liked the functionality and the freedom of being able to something independent and while I love Google and there's no question about that. You know I'm on the record but you know. It's too good to diversify. It just to comment on that Matt I use two different browsers very frequently I bounced between chrome and edge multiple times during the course of a day and to have all of the passwords which some of my stuff isn't actually passwords it's notes it's count information that sort that isn't really tied to a webpage. Trying to store that in a browser based solution limits my flexibility. So I look I use last pass as well and I like it on the back end because I can get to it every place I have that ubiquitous access level and to me that's the key thing coupled with their levels of encryption security and two factor authentication..

Google account manager Matt
Go from Vendor to Member

Ag Sales Professional's Podcast by Greg Martinelli

07:11 min | 1 year ago

Go from Vendor to Member

"I want you to go from being a vendor in your industry to being a member how to change your mind set on who you are in your industry the shift from being a vet near in your industry to being a part of your industry is a subtle mental shift in your thinking. However, it is a huge impact on your confidence and what you bring to your customer often. We consider ourselves Spectators in the industry. We sell into since we are not grain or livestock producers. We feel almost like an outsider when it comes to our industry took some reason the fact that we sell and ask for money makes us feel as if we are not truly in the trenches of the business. We can almost feel marginalized in this feeling can be so strong. People don't want to be described as a salesperson when I began working with sales teams. There are those on some of the teams who will tell me very loudly and in phatic Lee I am not in sales. I do not do the sales thing. Well, these feelings are reinforced as we participate in trade shows designed for producers. All the programs are focused on the producers bathtime is relegated to a short time in the morning lunch. And at a random break-in the presentations we even get different colored name tags to it. So attendees can tell us apart. I'm not saying we need change anything we were doing in the industry. I understand why we operate trade shows the way we do what I am saying is that you can change the way you think about your involvement in the industry. I'm doing so will provide several huge benefits in your sales career being recognized as a leader in your industry increases the trust that customers and Prospects have with you which of course speeds. The selling process first thing to do is realize that you are not in the fertilizer business. You're in the crop production industry. You're not in the feed industry. You are in the swine industry wage fill in your own example of whatever it is, but realize that you're not in the industry of what you sell but you are in the customers industry. This mental shift alone is enough for some sales people to embrace what they do quit feeling apologetic or vague about what you do you're not some vendor sitting on the sidelines waiting to extract money, you are a talented experienced and trusted advisor wage by some of the best producers in the industry. You not only deserve to be paid for it, but paid more due to your involvement in the industry and you're worth it that involvement means that you are network with others than industry so you can help your customers. Yes, you sell feed but you are connected to vets University resources and to Industry leaders and influencers. You don't just connect or learn with people on nutrition facts. Networked widely across your industry your customers realize how valuable your industry involvement is when they are in a crisis. That's when they really find out you're worth when their animals are sick or dying their crops are having disease outbreaks or yield issues when they need help understanding and navigating the challenging world of precision Egg Farm financial decisions are grain marketing. That's when they find out how valuable you are with these are the moments when they realize you are not just a vendor you're a valuable resource that works hard for their success. And yes, you get paid to do it back to our agronomist nutritionist tagblender account manager who doesn't consider themselves A salesperson or doesn't do the sales thing first. Everyone is selling something at a minimum you sold your company on your resume when you interviewed for the job currently hold secondly the whole company your whole company is designed to create and keep customers. So whatever you do, it's for the customer when I run into these individuals I never wage. To change their mind. I simply asked him. Well, that's good. What do you do then? They usually explain all the things they do for customers are how they help the sales team help their customer. Sometimes they get it as they explain what they do and sometimes they don't I imagine that day when they realize diet I guess I really am in sales. Well, here are a few suggestions of ways that you could move and shift from vendor to member of your industry. Number one participate in your customers trade shows a 10 get a booth sponsor speak at them or volunteer to help em City number to participate in the trade Association join the board be an expert in a particular area for the association right for their newsletter. Number three network key players in Crop Production reach out to several agronomists microbial suppliers chemical suppliers seed companies. We are doing so much in the virtual world today at the cost of putting down. Grouped together is virtually free number for Network your company experts into an online event give your customers and your industry a chance to see behind the curtain a little bit odd points of interest for this might be you know, what a loan committee looks at in improving your larger loans how your PhD researchers set up feeding trials how equipment is tested during product engineering and design or how satellite data is actually converted into real-time data. Obviously, you would never reveal proprietary information, but we are in a very mature industry. Most of what we do is either common knowledge or easily found out and on the internet you can certainly explain or share what you do without sharing exactly how you do it. The number five is not working participate in your customers customers business. Let me say that again Network and participate in your customers customers business. This is more applicable to those of us that sell to agri-business. If you sell to a Cooperative locations be involved with producer groups in that area. That's where your customers will be focused. I sold to dealers so I was not only involved in the dealer business office, but I was involved in the horse and poultry industry. Well as you make that transition from vendor to trusted industry adviser realize that this all comes at a cost you spend valuable time and money to become that you attend sponsor and set up booths you attend training events to learn how to be a better resource for your customers you are available as an advisor on other parts of the industry, you know know I was off a lawyer but I did know a few rules and regulations to help customers stay out of trouble. All of this comes at a cost and should not be given away for free by that. I mean you should not be priced shop penny for Penny against a competitor who offers nothing more than a 1-800 number to place an order if that is the case find another Market to sell into if your Market is so price-sensitive you home. Sell your products at the same price, even though you are this trusted advisor, then your rewards should be loyalty. In other words customers loyalty is another way of recognizing your value to them. They could or would buy from others if you weren't who you are in the industry, and when you reach that point, congratulations, you have established a strong personal brand in your industry. I hope today's podcast helped you on your journey to be the best

Advisor Trade Association Egg Farm Penny LEE Account Manager Producer
How To Negotiate Any Big Expense

The $100 MBA Show

05:11 min | 1 year ago

How To Negotiate Any Big Expense

"Let's jump right into today's lesson and make sure we know how to negotiate those big expenses. So first, let's identify what our big expenses are. So you've got to take a look air piano if you don't have a profit law she. Then, you should have one. This is a simple simple google she or excel. She were you just list all the things you spend your money on for Your Business, the expenses, the loss sheet. And the profits are, of course, we revenue another quick and dirty way to do this while you're creating or is to take a look at your bank account we're your money is going when it comes to the expenses of Your Business. For the moment, we're GonNa put aside any payroll, any employees that work directly for you because that's something that you've agreed upon and we don't to Give somebody something that they didn't expect right. You have an expectation you to make sure you pay them what they're worth the exception to this are contractors or service providers. Maybe you're outsourcing your marketing or you're paid advertising and you have a firm that's doing this for you. You definitely negotiate that and you can use the techniques I've talked about today. So what other big expensive? Jeff server costs do. Maintenance deaf suppliers. Do you have rent. That's costing you a lot of money. Equipment, what is it wants you to list the top five big expenses and have them handy. You're spending a lot of money you're paying a company, a certain amount of money. Every single month is a good chance. You're a high volume customer. You are actually consuming their service or product at a high rate and your customer they don't want to lose they want to do everything they can to keep you happy and keep you paying. So you have a bit of leverage here when it comes to negotiating a better rate. One of the easiest ways negotiate a better rate is commit to a longer term. So for example, we have server costs to run our software company. We Pay Amazon web services, thousands, and thousands of dollars every single month. Literally hundreds of thousands of dollars every year. So one of the things that we do is we negotiate a better rate with Amazon say to them. We're not going anywhere. We want to commit to you. We will commit to a year in advance. Now doesn't mean you have to pay everything upfront. It just means that you're locked into a contract where you're not gonNA move off their platform it's pays go anymore you're going to lock in in exchange for a better race you're paying less every month you lose the flexibility of the possibility of leaving the platform you're paying that kind of money. Going to be free to leave anyway, commit to a longer term a year to year contracts even are available for a lot of types of companies and suppliers call them up, find your account manager and say, Hey, we want to go she a better rate and even if you save ten fifteen percent that makes a humongous difference on your bottom line in terms of what you. Spend every year. So negotiation tactic number one is unique negotiate a better. If you commit to longer term, another negotiation tactic is that you commit to more volume. For example, I was coaching client a few years ago who their APP has SMS reminders, and they have a supplier that allows them to send X. Amount SMS's every single month they committed to a higher volume semesters. Have more customers before they were kind of on a lower plan they're paying SMS after a certain rate. So they said, hey, instead of us, you know on this lower plan and we pay SMS after we hit our limits how `bout? We say we're going to pay for thousand a month instead of the you know twenty or thirty plan. Every month, no matter what will pay for a thousand SMS is and those kind of the number of SMS's they were using every month anyway. But the commit more volume up front every month, and therefore they can negotiate a better rate. Another way to save money on a big expense is to make sure that you're actually being billed in your local currency i. know this sounds very simple but the exchange rate and the international fee that your bank might be charging you. Could be astronomical because of the volume because of the number that you're being charged the price. So. For example, if you're doing business with a UK company and they're charging you a British pounds every time they charge you, they're converting that British pound amount to your local currency. It's a really bad rate for the most part you're losing money on the exchange and your bank will charge you an exchange or a foreign transaction fee. So this can get expensive. You can call this company up and say, Hey, can you charge me in my local currency and basically you agree on what that is, and of course, currencies will fluctuate. So the MIC give you a know an exchange rate that's not super favorable but fair which. means. You know exactly how much you're GONNA pay every single month regardless of what the market's doing wherever you know foreign exchanges or doing, and there's no international transaction fee saving you some money

Amazon Google UK Account Manager
NPR Poll: Black, Latino Households Struggle To Pay Rent, Mortgages

NPR's Business Story of the Day

04:23 min | 1 year ago

NPR Poll: Black, Latino Households Struggle To Pay Rent, Mortgages

"Some new data from an NPR poll suggests just how badly Americans are suffering economically during the pandemic. Here's NPR's Chris Arnold Gina Lost Her job as a school bus driver in Chicago during the pandemic she was managing. Okay with unemployment money. But then about two weeks ago, she got a desperate call from her adult son his job had laid him off. He wasn't able to pay rate. There was an eviction moratorium in Chicago, but Jean says the landlord wanted her son out anyway a warning what happened next is disturbing and violent. She says the landlord got someone to threaten her son and shoot his dog a German shepherd mix that he'd had for years Economi. His mom they kill my dog. And the GATT told me that he should kill me to. MSA. Said market you come over here. I went over there. I said, okay star packing you gather go. and. Never went back. Gene only wants to use her first name for fear retribution. She says, she was afraid to report what happened to the police, her son and his two kids if now moved in with her. Gene was one of more than three thousand people who took part in a poll from NPR the Robert Wood, Johnson? Foundation. And the Harvard T H Chan School of Public Health. Her. Story is a sad and dramatic example. But the poll found many people reported problems with housing healthcare, unsafe workplaces, and a very high percentage of Americans. Forty six percent said they're having serious financial problems are surprises how large the? Numbers are Robert Blend in is a Harvard public health professor. He says, the poll was done in July after Congress approved an extra six hundred dollars a week in federal and apply benefits, and that was still supposed to be flowing to people and yet. So many people said, they were struggling one in six households even reported missing or delaying major bills just so that they could buy food blending says it's. Like the government sent a hundred FEMA trucks into a disaster zone but a lot of people never saw them or got any help it just like interviewing people in a hurricane area and the people are telling you, there's no relief it should be there could be some people are having trouble accessing the HAL blend says the government should quickly try to discover where the biggest problems are and there could be. Another factor. My name is Linda Neuron who and I was an accounting manager dorato lives in Phoenix Arizona and lost her accounting job at a tow truck company in the pandemic. Once that stay home order was issued if our driving, they're not getting a car accidents if they're not getting in car accidents, we don't have much of a business Dorato said in the poll that she was having serious financial problems when. She was getting that extra six hundred dollars a week and so she was doing. Okay. But she knew that that was about to expire and that she wasn't going to be able to support her four kids on the state benefits alone which for her just two hundred, forty dollars a week in Arizona and she was right. She's now burned through almost all of her savings and she won't able to pay reds after next month it's extremely difficult. To sleep at night I wake up at two or three in the morning and I just have my mind's just racing just constantly racing, and then I'm having to get up in the morning and sit with my two younger children but I'm so focused on you know bills and money and jobs Dorato who's Latina says she's been looking for work with no luck. She says she has no family she can go live with or borrow money from. And Black and Latino households were two times more likely than white families to say that they've fallen behind on their rent or mortgage. It is striking. It's not surprising. David Williams is a Harvard professor who studies race and sociology. He says blacks and Latinos make money than whites and have less savings. So they're more vulnerable Andy says they're less likely to have family members who can afford to loan the money for. Rent or other bills for every dollar of wealth white households have African American households have ten pennies and Latino households have twelfth pennies. So it's really not surprising that they are really been hurt badly in the context of the pandemic

Linda Neuron NPR Gene Chicago Robert Blend Harvard T H Chan School Of Pub Phoenix Arizona Dorato Professor Chris Arnold Gina David Williams Harvard Gatt Fema Economi Robert Wood Andy Jean
7 Tools to Grow Your Agency

Marketing School

03:23 min | 1 year ago

7 Tools to Grow Your Agency

"Super committed to your success online. We've worked with them to a special offer just remarking school listeners. All you have to do is go to dream host dot com slash marking school to learn more and get your website online today. Welcome to eight another episode of marketing. School I'm Eric Su. And I'm Neil Patel and today we are going to talk about seven tools to grow your agency. So I'll go with the first one I. One is super metrics, supermax ships to me is the best reporting tool when it comes to reporting on pay media or SEO or any of this type of stuff. So different integrations and it's just makes really cool looking reports and it's easy to understand. It's easy to use super metrics. We've been recommending it since the beginning of this podcast just great product. Number to salesforce you probably like, Hey, as the agency, what I need to use cell source is such a great tool as your crm to deal with sales new leads in also when someone comes onboard as a customer to continually have them and there, and then you can use it to up sell down. So we used cell so far agency it really is one of the key tools that we use it sadly expensive yet papers eat, but it's used from everywhere from account managers, client services, people doing the work to even sales reps. We like using able just think of it as spreadsheets that are superpower and they raised a ton of money I. think they're valued at over they've a Unicorn valuation. It's great. We use it for managing all of our content production, and before that, it was radicals all over the place we found that this is just to have an all in one solution, and then also that maps out our pillar content and all of our social content is just incredible. So just check it out you can. Use It for free to have a lot of different templates you can use just to kind of deploy immediately is just made us a lot more organized. So number four, I would use schedule once or any one of those call scheduling offers you'll get leaders the agency from your website here, and there if you use a scheduling software, you have a much higher still increase, your closing rate. So you schedule once or at any one of the alternatives number five I mean look there's a lot. Of Project management tools out there we personally use Asana you can use basecamp as well. We just WANNA have one source to everyone in what you want to have. The worst would be What I've seen in the past is agency uses all these different project management tools and there's no consistency right you wanna have consistency and you want to have people operating marching in the same direction number six google data studio, Google, data studios, a really simple tools like business intelligence until that ties in analytics. All the different data sources, Eric mentioned, super metric super metrics ties into data studios while. But the reason we love it as you can create your own custom designs in templates that when you're doing reporting fair clients, it can look and feel the way you want, and you can have different couplets based on different types of industries as you start scaling up, and then you can, of course, customize everything to each and every single account. So that way the analytics is much more actionable versus generic reports. Seven last but not least is. Zappia is workflow automation under a lot of people call Xabier. The founder will have you know that it's called Zap your workflow automation. What I mean by that, you're using a lot of different tools and so as an example, let's say we do this podcast it gets published I'll well, we want that to automatic a spreadsheet so we can happen for writers later to easily track you can do that. Using Zappia, never freedom option that you can just say, Hey, I want from RSS feed, which is as podcast to be able to push to Google sheet. You can do that, and then you can set other workflows on top of that, right I it to about

Eric Su Google Zappia Neil Patel Founder ZAP Xabier
How To Consistently Reach Your Sales Quota

Journey to $100 Million

04:39 min | 1 year ago

How To Consistently Reach Your Sales Quota

"What's up? Everybody Needs Kevin Daisy. So we are fairly new at sales as far as the station is concerned having professional. salespeople. We're about, I guess a year and a half into it I. It was Eric and I always sell in the business. then. We had a Glenn who came on about. Not, even a year and a half ago. Now, if our sales professional and we're looking to hire more so we're kind of quickly scale on this up. But we have a very basic system as far as what we're looking for. What the monthly quota is. An and they should be bringing in and it is super basic and as for me, it still works I know we might get more sophisticated as we grow in the teams grow and we have managers and things like that. But right now it's it's super basic. So interesting lay it out for you. and you can see how all this may be different than your model or if you don't have a model because you're disowned for yourself. something you can think about doing. SARS is very. Is. Five thousand dollars a month. In monthly reoccurring revenue. That's the theme here monthly reoccurring revenue five grand every month, not five gram once or twice or ten times, and then Kinda sit back. Five men every month. That's all we care about. We want those results. If you do the math on that, if you're GONNA do five grandmothers salesperson. Times twelve that sixty thousand dollars of monthly reoccurring revenue. So that means a month thirteen. We've collected sixty grand. From the clients that you've brought in as a salesperson here. At Mont Thirteen but take that that book of business. Times another twelve and that seven hundred, twenty, thousand dollars. So a very successful salesperson in their first year should be over half a million at least. And that's what looking at. That's the kind of success we need to grow this business. Now we do have ramp up period. said. You come on with us for as a salesperson which we're hiring right now as recording this for sales. There's a ramp up period so The first few months. Washington. The first four months or not one hundred percent of that. So we actually sort out with about a two week training period. A month is twenty, five percent of five grand, which is twelve fifty. Then he gets to fifty percent seventy percent and then the fourth full month. After a two week. Period you're expected to bring in five thousand in monthly recurring revenue. So right now, this is a very basic system and it works. We don't care about how many phone calls you made. We don't care about how emails you sent. I don't care if you want to network in meetings or not doesn't matter to me. It's. Can You bring in five thousand a month in New York consistently. And again, this reoccurring. So this is contacted. Using on twelve month. So, as predictable cash flow that we can count on for at least next year. So. That's really how we're building up our sales and growing the company. In if I can just hire another person and they can achieve that. Five thousand per month each. Then, we're in really good spot and we're growing very quickly. So. That's what we're trying to do again right now is very basic, but it works for us. We've had other people tell us different things and don't do like do it like this. Do like that. But for us is working out, well, we also pay salespeople a salary plus the commission net. And we do the life for that the life of the account. So. We've got a pretty good system going also the salespeople here they're not account managers. So they can build a book business and then keep building it not managing. There's accounts. Our operations team which according to the episode on that but. Operations seems takes over that relationship and the responsibility. So the salesperson continued yourself. Now, they can touch base and and reach out of the client of course, but it's not really the responsibility so. They Cabal. You know what you're tracking with sales was important for us the results, how much can you bring in per month and for us the minimum is five grand per month. And that's going to set us up for success. We were

Glenn Mont Thirteen Kevin Daisy Eric New York Washington
How brutal honesty will bring you massive profits, happiness, and success with Peter Kozodoy

Entrepreneur on FIRE

08:08 min | 1 year ago

How brutal honesty will bring you massive profits, happiness, and success with Peter Kozodoy

"Well, fire nation we have a lot to. Talk about today, it's going to be a blast. We're talking about honest to greatness how brutal honesty is going GonNa Bring you NASA prophets happiness and success and Peter. You're upcoming book is endorsed by Barbara Corcoran, which I'm very proud and have always been very excited to say was one of our power twenty, the first twenty people I ever interviewed on this show. So she was very kind enough are never forget to take my interview while she was getting her makeup done before an episode of Shark Tank. So it was pretty cool. It has some background noise going on but overall, it was a blast and. Kudos to that, it's about using brutal honesty to achieve massive success. So I just have to ask why honesty why did that concept intrigued you so much as to write a book about it it's a great question because I actually never set out to write about speak about or frankly even care about honesty. It's surprising to me as it is to anyone that I've written. A book about something we all learned in preschool, and yet I think when we look around at the we live in right now it's pretty clear that we need a whole lot more honesty here in twenty twenty So to take you back and help everyone understand how I got here Let's go back to that that figure Skater seventeen-year-old Peter and at that age. I was the same size, five, seventy cancer a smaller younger. The two things were true. I knew two things to be absolutely true. My Life I was I was going to going to the Olympics has a figure skater unequivocally that was what was going to occur and the second thing. John's I. Was GonNa go to Harvard I, grew up on the South Shore Boston there is only one college for me it was in. My backyard that was Harvard. Well, by eighteen I had missed my shot at the Olympics was clear that I just couldn't keep my nerves together to make it work I applied to Harvard Harvard. Sent me a letter back saying thank you. But no, thank you. Don't call us. We'll call you and from that point on I won't live I, was devastated. Devastated I ended up. Going to another college and When I came out, I started a company. it ended well, it's a long story. Short story has started a video production company, my business partner I. Having no idea what we can do I I've always been the type to think I can do it better. And so the great thing about that is when you think you do a better, you can go start a business. The bad thing about that is when you think you can do a better. You actually have to go out and do it better A. So we spent a lot of years having no idea what we were doing John we were we were shooting eight hundred dollar television commercials for local car dealers, which is exactly as glamorous as it sounds. And I remember thinking like, wow, we could only shoot more eight, hundred dollars television commercials, ain't we would be rich we'd be rich. That's the past millions while apparently I had not studied hard math classes at college because if I had, I realized that that was the stupidest thing I could have thought it was just unfeasible for a whole lot of reasons, and again you know this young twenties entrepreneur. More gumption than brains. So eventually we Pivoted into being a full service marketing agency, and the reason we made that pivots because we were getting hired by other agencies and we realized that Kinda sucked they didn't take care of their clients. They overcharged they missed deadlines. Strategies weren't that good what we can do this better again right? We can do better. So or what we do you slap a new label on our. On our agency. Now Boom, we're full service marketing agency, and so quick story. The way we got our first client was that we were doing videos for local college and shooting their students and listening to their stories. And one day the the market called and said, Hey, we have a pitch open. We're going to hire a full service agency. It's about a million dollar account. Do you WanNa come pitch in do you have the resources to do this? And so we put the phone on mute or like okay. We'll do you know we need like graphic design to do account manager. We're GONNA probably need some web developed. Do we have the resources to that? No No. Definitely not So we pick the phone backup we said, yeah, absolutely WANNA. Come and touch will be there whatever time you need a Haredi go. So. We're in the pitch and at the towards the end we show this video had been recording of their students and the students are talking than we reveal our Tagline, which is the foundation of the entire campaign. And the room goes quiet. And the President looks down at what we've done pause. She looks up. And says, where did you? Where did you get this? I've been looking for this for years and I was tempted to say because we're the biggest bunch of geniuses ever. Of course, that's why I didn't because that wouldn't have been honest instead I said, your own, your own students gave us this. This is how they really think and feel these by the way of the only people who matter the ones who pay you money for your product and service. And so throughout building my company I got very interested in how honesty plays into the organization into the executives because it's not just being about your customers, what they think but I was always fascinated by how some of our clients took our growth strategies and just crushed it Golic a five, hundred, six, hundred, percent Roi loved US stayed with us for years and others. John. We'd work with. We'd give the same love attention strategies and they would just blow up on the launch pad I. Mean They could not get out of their own way they descended into infighting and politics in both quite frankly, and I always chalked it up to stupidity as these people are a bunch of morons. But of course, they weren't that. Was Me being a moron did. A tremendous amount of acumen intelligence to become an executive in any role. What I actually found over the years was it was something much more serious, which was a lack of honesty and in a variety of ways you're honest about what was going on in the world and how consumer trends were changing honest about what was going on with their fellow executives or their customers or dishonest with themselves and with their own biases and self limiting beliefs as a leader in and I saw many. And it wasn't until. I had my own crisis of honesty that the whole solidified for me that I that I made sense of this both both in the organizational sense in the personal sense something terrible happened to me John. It took me years to get over I don't know if this happened to you but I turned thirty. Oh. My God I don't know how people survive that. It was just devastated. I was like this is off. So I turned thirty and Mike Okay. This isn't so bad and then as I looked around, I just started descended into darkness and I just started beating myself up over. You know what happened because I realized that those two massive failures I had seventeen had been sticking with. Me had had given me these big weights on my shoulders at said Peter you can strive for greatness, but it's never going to be the best life because you already failed at that you already done your already failure. And it turned out it was carrying that around. So so by thirty, you know I looked around listen I built a million dollar company just married. My wife were flipping anew house I mean bronze purposes show just shut the hell up and been happy. But life doesn't work that way and I realized that there was so much more that I still had him that I still wanted to do and that's when I realized I had been dishonest with myself. Here I was preaching organizational honesty and I had failed to get out of my own way in realized my own self limiting beliefs and in the year after I turned thirty John achieved than I had in the ten years prior one of these things being the book that is now going to come out this year fire nation I. Hope you can just hear and understand and absorb what Peter Sharing Right now how critical

John Peter Harvard Olympics Barbara Corcoran Executive Nasa Shark Tank Harvard Harvard Mike Okay Boston United States Partner Account Manager President Trump
How To Unlock The Power Of Innovation

Accelerate Your Business Growth

06:16 min | 1 year ago

How To Unlock The Power Of Innovation

"I guess today is tomorrow Gondar. Author had caster keynote, speaker and founder of innovation. Training Company Launched Street. Tamara used I'm sorry used to believe that innovation was the domain of a select few exclusive to certain industries or relegated to a specific job role. But as she's discovered in her twenty five years of work and research, everybody has the capacity to innovate. It's a person's unique innovations style which can be assessed in channel the CAN. Transform inertia into innovation. Thanks so much for joining me. Today tomorrow. I'm looking forward to the conversation. Thank you for having me I am too. Thank you for being here now, Here's what I want to START III. In your bio that. You use to believe that innovation was the domain of a select few, and it does feel like it has been something that's been reserved. For a certain group at, but you're saying you know that it's for everyone I'm really curious how you figured that out. Yet so and I'm glad you said it that way. And with almost what sounded like a little bit of hesitation in your voice, which is I think because the narrative that innovation is for the select few with the cooled. Titles or in the departments or on the Cover Fast Company magazine is just as narrative that's out there and has been out there for so long that we've all kind of bought into it a little bit, and I did too, but let me share a story with Yo something that happened early on in my career that really opened my eyes to the fact that if given permission and room and some. Some ownership of innovation and everybody is truly capable so I was I was when I very first started. My career I was I moved to New York City and became an account manager at the second largest advertising agency in the world now as an account manager that meant that I. was the bottom of the bottom of the bottom of the totem. Pole I was lucky to get coffee and make copies. But I had this incredible boss who thought I was capable of more, so she put me in charge of the big strategy meeting now Dan. This is the meeting where everybody who touches the brand that I was working on in any way comes to the meeting, and we set the strategy for the coming year. Market! What are advertising teams are all of it hinges on this meeting, and so it was a client, the account management team which I was on accounts, payable people who bought the advertising, the creatives and most importantly one creative in particular name. Steve now. Maybe you've known one of these guys. Steve just had that magical brilliance to him and my job, honestly on most days was just a hope, hope that I was standing behind him so that I could capture his brilliance and then go execute on it like he had. All the time and we put him up on a pedestal as the innovative one and the rest of us. Just executor's so i. get the meeting together. The day arrives I get there early. The coffees there I've got easel pads incented markers on full size of the rooms, waiting to capture Steve's brilliance. My boss comes in clients. Come in, and they grabbed their coffee in I look at my watch. Okay, we'll crabs never early, so it's okay. That Steve's not here yet. Then everybody else starts rolling in in everybody but Steve but I think okay creatives never on time, right? That's okay. Nine twenty still knows Steve Crabs rollerblades. He'll role in any minute then nine forty rolls around, and he still not there and now everybody's sitting at the table. The coffees gone cold and everybody staring at me so I start calling around looking for Steve I finally got him at home. As Steve. Where are you? He says. What do you mean I said? Well, today's the day is a strategy meeting. He says Oh. I just wasn't feeling the Mojo today, so we're GONNA have to reschedule that. Thank you. It was horrified. Rear Flash before my eyes let's. Worth this big round table where everybody staring at each other's big conference table and I look at everybody and I think we'll see not here so. I got say that's all I had I had no. I don't do so there. This awkward silence fills the room. It's horrible, right? Nobody saying anything I'm sweating finally. Someone pops from accounts payable. Right people who do the bills and says hey I've been looking at the money and I've been seeing this pattern, and that led me to an idea and then the person who buys media. All they do is fill timeslots on TV. They pop up missing. Yeah, I've been seeing this pattern with our time slots in the competition, and that led me to this idea, and before I knew it, the entire room was bubbling with innovative ideas, and we set the strategy for the year. It grew the business without Steve. Yeah and that was my first real experience of like. Wait a minute. Maybe this narrative that innovations were the select few is actually not right, and you know that led me to start to dig into the neuroscience of it, behavioral psychology and kind of how it all really works, and it turns out. The research shows us the innovation of something. We're all capable of and we all have. We've just let it get dusty over time, but it was that experience that really sent me down this path. It really made me realize when I started to look around and. And for your listeners to. If you start to look around, you'll see people having hot spots of innovation everywhere, because really innovation, simply about this definition that we give is thinking differently about what's right in front of you to create a competitive advantage, so you'll see it I've seen it in the receptionist I've seen it in the CEO. I've seen it in the janitor, right? How do they optimize their job? Think differently about solution. Solve a problem,

Steve Crabs Fast Company Magazine Tamara Founder Account Manager New York City DAN CEO
Understanding Customer Success in Saas: Javier Cortavitarte, Customer Adoption Manager at Broadcom Inc.

Latinos Who Tech

02:13 min | 1 year ago

Understanding Customer Success in Saas: Javier Cortavitarte, Customer Adoption Manager at Broadcom Inc.

"Nowadays. What happened Basically I am now. Doing what is called a customer adoption management or Customer Success Management Basically that's what my role is nowadays. Which is a big change from what I did when I moved into the valley. So so when you say. Customer success What does that look like? I mean because of the way I look at Liza in the Tech Space. I see that great. We Build APPS WE BUILT OUR. Were we sell it and thank you for your money? And that's it. You mean that we have to keep working with the customer. Yes definitely okay. Whether then look then. What does a happy customer look like? How do you know that your customers happy and I guess those are two different questions but I just be customer? Success thing is very well. There's in most business. Transactions or or relationships The usually three faces two phases basically There's a pre sales portion and then there's the transaction basically and then the the pulse ration- then nowadays most businesses. Very full is on making sure that their customers are engaged in are actually Really focused on prairie feedback onto whether experiences. So what happens after someone has bought out or product from another company? And those you know those people the customer say they want to know how to best use it. I mean one thing. Is You come in our stop retailing in year or account manager and show you what their product can do? one is

Customer Success Management Liza Account Manager
HOW TO BUILD A GREAT TEAM OF SALES PEOPLE AND CLOSE LARGE DEALS

The B2B Revenue Leadership Show

09:08 min | 1 year ago

HOW TO BUILD A GREAT TEAM OF SALES PEOPLE AND CLOSE LARGE DEALS

"A great welcome to the show Sweden started. Tell us a little bit about yourself. Thanks thanks for having me. Brian van of the show. Listening to your podcasts. Both through as well as the B. Two B. Revenue podcasts. Quite a bit so appreciate you having me So you know. I'm I'm Greg Anderson. Thirteen years in sales. I think it'd be a rarity at the exact same company so I mentioned the company I started with a out of college company called target started in Boston so now thirteen years. Four offices in three continents Started out as essentially what you'd think of as an inside sales rep calling sue local vars resellers to sell our marketing services and solutions so as a business essentially what we do is we work with Enterprise it organizations and help to connect them with buyers through publishing company and have since evolved in Suwa Tech Company with with intent data so started out work with a lot of those small Vars resellers. Some two to three man shop. Some larger ones Eventually showed that I think I you know I have the chops to work with. Large organizations was asked to move out to San Francisco early twenties to take on some part global accounts like Cisco and Intel and odd Dell and. Hp said work with those really large organizations in complex sales in the next step. I was eventually asked to move out. Sue Our Singapore office to to build up our sales team across Asia Pacific. So I did that in two thousand fourteen in now. I am calling you in from on new from Sydney where I now reside side moved down here to our Australia office. I look after our sales team across all of Asia Pacific with offices in Australia Singapore as well as India. Well I guess you must like to travel. I have to kind of just kind of get used to. Yeah just in the last two weeks. I was up in Singapore per week and then over in our Bangalore Office ROIC so yeah travel quite a bit when I was in the. Us is a rapid with every single. Week I was on a plane who different city on spending time with a lot of customers. But you do have to learn to love to travel. Learn to learn to be able to work on the road. You'RE IN DIFFERENT HOTEL. Rooms in cities and towns waking up. Not Knowing where you are but you've always got your laptop and Internet connections giving stop. Yeah that's it. I always remember because I traveled a lot to that that first moment when you wake up and you look at the phone to see what city your time zones in. Its the greatest things that ever happened with the smartphone automatically change in time zones so it was always right for you. Have to look at the clock in the hotel room anymore to figure out what you need to set your watch to when. I remember one day or several times waking up on the plane not knowing where I was going just just for a minute. Where you're like okay monoplane. Oh you wake up here that little thing. I think the the the biggest week of travel I ever had. I was in our San Francisco office and I had a number of meetings. So this head You know working with HP and Cisco in a Lotta those large organizations but also with their ad agencies so we supported all their sales and marketing campaigns. So there's agencies in Chicago in the York in there was also sales floors in places like Arkansas. So I hit a trip where it was from San Francisco to Boston. Boston to New York New York. Arkansas Arkansas Dallas Dallas to Houston Houston to Boulder Boulder's San Francisco. That was one day in each city. Seven Day whirlwinds around the US in by end of it you know you definitely don't know where you are what time zone it is. Does it have to but you know. That's it's it's fun to be able to do that for a while now. You have an interesting career how to check the same company but you know going up. Every time is that what's kept you there or did you just find a perfect match for your personality your style. I think it's a little bit of both. I really enjoy the work that we do from our leadership team. Who's been around if you actually take a look at some of the some of the folks who are at the top of organization. Those people have been here ten to fifteen plus years. It's IT'S A. It's a great culture. It's a great business But it's always evolving so you know we started out as I mentioned his publishing company where we create content for it buyers to make smarter decisions. So I saw that you were at data power. That was Lybian and so people that were looking at. Api software for example would come to our sites evaluate vendors. Better understands you know ave can secure integrations and whatnot And that's how we started just reading on those folks in that it. Continuously evolved to smarter marketing services now in dense intent data services where we've moved from strictly talking marketing folks and our talk to sales leader is an inside sales organizations so the company itself has changed. I think in changing roles and changing cities. It always feels like a new job. It always feels like a new challenge so for anybody listening and considering relocating I I. I couldn't I could encourage you to do that more. I think it's really refreshing to do that. I'd say the last bit in in being in Marketing Services and software where we don't go in and sell a product and move on to a new customer. We sell a product to a customer. We stick with them for us. referenced. Ibm where you were. You know. They've been a big customer for a long time and we have teams dedicated to going in and talking to the marketing teams in sales teams on daily weekly monthly quarterly basis. So we get to learn the INS and outs of a lot of the you know the largest most profitable interesting organizations from companies like IBM to some of the small startups so Dana. Day Out. We're spending time with some of the smartest exonerated at companies open. The sales and marketing fronts get really interesting exposure to other organizations so it's a real combination of our culture shift in our products but also just exposure to always changing landscape of tech. It's really interesting. And so now you manage a team or you're building a team or both both so a manager containment we're continuing to build a team so We have a team here in Sydney a team in Singapore in a team in India as well so a couple of different layers from From got our inside sales team. We've got our account executives out there. Hunting with enterprise account managers that are managing a smaller territories. It's a twenty accounts so it's been it's been a very interesting shift going from sales rep to leading a team. Not only leading team Us leading team across three different countries in multiple geographies multiple culture. Cultures is well which has been. It's been eye-opening it's been a real you know. I think really valuable journey to be able to come out here to understand how things work immediately outside of the US. Where I know that a lot of folks in North America a very North America centric perspective that you will. Everybody's got a very central. I've worked for people from all over the country and they tend to assume that the whole world is the way is in their their homebase yet. Yeah yeah so I you know. I one of the one of the first meetings that I had here I recall. I came down and I met with With Dell a whole Marketing Organization Cross Australians. I was young. Would I moved out. Here it's twenty eight as real confident. Now that I've not seen business North America in terms of running all these global marketing teams selling all these companies. So I teach these guys a lot of things that went into the meeting and I think my opening was well. You know I worked with your team in North America and I've a lot of learnings to bring there. I was like well. I just got reminded that this is in North America. Commerical spot another that. It's GONNA necessarily matter to us. It was he was right. He was very Markets Sizes Different Cultures Awesome. I'm definitely taken step back saying. Hey I can teach you something because I come from the US in changing around so you know. Teach me what you need and I'll figure out a way to make happen

United States North America San Francisco Boston Singapore IBM Arkansas Sydney Suwa Tech Company Cisco India Greg Anderson Asia Pacific Brian Van Sweden HP New York Bangalore Australia Singapore
What Companies are Looking for in Sales Professionals Today

Daily Sales Tips

03:09 min | 1 year ago

What Companies are Looking for in Sales Professionals Today

"So the question is what are companies unease looking for in sales professionals today and the second piece that question is how's it changed over the last few years so it's a bit of a tricky question to to answer because not all sales people are created equal and. I think when I was thinking about this question I think back to all the feedback that I get get from my clients and I think about why they don't move forward with people in their interview in selection process and so I want to reverse engineer engineer. The question a bit of what are they looking for in. What's missing and I think what they're looking for is someone that understands their particular task at hand and can clearly articulate how they met back to that people really struggle being specific about what they've done where they've they've done it who they've done it with what the outcome was what they learned from it. How they can apply it? Companies are craving that. They're creating natural curiosity. That people people want to immerse themselves into whatever it is that they might be doing because that translates to the buyer journey. People Care About folks that can listen. They want to work hard that they WANNA roll their sleeves up. These are things that go back to you. A lot of the basics in the human element of things so think about the criteria so to speak that cannot be replaced by technology. That's what the best companies are looking for in terms of the people that are hiring for sales else. How has that changed over the last few years I think because we live in such a world where it's digital technology is everywhere and there are a million ways to Sunday to get help from a technology perspective. It has made sales people little lazy. I'm a salesperson. I promise I come in peace. I'm not trying to be offensive. But we've over. segmented the sales world it is really choppy choppy. I grew up in the world of having to do every single thing myself. I was my own customer success person. I was my own. Bdr I was my own account manager I was a own enterprise seller. I was all of it and I'm so grateful that I had that because it has served me well and so I think over the last few years at least the last this decade we've fallen into this world of over segmentation where sellers learn one thing. And that's all that they know and then to get ahead they either have to be promoted or they have to leave which contributes to a lot of other problems that people talk about. But what's really changed as technology has contributed to that and it's made people hide behind tack to not be able to have real conversations which goes back to what companies are looking for foreign sales professionals today. They want somebody that can communicate. They want somebody that can be accountable. They want somebody that can have a thoughtful strategic business discussion. They want someone that's going to follow through all of these things. Technology can't really do because it's a human

Engineer Account Manager
"account manager" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

03:39 min | 2 years ago

"account manager" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"What's an unconventional technology decision. You've made new front. One of the maybe surprising decisions that we made was building on top of salesforce early on the way that i think about what we're building is. We we have to make a lot of trade offs and decisions to actually operate operate this brokerage unlike pure software provider. We sit right next to our users so we're building software for brokers and account managers who who are interoffice every day and constantly making that build versus buy decision so one example of something we did early on as we could have built a lot of c._r._m. Functionality into our a product but instead we decided to just use salesforce off the shelf and we constantly have to make that trade off because brokers are savvy they can they can look out in the world and see other technologies out there and think hey. Why are we not using that. Why why do we need to build that in house. We always seem to justify you know the product prioritization organization that we're going through each you still built on salesforce or did you move off event. I'm so parts of the platform are still built on salesforce on for example a lot of the the reporting around. How is the business performing week over week. And how are we managing. Certain teams will push data into sales. It's worse but it's not the primary data store. Our back end is node with brass using a post crest. Database does regulation affect your business at all. It's definitely a factor one of the advantages though of being set up as a brokerage is that were not subject to as much regulatory overhead as a carrier which will have certain certain capital requirements and other regulations that they have to go through. Are there any interesting internal tools that you've built yeah. The example that i i love pointing to is our ano- pipeline for parsing quote documents so this is normally a process that at a conventional brokerage might take a few hours where an account manager will wind up these p._d._f. Side by side on their either printed out or on their desktop and they'll just very manually copy and paste all the important piece of information like the premium the the limits the supplements and put that often into a word document so that they can make a proposal to their client. We've built is this this engine that takes in those five or six p._d._f.'s and instantly passes out the important pieces of information and shows it to that account manager in the actual proposal that they can send directly to the client and then of course the account manager can review the proposal and make any edits so let's say that we accidentally extracted attracted a number like one hundred thousand when we meant to extract a million they can make those tweaks and then send a link right away to the to that client and so we've taken something that normally takes a a few hours and it runs instantly and then obviously maybe it takes ten minutes for the account manager review and your front knee. You'd like to build a business where you can have interactions between the engineering workforce and the brokers because if you're trying to improve the experience for brokers you wanna have some direct feedback. How do you structure the organization in a way where there is consistent and feedback between those brokers and the engineering team something that we think about a lot one of our core values is empower people. Oh it's really at the core of our business model and flows through everything that we do and so we really select for engineers that are excited about collaborating closely with their users <hes> and understanding..

account manager ten minutes
Ask Your Clients for a Referral

Journey to $100 Million

03:07 min | 2 years ago

Ask Your Clients for a Referral

"Ask for referral now. You may be wondering why that contributes to customer experience. It's really just part of our process. We know now that they're the that the client is, is fairly happy, where we've checked in with them. We've had our monthly call. We've offered them a referral. And we, you know, we just have a sense that they're happy. Of course. If you don't believe they are happy, and that's definitely sometimes the case, you may not get to the step or you might want to skip over this step. But if you know that they're happy, you give them referral. Now it's time to trigger yourself to ask them for something. So this stage of, you know, sampled them I know that they're happy. We actually sent out a survey to, to make sure they come back with good feedback in that triggers me actually creates a task for me or Erik or the account manager to assery. Pharrell and ask for a review on Google that we can share for the really good ones washy offer. You know, ask for a testimonial video or a case study. So depending on where you're at and what the project is you can decide. But for us, we definitely to ask for referral because we want more business. So for the step, I feel good about them. They've give them referral now reach out and say, hey guys, would you refer us business or anyone just like you just like your company? That could use our service that you refers to very simple. When you're going to do this, don't ask for just abroad. Heiki refers to anyone. Or if there's ten people, you can think of that refers to, because then the client can't pull that out of their mind, real quick. If you say has anyone just like you maybe the same industry. Maybe it's another colleague of theirs owns a company or a company that they do work with that. They can think of just ask for one because they can actually get you that if you ask for too many than they kinda thinking about all kinds of stuff, and then they end up not getting that one referral that you're asking for. So simply reach out to them. Get on the phone talk to them and ask them. And then also they're gonna probably wanna know how they can best refer. You sit down and talk to them and say, let me tell you how you can best refer us. Here's what we're looking for. Here's the typically it's just like you that we, you know, were good fits for make easy for them. And maybe send over little sheet or an Email that says these types of people we like to work with, and here's here's all the things that we offer. So. Now that you've done a good job for them. It's on to ask them for something. And it just strengthen the relationship together you've give them a referral. They pass your referral. And now what does, what does it kicks off, hopefully a process where the referring you work multiple times throughout the

Google Account Manager Erik Pharrell Heiki
"account manager" Discussed on The Product Podcast

The Product Podcast

04:21 min | 2 years ago

"account manager" Discussed on The Product Podcast

"You want sales field come to you to tell you that. So you want to have that open door and in most of my roles we've had a process where we would get feedback. But then you just have this long backlog on this spreadsheet that eventually you get through and you take a look at. But it's stuff that's like, really important. And it's kinda like, you know, sometimes you have these quick wins that you can get off your door. Like may not be the best feature, but you might be able to sneak into a release, and it's going to make that account manager really happy because she's now going to be able to go back to that. Or he's going to be able to go back to that customer and make their day. 'cause I was feature that they have been wanting for like the longest time and kind of. Plan your cards right as some -cially on pure. It's it's a balancing act 'cause you're gonna have all these priorities coming at you. And you need to be able to prioritize, but you also need to. Think about what what your goal is. Any questions? All right. So the lost one is the art of saying no VS heard like product managers say no a lot. We do. And it's it's not easy. Even like the mountain time. I've said, no, it's not easy. I mean, there's been times when I've had to turn off a product or feature, and I have to tell the customer that. And they may have just signed up for this product. Because of this this feature in just like. I understand this is like kind of is what it is. And you kind of walk through that give them alternatives. The reason why we say no ally is because. What I feel is request would come to us. That haven't been bedded or that aren't solving the real problem. They're solving symptoms of the problem. So this is where like product management, you kinda get into this detective work where you gotta figure out like, wait. What is the customer Rulli trying to solve for what what is their need. And is this a roadblock for them? And you may find like it something completely different. And they didn't even realize it. And that's where you want to go back enough questions and kind of really get to the root of it. Because a lot of what I've seen is could be sometimes that's just being covered up because they're just frustrated. Sometimes the users of your products aren't tech savvy. They don't understand product management. They don't understand product developments. They don't necessarily understand the technology that they're using. Right. And it's something as simple as just kind of understanding their needs is kind of going back. Let's empathy and being able to relate to them has been really helpful. Whenever you have to say, no. You don't say no you have to back it up with something. Right. So you wanna I not have that new jerk reaction. Like, no can't out. Are you kidding me? You wanna you wanna say like, okay. Let me look into this. Or let me think about this. Let me see where this would go in the road map. And what into it see where see where it will go in the roadmap. And then go back to whoever was asking for it in and provide some details like can't necessarily do it right now. But we'll be able to get to it later or there's something else that we're getting that. May suffice for now you never. You never wanted to say no without providing another solution to it. That's the other thing is that you wanna see them in a different direction or you wanna at least give them something to hold onto because that's also going to build trust one of the things with product management is trust. Are they going to get the requirements? Right. Are they going to get this out on time? Did they give me a roadmap? It's accurate. Can I tell my customers they're gonna get this feature? And it's going to be delivered your constantly building up your relationships entrust throughout the company and a lot of that starts in the very beginning with getting the requirements in estimating down in building out that road map new put your buffer in. But over time you're going to build up this trust in relationship..

account manager
"account manager" Discussed on The Tech Guy

The Tech Guy

02:30 min | 3 years ago

"account manager" Discussed on The Tech Guy

"And by default, it's switched on. Okay. So the first thing you have to do is is is and that's getting apps from another store called side loading. So the first thing after do is go into settings and security and say, enable the apps from unknown sources. Now, my suggestion is once you do this, turn it back on, it's a good thing to have. It will protect you. Don't bring the screen down from the gives me the. I'm on Belkin to twenty. You see router right now. So I'm getting the signal from that. It's shows bluetooth, have airplane mode, boots, blue shade, and do not just serve and help. Nothing. Shows me anything settings in your tablet. Okay. No, how do I get into the settings of tablet? He's brand new to me. It is a little challenging because it it doesn't actually look like Android at all. So it is a little challenging. Yeah. You see it in the carousel. There. Yeah, it's it's in the carousel. Okay. Settings. Okay. Yeah. And then there's the security tab. Security. I tell you what I want to take the time to walk you through it, but you'll find it and then turn, you know, enable an apse from unknown sources than that. That's step one. Step two is you've got to find the unknown sources. And there's four things you need. You need the Google. Actually, this may change because Google is always fiddling with this. But as of a few months ago, I'll put link the shutout to take out labs dot com that gives you the the links to this. You get it from something called a PK. Mirror. AP k. is the name of an Android app. It's an a p k and AP k. mirror is you want to be very careful doing this. Downloading AP case from random people can download malware, but in this case, a PK mirror is a trusted source, but be very careful. You're gonna need four things. Google account manager, Google services framework, Google play services. And then finally, you can install the play store. This can be.

Google Belkin account manager
"account manager" Discussed on Bad Voltage

Bad Voltage

04:51 min | 3 years ago

"account manager" Discussed on Bad Voltage

"It's like it's like if she got the house, but you have the only dorky and you were buried with it, but you come get it. Yeah, it's it's off as well because there are so many layers to this right one element is is access, right? So arguably so long as Eric has got my phone, she could get access to my to my account because you know the two factor authentication thing will send. Severed thumb, push. Well. Yeah. But I mean, everybody's biometric sensor on the on the devices, whatever else. So this ways around that. But I think this becomes infant infinitely more complicated for particularly for for public figures. So for the three of us, we're not public figures. So reasonably this is about our our families getting access to this kind of stuff. But you know, I absolutely foresee, for example, a politician. Dying, and then their account be misused for for various purposes for fabricating information or whatever it might be like, I, I think the risk goes up when you depending on the kind of person that you are. So it's not just access, but it's like, what can you do with the access? So we typically see this with Facebook as an example. Like, do you remember? I will. I won't say his name because I don't know if he's finally listening and it might be difficult subject, but there was a guy in the lyrics community came to voltage live a few times. He passed away and he had like an auto thing set up his Facebook account that would basically send out new so he died. But he was still like sending news and commentary which I think he would have found quite funny, but that's just a small normally. But what happens is the public consideration this, the private hunting consideration this, like what people can do. So I guess I'm curious act while you think it's so different than non digital stuff. You said unlike the keys to the house, you can't get it to my understanding. Every major provider has a nest of next of kin policy certainly go. Certainly, Facebook does certainly almost any major institutions going to have that. So I guess to me, it's like if you if you grew up one hundred years ago when you died with a bunch of letters box and you didn't want people to see him the box, was there just as if now your Email is there and you're. Bill have Google the inactive account manager, for example, which you can go to. And Phillies explicitly wall should happen in these situations. But the next of cayden policy are not necessarily sure when you say that go to next of kin policy, those woke up off the, you've died and I want access to the account. I'm told show they'll give it to you Feis. Vol- name your physical mailing, address your Email, a photocopy of your government issued driver's license, the g mail address or Google username that you would like access to the deceased user, the death certificate. I mean, there's a specific list of things you give them, and then they give. Now that's in Facebook. They let you appoint what they call a legacy contact who can take off Tif died and that allow people who you you to notify Facebook that you have, they will then memorialize your account. So stop showing people's walls and stuff. But as far as I can tell, I may have missed this, but it doesn't seem to be any prevision for someone shop after you've died. On you didn't appoint the legacy contact inside that dead are want access to the count toll show are actually won't my anyway, right. Right. The larger question, how are you even if you just how by will find they'll be able to access to after dead if they shot with more deaths difficu- and they're driving us. And so why do you want people to be able to do that? But hang on. Let me into stand you correctly. You're saying. So Jeremy's said that there's a set of a process and a workflow that someone goes through to set what happens in the event of someone dying an act. It sounds like what you're saying is what happens if you haven't gone through that process? What happens in that situation? Well, and if you haven't gone through that process, do you want someone rucking and claimed let me let me every hour for most people most services. So most major services. So also by GE's Google Facebook. Twitter will allow you to set up explicitly if this person gets this account..

Facebook Phillies Google account manager Eric Twitter Bill GE Jeremy one hundred years
"account manager" Discussed on The B2B Revenue Leadership Show

The B2B Revenue Leadership Show

01:45 min | 3 years ago

"account manager" Discussed on The B2B Revenue Leadership Show

"The manageable apparent with a rapid reps rap in that we know will rotate around kind of like speed dating they do that as the competent heated speed dating to meeting other people with conferences or speed dating to date we rotate around and the other thing is obviously listening to calls coaching the rap you know you can get into you can be whisper mode where you can whisper to them while they're on the call or you can interject yourself on the call or you can just listen and coach later recording calls things like that are other ways that we helped the route appreciate the business value of the product knowing her dough sdr's you you segment the function from sales development getting the meeting to account exac carrying the deal from the meeting to close is that accurate death accurately have sales reps whose purpose is to qualify inbound marketing leads and do the outbound campaigns when they find a qualified lead that's passed to the appropriate account manager who and takes it forward through the sales cycles so it is definitely separate role is that under inside sales is that inside outside is that dependent inside sales dues okuda's so that's that's a pretty complex sale to do without visiting is there demos or technical sale component that is involved with you have us sales engineers not for the estee our portion but yes definitely during the sales cycle we have inside engineers and we have external tsm's so we do have she assumes that support all the different sales teams and so we can do obviously demos over screen sharing site like everybody else that we can do we can do that we do do that.

account manager
"account manager" Discussed on The Ken Coleman Show

The Ken Coleman Show

02:09 min | 3 years ago

"account manager" Discussed on The Ken Coleman Show

"Basically it's an adviser do i look at it to account management is kind of what i see my role as i started out in sales and that's the way you described myself i'm not a hunter i'm farmer in so that's kind of well in a family business i have more hanson i care to have but you're so here's my question let's stop right there because you if you could do what you just described to me all day every day how would you feel at the end of the day pretty damn good excuse me it's okay you're on sirius xm it's it's okay where where we won't bleep that when that's okay so so erin did you hear that response you just accidents swore because you're so fired up about that so this is a sit down with dad in my opinion and go dead i'm a i'm a farmer not a hunter and i am doing this this this this and this on top of farming an account manager and all these other things they're they're killing me and this is all i wanna do and i think if i lead this initiative and was the guy on this and developed a team around this within our family business we grow and i'm more fulfilled and that's a win for the company i just wonder aaron if you aren't in the right place but you're doing the wrong things you just got to actually you're doing the right thing and i think you might be in the right place but i think you've not grown eve not moved up and you've not expanded because the nature of family businesses well it's my dad and i love my dad and i love the company and i'm going to do all these other things because i'm good son when in reality is a good employee would say hey boss i'm doing a bunch of stuff that am not that great at and be i don't enjoy and it's affecting overall performance how does that sound that sound like that's about the right situation that you're dealing with i'd say close and.

erin account manager aaron
"account manager" Discussed on The Ken Coleman Show

The Ken Coleman Show

01:30 min | 3 years ago

"account manager" Discussed on The Ken Coleman Show

"Point kinda my question to you i haven't a account manager locally here in in nashville grow so i i don't travel on at home i've got a lot of a lot of flexibility i can answer my phone whenever i want to i punch a clock you know i come in i go i take care of business you know whether that's at night or today i just this what i do so with that being said i'm in the construction field and i kinda have a feel to lean towards more or less where we've seen about trying to get my real estate license in do a little bit of that with the intention is a little caveat i've got a friend and i don't know if you know this is he's got a contract to close business with the thinking of my wife wants to kind of transition away from her job to help me with the marketing and the administrative stuff it once we get a binding contract i would turn it over to our realtor who has a contract closed business and let him run with the appraisals and the inspections and all of the rest letting him do that for a fee in let us come at the end of that so sensually real estate part time i don't know if it's a good thing i said we're just looking to what are you okay so you tons of information i've got so much information i may have to take a quiz with you here in just a second so what is the big question for me what can i give you some advice on give you a plan what do we need to think through why did you call part time real estate should idea.

account manager nashville
"account manager" Discussed on Conversations with Phil

Conversations with Phil

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"account manager" Discussed on Conversations with Phil

"We can ask any time during the sales process but certainly you know at the end and we don't have to wait forever because the the trap is that we say oh you know we just signed the deal now can i ask what better way to we implement no can't ask a better way to we actually get results well you know we're just weighed too far away from our buyers at that point and why steak buyers multiple because they're typically are and we need to be asking every single one of the people who come in contact during the buying process for a referral could be within their company the still larger company or to the counterparts in other companies okay so that's really interesting so we we asked for that both inside the company may be upper level or across the organization right or i like that outside the organization and i'm sure because i do we forget one of the two so which one do you think it's forgotten more or are they both equally forgot very quickly forgotten because nobody's asking okay interesting and they're they're not and part of the bill is the way a lot of company is organized you know especially in software sales if you take a look at software salesperson account executive k i'm selling a deal i sold that i've come in contact with loads of people than i handed off the customer successor to an account manager and then.

account manager account executive
"account manager" Discussed on Conversations with Phil - Sales and Leadership Insights to Increase Your Influence, Impact and Income

Conversations with Phil - Sales and Leadership Insights to Increase Your Influence, Impact and Income

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"account manager" Discussed on Conversations with Phil - Sales and Leadership Insights to Increase Your Influence, Impact and Income

"We can ask any time during the sales process but certainly you know at the end and we don't have to wait forever because the the trap is that we say oh you know we just signed the deal now can i ask what better way to we implement no can't ask a better way to we actually get results well you know we're just weighed too far away from our buyers at that point and why steak buyers multiple because they're typically are and we need to be asking every single one of the people who come in contact during the buying process for a referral could be within their company the still larger company or to the counterparts in other companies okay so that's really interesting so we we asked for that both inside the company may be upper level or across the organization right or i like that outside the organization and i'm sure because i do we forget one of the two so which one do you think it's forgotten more or are they both equally forgot very quickly forgotten because nobody's asking okay interesting and they're they're not and part of the bill is the way a lot of company is organized you know especially in software sales if you take a look at software salesperson account executive k i'm selling a deal i sold that i've come in contact with loads of people than i handed off the customer successor to an account manager and then.

account manager account executive
"account manager" Discussed on The Jason Stapleton Program

The Jason Stapleton Program

02:09 min | 3 years ago

"account manager" Discussed on The Jason Stapleton Program

"Right so this is the processor so then i call my business rep this is the person at bank of america that is supposed to be the person who handles all this for me now if you remember back to the last time i ranted rather than her doing that she actually just passed them off to macy's here you deal with it so you can talk directly with the credit card processing company and i'll just stay out of it which truthfully is better because she was absolutely worthless as anybody doing anything so it was better that she just be on the sidelines but after i found out that they released my money what do i want while i'm not gonna just assume that the money's getting released right i call my business rep sent her an email and i say hey here's the email from the the account manager show that she said i'm good to go can you send me an email and confirmed for me win the money has been released this is what she sends me let me pull it up for you i'm not even joking you this is this is this is what happened so she goes she goes back up and find it where is it where is it oh here it is she says jason i'm in a meeting today can you call them or or i will tomorrow and i i'm like call who who am i supposed you're the person i call your literally the person that i call when i have a business problem call who so i emailed her back and i say call who yours is the only number i have i don't have anybody else's number who am i supposed to call and then she said she she says me back and she says here's the number call this number and ask them when you will see the deposit that was on hold deposited and just like you gotta be kidding me this is what i'm on my own it doesn't matter like i got these people that are being paid by bank of america to do this stuff for me and they're completely absolutely one hundred percent worthless.

macy bank of america account manager jason i one hundred percent
"account manager" Discussed on The Jason Stapleton Program

The Jason Stapleton Program

02:09 min | 3 years ago

"account manager" Discussed on The Jason Stapleton Program

"Right so this is the processor so then i call my business rep this is the person at bank of america that is supposed to be the person who handles all this for me now if you remember back to the last time i ranted rather than her doing that she actually just passed them off to macy's here you deal with it so you can talk directly with the credit card processing company and i'll just stay out of it which truthfully is better because she was absolutely worthless as anybody doing anything so it was better that she just be on the sidelines but after i found out that they released my money what do i want while i'm not gonna just assume that the money's getting released right i call my business rep sent her an email and i say hey here's the email from the the account manager show that she said i'm good to go can you send me an email and confirmed for me win the money has been released this is what she sends me let me pull it up for you i'm not even joking you this is this is this is what happened so she goes she goes back up and find it where is it where is it oh here it is she says jason i'm in a meeting today can you call them or or i will tomorrow and i i'm like call who who am i supposed you're the person i call your literally the person that i call when i have a business problem call who so i emailed her back and i say call who yours is the only number i have i don't have anybody else's number who am i supposed to call and then she said she she says me back and she says here's the number call this number and ask them when you will see the deposit that was on hold deposited and just like you gotta be kidding me this is what i'm on my own it doesn't matter like i got these people that are being paid by bank of america to do this stuff for me and they're completely absolutely one hundred percent worthless.

macy bank of america account manager jason i one hundred percent
"account manager" Discussed on Clark Howard Show

Clark Howard Show

01:48 min | 3 years ago

"account manager" Discussed on Clark Howard Show

"Even number of reasons why someone up to no good would want to take over one of your accounts and it's really really easy to do you go to your security and log in settings and you scroll down they'll be a section where you can choose your friends that are like your safe zone your trusted contacts and you're able to put them in the system and then you're good we have step by step for you on clark dot com had a do this if you have trouble figuring out how to do this on facebook and if the google thing i talked about wake who go has what go to your google account and type in the search inactive account manager and it's a really useful thing to have attached to your google accounts felipe is with us on the clark howard show hi philippi high clark how are you great thank you you got student loans you gotta deal with do you have a mountainous student loans or just a manageable pile it's it's a mountain well first of all let me just say huge fan and i've been listening to you continue to listen and follow you but yeah i do have a mountain of student loans and i've received some advice and i just don't know if i should take this advice or you know i just wanna get your opinion i guess i have about two hundred thirty thousand dollars in student loans my i would say that that qualifies is like a rocky mountain peak that's a lot.

facebook account manager felipe rocky mountain peak google clark howard two hundred thirty thousand do
"account manager" Discussed on AWS Podcast

AWS Podcast

01:50 min | 4 years ago

"account manager" Discussed on AWS Podcast

"La coruna welcome back to the idea of his podcast some laixi he would you good to have you back and i'm attempting podcast difficulty level eight at this point i'm because i have a guess birth in the office with me and also on voight surface let me welcome jenny davies who's a tam here in amazon in melbourne australia will come to the podcast jenny frank farming grants be here i've pain a big fan of the podcast listen since it beside one while original old school and onboard we have a mock napoli in sydney has also technical came as you here amazon web services welcome mark thank you saw him man it's good to be back i think i was on the podcast maybe three years ago talking about what a ten thousand and heavier here i am again in two thousand seventeen doing the same thing so thanks for having me back great to have you back and dumb as good to have returned guests to the podcast and hopefully things uh a little hawk quality them back dental a week we do keep it rough radion a little bit agricultural soham so what does have both of you come on the podcast to talk to us of that very interesting role with united various and that is one of the technical account manager i'm looking to try to explain it because i have one rot with me janney said ginny a tell us what is the role of a technical cap managers pop into prosecutes show simon emma clincs for the opportunity so a technical cap manage out is someone we really look for people who have that mix of technical and soft skills work with now and across customers sir terms we try to work onslaught now customers as much as possible really in searing that todd by getting what i require from in a process support so we have a very deep engagement with these custom as we want to really spent a lot of time learning an understanding their environment you're typically fonts on in that tom tamsir of the customs first point of contact into iws.

jenny davies amazon melbourne australia sydney web services technical account manager janney ginny simon emma clincs todd tom tamsir La coruna voight jenny frank three years