19 Burst results for "Zubeida"

"zubeida" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

Democracy Now! Audio

05:35 min | 1 year ago

"zubeida" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

"While of course that's what we've been saying for some time as you speak. We're showing for our web and television audience around the world. The art work of booze beta in guantanamo Raymond bonner. it's great to have you with us. Can you talk about the story of abu zubaydah Tell us who he is. You're doing documentary. The forever prisoner on it is he. Was the verse. A terrorist suspect captured after nine eleven. He was captured in seized in pakistan. Joint cia fbi. Some extent pakistani a police operation and he was rendered his first captured. He was the first take into a secret prison. I mean i've interviewed both the cia. Apparation the fbi operation at the time and was taken the first to be rendered to a secret side. He was taken to thailand. And soon after got there is when james mitchell and then bruce jessen showed up and began. The the interrogation is joe just pointed out. It was very interesting yesterday. And the argument to hear injustice barrett included talking great about torture. What happened to zubeida was torture. There was none of this euphemisms like enhanced interrogation techniques and he he was the guinea pig in a way. This is where mitchell design the program and tested the program of torture. You know amy. It's always struck me that a lot is made of the eighty three times. He was waterboarded if you read what was done to him. Read in the government cables. There were send at the time to me. The waterboarding was almost benign. They kept him sleepless. They put them in a small coffin sized box for hours overnight. He couldn't move. They hung him by the cell bars and with his feet dangling off the ground got to the point. It was so bad that mitchell would just snap his fingers and zubeida would act would get onto the waterboard..

Raymond bonner cia fbi abu zubaydah bruce jessen zubeida guantanamo james mitchell pakistan thailand barrett joe guinea mitchell amy
"zubeida" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

Democracy Now! Audio

07:55 min | 1 year ago

"zubeida" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

"Don't know if he's your client isn't your client. His name is on. This obviously is bad. Obviously beta cannot test fly now. He's because he's being held incommunicado. He has been held in one taught him. Oh why why i mean. I'm not sure this is relevant. But i mean in hamady. We said you can hold people in guantanamo. The words were active. Combat operations against taliban fighters apparently are going on in afghanistan. But they're not anymore minnesota. What why is he there. That's a question to put the government we don't have you filed or something. Get him out. There's been a habeas pending in the last fourteen years. There's been no action decide. I'm sorry i'm just let it sit there all right. I guess it's not relevant curiously. I'm not handling that preceding but no my understanding is that we we've done everything we could to move it forward but it simply has not move forward. That's an excerpt from the oral arguments in the supreme court case united states versus zubeida. We're joined now by two guests. Ray bonner is a pulitzer prize. Winning investigative journalists. He's producing a documentary with alex. Gibney about Zubeida and the interrogation program called the forever prisoner. His latest article for propublica is will the united states officially acknowledged that it had a secret torture site in poland. Also with us. Joe margulis and attorney for abu zubeida professor of law and governmenet cornell university. He was counsel of record in the landmark guantanamo case russell versus bush. We welcome you both to democracy now. Joe let's begin with you. You're part of the legal team. The case argued before the supreme court talk about the significance of the oral arguments yesterday. And when you use words like habeas corpus explain exactly what that means. Of course thanks sure. It was an extraordinary argument in several respects. The narrow question is whether we can secure the testimony of james mitchell and bruce jessen for use by the polish prosecutors in their investigation into whether crimes were committed in poland at the black site there but the the more important turn that the oral argument took is several things. One virtually every justice on the court described opposite betas treatment as torture. They used that word. There renew euphemisms there was no equivocation. Everyone understood that what happened to them was tortured. Second was the observation that you made. Which is the the questions by justice. Briar justice gorsuch. And just to sorta my or asking. Why is it that you can't just let. Does you better testify. That obviously would obviate the need for mitchell injustice testimony and what was interesting as their requests that it'd be allowed to testify was the government's equivocation and inability to answer that they were asked that is the solicitor. General was asked to provide a follow up statement. So they'll be filing something else explaining whether they're going to allow elvis testify and if they do. That will be teaching guantanamo that will be a radical change guantanamo was built to be an isolation chamber and they have never allowed any detainee to have uncensored access to the outside the whole purpose of it was to prevent that kind of a communication so that changes that will be a radical thing and the third piece that was really interesting was just as briars observation which we have been arguing on behalf for some time as well as other detainees have made this argument that there are no hostilities left in afghanistan. The legal justification for continuing to hold guys has disappeared. We've been making that argument. and yesterday. We heard a supreme court. Justice accepted as though it were commonplace. How could anyone think otherwise. While of course that's what we've been saying for some time as you speak. We're showing for our web and television audience around the world. The art work of booze beta in guantanamo Raymond bonner. it's great to have you with us. Can you talk about the story of abu zubaydah Tell us who he is. You're doing documentary. The forever prisoner on it is. He was the verse Terrorist suspect captured after nine eleven. He was captured in seized in pakistan. Joint cia fbi. Some extent pakistani a police operation and he was rendered his first captured. He was the first take into a secret prison. I mean i've interviewed both the cia operation the fbi operation at the time and was taken the first to be rendered to a secret side. He was taken to thailand. And soon after got there is when james mitchell and then bruce jessen showed up and began. The the interrogation is joe just pointed out. It was very interesting yesterday. And the argument to hear injustice barrett included talking great about torture. What happened to zubeida was torture. There was none of this euphemisms like enhanced interrogation techniques and he he was the guinea pig in a way. This is where mitchell design the program and tested the program of torture. You know amy. It's always struck me that a lot is made of the eighty three times. He was waterboarded if you read what was done to him. Read in the government cables. There were send at the time to me. The waterboarding was almost benign. They kept him sleepless. They put them in a small coffin sized box for hours overnight. He couldn't move. They hung him by the cell bars and with his feet dangling off the ground the got to the point. It was so bad that mitchell would just snap his fingers and zubeida would act would get onto the waterboard. What they did to him was bar worse in my view than than waterboarding and then when when journalists started to get onto the story about a secret prison you gotta remember this was back in two thousand and two and we didn't know about secret prisons and black sites and when they found out about and start desk questions then the cei- moved to pollen and quietly of course secretly and which leads to the case cases. Joe has describe that's in the supreme court there was hurt in the supreme court yesterday. But if i could say one more thing about yesterday's argument and addition to the three points joe raise. I was gobsmacked when they started asking the lawyers about zubaydah's habeas petition. Or teen years ago justice roberts ask about it too. Well hasn't filed a habeas petition. Yes he has or eighteen years ago jomar ghoulish was his lawyer or ten years and the court has yet to rule on his habeas petition. And it's.

zubeida guantanamo bruce jessen Ray bonner supreme court abu zubeida Joe margulis governmenet cornell university russell versus bush Joe let james mitchell Briar justice gorsuch poland afghanistan Gibney propublica united states pulitzer prize taliban mitchell
"zubeida" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

Democracy Now! Audio

07:55 min | 1 year ago

"zubeida" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

"Don't know if he's your client isn't your client. His name is on this. obviously bad. Obviously beta cannot test fly now. He's because he's being held incommunicado. He has been held in one taught him. Oh why why i mean. I'm not sure this is relevant. But i mean in hamady. We said you can hold people in guantanamo. The words were active. Combat operations against taliban fighters apparently are going on in afghanistan. But they're not anymore minnesota. What why is he there. That's a question to put the government. We don't have you filed habeas or something. Get him out. There's been a habeas preceding pending in the last fourteen years. There's been no action decide. I'm sorry i'm just let it sit there all right. I guess it's not relevant curiously. I'm not handling that preceding but no my understanding is that we we've done everything we could to move it forward but it simply has not move forward. That's an excerpt from the oral arguments in the supreme court case united states versus zubeida. We're joined now by two guests. Ray bonner is a pulitzer prize. Winning investigative journalists. He's producing a documentary with alex. Gibney about Zubeida and the interrogation program called the forever prisoner. His latest article for propublica is will the united states officially acknowledged that it had a secret torture site in poland. Also with us. Joe margulis and attorney for abu zubeida professor of law and governmenet cornell university. He was counsel of record in the landmark guantanamo case russell versus bush. We welcome you both to democracy now. Joe let's begin with you. You're part of the legal team. The case argued before the supreme court talk about the significance of the oral arguments yesterday. And when you use words like habeas corpus explain exactly what that means. Of course thanks sure. It was an extraordinary argument in several respects. The narrow question is whether we can secure the testimony of james mitchell and bruce jessen for use by the polish prosecutors in their investigation into whether crimes were committed in poland at the black site there but the the more important turn that the oral argument took is several things. One virtually every justice on the court described opposite betas treatment as torture. They used that word. There renew euphemisms there was no equivocation. Everyone understood that what happened to them was tortured. Second was the observation that you made. Which is the the questions by justice. Briar justice gorsuch. And just to sorta my or asking. Why is it that you can't just let odds you better testify. That obviously would obviate the need for mitchell injustice testimony and what was interesting as their requests that it'd be allowed to testify was the government's equivocation and inability to answer that they were asked that is the solicitor. General was asked to provide a follow up statement. So they'll be filing something else explaining whether they're going to allow elvis admitted to testify. And if they do that will be teaching. Guantanamo that will be a radical change. Guantanamo was built to be an isolation chamber and they have never allowed any detainee to have uncensored access to the outside the whole purpose of it was to prevent that kind of a communication so that changes that will be a radical thing and the third piece that was really interesting was just as briars observation which we have been arguing on behalf for some time as well as other detainees have made this argument that there are no hostilities left in afghanistan. The legal justification for continuing to hold guys has disappeared. We've been making that argument. and yesterday. We heard a supreme court. Justice accepted as though it were commonplace. How could anyone think otherwise. While of course that's what we've been saying for some time as you speak. We're showing for our web and television audience around the world. The art work of booze beta in guantanamo Raymond bonner. it's great to have you with us. Can you talk about the story of abu zubaydah Tell us who he is. You're doing documentary. The forever prisoner on it is. He was the verse Terrorist suspect captured after nine eleven. He was captured in seized in pakistan. Joint cia fbi. Some extent pakistani a police operation and he was rendered his first captured. He was the first take into a secret prison. I mean i've interviewed both the cia operation the fbi operation at the time and was taken the first to be rendered to a secret side. He was taken to thailand. And soon after got there is when james mitchell and then bruce jessen showed up and began. The the interrogation is joe just pointed out. It was very interesting yesterday. And the argument to hear injustice barrett included talking great about torture. What happened to zubeida was torture. There was none of this euphemisms like enhanced interrogation techniques and he he was the guinea pig in a way. This is where mitchell design the program and tested the program of torture. You know amy. It's always struck me that a lot is made of the eighty three times. He was waterboarded if you read what was done to him. Read in the government cables. There were send at the time to me. The waterboarding was almost benign. They kept him sleepless. They put them in a small coffin sized box for hours overnight. He couldn't move. They hung him by the cell bars and with his feet dangling off the ground the got to the point. It was so bad that mitchell would just snap his fingers and zubeida would act would get onto the waterboard. What they did to him was far worse in my view than than waterboarding and then when when journalists started to get onto the story about a secret prison you gotta remember this was back in two thousand and two and we didn't know about secret prisons and black sites and when they found out about and start desk questions then the cei- moved to pollen and quietly of course secretly and which leads to the cases. Joe has describe that's in the supreme court there was hurt in the supreme court yesterday. But if i could say one more thing about yesterday's argument and addition to the three points joe raise. I was gobsmacked when they started asking the lawyers about zubaydah's habeas petition. Or teen years ago justice roberts ask about it too. Well hasn't filed a habeas petition. Yes he has. Or teen years ago jomar ghoulish was his lawyer or ten years and the court has yet to rule on his habeas petition. And it's.

zubeida guantanamo bruce jessen Ray bonner supreme court abu zubeida Joe margulis governmenet cornell university russell versus bush Joe let james mitchell Briar justice gorsuch poland afghanistan Guantanamo Gibney propublica united states pulitzer prize taliban
"zubeida" Discussed on THIS IS DEMOCRACY

THIS IS DEMOCRACY

07:55 min | 1 year ago

"zubeida" Discussed on THIS IS DEMOCRACY

"Don't know if he's your client isn't your client. His name is on. This obviously is bad. Obviously beta cannot test fly now. He's because he's being held incommunicado. He has been held in wanting him. Oh why why i mean. I'm not sure this is relevant. But i mean in hamady. We said you can hold people in guantanamo. The words were active. Combat operations against taliban fighters apparently are going on in afghanistan. But they're not anymore minnesota. What why is he there. That's a question to put the government. We don't have you filed habeas or something. Get him out. There's been a habeas proceeding pending in the last fourteen years. There's been no action. I'm sorry i'm just let it sit there all right. I guess it's not relevant curiously. I'm not handling that preceding but no my understanding is that we we've done everything we could to move it forward but it simply has not move forward. That's an excerpt from the oral arguments in the supreme court case united states versus zubeida. We're joined now by two guests. Ray bonner is a pulitzer prize. Winning investigative journalists. He's producing a documentary with alex. Gibney about Zubeida and the interrogation program called the forever prisoner. His latest article for propublica is will the united states officially acknowledged that it had a secret torture site in poland. Also with us. Joe margulis and attorney for abu zubeida professor of law and governmenet cornell university. He was counsel of record in the landmark guantanamo case russell versus bush. We welcome you both to democracy now. Joe let's begin with you. You're part of the legal team. The case argued before the supreme court talk about the significance of the oral arguments yesterday. And when you use words like habeas corpus explain exactly what that means. Of course thanks sure. It was an extraordinary argument in several respects. The narrow question is whether we can secure the testimony of james mitchell and bruce jessen for use by the polish prosecutors in their investigation into whether crimes were committed in poland at the black site there but the the more important turn that the oral argument took is several things. One virtually every justice on the court described betas treatment as torture. They used that word. There renew euphemisms there was no equivocation. Everyone understood that what happened to them was tortured. Second was the observation that you made. Which is the the questions by justice. Briar justice gorsuch. And just to sorta my or asking. Why is it that you can't just let. Does you better testify. That obviously would obviate the need for mitchell injustice testimony and what was interesting as their requests that it'd be allowed to testify was the government's equivocation and inability to answer that they were asked that is the solicitor. General was asked to provide a follow up statement. So they'll be filing something else explaining whether they're going to allow. Elvis admitted to testify. And if they do that will be teaching at guantanamo. That will be a radical change. Guantanamo was built to be an isolation chamber and they have never allowed any detainee to have uncensored access to the outside the whole purpose of it was to prevent that kind of a communication so that changes that will be a radical thing and the third piece. That was really interesting was just as briars observation which we have been arguing on behalf for some time as well as other detainees have made this argument that there are no hostilities left in afghanistan. The legal justification for continuing to hold guys has disappeared. We've been making that argument. and yesterday. We heard a supreme court. Justice accepted as though it were commonplace. How could anyone think otherwise. While of course that's what we've been saying for some time as you speak. We're showing for our web and television audience around the world. The art work of booze beta in guantanamo Raymond bonner. it's great to have you with us. Can you talk about the story of a booster beta Tell us who he is. You're doing documentary. The forever prisoner on it is. He was the verse Terrorist suspect captured after nine eleven. He was captured in seized in pakistan. Joint cia fbi. Some extent pakistani a police operation and he was rendered his first captured. He was the first take into a secret prison. I mean i've interviewed both the cia. The operation the fbi operation at the time and was taken the first to be rendered to a secret side. He was taken to thailand. And soon after got there is when james mitchell and then bruce jessen showed up and began. The the interrogation is joe just pointed out. It was very interesting yesterday. And the argument to hear injustice barrett included talking great about torture. What happened to zubeida was torture. There was none of this euphemisms like enhanced interrogation techniques and he he was the guinea pig in a way. This is where mitchell design the program and tested the program of torture me. It's always struck me that a lot is made of the eighty three times. He was waterboarded if you read what was done to him. Read in the government cables. There were send at the time to me. The waterboarding was almost benign. They kept him sleepless. They put them in a small coffin sized box for hours overnight. He couldn't move. They hung him by the cell bars and with his feet dangling off the ground the got to the point. It was so bad that mitchell would just snap his fingers and zubeida would act would get onto the waterboard. What they did to him was bar worse in my view than than waterboarding and then when when journalists started to get onto the story about a secret prison you gotta remember this was back in two thousand and two and we didn't know about secret prisons and black sites and when they found out about and start to ask questions then the cei- moved to pollen and quietly of course secretly and which leads to the case cases. Joe has describe that's in the supreme court there was hurt in the supreme court yesterday. But if i could say one more thing about yesterday's argument and addition to the three points joe raise. I was gobsmacked when they started asking the lawyers about zubaydah's habeas petition. Or teen years ago justice roberts ask about it too. Well hasn't filed a habeas petition. Yes he has. Or teen years ago jomar ghoulish was his lawyer or teen years and the court has yet to rule on his habeas petition. And it's.

zubeida guantanamo bruce jessen Ray bonner supreme court Joe margulis abu zubeida governmenet cornell university russell versus bush Joe let james mitchell Briar justice gorsuch poland afghanistan Gibney propublica united states pulitzer prize taliban mitchell
"zubeida" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

Democracy Now! Audio

07:55 min | 1 year ago

"zubeida" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

"Don't know if he's your client isn't your client. His name is on. This obviously is bad. Obviously beta cannot test fly now. He's because he's being held incommunicado. He has been held in one wanting him. Oh why why i mean. I'm not sure this is relevant. But i mean in hamady. We said you can hold people in guantanamo. The words were active. Combat operations against taliban fighters apparently are going on in afghanistan. But they're not anymore minnesota. What why is he there. That's a question to put the government. We don't have you filed habeas or something. Get him out. There's been a habeas proceeding pending in the last fourteen years. There's been no action decide. I'm sorry i'm just let it sit there all right. I guess it's not relevant curiously. I'm not handling that preceding but no my understanding is that we we've done everything we could to move it forward but it simply has not move forward. That's an excerpt from the oral arguments in the supreme court case united states versus zubeida. We're joined now by two guests. Ray bonner is a pulitzer prize. Winning investigative journalists. He's producing a documentary with alex. Gibney about Zubeida and the interrogation program called the forever prisoner. His latest article for propublica is will the united states officially acknowledged that it had a secret torture site in poland. Also with us. Joe margulis and attorney for abu zubeida professor of law and governmenet cornell university. He was counsel of record in the landmark guantanamo case russell versus bush. We welcome you both to democracy now. Joe let's begin with you. You're part of the legal team. The case argued before the supreme court talk about the significance of the oral arguments yesterday. And when you use words like habeas corpus explain exactly what that means. Of course thanks sure. It was an extraordinary argument in several respects. The narrow question is whether we can secure the testimony of james mitchell and bruce jessen for use by the polish prosecutors in their investigation into whether crimes were committed in poland at the black site there but the the more important turn that the oral argument took is several things. One virtually every justice on the court described opposite betas treatment as torture. They used that word. There renew euphemisms there was no equivocation. Everyone understood that what happened to them was tortured. Second was the observation that you made. Which is the the questions by justice. Briar justice gorsuch. And just to sorta my or asking. Why is it that you can't just let odds you better testify. That obviously would obviate the need for mitchell injustice testimony and what was interesting as their requests that it'd be allowed to testify was the government's equivocation and inability to answer that they were asked that is the solicitor. General was asked to provide a follow up statement. So they'll be filing something else explaining whether they're going to allow. Elvis admitted to testify. And if they do that will be teaching at guantanamo. That will be a radical change. Guantanamo was built to be an isolation chamber and they have never allowed any detainee to have uncensored access to the outside the whole purpose of it was to prevent that kind of a communication so that changes that will be a radical thing and the third piece. That was really interesting was just as briars observation which we have been arguing on behalf for some time as well as other detainees have made this argument that there are no hostilities left in afghanistan. The legal justification for continuing to hold guys has disappeared. We've been making that argument. and yesterday. We heard a supreme court. Justice accepted as though it were commonplace. How could anyone think otherwise. While of course that's what we've been saying for some time as you speak. We're showing for our web and television audience around the world. The art work of booze beta in guantanamo Raymond bonner. it's great to have you with us. Can you talk about the story of a booster beta Tell us who he is. You're doing documentary. The forever prisoner on it is he. Was the verse. A terrorist suspect captured after nine eleven. He was captured in seized in pakistan. Joint cia fbi. Some extent pakistani a police operation and he was rendered his first captured. He was the first take into a secret prison. I mean i've interviewed both the cia. The operation the fbi operation at the time and was taken the first to be rendered to a secret side. He was taken to thailand. And soon after got there is when james mitchell and then bruce jessen showed up and began. The the interrogation is joe just pointed out. It was very interesting yesterday. And the argument to hear injustice barrett included talking great about torture. What happened to zubeida was torture. There was none of this euphemisms like enhanced interrogation techniques and he he was the guinea pig in a way. This is where mitchell design the program and tested the program of torture. You know amy. It's always struck me that a lot is made of the eighty three times. He was waterboarded if you read what was done to him. Read in the government cables. There were send at the time to me. The waterboarding was almost benign. They kept him sleepless. They put them in a small coffin sized box for hours overnight. He couldn't move. They hung him by the cell bars and with his feet dangling off the ground the got to the point. It was so bad that mitchell would just snap his fingers and zubeida would act would get onto the waterboard. What they did to him was far worse in my view than than waterboarding and then when when journalists started to get onto the story about a secret prison you gotta remember this was back in two thousand and two and we didn't know about secret prisons and black sites and when they found out about and start to ask questions then the cei- moved to pollen and quietly of course secretly and which leads to the case cases. Joe has describe that's in the supreme court there was hurt in the supreme court yesterday. But if i could say one more thing about yesterday's argument and addition to the three points joe raise. I was gobsmacked when they started asking the lawyers about zubaydah's habeas petition. Or teen years ago justice roberts ask about it too. Well hasn't filed a habeas petition. Yes he has. Or teen years ago jomar ghoulish was his lawyer or ten years and the court has yet to rule on his habeas petition. And it's.

zubeida guantanamo bruce jessen Ray bonner supreme court Joe margulis abu zubeida governmenet cornell university russell versus bush Joe let james mitchell Briar justice gorsuch poland afghanistan Gibney propublica united states pulitzer prize taliban mitchell
"zubeida" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

Democracy Now! Audio

07:55 min | 1 year ago

"zubeida" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

"Don't know if he's your client isn't your client. His name is on. This obviously is bad. Obviously beta cannot test fly now. He's because he's being held incommunicado. He has been held in wanting him. Oh why why i mean. I'm not sure this is relevant. But i mean in hamady. We said you can hold people in guantanamo. The words were active. Combat operations against taliban fighters apparently are going on in afghanistan. But they're not anymore minnesota. What why is he there. That's a question to put the government. We don't have you filed habeas or something. Get him out. There's been a habeas pending in the last fourteen years. There's been no action decide. I'm sorry i'm just let it sit there all right. I guess it's not relevant curiously. I'm not handling that preceding but no my understanding is that we we've done everything we could to move it forward but it simply has not move forward. That's an excerpt from the oral arguments in the supreme court case united states versus zubeida. We're joined now by two guests. Ray bonner is a pulitzer prize. Winning investigative journalists. He's producing a documentary with alex. Gibney about Zubeida and the interrogation program called the forever prisoner. His latest article for propublica is will the united states officially acknowledged that it had a secret torture site in poland. Also with us. Joe margulis and attorney for abu zubeida professor of law and governmenet cornell university. He was counsel of record in the landmark guantanamo case russell versus bush. We welcome you both to democracy now. Joe let's begin with you. You're part of the legal team. The case argued before the supreme court talk about the significance of the oral arguments yesterday. And when you use words like habeas corpus explain exactly what that means. Of course thanks sure. It was an extraordinary argument in several respects. The narrow question is whether we can secure the testimony of james mitchell and bruce jessen for use by the polish prosecutors in their investigation into whether crimes were committed in poland at the black site there but the the more important turn that the oral argument took is several things. One virtually every justice on the court described opposite betas treatment as torture. They used that word. There renew euphemisms there was no equivocation. Everyone understood that what happened to them was tortured. Second was the observation that you made. Which is the the questions by justice. Briar justice gorsuch. And just to sorta my or asking. Why is it that you can't just let. Does you better testify. That obviously would obviate the need for mitchell injustice testimony and what was interesting as their requests that it'd be allowed to testify was the government's equivocation and inability to answer that they were asked that is the solicitor. General was asked to provide a follow up statement. So they'll be filing something else explaining whether they're going to allow elvis admitted to testify. And if they do that will be teaching. Guantanamo that will be a radical change. Guantanamo was built to be an isolation chamber and they have never allowed any detainee to have uncensored access to the outside the whole purpose of it was to prevent that kind of a communication so that changes that will be a radical thing and the third piece that was really interesting was just as briars observation which we have been arguing on behalf for some time as well as other detainees have made this argument that there are no hostilities left in afghanistan. The legal justification for continuing to hold guys has disappeared. We've been making that argument. and yesterday. We heard a supreme court. Justice accepted as though it were commonplace. How could anyone think otherwise. While of course that's what we've been saying for some time as you speak. We're showing for our web and television audience around the world. The art work of booze beta in guantanamo Raymond bonner. it's great to have you with us. Can you talk about the story of a booster beta Tell us who he is. You're doing documentary. The forever prisoner on it is he. Was the verse terrorist. Suspect captured after nine eleven. He was captured in seized in pakistan. Joint cia fbi. Some extent pakistani a police operation and he was rendered his first captured. He was the first take into a secret prison. I mean i've interviewed both the cia operation the fbi operation at the time and was taken the first to be rendered to a secret side. He was taken to thailand. And soon after got there is when james mitchell and then bruce jessen showed up and began. The the interrogation is joe just pointed out. It was very interesting yesterday. And the argument to hear injustice barrett included talking great about torture. What happened to zubeida was torture. There was none of this euphemisms like enhanced interrogation techniques and he he was the guinea pig in a way. This is where mitchell design the program and tested the program of torture you me. It's always struck me that a lot is made of the eighty three times. He was waterboarded if you read what was done to him. Read in the government cables. There were send at the time to me. The waterboarding was almost benign. They kept him sleepless. They put them in a small coffin sized box for hours overnight. He couldn't move. They hung him by the cell bars and with his feet dangling off the ground the got to the point. It was so bad that mitchell would just snap his fingers and zubeida would act would get onto the waterboard. What they did to him was bar worse in my view than than waterboarding and then when when journalists started to get onto the story about a secret prison you gotta remember this was back in two thousand and two and we didn't know about secret prisons and black sites and when they found out about and start to ask questions then the cei- moved to pollen and quietly of course secretly and which leads to the cases. Joe has describe that's in the supreme court there was hurt in the supreme court yesterday. But if i could say one more thing about yesterday's argument and addition to the three points joe raise. I was gobsmacked when they started asking the lawyers about zubaydah's habeas petition. Or teen years ago justice roberts ask about it too. Well hasn't filed a habeas. Yes he has. Or teen years ago jomar ghoulish was his lawyer or and the court has yet to rule on his habeas petition. And it's.

zubeida guantanamo bruce jessen Ray bonner supreme court Joe margulis abu zubeida governmenet cornell university russell versus bush Joe let james mitchell Briar justice gorsuch poland afghanistan Guantanamo Gibney propublica united states pulitzer prize taliban
"zubeida" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

Democracy Now! Audio

07:55 min | 1 year ago

"zubeida" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

"Don't know if he's your client isn't your client. His name is on this. obviously bad. Obviously beta cannot test fly now. He's because he's being held incommunicado. He has been held in one wanting him. Oh why why i mean. I'm not sure this is relevant. But i mean in hamady. We said you can hold people in guantanamo. The words were active. Combat operations against taliban fighters apparently are going on in afghanistan. But they're not anymore minnesota. What why is he there. That's a question to put the government. We don't have you filed habeas or something. Get him out. There's been a habeas preceding pending in the last fourteen years. There's been no action. I'm sorry i'm just let it sit there all right. I guess it's not relevant curiously. I'm not handling that preceding but no my understanding is that we we've done everything we could to move it forward but it simply has not move forward. That's an excerpt from the oral arguments in the supreme court case united states versus zubeida. We're joined now by two guests. Ray bonner is a pulitzer prize. Winning investigative journalists. He's producing a documentary with alex. Gibney about Zubeida and the interrogation program called the forever prisoner. His latest article for propublica is will the united states officially acknowledged that it had a secret torture site in poland. Also with us. Joe margulis and attorney for abu zubeida professor of law and governmenet cornell university. He was counsel of record in the landmark guantanamo case russell versus bush. We welcome you both to democracy now. Joe let's begin with you. You're part of the legal team. The case argued before the supreme court talk about the significance of the oral arguments yesterday. And when you use words corpus explain exactly what that means of course. Thanks sure it was an extraordinary argument. In several respects. The narrow question is whether we can secure the testimony of james mitchell and bruce jessen for use by the polish prosecutors in their investigation into whether crimes were committed in poland at the black site there but the the more important turn that the oral argument took is several things. One virtually every justice on the court described opposite betas treatment as torture. They used that word. There renew euphemisms there was no equivocation. Everyone understood that what happened to them was tortured. Second was the observation that you made. Which is the the questions by justice. Briar justice gorsuch. And just to sorta my or asking. Why is it that you can't just let. Does you better testify. That obviously would obviate the need for mitchell injustice testimony and what was interesting as their requests that it'd be allowed to testify was the government's equivocation and inability to answer that they were asked that is the solicitor. General was asked to provide a follow up statement. So they'll be filing something else explaining whether they're going to allow. Elvis admitted to testify. And if they do that will be teaching at guantanamo. That will be a radical change. Guantanamo was built to be an isolation chamber and they have never allowed any detainee to have uncensored access to the outside the whole purpose of it was to prevent that kind of a communication so that changes that will be a radical thing and the third piece. That was really interesting was just as briars observation which we have been arguing on behalf for some time as well as other detainees have made this argument that there are no hostilities left in afghanistan. The legal justification for continuing to hold guys has disappeared. We've been making that argument. and yesterday. We heard a supreme court. Justice accepted as though it were commonplace. How could anyone think otherwise. While of course that's what we've been saying for some time as you speak. We're showing for our web and television audience around the world. The art work of booze beta in guantanamo Raymond bonner. it's great to have you with us. Can you talk about the story of a booster beta Tell us who he is. You're doing documentary. The forever prisoner on it is. He was the verse Terrorist suspect captured after nine eleven. He was captured in seized in pakistan. Joint cia fbi. Some extent pakistani a police operation and he was rendered his first captured. He was the first take into a secret prison. I mean i've interviewed both the cia operation the fbi operation at the time and was taken the first to be rendered to a secret side. He was taken to thailand. And soon after got there is when james mitchell and then bruce jessen showed up and began. The the interrogation is joe just pointed out. It was very interesting yesterday. And the argument to hear injustice barrett included talking great about torture. What happened to zubeida was torture. There was none of this euphemisms like enhanced interrogation techniques and he he was the guinea pig in a way. This is where mitchell design the program and tested the program of torture. You know me. It's always struck me that a lot is made of the eighty three times. He was waterboarded if you read what was done to him. Read in the government cables. There were send at the time to me. The waterboarding was almost benign. They kept him sleepless. They put them in a small coffin sized box for hours overnight. He couldn't move. They hung him by the cell bars and with his feet dangling off the ground the got to the point. It was so bad that mitchell would just snap his fingers and zubeida would act would get onto the waterboard. What they did to him was far worse in my view than than waterboarding and then when when journalists started to get onto the story about a secret prison you gotta remember this was back in two thousand and two and we didn't know about secret prisons and black sites and when they found out about and start desk questions then the cei- moved to pollen and quietly of course secretly and which leads to the cases. Joe has describe that's in the supreme court there was hurt in the supreme court yesterday. But if i could say one more thing about yesterday's argument and addition to the three points joe raise. I was gobsmacked when they started asking the lawyers about zubaydah's habeas petition. Or teen years ago justice roberts ask about it too. Well hasn't filed a habeas petition. Yes he has. Or teen years ago jomar ghoulish was his lawyer or ten years and the court has yet to rule on his habeas petition. And it's.

zubeida guantanamo bruce jessen Ray bonner supreme court Joe margulis abu zubeida governmenet cornell university russell versus bush Joe let james mitchell Briar justice gorsuch poland afghanistan Gibney propublica united states pulitzer prize taliban mitchell
"zubeida" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

Democracy Now! Audio

07:55 min | 1 year ago

"zubeida" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

"Don't know if he's your client isn't your client. His name is on. This obviously is bad. Obviously beta cannot test fly now. He's because he's being held incommunicado. He has been held in one taught him. Oh why why i mean. I'm not sure this is relevant. But i mean in hamady. We said you can hold people in guantanamo. The words were active. Combat operations against taliban fighters apparently are going on in afghanistan. But they're not anymore minnesota. What why is he there. That's a question to put the government. We don't have you filed habeas or something. Get him out. There's been a habeas proceeding pending in the last fourteen years. There's been no action decide. I'm sorry i'm just let it sit there all right. I guess it's not relevant curiously. I'm not handling that preceding but no my understanding is that we we've done everything we could to move it forward but it simply has not move forward. That's an excerpt from the oral arguments in the supreme court case united states versus zubeida. We're joined now by two guests. Ray bonner is a pulitzer prize. Winning investigative journalists. He's producing a documentary with alex. Gibney about Zubeida and the interrogation program called the forever prisoner. His latest article for propublica is will the united states officially acknowledged that it had a secret torture site in poland. Also with us. Joe margulis and attorney for abu zubeida professor of law and governmenet cornell university. He was counsel of record in the landmark guantanamo case russell versus bush. We welcome you both to democracy now. Joe let's begin with you. You're part of the legal team. The case argued before the supreme court talk about the significance of the oral arguments yesterday. And when you use words like habeas corpus explain exactly what that means. Of course thanks sure. It was an extraordinary argument in several respects. The narrow question is whether we can secure the testimony of james mitchell and bruce jessen for use by the polish prosecutors in their investigation into whether crimes were committed in poland at the black site there but the the more important turn that the oral argument took is several things. One virtually every justice on the court described opposite betas treatment as torture. They used that word. There renew euphemisms there was no equivocation. Everyone understood that what happened to them was tortured. Second was the observation that you made. Which is the the questions by justice. Briar justice gorsuch. And just to sorta my or asking. Why is it that you can't just let odds you better testify. That obviously would obviate the need for mitchell injustice testimony and what was interesting as their requests that it'd be allowed to testify was the government's equivocation and inability to answer that they were asked that is the solicitor. General was asked to provide a follow up statement. So they'll be filing something else explaining whether they're going to allow elvis admitted to testify. And if they do that will be teaching. Guantanamo that will be a radical change. Guantanamo was built to be an isolation chamber and they have never allowed any detainee to have uncensored access to the outside the whole purpose of it was to prevent that kind of a communication so that changes that will be a radical thing and the third piece that was really interesting was just as briars observation which we have been arguing on behalf for some time as well as other detainees have made this argument that there are no hostilities left in afghanistan. The legal justification for continuing to hold guys has disappeared. We've been making that argument. and yesterday. We heard a supreme court. Justice accepted as though it were commonplace. How could anyone think otherwise. While of course that's what we've been saying for some time as you speak. We're showing for our web and television audience around the world. The art work of booze beta in guantanamo Raymond bonner. it's great to have you with us. Can you talk about the story of a booster beta Tell us who he is. You're doing documentary. The forever prisoner on it is. He was the verse Terrorist suspect captured after nine eleven. He was captured in seized in pakistan. Joint cia fbi. Some extent pakistani a police operation and he was rendered his first captured. He was the first take into a secret prison. I mean i've interviewed both the cia operation the fbi operation at the time and was taken the first to be rendered to a secret side. He was taken to thailand. And soon after got there is when james mitchell and then bruce jessen showed up and began. The the interrogation is joe just pointed out. It was very interesting yesterday. And the argument to hear injustice barrett included talking great about torture. What happened to zubeida was torture. There was none of this euphemisms like enhanced interrogation techniques and he he was the guinea pig in a way. This is where mitchell design the program and tested the program of torture. You know amy. It's always struck me that a lot is made of the eighty three times. He was waterboarded if you read what was done to him. Read in the government cables. There were send at the time to me. The waterboarding was almost benign. They kept him sleepless. They put them in a small coffin sized box for hours overnight. He couldn't move. They hung him by the cell bars and with his feet dangling off the ground the got to the point. It was so bad that mitchell would just snap his fingers and zubeida would act would get onto the waterboard. What they did to him was far worse in my view than than waterboarding and then when when journalists started to get onto the story about a secret prison you gotta remember this was back in two thousand and two and we didn't know about secret prisons and black sites and when they found out about and start to ask questions then the cei- moved to pollen and quietly of course secretly and which leads to the case cases. Joe has describe that's in the supreme court there was hurt in the supreme court yesterday. But if i could say one more thing about yesterday's argument and addition to the three points joe raise. I was gobsmacked when they started asking the lawyers about zubaydah's habeas petition. Or teen years ago justice roberts ask about it too. Well hasn't filed a habeas petition. Yes he has. Or teen years ago jomar ghoulish was his lawyer or ten years and the court has yet to rule on his habeas petition. And it's.

zubeida guantanamo bruce jessen Ray bonner supreme court Joe margulis abu zubeida governmenet cornell university russell versus bush Joe let james mitchell Briar justice gorsuch poland afghanistan Guantanamo Gibney propublica united states pulitzer prize taliban
"zubeida" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

Democracy Now! Audio

07:55 min | 1 year ago

"zubeida" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

"Don't know if he's your client isn't your client. His name is on. This obviously is bad. Obviously beta cannot test fly now. He's because he's being held incommunicado. He has been held in wanting him. Oh why why i mean. I'm not sure this is relevant. But i mean in hamady. We said you can hold people in guantanamo. The words were active. Combat operations against taliban fighters apparently are going on in afghanistan. But they're not anymore minnesota. What why is he there. That's a question to put the government. We don't have you filed habeas or something. Get him out. There's been a habeas proceeding pending in the last fourteen years. There's been no action decide. I'm sorry i'm just let it sit there all right. I guess it's not relevant curiously. I'm not handling that preceding but no my understanding is that we we've done everything we could to move it forward but it simply has not move forward. That's an excerpt from the oral arguments in the supreme court case united states versus zubeida. We're joined now by two guests. Ray bonner is a pulitzer prize. Winning investigative journalists. He's producing a documentary with alex. Gibney about Zubeida and the interrogation program called the forever prisoner. His latest article for propublica is will the united states officially acknowledged that it had a secret torture site in poland. Also with us. Joe margulis and attorney for abu zubeida professor of law and governmenet cornell university. He was counsel of record in the landmark guantanamo case russell versus bush. We welcome you both to democracy now. Joe let's begin with you. You're part of the legal team. The case argued before the supreme court talk about the significance of the oral arguments yesterday. And when you use words like habeas corpus explain exactly what that means. Of course thanks sure. It was an extraordinary argument in several respects. The narrow question is whether we can secure the testimony of james mitchell and bruce jessen for use by the polish prosecutors in their investigation into whether crimes were committed in poland at the black site there but the the more important turn that the oral argument took is several things. One virtually every justice on the court described opposite betas treatment as torture. They used that word. There renew euphemisms there was no equivocation. Everyone understood that what happened to them was tortured. Second was the observation that you made. Which is the the questions by justice. Briar justice gorsuch. And just to sorta my or asking. Why is it that you can't just let. Does you better testify. That obviously would obviate the need for mitchell injustice testimony and what was interesting as their requests that it'd be allowed to testify was the government's equivocation and inability to answer that they were asked that is the solicitor. General was asked to provide a follow up statement. So they'll be filing something else explaining whether they're going to allow elvis admitted to testify. And if they do that will be a change. Guantanamo that will be a radical change guantanamo was built to be an isolation chamber and they have never allowed any detainee to have uncensored access to the outside the whole purpose of it was to prevent that kind of a communication so that changes that will be a radical thing and the third piece. That was really interesting was just as briars observation which we have been arguing on behalf for some time as well as other detainees have made this argument that there are no hostilities left in afghanistan. The legal justification for continuing to hold guys has disappeared. We've been making that argument. and yesterday. We heard a supreme court. Justice accepted as though it were commonplace. How could anyone think otherwise. While of course that's what we've been saying for some time as you speak. We're showing for our web and television audience around the world. The art work of booze beta in guantanamo Raymond bonner. it's great to have you with us. Can you talk about the story of abu zubaydah Tell us who he is. You're doing documentary. The forever prisoner on it is. He was the verse Terrorist suspect captured after nine eleven. He was captured in seized in pakistan. Joint cia fbi. Some extent pakistani a police operation and he was rendered his first captured. He was the first take into a secret prison. I mean i've interviewed both the cia operation the fbi operation at the time and was taken the first to be rendered to a secret side. He was taken to thailand. And soon after got there is when james mitchell and then bruce jessen showed up and began. The the interrogation is joe just pointed out. It was very interesting yesterday. And the argument to hear injustice barrett included talking great about torture. What happened to zubeida was torture. There was none of this euphemisms like enhanced interrogation techniques and he he was the guinea pig in a way. This is where mitchell design the program and tested the program of torture. You know amy. It's always struck me that a lot is made of the eighty three times. He was waterboarded if you read what was done to him. Read in the government cables. There were send at the time to me. The waterboarding was almost benign. They kept him sleepless. They put them in a small coffin sized box for hours overnight. He couldn't move. They hung him by the cell bars and with his feet dangling off the ground the got to the point. It was so bad that mitchell would just snap his fingers and zubeida would act would get onto the waterboard. What they did to him was far worse in my view than than waterboarding and then when when journalists started to get onto the story about a secret prison you gotta remember this was back in two thousand and two and we didn't know about secret prisons and black sites and when they found out about and start to ask questions then the cei- moved to pollen and quietly of course secretly and which leads to the case cases. Joe has describe that's in the supreme court there was hurt in the supreme court yesterday. But if i could say one more thing about yesterday's argument and addition to the three points joe raise. I was gobsmacked when they started asking the lawyers about zubaydah's habeas petition. Or teen years ago justice roberts ask about it too. Well hasn't filed a habeas petition. Yes he has. Or teen years ago jomar ghoulish was his lawyer or ten years and the court has yet to rule on his habeas petition. And it's.

zubeida guantanamo bruce jessen Ray bonner supreme court abu zubaydah Joe margulis governmenet cornell university russell versus bush Joe let james mitchell Briar justice gorsuch poland afghanistan Gibney propublica united states pulitzer prize taliban mitchell
"zubeida" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

Democracy Now! Audio

08:00 min | 1 year ago

"zubeida" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

"Mirror of the stone by chameleons uber. On this is democracy now democracy now dot org the war and peace report. I mean he could men we turn now to look at the biden. Administration's attempts to keep secret information about the us torture program following the september eleventh attacks on wednesday. The supreme court heard a case brought by abu zubaydah a guantanamo prisoner who was waterboarded over eighty times while being held at the cia block site. His legal team has spent years trying to obtain testimony from two psychologists doctors. James mitchell and bruce jessen who helped the cia design and implement it's torture program the us government's also trying to keep secret. The location and poland of the cia black site where abu zubaydah was tortured. Wednesday's hearing took a surprising. Turn when several justices asked why the united states is refusing to allow zubeida to testify himself in an ongoing cram poland. This is justice. Steven brier questioning a boozer betas. Turney david kline. Why don't you ask zubeida wait. Isn't he testify. Right is misused. He was there. Why doesn't he say this is what happened. And they won't deny it. I mean i don't think if he's telling true you're talking about mitchell or jessen when you know i'm not i'm saying the person who is there was i don't know if he's your client isn't your client. His name is on. This obviously is bad. Obviously beta cannot test fly now. He's because he's being held incommunicado. He has been held in one wanting him. Oh why why i mean. I'm not sure this is relevant. But i mean in hamady. We said you can hold people in guantanamo. The words were active. Combat operations against taliban fighters apparently are going on in afghanistan. But they're not anymore minnesota. What why is he there. That's a question to put the government. We don't have you filed habeas or something. Get him out. There's been a habeas proceeding pending in the last fourteen years. There's been no action. I'm sorry i'm just let it sit there all right. I guess it's not relevant curiously. I'm not handling that preceding but no my understanding is that we we've done everything we could to move it forward but it simply has not move forward. That's an excerpt from the oral arguments in the supreme court case united states versus zubeida. We're joined now by two guests. Ray bonner is a pulitzer prize. Winning investigative journalists. He's producing a documentary with alex. Gibney about Zubeida and the interrogation program called the forever prisoner. His latest article for propublica is will the united states officially acknowledged that it had a secret torture site in poland. Also with us. Joe margulis and attorney for abu zubeida professor of law and government at cornell university. He was counsel of record in the landmark guantanamo case russell versus bush. We welcome you both to democracy now. Joe let's begin with you. You're part of the legal team. The case argued before the supreme court talk about the significance of the oral arguments yesterday. And when you use words corpus explain exactly what that means of course. Thanks sure it was an extraordinary argument. In several respects. The narrow question is whether we can secure the testimony of james mitchell and bruce jessen for use by the polish prosecutors in their investigation into whether crimes were committed in poland at the black site there but the the more important turn that the oral argument took is several things. One virtually every justice on the court described opposite betas treatment as torture. They used that word. There renew euphemisms there was no equivocation. Everyone understood that what happened to them was tortured. Second was the observation that you made. Which is the the questions by justice. Briar justice gorsuch. And just to sorta my or asking. Why is it that you can't just let odds you better testify. That obviously would obviate the need for mitchell injustice testimony and what was interesting as their requests that it'd be allowed to testify was the government's equivocation and inability to answer that they were asked that is the solicitor. General was asked to provide a follow up statement. So they'll be filing something else explaining whether they're going to allow. Elvis admitted to testify. And if they do that will be teaching at guantanamo. That will be a radical change. Guantanamo was built to be an isolation chamber and they have never allowed any detainee to have uncensored access to the outside the whole purpose of it was to prevent that kind of a communication so that changes that will be a radical thing and the third piece. That was really interesting was just as briars observation which we have been arguing on behalf for some time as well as other detainees have made this argument that there are no hostilities left in afghanistan. The legal justification for continuing to hold guys has disappeared. We've been making that argument and yesterday. We heard a court. Justice accepted as though it were commonplace. How could anyone think otherwise. While of course that's what we've been saying for some time as you speak. We're showing for our web and television audience around the world. The art work of booze beta in guantanamo raymond bonner. It's great to have you with us. Can you talk about the story of abu beta Tell us who he is. You're doing documentary. The forever prisoner on it is. He was the verse Terrorist suspect captured after nine eleven. He was captured in seized in pakistan. Joint cia fbi. Some extent pakistani a police operation and he was rendered his first captured. He was the first take into a secret prison. I mean i've interviewed both the cia operation the fbi operation at the time and was taken the first to be rendered to a secret side. He was taken to thailand. And soon after got there is when james mitchell and then bruce jessen showed up and began. The the interrogation is joe just pointed out. It was very interesting yesterday. And the argument to hear injustice barrett included talking great about torture. What happened to zubeida was torture. There was none of this euphemisms like enhanced interrogation techniques and he he was the guinea pig in a way. This is where mitchell design the program and tested the program of torture you me. It's always struck me that a lot is made of the eighty three times. He was waterboarded if you read what was done to him. Read in the government cables. There were send at the time to me. The waterboarding was almost benign. They kept him sleepless. They put them in a small coffin sized box for hours overnight. He couldn't move. They hung him by the cell bars and with his feet dangling off the ground the got to the point. It was so bad that mitchell would just snap his.

zubeida abu zubeida bruce jessen cia poland guantanamo Steven brier Turney david kline supreme court united states Ray bonner James mitchell Joe margulis russell versus bush Joe let mitchell jessen biden Briar justice gorsuch james mitchell
"zubeida" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

Democracy Now! Audio

08:00 min | 1 year ago

"zubeida" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

"Mirror of the stone by chameleons uber. On this is democracy now democracy now dot org the war and peace report. I mean he could men we turn now to look at the biden. Administration's attempts to keep secret information about the us torture program following the september eleventh attacks on wednesday. The supreme court heard a case brought by abu zubaydah a guantanamo prisoner who was waterboarded over eighty times while being held at the cia block site. His legal team has spent years trying to obtain testimony from two psychologists doctors. James mitchell and bruce jessen who helped the cia design and implement it's torture program the us government's also trying to keep secret the location and pull into the cia black site where abu zubaydah was tortured. Wednesday's hearing took a surprising. Turn when several justices asked why the united states is refusing to allow zubeida to testify himself in an ongoing cram poland. This is justice. Steven brier questioning a boozer betas. Turney david kline. Why don't you ask zubeida wait. Isn't he testify. Right is misused. He was there. Why doesn't he say this is what happened. And they won't deny it. I mean i don't think if he's telling true you're talking about mitchell or jessen when you know i'm not i'm saying the person who is there was i don't know if he's your client isn't your client. His name is on. This obviously is bad. Obviously beta cannot test fly now. He's because he's being held incommunicado. He has been held in one taught him. Oh why why i mean. I'm not sure this is relevant. But i mean in hamady. We said you can hold people in guantanamo. The words were active. Combat operations against taliban fighters apparently are going on in afghanistan. But they're not anymore minnesota. What why is he there. That's a question to put the government. We don't have you filed habeas or something. Get him out. There's been a habeas proceeding pending in the last fourteen years. There's been no action decide. I'm sorry i'm just let it sit there all right. I guess it's not relevant curiously. I'm not handling that preceding but no my understanding is that we we've done everything we could to move it forward but it simply has not move forward. That's an excerpt from the oral arguments in the supreme court case united states versus zubeida. We're joined now by two guests. Ray bonner is a pulitzer prize. Winning investigative journalists. He's producing a documentary with alex. Gibney about Zubeida and the interrogation program called the forever prisoner. His latest article for propublica is will the united states officially acknowledged that it had a secret torture site in poland. Also with us. Joe margulis and attorney for abu zubeida professor of law and governmenet cornell university. He was counsel of record in the landmark guantanamo case russell versus bush. We welcome you both to democracy now. Joe let's begin with you. You're part of the legal team. The case argued before the supreme court talk about the significance of the oral arguments yesterday. And when you use words like habeas corpus explain exactly what that means of. Thanks sure it was an extraordinary argument. In several respects. The narrow question is whether we can secure the testimony of james mitchell and bruce jessen for use by the polish prosecutors in their investigation into whether crimes were committed in poland at the black site there but the the more important turn that the oral argument took is several things. One virtually every justice on the court described opposite betas treatment as torture. They used that word. There renew euphemisms there was no equivocation. Everyone understood that what happened to them was tortured. Second was the observation that you made. Which is the the questions by justice. Briar justice gorsuch. And just to sorta my or asking. Why is it that you can't just let. Does you better testify. That obviously would obviate the need for mitchell injustice testimony and what was interesting as their requests that it'd be allowed to testify was the government's equivocation and inability to answer that they were asked that is the solicitor. General was asked to provide a follow up statement. So they'll be filing something else explaining whether they're going to allow. Elvis admitted to testify. And if they do that will be teaching at guantanamo. That will be a radical change. Guantanamo was built to be an isolation chamber and they have never allowed any detainee to have uncensored access to the outside the whole purpose of it was to prevent that kind of a communication so that changes that will be a radical thing and the third piece. That was really interesting was just as briars observation which we have been arguing on behalf for some time as well as other detainees have made this argument that there are no hostilities left in afghanistan. The legal justification for continuing to hold guys has disappeared. We've been making that argument and yesterday. We heard a court. Justice accepted as though it were commonplace. How could anyone think otherwise. While of course that's what we've been saying for some time as you speak. We're showing for our web and television audience around the world. The art work of booze beta in guantanamo Raymond bonner. it's great to have you with us. Can you talk about the story of a booster beta Tell us who he is. You're doing documentary. The forever prisoner on it is. He was the verse Terrorist suspect captured after nine eleven. He was captured in seized in pakistan. Joint cia fbi. Some extent pakistani a police operation and he was rendered his first captured. He was the first take into a secret prison. I mean i've interviewed both the cia. Peration the fbi operation at the time and was taken the first to be rendered to a secret side. He was taken to thailand. And soon after got there is when james mitchell and then bruce jessen showed up and began. The the interrogation is joe just pointed out. It was very interesting yesterday. And the argument to hear injustice barrett included talking great about torture. What happened to zubeida was torture. There was none of this euphemisms like enhanced interrogation techniques and he he was the guinea pig in a way. This is where mitchell design the program and tested the program of torture me. It's always struck me that a lot is made of the eighty three times. He was waterboarded if you read what was done to him. Read in the government cables. There were send at the time to me. The waterboarding was almost benign. They kept him sleepless. They put them in a small coffin sized box for hours overnight. He couldn't move. They hung him by the cell bars and with his feet dangling off the ground the got to the point. It was so bad that mitchell would just snap his.

zubeida abu zubaydah bruce jessen cia guantanamo Steven brier Turney david kline supreme court poland united states Ray bonner James mitchell Joe margulis governmenet cornell university russell versus bush Joe let mitchell jessen biden Briar justice gorsuch
"zubeida" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

Democracy Now! Audio

04:22 min | 1 year ago

"zubeida" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

"And they won't deny it. I mean i don't think if he's telling true you're talking about mitchell or jessen when you know i'm not i'm saying the person who is there was i don't know if he's your client isn't your client. His name is on. This obviously is bad. Obviously beta cannot test fly now. He's because he's being held incommunicado. He has been held in wanting him. Oh why why i mean. I'm not sure this is relevant. But i mean in hamady. We said you can hold people in guantanamo. The words were active. Combat operations against taliban fighters apparently are going on in afghanistan. But they're not anymore minnesota. What why is he there. That's a question to put the government. We don't have you filed habeas or something. Get him out. There's been a habeas proceeding pending in the last fourteen years. There's been no action. I'm sorry i'm just let it sit there all right. I guess it's not relevant curiously. I'm not handling that preceding but no my understanding is that we we've done everything we could to move it forward but it simply has not move forward. That's an excerpt from the oral arguments in the supreme court case united states versus zubeida. We're joined now by two guests. Ray bonner is a pulitzer prize. Winning investigative journalists. He's producing a documentary with alex. Gibney about Zubeida and the interrogation program called the forever prisoner. His latest article for propublica is will the united states officially acknowledged that it had a secret torture site in poland. Also with us. Joe margulis and attorney for abu zubeida professor of law and governmenet cornell university. He was counsel of record in the landmark guantanamo case russell versus bush. We welcome you both to democracy now. Joe let's begin with you. You're part of the legal team. The case argued before the supreme court talk about the significance of the oral arguments yesterday. And when you use words like habeas corpus explain exactly what that means..

Zubeida jessen guantanamo Ray bonner mitchell taliban afghanistan minnesota Joe margulis Gibney abu zubeida pulitzer prize united states supreme court governmenet cornell university propublica russell versus bush alex Joe let poland
"zubeida" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

The Lawfare Podcast

09:56 min | 1 year ago

"zubeida" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

"Followed the kept abreast of the investigation into the tel-aviv plot And he he read all the cable traffic going back and forth As we passed the information to the israelis so he would have known what the israelis uncovered Once we gave them the tip off that started this process going. And there's no reason to doubt that. Alex smith the salon is telling us accurately Populace fairly well advanced and that Who was close bonds. Were to going off. And it's quite a dramatic counter-terrorism success both for the united states and for israel to have stayed completely quiet for twenty years especially because abu zubeida who is still to this day at guantanamo and of course was Famously part of the cia. As i interrogation and detention black sites torture program and was equally famously. You know they've been unable to try him at guantanamo as a result of the treatment of him. I mean he's been particularly prominent to have this kind of near-miss of a major attack by him. Go stay quiet for twenty years. It's a rare that twenty years after an important event like this. We fines news which is quite as Newsworthy is this But there was intense pressure To protect the notion that waterboarding was essential And this would have just push that all day I also have to say Know mr fong as demonstrated exemplary commitment to the principle of not talking about things that he was told he could talk about I'm sure over the years He was probably tempted but he kept to his to his oath. And only when the information beginning available in court ruling was ready to talk about it now. Interestingly he talked about it to an israeli newspaper and they've published the details. The american press is shown much less interest in the store. it's interesting. I would just Emphasize the point that you made because a about sue fans discipline and not talking about this before it was declassified because you know the larger fight that he had with the cia over. abu zubeida has been very much a part of the public record even since before he published his book. You know that abu zubaydah was first interrogated by the fbi using noncoercive means than the cia came. In and i initiated the the a much more brutal approach and bob muller pulled ali sufen and the other. fbi people out as a result that has been known for a long time and when the senate did the the big rdi investigation they The broad outlines here that you know that ali salons investigations and interrogations of abu zubaydah were productive. And and that the the most important things that he said came during those periods not during the abusive Cia interrogation all that has been known what hasn't been known. Is that ghetto know. The matter was a piece of actionable. Intelligence against about a major set of plots against tel aviv nightclubs. And so it's it's a pretty dramatic Capstone on the alley. Sufian abu zubaydah story. I agree with you completely. It is It's remarkable that the secret has been kept for twenty years As you say we've known a book is i. Think eight or nine years old It's actually been reviewed twice my the publication review process There's there's a more recent version Which has some of the formerly redacted material unredacted but the even the new version does not speak of what country i was. Beta was talking about. If you go back and read the book you'll find. It's it's right. At the beginning of the chapter about abu obata that was beta reveals. Major plot was underway. And we were able to foil it so that part of the story has been out there for years and years. It's just the name of the country that his now recently unclassified declassified so taking these true stories together it seems to me that they stand for the modest proposition that there's still a lot of details about nine eleven and the post nine eleven era that we have yet to learn. One of them is Hey we knew. Bush was early obsessed with With iraq but boy it was recurrent right after nine eleven. A recurrent theme really close to his mind in a close to the center of his mind in a way that at least i had not appreciated and the other is. Hey we knew. There were some big counter-terrorism successes following the arrest of abu zubaydah. But you know just how big and where we we didn't know. Do you think this is a generalize. -able point that we're going to keep over the next few years and decades keep learning more dramatic staffing this. Not that fundamentally changes our understanding of what happened but that really continues to enrich at and provide details. Yes i think. I think there are a number of of finns. I'll give you the one that always troubles me the most In the summer of two thousand and one of the was constantly worn it bush white house and the rest of the narc. Government that an attack by al-qaeda was founded Georgetown in particular literally drove around washington. Putting this message out. I heard it in the in in the nfc multiple times and we saw the raw intelligence as well and of course. There's the famous august six. Pd that said. An attack in the united states is coming But the thing is the cia also knew that there were two al qaeda operatives in the united states Who arrived in southern california more than a year in advance of september eleventh and they had their true names. That information had never been shared with white house It never been shared. Until i think quite late in the game with the fbi. Had you had that information And you given it to state local authorities. We almost certainly would have arrested. Those two guys and that would have unraveled. The old nine eleven lot. So the question i have. I've had on my mind. Is what went what went wrong. Why didn't why didn't pass that information along. I i remember distinctly the day after september eleven september twelfth talking dick clark who learned of this few hours after nine eleven And we both said to each other. We never heard of a single al-qaeda operative ever being in the united states of america. They knew that there were two of them and they didn't tell us that's.

abu zubeida cia guantanamo mr fong The american press bob muller ali sufen ali salons fbi Alex smith Sufian abu zubaydah aviv abu obata united states israel tel aviv senate narc iraq Bush
"zubeida" Discussed on The Nicole Sandler Show

The Nicole Sandler Show

07:01 min | 1 year ago

"zubeida" Discussed on The Nicole Sandler Show

"He's just in the wind somewhere. No nowhere to be found. I think somebody somebody asset question We publish a story last week. Somebody tweeted out photo. I don't know that's a recent photo but it's Know it's a it's it's another piece to the puzzle here you know and i i really do believe it's a. It's a very very important piece of the puzzle. You know this this story or the story you know about the capital riots. The insurrection what was happening. Who knew what and when is a is a narrative that continuously has evolved over. the past. Nine months yet is on multiple dude. Assignments and documents are very very important and so because documents will help. Tell that stories on pleased that we were able to get this. Get this out there and to do so By overcoming the obstacles that were in our lack. Of course and jason leopold again. Congratulations because you you rock You know so so this happened. They were so unprepared. They did that. The intelligence either was lacking or covered up or whatever and now and again i knew that was an important day on capitol hill congresses and session. They were certifying. The vote it was there was there should have been tons of police. A big police presence there while now we have this january eighteenth and what are they calling it that i'm sorry September eighteenth this coming saturday. They're going back. And i guess they have permits again. This time the police are going to be out in force their redirecting the fence around the capital congress. The senate is back in session. This week against the house comes back next week. But it's a weekend so it's not like they're going to be conducting business. But i expect. There's going to be a huge police presence there. What do you know about. What's happening on saturday and i have kind of around. I mean there there will be a big police presence in it. It does appear that you know. They are acting on any all intelligence this time and it's with regard to the capital. It does not appear that they are going to allow As far as i can tell any protester demonstrations there. I can't be a hundred percent. Sure that because i also don't know what the what. The rationale is the reasoning behind if they were to deny any request for permit right but Yeah i mean the the you know. The law enforcement presence is going to be quite big dry the different administration in place to and we know that this is not a friendly crowd to the current administration. so it's also one of the lessons learned. Yeah shit big lesson learned you know and and it will be very interesting to see you know who actually or how many people show up in what that what. It looks like this time around absolutely. Hey jason we've only got a few minutes left. But i'd be remiss if i didn't ask you about what's happening down in guantanamo bay. Now you you did a lot of work covering The torture covering abu zubeida covering the you know what went on in get you were there. Yeah and i was thinking. It's funny that you mentioned abbas better. Because i think we spoke about this many years ago asked his diaries. That's right. we talked lending. His diaries are incredible because it really lays bare the hit his journey from a from an engineering students to this Jihadist abu johnny dean. Who went to afghanistan and he in his diaries. He talks about the arrival of this. You know this new group. The taliban were taking over Afghanistan I mean as far as guantanamo. There's it's it's still a black hole. Secrecy i mean it's it's has stock in time in another time. I mean even though on the outside here we learn so much about you. Know what took place with regard to the cis torture program when you're at guantanamo. That's still something that cannot be discussed been really with the twentieth anniversary of nine. Eleven happens last weekend. The you know the they're they're still arguing over what can be introduced in the you know as far as evidence in the trial of khalid sheikh muhammad And who who has not been tried for the crimes that he's accused of perpetrating or being the mastermind behind the nine eleven attacks. But there's still a few dozen people who are at guantanamo They closed one of the high value. detention facilities there that held the cia detainees right. And it's you know it's it's still it it it it still goes on. I mean it's it's Yeah it's it does not appear. That could be any effort to really close. Oh l. held on. Oh i cut off our audio hold on one second. I got to bring her back on. Sorry yeah i wanted. I wanted to put up the picture of you at at camp justice but i lost audio my war. Why can't we be friends. Insurance little message. I t shirts But yeah guantanamo. Eventually being after the i think to try to return there because january twentieth anniversary that it's been open and like i said. A few dozen dozen detainees are still there and as you can imagine they're getting very very old yes well but now there's a trial trial is finally happening twenty years later or is it going to finish. Our i mean is this action. The trial is ever going to. I don't think it's ever going to happen. I mean there's still you know in the in the pre-trial cafes arguing over what evidence can can be introduced and the government. Is you know fighting the defense attorneys and arguing against any any introduction of evidence that may pertain to their own torture. Amazing all right now. Here's.

jason leopold abu zubeida guantanamo abu johnny dean afghanistan khalid sheikh muhammad guantanamo bay senate congress abbas jason taliban cia
"zubeida" Discussed on Timesuck with Dan Cummins

Timesuck with Dan Cummins

03:46 min | 1 year ago

"zubeida" Discussed on Timesuck with Dan Cummins

"Like rattlesnakes walnuts very hard to build a civilization in a solid menu. If you only had rattlesnakes walnuts to work with over seven thousand years ago. The methamphetamine precursors to the sumerian started constructing series of temples using mud bricks Possibly i at a site called era do had worshipped. Some gods had thank some. Dvd's throw that fish stew area will become a major. Sumerian city seems have been found that around fifty four hundred bc almost seventy five centuries ago era do status with legendary in ancient times babylonians who came after the samaritans actually believe era do was the oldest city on earth created by the themselves. One sumerian tablet reads after kinship had descended from heaven. Era do became the seat of kingship. Oh i think it was a type. After kingship had ended from heaven. It became the seat of kingship sometime by thirty nine hundred bc possibly early sixty five hundred bc the ubaid people flourish in mesopotamia the first well known culture for from a living in southern not there the ubaid period of mesopotamia and a lot of articles online. The accomplishments of ubaid culture gets lumped in with the accomplishments of the samaritans. Actually the accomplishments of the acadians babylonians and assyrians who come afterwards also get lumped in and made things a little tricky was during this period. zubeida began to build. Large temples develop comparatively sophisticated architecture but no written language yet no real cities yet so not quite civilization but moving that direction. Then we have the samaritan show show up coming from somewhere into southern mesopotamia moving into the area that later became babylonia and is now southern iraq in area stretching from around baghdad to the persian gulf area first settled by humans. No later than forty five hundred. Bc how do we know that. How do we know any of these approximate dates right. If you don't know the exact dates if we don't have records a lot of these days how do we know these dates. We'll archaeologist us contextual clues and dating techniques like strategic free stratego rafi by god come on strict tiffy. Sorry this might sound crazy. But i don't. I don't say that we're a lot. In the daily life sites undergoes stratification overtime leaving older layers beneath newer ones. Like a layer cake or slice. Lasagna sites. lower layers are assumed older than those that lie above them. I love his by the way especially when it has sausage it like homemade sausage nobel peppers. Yeah just to say no anyway. Archaeologists also lean heavily on radiocarbon dating technique developed during the nineteen forties that relies on chemistry to determine the ages of objects. You've done organic matter. The technique measures the amount of radioactive carbon decay to determine and objects age is believed to be accurate within a few decades when used on organic material. And there are many other dating techniques like a thermo luminescence dating which measures how. Many years have elapsed since the heating of material containing crystalline mineral. Like ceramics They definitely don't just wing it. Guess but also they don't always find artifacts out exactly to the to the day when something was built and sometimes it's very hard to determine even the decade or you know the exact century using all these techniques it seems as if by no later than thirty five hundred bc marion's had arrived and they may have showed up as early as forty five hundred. People were lower misbehaving again before them. Then this marian showed up again from somewhere interesting detail about this marion's no one knows for sure. Exactly where they came from Since her language developed independently didn't relate to any other languages in the area The ubaid people likely taught us marion thing or to. The samaritans may have conquered uber. People we just don't know for sure Ubaid from what we do know were notable for strides in the.

zubeida mesopotamia babylonia persian gulf baghdad iraq marion marian Ubaid
"zubeida" Discussed on Dark Horse Entrepreneur

Dark Horse Entrepreneur

08:13 min | 1 year ago

"zubeida" Discussed on Dark Horse Entrepreneur

"Preneurs just like yourself so please take a moment. Show the love and help spread the word. So let's get straight into it now. I had something else planned for today. I was driving home yesterday in something. Hit me it's your offer right. I was listening to some folks. I forget what platform was on but listen some folks talking about he. No i i do this thing on facebook. And targeting this market and that market and this age group and this interest and blabbity blah and no one's no one's buying you know and then someone else's going well the unit change your heading. We need to change the color. You need to change this or you need to change that or you need to offer a freemium. Oh i god dude leaders and gentlemen let me just. I'm just going to call it. Like i see it. It's the offer stupid right. If you send people to an offer and you're you're you're even close on the targeting. You could be handgrenade close. You know they say there's Horseshoes and hand grenades. You'd be close to the target and you're going to have an impact If you are sending even someone that near your core audience to an offer a someone is going to buy so if no one is buying thin. I guess what it's your offer stupid. I don't care what color you're heading is. I don't care if the words are perfect. If you're communicating a message of hey if you buy this you'll get that and if they need that then they'll by this right. It's not rocket science. And i think sometimes folks just freaking overcomplicated they and and here's the next thing if you're sending traffic to your offer and they're not buying then it hits your offer stupid number eighty myself. I'm i'm flying. I'm just shooting from the hip here. No notes just had this thought yesterday. And i wouldn't to get on the mic and share this with you but if you look at your offer. Are you focused in on the benefits. They're gonna get. Yeah that's the first thing Are you focused in on. What he what is they have to do to get that those benefits of the tay take this course right. Watch these ten videos. These four hours worth of videos and you will see this result. Whatever this is. I mean it can be as simple as that. I've seen landing pages that have less than a hundred words convert because they go straight to the offer. Hey would you. You're looking for this. Guess what by this and you'll get that that simple right. Maybe maybe it. Of course we've all seen these long long. Vsel's long videos sales letters and you know there's there's a market and there's all the reasons for that you're trying to shoot down objections and they'd get it but maybe it's your offer stupid because at the end of the day you maybe you have a well crafted. Vsan go down in your offers all right if you wanna do that. It's going to cost you nine thousand nine hundred ninety nine dollars or you have a three pay of you. Know four thousand dollars three times i- poking malul being a little tongue in cheek here but the day is what it is. You're offering worse that much money. I don't want you to undervalue yourself. Don't get me wrong here. But what i'm saying is you've communicated everything they're like. Oh yeah they made it all be down to your price point and you're saying here's what you've got to pay and they're going. I don't think so. Rested market is at nine hundred ninety. Nine dollars your ten x that and maybe your content is worse it but you've got to build them up to it you've got to you know. Come out of the gate by saying look. Here's a piece of it for half of what the rest of the is pain. Now you've got demand you like. Wow they really get it. They see the. You're so unique and you're so out there that no wonder no one else is is is charging the same price you are because you have a unique perspective you have a unique process a unique framework that you take them through so yeah now. They're like men. Do this totally were ten thousand dollars. I didn't know this before but because you gave them that taste at half the price of the rest of the market. You like Now i get it. Okay now you can hit them with that The the original offering. Maybe you give them before but the point is sometimes ladies and gentlemen. It's just your offer stupid or could flip it around and say it's your stupid offer And here's the other side of that you give them the all these great benefits and there's and you say and it's only twenty seven dollars. They're like whoa wait a minute. All this amazing value in it's only twenty seven is You know there's a question mark that goes with that and that's you know sometimes the downside of undervaluing what it is your You're bringing to the market now if you give them a reason why it's hey it's only twenty seven dollars because i wanna get some testimonials right. I want to shoot a video After you've gone through the course. So that when i go out to the market at the full price of whatever it is you know the full price of ninety seven That i go to the market with those testimonials and your success stories armed with that now. They're going oh i get it zubeida of the of the content. And you want me to go through it with you and give you my testimonial that is worth it right so sometimes lays gentleman it your offer stupid now. I'm going to go into this a little bit more. Tamang tomorrow's episode. We're going to chat about this a little bit deeper. Refining your products. Maybe enhancing your price packages you go through things like yale. Customer surveys which i'm popey verdy did Maybe you should survey a bigger piece of the markets. Even a little max maker play making sure you put your sales hat on as you're going through this process and you know like i mentioned earlier there are some tears you want to introduce And then maybe year Offering them smorgasbord. If you think about if you watch any of these reality shows. I'm a big fan of shows like restaurant impossible and you see him. He'll walk into the restaurant and he'll look around and obviously the young. These things are staged though bitch and to make great tv but one of the things that always resonates with me is when he sits down. He picks up the menu and fold out to he. And there's all these options you know. Fifty options twenty thirty. I'm c. one where he counted it and i believe it was almost a hundred options On the menu no joke. I can imagine how the kitchen could do this. So you're giving them too many options right. It's your offer stupid right out of the gate. So we'll we'll chat a bit about that tomorrow as well. In the meantime you get out there. You run your race. You get your results in. Come on over to the facebook The dark horse tribe Go to facebook dot com and in that search bar up there. Type darkhorse tribe necc- dickey right there. If for some reason that's not working you can go to my website. Dark cooling dot com forward slash darkhorse tribe. All one word that would take straight there. Look forward to meeting you in the group in celebrating your results with you until next time successfully and take action. Thank you for listening to the dark horse entrepreneur. Podcast tuning in check us out at. Www dot dark horse schooling dot com. My name is tracey bregman..

Vsel malul facebook dickey tracey bregman
"zubeida" Discussed on Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

02:23 min | 1 year ago

"zubeida" Discussed on Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

"It's merriam webster's word of the day for june seventeenth any in quinta of fake. The whatever about this baby domingo. Yeah pro which by the way in quinto regardless komo's in the saint. John's bay brian. I salute every web rewards could be x five selected in november norway. Zubeida we dc. Benny offer valid does not to the indoor. Today's word his hairy also pronounced harry and spelled h. a. r. y. Harry is a verb. That means to make a pillaging or destructive raid on to assault. It can also mean to force to move along by harassing or to torment or as if by constant attack. Here's the word used in a sentence from the new york post by larry brooks. There was little puck support in either zone. The rangers were pinned for shifts. At a time and were harried into turnovers. While unable to apply more than token pressure in the offensive zone was there once a warlike man named harry who is the source for the english verb the name mirrors one particularly belligerent. Harry does come to mind. Shakespeare once described how feminine and fire accompanied the warlike. Harry england's king henry the fifth. But neither this nor any of his namesake's are the source for the verb. Harry rather harry or a word resembling. It has been a part of english for as long as there's been anything that could be called english. It took the form hagan. H. e. r. g. i. n. in old english and harry n. h. a. r. i. e. n. in middle english passing through numerous variations before finally settling into its modern spelling. The words old english ancestors are related to the old high german words meaning to devastate or plunder or host army with your word of the day. I'm peter sokolski visit marian webster dot com today for definitions wordplay and trending cups..

peter sokolski today Shakespeare larry brooks new york Today english Zubeida fifth John german harry merriam webster november Harry Benny june seventeenth norway marian webster dot com england
A CAmpaign To End The Celebration Of New Years

The Promised Podcast

08:12 min | 3 years ago

A CAmpaign To End The Celebration Of New Years

"Welcome to the promised by gas. Brought to you on T. l. v. one the voice of the city whose worthies and Burgers in the nineteen thirties launched a campaign against the celebration of New Year's which in mandatory Palestine as in Modern Day Israel was known as Sylvester the name borrowed from Pope Sylvester the first thirty third pope of the Catholic Church who was buried and in the catacombs of Priscilla in Rome on December thirty first and who was beatified on December thirty first date became known as Saint Sylvester's Day or the Feast of Saint Sylvester which feasts came to stand for the reveries of the night dividing the last day of the year from the first day of the New Year in Israel as in Austria Italy Lee Bosnia Germany Slovenia Slovakia Switzerland Luxembourg left in China Poland and the Czech Republic France Croatia and probably elsewhere as well now on December remember twenty seven thousand nine hundred eighty four for instance. The paper hired-in reported that the city had been plastered with posters quote sponsored by the rabbinate and the the Hebrew community calling for residents not to celebrate this holiday Silvester as it is foreign to the spirit of Judaism they ask the owners of houses of pleasure and cafes not to rent their rooms for these purposes and quote Davar reported in the same year that deputy mayor Easter Iraq who fifteen years later would ascend to to mayor addressed the city council about quote the question of the holiday of Sylvester that is setting down roots in Tel Aviv. FEE proposal of Mr Rocca was accepted saying at the city council of Tel Aviv sees in the foreign custom of Sylvester celebrations a definitely unwanted thing which is in opposition to the spirit and traditions of the people title of Israel and asks all cafe owners and owners of large halls in the city not to organize Sylvester parties. A committee was chosen to speak with cafe owners owners etc about this matter and quote a year later in nineteen thirty five the municipality itself published this notice quote the city sees itself as obligated to remind owners of cafes and restaurants this year once again of the need to refrain from having public celebrations in honor of Sylvester Eve. This custom to celebrate the holiday of Sylvester believe in public Jewish circles in the Hebrew city harms the national lifestyle that is taking form in the land of our forefathers. This claim is aimed also at the General Oh public some of whom admittedly only a few make a practice of celebrating this holiday with debauchery and loud social parties obviously the municipality and the the citizens of the city will treat with respect anything undertaken and done in honor of this day by those residents of the city and their guests who are not Jewish for this is their holiday and quote in a year after that in one thousand nine thirty six of our reported after the fact that quote several cafes such as the Lawrence and Savoy had special holiday programs in Tel Aviv. There there were many private Sylvester parties mostly from the circles of immigrants from Germany until morning. There was much car traffic and many walking on foot. One of these people who return to his home home after midnight under the influence of alcohol startled the volunteer firefighters with a false report of a fire end quote in nineteen thirty nine. The paper beaucaire made its feelings things about known with a one line article with a banner headline on page three the article in its entirety. Read quote on Silvester Eve. Eleven people committed suicide in new. You Work and quote in one thousand nine forty. The religious paper hot so fat reported this quote I witnesses say that a man of Israel at midnight in Tel Aviv especially in the North would forget that he lives in his own nation and land semester celebrations were celebrated in several coffee houses Jewish houses in the Hebrew city and whomever was indies coffee houses which elevated the celebration to the top of the top and drinking and debauchery would forget that we live in times of emergency. The New Year by the general accounting is not for us. It's the Jews. But it is a New Year for trade and bills and money's silvester celebrations are not Jewish celebrations in the land of Israel. Especially and only those who became habituated to these celebrations collaborations in foreign lands the lands of assimilation fail to Wean themselves of this habit. Even after they pass through all the circles of hell they returned to their iniquity in the land of Israel Israel. These are just one chapter of the spiritual and moral decline that is evident in our public life especially in the first Hebrew city the glorious tel.. Ah Vive end quote now to celebrate. Silvester Twenty twenty in the glorious Tel Aviv. There were hundreds of events for instance one could welcome the New Year with the Abba Tribute Band Carney or or go to Cooley Alma for their annual gala. Three for one Christmas New Years Novi Bash the bootleg was hosting a centers party quote unquote the hostile hosted hip hop new year's breakfast on Rothschild had funke Meli and these were just a fraction of what was on offer so grand was the celebration that the municipality itself posted this on facebook from the legendary Tel Aviv. EDM Club the block quote mayor e high. I don't feel so good. I won't be coming into work tomorrow and quote quote this post from Iraq Tel Aviv Tel Aviv municipality itself. Yes there was the battery in the city. All right one could pretty much find any form of depravity ones. Momma might have worn one against save perhaps for the badgering bullying browbeating of the burgers. About how you really shouldn't go to a drag show on New Year's in the first Hebrew city in the Jewish state and arguing nothing captures the spirit of the city. Well Tel Aviv. Dafa better than a tradition reaching back. Almost ninety years of offsetting the ideological severity doctrinaire rectitude a to enforce the citizen of the hidden who ain't kidding of joyless Orthodox Zionism and greeting each new year. Hal each new day with playful exuberance heterodox selective Goya's and lots and lots of alcohol and seeing the first Hebrew city is a place not just for spiritual fulfillment but also for fun fun fun and more heretical. Still Bill Finding spiritual fulfillment in fun. Fun Fun with us. In the studio is the woman who's lovely prose is like a killer party and everyone's invited I speak of course of Alison gap and Summer Alison for Politico Than Republic foreign policy the Jerusalem posted. Jt the Ford and many other of your very best papers magazine is a columnist for Arts. You heard on. NPR PRI where I and the BBC and you've seen her on twenty four television and Al Jazeera TV and other places as well. She holds a World Centre Award for Journalism Recognizing Excellence and Diaspora reported anytime and rock our award for excellence and covering Zionism Eliane Israel. I was how was your Silvester. Oh very boring. I'm not a big New Year's eve person but it always takes me back to. When I first arrived in Israel in the nineteen eighteen eighty s and like most Americans had never heard of Saint Sylvester or New Year's Eve being referred to as Sylvester so when people started talking about Sylvester? What was the only Sylvester? I was familiar lady Birds Sylvester the cat. tweet neighbors I was like what are they crazy about the cartoons. I it took me a while to like and still now when I hear about Sylvester immediately that like cat face POPs. What's up in front of me? I thought I thought also in the studio with us as a man who is exhibit a rather than spiritual and moral decline in the city seems to be gaining in spiritual and moral seriousness through the generations. I speak of course of Os Zelter Zubeida Zelter writes and reviews books for arts including waiting just a week ago in the past he hosted a weekly show on TV on arts and culture in Israel and he is a political activist of passionate power charm and charisma insight and intelligence Ohad. Oh how is your Silvester. I was dancing on a wooden bar dancing on the bar. Because somebody in this room should have had a proper nears eve right now that's Great throughout my neck from dancing so hard I think that means that I partied as much as I could dance on your neck. No is is now painful because identity on my feet that that is a badge of honor. Yes angry my name is Owen. I don't meet the boasts upgraded the operating system on my phone last week and ever since I've been receiving hectoring messages about how I don't sleep enough and maybe it's time for me to go to sleep right now and how. I listened to an awful lot of podcast and oh I listen to my music. Too loud ended ended. I know that long term exposure to loud noise can be damaging to my hearing. And I really don't WanNa Brag about how I have maintained my youthful lifestyle

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Gina Haspel, Trump's pick for CIA director, faces scrutiny for role in torture program

02:02 min | 5 years ago

Gina Haspel, Trump's pick for CIA director, faces scrutiny for role in torture program

"This is all things considered from npr news i'm ari shapiro and i'm sarah mccamman president trump's firing of his secretary of state has set off some dominos in the administration he's nominated mike pompeo currently the director of the cia to step in at state which means trump needs a new cia chief and for that he's tapped gina hassle gina hospital is currently the deputy director of the cia if the senate confirms her she would be the first woman to take the agency's top job our colleague mary louise kelley has done some reporting about her and so i have her on the line with me from russia where she's on a reporting trip hello mary louise sarah greetings from moscow so tell us more about gina was the main thing to know about gina hospital is she is a spies spy she spent three plus decades on the clandestine side of operations for the cia multiple tours as chief of station we know that she's in her early sixties beyond that there's a lot we don't know she has almost no public profile this is a woman who only had her cover lifted last year to take on that number two job at the agency she was undercover the entire time under that she does not give interviews i know because i have asked repeatedly for one so it will be interesting if she is confirmed to see i mean she's not a political player in washington and that becomes relevant in terms of how much influence she would exert outside the will she have pulled with the white house the way that her predecessor mike pompeo has well mary louise one thing we do know from your reporting i understand she had some involvement in a pretty dark chapter of the history what can you tell us about that yes i mean you're referring to the cia interrogation and detention program that was set up after nine eleven and gina hospital she helped lead it she ran the black site prison in thailand where al qaeda suspect zubeida was waterboarded he was waterboarded eighty three times that is obviously controversial in.

Gina Moscow President Trump Sarah Mccamman NPR Zubeida Thailand Washington Ari Shapiro Russia Mary Louise Kelley Senate Deputy Director Gina Hospital CIA Director Mike Pompeo Donald Trump