22 Burst results for "Zoya"

"zoya" Discussed on The Thriving Dentist Show with Gary Takacs

The Thriving Dentist Show with Gary Takacs

02:07 min | 2 months ago

"zoya" Discussed on The Thriving Dentist Show with Gary Takacs

"Could be doctor zoya patients. Could be doctors you meet at conferences. Could be anybody who can write the two letters DR in front of their name. Just send it to them and you say something like, hey, I have been nominated to doctors choice awards. Can you take a couple of minutes to write a review for me? And we have 4000 doctors with many, many reviews each. And I have seen no negative reviews, almost like one in a thousand negative reviews. Almost every single review is a glowing 50 word plus wonderful review. Why? Because these are people who know you like you trust you already and of course they respect you as a clinician. So they're going to write this very personal review highlighting some of your strengths. Somebody might say, talk about your bedside manner. Somebody might say, you are dedicated to continuous learning. And you're always upping your game. And somebody might say, you teach others. Whatever they're going to say, they're going to say it. Plus that DR or MD at the end is going to again tell these patients that he's the doctor's doctor. He's the one that doctors go to when they have a need. I mean, we all want the insiders. When I want to build a house, I want to I want the person to do my kitchen, who my friend, the contractor is using, because hey, probably knows something that I don't, because he knows how to build homes, right? It's the same thing. When we see those insiders in this case, doctors saying these wonderful things. So that's the tip. So get these reviews, then make sure you are highlighting them like Gary suggested on the website. Even go a step further, you know, print them out. List these 25 reviews. Nicely on a nice in a framed portrayed or something like that. And then hang it in different places in your office. We are the patients are sitting. So when they're sitting, they're reading these other doctors saying these wonderful things. And they're like, he must be good because all these experts, all these insiders, doctors, think he's exceptional. She's exceptional. So those are my two tips. And one bonus tip I would give Gary is train your team that's answering the phone.

zoya Gary
"zoya" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

03:18 min | 4 months ago

"zoya" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"Just how messy and complicated all this is between them, I need to tell you this next story. Soya knows her mom so well and it's such a forceful formidable looking kid that zoya is the reason that her mom zarna became a stand up comedian at all. Four years ago when she was 16, zoya saw how unhappy her mom was. She trained to be a lawyer but didn't like it and stopped when she had her kids. She'd been home raising the kids for years. Here's zarna. I was dying, but I couldn't figure out what to do. I couldn't figure out what I should do. And she's like, no, mom, I really think you should do stand up comedy, and I thought she had lost her mind. She had so much fear going into stand up comedy. I mean, it took me 6 months of being like, mom, you can do it. Mom, you can do it. You're so good at this. Like all my Friends would want to come to my house 'cause she was just so funny and lively. She just had such a gift. Her always her answer was like, oh, I'll just be a secretary somewhere, or I got a law degree like I could go exercise my law degree. I could go practice a lot. I was like, mom, you hate it, practicing law. You love telling stories. So I took all those months to convince her mom that she should do what you loved, and now it is not lost and so that this is exactly what she's asking her mom to let her do. At college. So I keep telling her that where I'm like, mom, the reason you have your careers because I said do what you love, and she was like, yeah, but you shouldn't do it in your life. Like, that's too scary. Mom. When I ask her mom about this, she says that it is different for her than for zoya. When she started as a comedian, the family was financially secure. They were fine. Zoya doesn't have that in her mom's room. She needs to invent a life for herself, where she's supporting herself, and some humanities degree job as a writer, a job in the arts. I mean, it's a very unstable, unknown path. You don't know what's next. Is this hard for her to put that feeling aside, given her past? Can I say, from my experience with my parents, who grew up without money and fought their way to professional jobs in the middle class, I'm really not sure there's anything that zoya can say to zarina or zarnow de zoya to convince each other. It's almost like the parents did too good a job creating a safe life for zoya. And now she's not scared the way they are about how badly things can go. We live in fear. At least my husband and I, she doesn't, and for that I'm grateful she is very American in that way, that she's a little bit fearless. She's like, whatever happens, we'll figure it out. But my husband and I are immigrants, like we live in fear. As a designer doesn't trust soya to pick around future. Because I don't see her as a person who's driven by the need to survive. I ran that by zoya. Wow. I think I need to, I don't know, I don't know how to even respond to that. That's insane. I've never heard of verbally explicitly. Yeah, she thinks that her advice is better than what you think you want for yourself because she's more scared for you than you are. She's worried about you surviving. But I'm like, why do decisions have to be made out of fear? All of

zoya zarna Soya zarina zarnow de zoya Zoya
"zoya" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

01:53 min | 4 months ago

"zoya" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"Who I had an interview just yet with instructions on what to say to me. Well, she just said she just said when they ask you, do you control me? You should say no. Wait, but isn't telling you to tell us that she has in controlling rather controlling? I think that that's the thing about my mom is she doesn't think she's hypocritical because it all comes from a place of just pure love and she gave me a little lines of explanations of what I should say and what stories I should tell and I was just kind of like, yeah, those are good ideas and she was like, are you going to do it? And I was like, you know, I might improvise and she was like, no improvisation. We need to play on. Somebody is not sticking with the plan. But since you arrived at Stanford, Zoe has been pushing back on her mom more than she ever has. And the biggest thing to disagree about, the most serious battlefront in this war over how much control, zarna gets over zoya's life, is what classes so you should take. In fact, last year, when zori was a freshman, her mom did something very unusual for a Stanford parent. She sat in when soya Zoom meetings with her academic adviser. Mostly lurking off camera and making her wishes known to zoya. But sometimes speaking up. So he remembers one call, for instance, with adviser. I think the most embarrassing part of the call was my mom saying zoya is only supposed to take computer science. Like she should only take computer science and then I think what was so embarrassing was she had said that right after I had gone on this whole tangent about how I loved learning about Latin and ancient cultures. And then she was like, but zoya needs to take computer science. Almost as if she hadn't heard what I had said. And the academic adviser was like, her face just dropped. It was just so embarrassing. I think she's thinking, oh, like, typical

zoya zarna zori Stanford Zoe
 Ukraine's nuclear plant partly goes offline amid fighting

AP News Radio

00:40 sec | 5 months ago

Ukraine's nuclear plant partly goes offline amid fighting

"Ukraine's and Europe's largest nuclear plant was once again knocked off line in the early hours of Saturday amid sustained shelling Russian backed authorities say the latest shelling destroyed a key power line and penetrated deep into zapper Asia and official adding the facility has now switched to servicing its own needs late on Friday evening the same authorities said the plant had been under fire for about two hours blaming Ukrainian forces in the latest of a series of similar claims in zoya a small village 12 miles away residents said they could hear the sound of explosions in the area one

Ukraine Europe Asia Zoya
"zoya" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

TED Talks Daily

07:17 min | 10 months ago

"zoya" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

"Are fighting for. Hey ted-talks daily listeners. I'm Adam grant. I host another podcast from the Ted audio collective. It's called work life, and it's about the science of making work, not suck. We're starting our new season with a great resignation. Once you've made that decision to leave, there's no guidebook, and because it's secretive, there's a lot of people that you can't talk to about it. When and how to quit your job and how to build a workplace where people want to stay. Follow work life without them grant on Apple podcasts, Spotify, or wherever you listen. Did you know that one in 8 couples struggle with fertility? Maybe you do too on the new podcast baby or bust, host Dr. Laura shaheen answers your questions, dispels the myths and transforms disappointment into hope. Fact based answers from a real o-b-gyn and reproductive endocrinologist who helps people build families every day. Every episode of baby or bust features interviews with experts and real life infertility survivors. Find baby or bust wherever you get your podcasts. Support for ted-talks daily comes from Capital One, with no fees or minimums, banking with Capital One is the easiest decision in the history of decisions. Even easier than deciding to listen to another episode of ted-talks daily. And with no overdraft fees, is it even a decision? That's banking reimagined what's in your wallet, terms apply. See Capital One dot com slash bank, Capital One NA member FDIC. On the 24th of February, my daughter spoke for the first time. First work was Baba. Which means the sound of a great explosion. That night revoke to the concussive sound of bombs as our windows came crashing in. It was the bombardment of Kyiv. I am someone who didn't believe it would happen. I was born just a few days before the Chernobyl disaster. And a few years before the collapse of the Soviet Union, I grew up in an independent Ukraine, struggling to overcome the legacy of the Soviet system. My mother and my grandmother worked very hard so that I could have a good education because they believed my generation would build the country. And we have, until 6 weeks ago, Ukraine was on an upward path, becoming more prosperous, unfair, more free. In 2004 and 2013, we marched for democracy and we defeated autocracy. So it was stunt when the windows crushed in. I froze. Speechless, motionless, absolutely helpless. That was my first lesson of war. What you cherish can be taken from you in a moment. Even your peace of mind. My hands were still shaken as I fled to the west of Ukraine with my children. And then over the border to Slovakia, my husband, and my parents remain in Kyiv, help in our country. As we traveled further from our family, I imagined all that was being destroyed. Our homes, our hospitals, our critical infrastructure, and so much more. For 40 million people in my country and for billions around the globe, February 24th is the day Russia invaded Ukraine. For 7 million Ukrainian children, it is also the day Russia tried to take their future. 176 children have been killed by Russian bombs. Hundreds more have been wounded. Ten years ago, I dedicated myself to building world class schools for the children of Ukraine. I believe education is the most powerful tool for improving the economy, the environment and human well-being. We're very quickly destroyed all three. So far, 900 schools have been critically damaged. 84 are completely destroyed. And yet, education goes on. During the COVID pandemic, Ukrainian government engaged my team to create the Ukrainian school online. During the last two years it has delivered school to children, wherever they were. Students from remote areas had access to teachers and lessons they wouldn't have otherwise. This platform covers the secondary school curriculum and puts every student in front of our very best teachers. We never imagined our nonprofit project would be needed in a situation even more horrible than COVID. But today, almost 400,000 students learn on this platform. They connect from within Ukraine and from 120 countries, but they are refugees at the moment. And for all of them, those couple of hours a day is not just a safe environment where they learn something new. It is also the space where, despite everything, Ukraine continues to invest in them. And that was my second lesson of war. Putin can take a lot from us. Our homes, our jobs, our loved ones, our peace. But he can not undo education. Knowledge and curiosity are unassailable treasures. And as long as our children keep learning and our teachers keep teaching, even while we are starving in shelter Santa bombardment, even in refugee camps, we are undefeated. In this war, every Ukrainian has his own front. Our soldiers, our doctors, our mothers, and yes, even our children and teachers. By continuing to learn, they fight for our future. And this fight is about so much more than borders. Ukrainians are fighting for freedom. For our right to imagine and build our future in our own way. Our people stand heroically, but against the second largest army in the world, we can not stand alone. To end this war, we need you. We need every citizen in every nation to demand that it's tough. And that was my third lesson. My.

Ukraine ted Adam grant Dr. Laura shaheen Kyiv FDIC Ukrainian government Baba Soviet Union Apple Slovakia Putin
"zoya" Discussed on Sigma Nutrition Radio

Sigma Nutrition Radio

03:55 min | 1 year ago

"zoya" Discussed on Sigma Nutrition Radio

"One third of the global population will be over 60. So that's me. That's my generation. That's going to be over 60. So there's not going to be enough young people to support the older generation and it's going to really impact the global healthcare system. So understanding the mechanisms a little bit more and what's effective strategies, whether it's exercise and nutrition that can really mitigate these risks is important. So I guess just stressing that point a little bit. Very cool. For people who want to find more of your work and follow me on social media, any of that type of stuff, where are some places on the Internet, they can go and find you. Yeah, so I'm on Twitter and Instagram and my handle for both these nourished by under school sites. Awesome. And for everyone listening, I will link to that in the show notes this episode, along with anything else relevant to this particular episode. You can go and check that out. And that brings us to the final question that I end the podcast on. This can be to do with anything, even completely outside of what we've discussed today. And it's simply if you could advise people to do one thing each day that would have a positive impact on any area of their life, what might that one thing be? Well, in relation to what we've talked about, I would probably say move every day in a way that feels good for you. So just keep moving. Don't say sedentary and that's it. Awesome. So I thank you so much for taking the time to chat to me and for walking us through such an important and interesting topic. I'm sure people will find it very interesting. So yeah, thanks for doing this. Thanks again for having me. So that was our discussion for today. I hope you found it interesting and informative. If so, please share it with someone else that you think might find this particular topic interesting. They would hopefully appreciate it and I know I certainly would. Remember that you can get the show notes over at sigma nutrition dot com slash episode four two three where everything will be linked up there, including a place to get transcripts to our podcast episodes. And then while you're on the website, you can check out our other content, so including our long form written sigma statements where we cover complex or conflicting and confusing topics related to nutrition science, layout our position on them based on the best available evidence and essentially explain how we came to those conclusions. So we have a variety of different topics covered there. So check them out, just under the sigma statements tab on the website. So that's sigma nutrition dot com. And then if you're not already receiving the sigma synopsis email newsletter, that is an email I said at once a week in kind of a short bullet point format where I'll give an overview of any content that we're producing, as well as recommended content from around the Internet. So new interesting studies that have came across maybe lectures or social media posts or articles or videos, something that is value to you in a variety of different topics to nutrition and health science. So there's one email a week, no spam, and that is the sigma synopsis email. So if you're just go to sigma nutrition dot com, you can find lots of places there just to click to subscribe to that email. And with that, let me say thank you for listening to another episode. We will of course be back again next week with another topic for you. Until then I hope you have enjoyed this episode and that you stay safe and take care..

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"zoya" Discussed on Sigma Nutrition Radio

Sigma Nutrition Radio

07:27 min | 1 year ago

"zoya" Discussed on Sigma Nutrition Radio

"Where is that current literature? It hasn't really evolved much more. So you touched on creating cartoons always. It's a safe supplement. It's great for muscle hypertrophy and strength, you mentioned omega three that has some sort of mechanism to reduce that inflammation that I briefly talked about before. And vitamin D is also one as well. But that's mainly beneficial if they've already got inadequate vitamin D levels in their blood as well. So making sure that taking all those boxes definitely can help. But at the end of the day, it is about energy the intake as well. So protein and energy. So if they're constantly in an energy deficit, they will be losing weight. So it's really about finding ways that they can actually improve their food and take and you do mention lack of appetite, dentation, so also when they have dentures, can be all factors that contribute to it. So that's where supplementation is good. So I've worked as a dietitian as a clinical dietitian before, so having those high energy high protein supplements for the aging population is always a good one if we think more of that clinical aspect of it. But I think it also comes down to education and awareness for a lot of these population really. Yeah, I guess one of the difficult paradoxes may be for dietitians to try to navigate in this area relates to sarco picnic obesity where you have maybe an aging patient that has the sign of this decreased muscle function and sarcopenia, but is also in a category of obesity that doing something to maybe reduce out of paucity would have a benefit on their health, but also knowing that increasing their muscle mass would have a benefit on their health for some of the reasons we've discussed today. And so you're left in this difficult decision of by the interventions you would typically go in order to help someone in a treatment of obesity if they did want to attempt to lose body mass would almost be countered to some of the things that might be useful in the context of improving muscle mass notably with energy here as you've outlined. How does one go about navigating that? Is there even a consensus at the moment for dietetic practice or of how to navigate such a issue? I'm not actually familiar with the latest guidelines in terms of thought to be honest. 'cause I haven't worked as a clinical doctor for a very long time. But for when I was in that area, it's estimate it's about really maintaining weight or making sure that the cardio metabolic risk factors are improved. So we can have someone that is in a bigger body but still be quite healthy. So making sure that they have those kind of metabolic risk factors in line. And doing nutritional interventions as well as exercise interventions. So mentioned resistance training is great for that population. So yeah, I'm not too familiar with the most up to date information on that one. But that's what I would do. Awesome. You've just introduced resistance training, which is something I wanted to ask about because clearly when we're talking about protein and this impact as an anabolic stimulus that in itself is great, but it's probably far exceeded by the potential impact of something like resistance training. And then there's also other benefits of maybe other types of training modalities if we're thinking about reducing inflammation or just actually getting the muscle to contract and have an influence. What's the kind of overview that we could come away with from certain interventions that have been done in these types of populations and what type of results that are possible from some of these interventions? Yeah, absolutely. I think there's a real user or lose it mentality when it comes to movement and muscle, so I did mention how just reducing step count can significantly have an impact on muscle protein synthesis. So just remaining active for all the adults is imperative for maintaining muscle mass and strength. But if we look at the literature, resistance training is definitely like you have to have resistance training. To have that stimulus to build muscle. So studies where they've done four groups with resistance training protein, those two together are a control protein alone is not effective at building muscle so you need that stimulus to build muscle. Other studies have looked at interval training as well, not so much because you know you have to think that the older population are quite frail, so you have to do what is appropriate for that type of group. But yeah, mainly resistance training, whether it's with weights with resistance bands, body weight have all shown to be effective at increasing muscle mass in the older population so where are the gaps in the current knowledge base? Where do we have to go in terms of maybe future research? What are some of the questions that maybe we don't have good answers to at the moment do you think? Yeah, as I mentioned, in terms of whole food versus supplementation. So there's a lot of preference for that supplementation versus whole foods. So what's the difference between dairy milk and yogurt and there's higher biological value protein sources and the whole food versions. Other aspects because my study, my PhD was mainly done in active old adults, my population were 56 year olds that were running marathons. So very different to that clinical population group. I was really interested in knowing how can lifetime training affect individuals response. So if they've had a whole background of training, how can that affect their ability to gain muscle later on in life even with a big break compared to someone that's been cemetery their whole life? And in my study, I active older adults that the population group was a little bit younger, so I think the median age was around 60. So how would older athletes thinking of your master's athletes so 65 in our overall 70 year old? How did they respond to similar exercise and nutritional interventions? They're the main questions that kind of came out of my PhD. But this area is certainly involving so much. I said my PhD in 2017 and nearly every single week there was a new study on sarcopenia so I really have to stay on top of it. So yeah, mainly the whole foods active old adults. I think he's a really interesting area as well. So yeah. Cool. Before start wrapping up here, is there anything I failed to bring up or forgot to address or any of their particular points that you think are important for people to know related to this topic? I guess just the main point as to why this is such an important area of research and why people are so interested in it. I think and the reason is because we know that by 2050 sorry 2050 that.

obesity sarcopenia
"zoya" Discussed on Sigma Nutrition Radio

Sigma Nutrition Radio

08:15 min | 1 year ago

"zoya" Discussed on Sigma Nutrition Radio

"Is obviously an area that you've done work in. What are some of the most important things with protein feeding that would fit into this picture? And can you maybe just kind of introduce some of the nutritional interventions we've seen in the area? Yeah, absolutely. So when it comes to general guidelines in terms of total protein intake, it's still kind of stuck on 0.8 grams per kilogram of body mass per day. But the literature is really showing that old adults do require a lot more protein to overcome that anabolic resistance. So the general guidelines for older adults over 65 is one to 1.2 grams per kilogram per day. And then active older adults need more than that are more than 1.2 grams per kilogram. So that's total protein intake. Then we also have protein intake per meal or protein distribution which are kind of touched on. So for I do briefly mention about that study where old adults consumed 20 grams of protein and what maximally stimulating muscle protein synthesis. So a lot of acute studies where they measure muscle protein synthesis levels after the consumption of protein. They found anywhere between 25 to 35 grams per meal or 0.4 grams per kilogram of body weight as well. So I personally like to use the relative amount because 25 to 35 grams is quite broad as well and if you've got a small female or a large male, that protein intake is very different. So that's per meal. And again, really trying to make sure that they're having enough protein at breakfast. So having that even distribution of protein throughout the day, you give yourself more opportunities to maximally stimulate muscle protein synthesis throughout the day and create a nitrogen that positive so allowing them to build or maintain that muscle mass. Then the third one is really protein quality. So protein types that have high biological value. We know our superior simulated muscle protein synthesis compared to plant proteins. So what essentially a high biological value of HPV protein is is a protein that has all of your essential amino acids. So it's a complete protein. And generally, that's out animal based sources. So dairy and meats. The reason for the high HPV protein is the main amino acid is leucine. So we know that leucine is really the key for muscle protein synthesis. So I like to call it the golden key of muscle protein synthesis because it really switches on that process and acts as an activator for the mTOR pathway. Unfortunately, we know a lot less about whole foods, which is kind of where my PhD goes. A lot of these are cute protein studies done in supplements, so whey protein isolate whey protein concentrate, soy protein, et cetera and we know that there is a whole food matrix effect. So I'm sure you've probably mentioned on this podcast before that classic study where they did the whole eggs versus just egg whites. And they measured the muscle protein synthesis. I think it was in cyclists and so they matched the protein amount for the eggs, but whole eggs versus egg whites and the group that had the whole eggs had higher rates of muscle protein synthesis despite matching fatal protein. And it's likely that the different components in the hole in the actual egg yolk is contributing to that muscle protein synthesis effect. So you have vitamins, you have different minerals in that whole egg as opposed to egg white which is just mainly protein in water. And the last one is really protein timing. So again, in acute studies that are measured muscle protein synthesis, we know that protein, especially close closely consumed to exercise, in particularly resistance training, really acts synergistically and increases muscle protein synthesis a lot more than just protein alone. So if we think of it as a hierarchy, the main thing is of a pyramid, the base of the pyramid should be total protein, then protein per meal, protein quality and protein time. And in terms of that hierarchical effect, awesome. Yeah, and I definitely want to talk maybe a bit about a couple of those elements and you mentioned the whole food matrix impact and some of the interesting work there. And I think the whole eggs study that you actually mentioned, I think the lead author, Stefan van vliet, was on this podcast discussing some of that that people can go and listen to. And there's also been some interesting work because I noted that some of your work looking at, say, for example, milk has been something that other groups like Kevin tipton's lab have looked at and see some interesting stuff when you see a whole milk versus say a supplemental way, product as an example. So we can definitely circle back to that. One of the things that interesting things to also to consider is we have this theoretical ideal way that we can maximize muscle protein synthesis that you've laid out in terms of the dose per meal, a distribution across the day, and then what types of sources are consumed. But if we think about observationally what maybe a lot of people are doing in the general population or maybe even specifically older adults, what do we know about the typical protein intakes, the typical protein distribution of people in the general population and how that might compare to a theoretical ideal in this sense? Yeah, absolutely. So in terms of the distribution, I actually did a cross sectional study looking at active older adults and assess their dietary intake. Even though they had quite high protein intakes. So I think it was 1.2 and over. They still had that inadequate protein breakfast. So if we think about the maximum amount, let's say 30 grams around that average of about 25 and 35. They're getting around 8 to ten grams of breakfast. 8 to ten grams at lunch and really getting 50 60 grams at dinner. So it's that real skewed intake of protein which is like I said back ended at dinnertime. So that's what I've observed in my study. And then when you look at community dwelling adults and all the studies, it's much the same thing. So it's really that serial based breakfast breakfast time really inadequate protein. Most likely some sort of sandwich at lunch and yeah, like a big protein serve at dinner. So yeah it's observed whether they're active or community as well as it's the same observation for so one thing is trying to get either more protein but also a distribution in cases where we're trying to improve this for certain people. I suppose pragmatically one of the things people often point to is a difficulty in some of these types of populations of being able to consume more food overall, never mind more protein and making some of these changes, whether that's through not being used to consuming certain foods or a lack of an appetite or typical decreases in food intake we see with age. And that is kind of led to some attempts to look at different ways to maybe reduce this anabolic resistance. And I know at least a few years ago there was the emergence of some group starting to look at other supplementation like creatine or I think omega three fatty acids. I think HMB, some groups were looking at. But in the time course since that period or more recently has any of that stuff played out what we know about any other types of supplements has there been any good evidence that they actually do much in this area or.

Stefan van vliet Kevin tipton
"zoya" Discussed on Sigma Nutrition Radio

Sigma Nutrition Radio

07:32 min | 1 year ago

"zoya" Discussed on Sigma Nutrition Radio

"Performance is sarcopenia. Yeah, no, I think that's incredibly important because I think sometimes maybe people on first hearing it may be associated with just a loss of muscle mass, but I think as you've outlined and will definitely dig into, that might be one element, but we are also looking at muscle function being incredibly important here. Where we probably see some of the intersection with what we're going to discuss in terms of the interventions around sarcopenia and what we've discussed in relation to muscle protein synthesis comes down to this idea of anabolic resistance. Can you maybe give an introduction to that concept? Yeah, absolutely. So anabolic resistance is as the name kind of suggests where there is a resistance to anabolic stimuli. So this was really outlined in quite a few acute studies where they would give older adults and younger adults the same amount of protein to 20 grams of protein. And the younger adults would maximally max out their muscle protein synthesis, whereas the older adults wouldn't quite get there. So there's this idea of this blunting of muscle protein synthesis, which is then known as anabolic resistance. Awesome. How much do we know about some of the underlying mechanisms of this anabolic resistance or what is currently known? I suppose in that area of literature. When it comes to sarcopenia and anabolic resistance, there's no one specific cause. It's multi factorial. There's a lot of different theories as to what causes it. One of the major ones is physical inactivity. So there was a study that was done in healthy older adults where they reduced their step count two weeks. So I think it was down to a thousand around a thousand steps. And what they found was that significantly reduce their muscle protein synthesis. So essentially going from active to sedentary can really affect that ability for that muscle to take up anabolic stimuli. Another big one is inflammation or lactic like to say in the inflammation, I really like that combination of the word. But essentially it's chronic elevated levels of inflammatory cytokines. So you're thinking, I have 6 TNF, alpha two and a factor. It's not really well understood how information actually works, but it's likely to do with something about the mTOR pathway. So production of that. We know from cross sectional studies and the longitudinal studies that there is an association between high levels of il 6 and TNF alpha and decrease fat free massive strength in old adults. And it's likely that these pro inflammatory cytokines might trigger a muscle cell. I've got ptosis or cell death in the muscle cell, but as I said, it's not really clear. So we have decreased physical activity in for Beijing also hormonal changes as well. So as people get older, we know that they generally testosterone decreases as well. In females, estrogen declines, especially after that person, it pulls a period and it's mainly in cross sectional studies where they found that association between muscle muscle mass and muscle strength and that decline in those anabolic stimuli. And lastly, if we think about extrinsic factors, I did briefly talk about physical activity, but also dietary changes. So decreases in protein intake. So that's the main focus of my research. So generally, we know that older adults and outs in general have that decline in protein as I get older. And also there's a real skew of protein intake. So not really enough protein at breakfast and lunch and then really back ending all that protein at dinner, which I'm sure we'll touch on, but distribution of protein is also important. So there is a variety of factors what's the single node factor. It's probably a combination of all of them. So yeah, that's generally the main factors that might cause pain here. So given that kind of complex nature and multi factorial nature of the development of this disorder, presumably, then we have a wide difference in maybe the time course of this because we obviously are going to think about this meaning the context of older adults and that's probably where most of the diagnosis is going on. But in terms of when some of this decrease in muscle function may start occurring, that could probably presumably be a bit earlier depending on some of those factors you just outlined. How do we start thinking about the time course of what we know about when this may be even has its origins? Yeah, absolutely. So we know that I guess depending on which study you read peak performance and muscle strength really breaches around mid 30s to early 40s. So we know that we lose from that. We lose muscle mass of around once 8% per decade. Up until our 50s and 60s where there's a real sharp decline in muscle mass where it occurs one to 5% per year. And that's just muscle mass, but we know that strength is lost one to 5 times higher to that rate. So that kind of really, I guess supports that idea of putting strength in the forefront of the clinical definition. So yeah, around 35 is when we it's actually starts physiologically happening, but it's really around our 50s and 60s have actually sought noticing it. Yeah, that reminds me of something that when I first heard it was one of the most interesting things to me about sarcopenia. And I think it was a number of years ago, doctor Brendan Egan was talking to me about some of this and had mentioned that we see essentially that loss of muscle function is disproportionate to the actual tissue loss that you mentioned. So in other words, strength seems to diminish diminish more than the amount of muscle that one loses would necessarily predict, which is kind of an interesting aspect. But again, as you said, brings the importance of muscle function and strength to the forefront because it's not just a normal expected decline with how much muscle mass is getting lost with age if I'm picking up correctly. Yeah and absolutely. So if you kind of think of any old person that you know with your life, they might not necessarily look like that they change. They might not change their clothes might fit exactly the same, but it's more so the change in body composition that changes kind of underneath that you don't really say, so it's that increase of fat mass, decrease muscle mass. So it's quite cute in and it's not really until they've reached their 70s or 80s where that acts of independent living where they have to get out of a chair or open the jar or walk down up or down some stairs where.

Beijing Brendan Egan
"zoya" Discussed on Sigma Nutrition Radio

Sigma Nutrition Radio

08:08 min | 1 year ago

"zoya" Discussed on Sigma Nutrition Radio

"Thank you everyone for either being a returning list or maybe this is the first time you were this thing in regard to this you are welcome to the podcast. Thank you everyone who is sent kind feedback in about some of our recent podcast episodes, a number of them seem to have struck a chord with a large majority of our listenership. That's awesome. Thank you if you've had nice things to say or have shared that around the Internet or have left reviews on iTunes or Apple podcasts as it is now. All of that stuff is very, very much appreciated. So thank you for doing that. It does really make a difference and it's also great to see. Today, I'm going to be talking with doctor zayer hooch who is a researcher and assistant lecturer at monash university in Australia where she's in the department of nutrition and dietetics. And she completed her PhD at the same institution where her research focused on interventions to prevent and treat sarcopenia. So this loss of muscle function and mass that can occur and typically with age, although not necessarily. So I also has a masters of dietetics and so in addition to her academic work she works in private practice as a sports dietitian. And today our focus is going to be in on that topic of sarcopenia and some of the issues related to that. So we'll get into concepts like anabolic resistance. We'll look at muscle protein balance. And then we'll try and get down to some of the practical strategies that may be beneficial to offset some of the downsides or maybe act as a preventative measure or then also in cases where psychopia is established. What would be a beneficial way to go, as well as then looking at how other things potentially could have some utility and where the gaps in the current knowledge base currently stand. So that is what we're going to focus in on today. You will be able to get show notes this episode over at sigma nutrition dot com slash episode four two three include any studies that we may mention here or any other resources that may be of value. So that signature dot com slash episode four two three. And so without further ado, let me introduce. And here we are. So I welcome to the podcast. Thanks so much for taking the time to come and chat to me today. Thanks for having me. I have a lot that I'm going to get into and it's a topic that I'm particularly interested in and knowing some of your background and very intrigued to ask some of these questions. But before doing that, maybe to give some context for people listening. Can you give a brief introduction to yourself and maybe talk about some of the work that you've done in academia and how that might relate to what we're going to discuss today? Yeah, absolutely. So my background is nutrition and dietetics. So I did a masters of dietetics back in 2015. And then they did honest, I kind of did things a bit reversed. So normally you do a research year within your masters or your bachelors, but I knew I kind of wanted to do my PhD and get into research. So after that completed my honors and then eventually did my PhD. So I completed my PhD in March this year and essentially it was in the areas of activating, looking at sarcopenia, which I know we're going to get a bit more into. So have that research component. I also work as a sports status as well. I do a lot of private practice work. And I guess a lot of my interest in areas perturbation to study soccer and muscle really has come from my sporting background. So I do a lot of strong men training as well. So it's a bit of I live and breathe strength training in a work sense as well as in my everyday life. So yeah, that's pretty much the nutshell a little bit. Awesome. I think we're going to cover quite a bit of that. And maybe before getting into sarcopenia specifically on some of the aspects of that. I think maybe a useful, useful way to frame this is to maybe give an introduction or maybe a refresher for people listening around muscle protein synthesis. And you've obviously mentioned two of your big interests being nutrition and strength training. And obviously they are things that relate here. Can you maybe just give a brief overview to people about what we're talking about in relation to muscle protein synthesis and then what factors can have an influence or an impact on that process. Yeah, absolutely. So when you want to build muscle essentially, we know that our muscles are constantly in turnover. So we have muscle protein synthesis, which is muscle building. So where our body essentially uses the amino acids from our diet or that our body makes to repair and build muscle. So if we use the analogy of a brick wall, so each brick is an amino acid and muscle protein synthesis is that building of that wall. Then we also have muscle protein breakdown. Essentially, which is the process of breaking down those amino acids that damaged to be repaired. And then you have that constant tone over. So the turnover is around one to 2% per day. So it's constantly moving. And in order to, I guess, game or to stimulate muscle protein synthesis we need some sort of anabolic stimuli. So the two main anabolic signal that we know of and that is the main focus in sarcopenia research is resistance training as well as protein. You take as well. So if we talk about sarcopenia, first of all, it's probably best to start with a definition or an explanation of that if people haven't came across that. What is most accurate way to state what sarcopenia actually is? Yeah, so if you go back a little bit in terms of the history of sarcopenia, I think it was in the 1980s, that's when the word sarcopenia kind of came about to really identify or describe the loss of muscle as we age. And it comes from the Greek words, which essentially means a lack of flesh. And since then it's really progressed and in 2010 I think that European working group of sarcopenia defined it is a progressive and generalized loss of skeletal muscle mass strength and performance. So it really included that strength in the performance that comes as well because we know that it leads to such an adverse effect on physical disability and poor quality of life. But it's really recently 2018 where the European working group of sarcopenia actually put the definition and changed it so that strength is actually the forefront of the definition. So when you measure sarcopenia, the operational definition includes three of the categories. So the first one being low muscle strength, and that's usually measured clinically using hand grip strength or chest into how many times you can actually get out of a chair. Blow your muscle quality or quantity. So usually measured dexa BIA CT MRI and then the third being a physical performance. So if we use the European definition of soccer, for you to be diagnosed with sacrifice to have category one, which is low muscle strengths and to confirm it, you need to have a low muscle quality as well. And then the lower physical performance, if you have all three of those, that's really considered severe sarcopenia. But that's just one definition. And I guess one of the biggest problems in the research is actually that this a lot of different clinical definitions of sarcopenia and they have different clinical cut of points. So that's been really challenging. There's no general consensus on what's the most appropriate definition to use. So in general, all of them do say a lot of muscle strength, muscle mass and.

zayer hooch department of nutrition and di monash university sarcopenia research Apple Australia soccer European working group of sarc
"zoya" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:44 min | 1 year ago

"zoya" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"On Obviously he's got to pay some attention inflation but now is the time Rick and junior are with us for the hour we'll rejoin the panel in a bit coming up the president's vaccine or test mandate for employers goes before the Supreme Court Arguments heard this morning in Washington And we'll talk about it coming up with Bloomberg's Supreme Court reporter Greg store here on the fastest hour in politics fascinating arguments will bring you in the room On sound on I'm Joe Matthew This is Bloomberg President of the Jewish streaming on pico is the girls trip of a lifetime Look at this water We're gonna give them something to talk about 7 iconic housewives four different cities Oh my God this thing right vacation a Turks and Caicos The party now And there's no party like a housewives party I don't give a fuck You're not a girl's girl Why would you say that Find out what happens when the forecast brings sunshine and a whole lot of shade You are so self absorbed It's crazy The Real Housewives ultimate girl trip All episodes streaming now Only on FIFA Communal fund zoya rains and her husband Robert Friedman Jewish activists and philanthropists Talk about why they chose the Jewish communal fund for their charitable giving As very busy working parents we wanted to focus more on the charity part of it and wanted to focus more on our children and less on the administration The Jewish communal fund is one of the oldest and largest donor advised funds but at the same time they are totally up to date and have state of the art systems for us to access and manage our contributions online The assets in our funds at the JCF grow tax free So we can generate more charitable dollars to support the charities that we care about most Let JCF minimize your taxes and maximize.

Bloomberg's Supreme Court Greg store Joe Matthew zoya rains Robert Friedman Rick Supreme Court Bloomberg Washington Jewish communal fund JCF
"zoya" Discussed on Papo no Auge!

Papo no Auge!

01:37 min | 1 year ago

"zoya" Discussed on Papo no Auge!

"Course or liatti's dividers waters seat. Jesus is that you're the shoddy approved. The she does. The permit i is learned of the season goes me. She allow shallan molly. He'll be started. I have also mondays. He yelled inside of seattle's watch official eve guilty in jamaica for bash. Thanks call his. Ask any of us care. You've had something. Soy chanukah value proposition is this coup. Thurstan was nice but by farmers i got to put cash spot. Fine we will put. The cash apple put cash non-muslim. Use these hamadeh inc or tube in siegel On an oscar now. She was traditional duties. As not the most gash nowadays dish deputies order the show link up putter former got tassie i'll cutting their racer at doncaster. Zeal i doubt fires another former fema summit collective for the contribute. Sopra ish prajit. Judy chris davis's proper guy. The toilet yet prospect zoya value.

liatti shallan molly Thurstan hamadeh inc jamaica seattle oscar apple doncaster fema Judy chris davis zoya
"zoya" Discussed on Elvis Duran and the Morning Show ON DEMAND

Elvis Duran and the Morning Show ON DEMAND

03:02 min | 1 year ago

"zoya" Discussed on Elvis Duran and the Morning Show ON DEMAND

"Hulu has their series premiere of nine perfect strangers. Which is based on a book by the way and net flex. Nate i think of you and i when i think of this memories of a murderer. It's the nelson tapes and the actual murderer dennis nelson. He is narrating his life and all of us horrific crimes. And i'm wondering if one day. I'm gonna see you having a netflix series like that. I know reports. Wow thank you danielle. Kristen online twenty. He kristen how you doing. Hi how are you guys. Were so well doing very well to beautiful wednesday. So you've been married for thirty years so we always love talking to people like you who've been married for a long time. What's the secret to stay staying together being best friends fighting knowing how to fight. What do you mean knowing how to fight talk about that. I'm telling you it's the secret you gotta know how to fight. Don't burn the house down no matter what your best friend but you argon fight and you have to face it. Wow okay five smartly fight fair. What about your orgasm situation zoya calling. I think that's what you're calling right. Exactly excuse me. I'm a little choked up. You know honestly were in or mid mid to late forties and it's the best time of our life and we have sex multiple times a day We wear each other out really wake. You have kids we do but there we're empty nesters now. Why we're having so much fun. Here's one of the great things about your phone. Call is a lot of people. Listening are in their twenties thirties. And they're they're just not getting married or they're thinking they're you know they're about to get married. Whatever you kind of wonder where marriage will take your life and when you hear someone like you christian talk about how great your sex life is. How how great it is. You know how to fight and you're still loving each other so much that's encouraging very encouraging for people who are afraid to take the leap and get married and so i appreciate hearing that. Thank you and one more thing..

dennis nelson Hulu Nate netflix danielle nelson Kristen kristen zoya
"zoya" Discussed on Slate's Double X Gabfest

Slate's Double X Gabfest

07:49 min | 1 year ago

"zoya" Discussed on Slate's Double X Gabfest

"And zoya is brand new in the big cities. She's just moved from buffalo with their hof sister's help even though their fathers there's no nothing about their collusion together. So what difference does it make. Do you think we'll that. These central characters are black. I am not sure that it makes quite a big difference to the first four episodes that i had seen i mean. I think it's great to signal that it's not just like all white people but i don't. The race is not very meaningful way. I don't think come to the fore like even even as zoya sort of been abused in teased by her here. It does not quite have like a racist overtone to it to me. It's almost like what it actually means is on the half of the writers which is that so not to get too deep into the gossip girl weeds but the original. The original has sort of its battle. Royale likes this. Frienemie love ship between these. Two characters of blair and serena and serena who's played by blake lively and blair who is played by late miester like late. Mr walked away with that. Show blair's the reason that show worked and blair was really mean sometimes. She's sort of like so controlling. Taipei like queen even though she was called the queen. Bee and you sort of loved her even though she was like constantly making mistakes and it was a perfect example of like. It's better to be interesting then to be good sort of as like what you really want a tv show. And i think the mistake the show is making. And i don't know this is totally ineradicable from them. Being played by black women and at a moment that feels like the people writing the show want to promote and like make them look really good essentially that you can that that for that show to work those characters actually need to be awful and feels like the show doesn't wanna make them awful. It doesn't want like zoya is not supposed to be awful. She's a goody two shoes. But julian just needs to be a smidge batter for her to be like a smidge more lovable that to me is almost where where we are with like empathy and sympathy and like strong female characters. Like is kind of making the show a mass like sort of things. Everyone has to be like idealistic and role model. And you're like. I don't know i think they could just be bitchy or and it would be more fun. I need to know a bit more about your views on strong female characters because sure seems like strong female character. Isn't that something we all want more of. But it sounds like you think that it can kind of tend towards blindness on television. This is not my thinking about this. There's like second order thoughts that like we do want more strong characters but then strong female character also becomes this trap right because you just have to be like a superhero and actually all. The interesting stuff comes when you get to be a person who's weak in a math and makes mistakes and i think that there's a little bit of strong female character in this. I mean julian is does a lot of unpleasant things but she is actually like a nice person in her heart and the shows that need that to work. Yeah yeah well. It almost seems to that her social media success is a problem because again. I don't know if they want us to do. A full comparison show wanted to show to but blair she was always like question. Questing she yes. She had a certain success. That would be very hard to be taken away but there was something that she was heading for. And what exactly more could could julian half. She's got this social media influence her life. The apparently is the one that is most sought-after no and so what what could go wrong. And then they make it like she what she really needs a lame boyfriend and you're lake. That's not what she needs like. Even she wouldn't think that's what she needs. That's also such a weird message to be sending about your go girl character. That like no one cares about her very nice boyfriend. I don't buy one second especially the one that the way that they kind of created. That boyfriend is the most boring on this earth. This get into the weeds. But this sort of this sort of do-gooder character in the show is kid dan humphrey who was like a middle class kid. Sort of pressing his face. Up to the glass. But he was always sort of so noxious 'cause he was as much as he said he wasn't. He was just like genuinely resentful and he wanted in and that made him interesting and they've turned that character now into really rich person. And if that character doesn't have this noxious wanting in he's not interesting. You know like they all gossip goal. They're supposed to be something about you. And that's what makes you interesting and likable ultimately and they kind of have just like everyone's less vile well. There's one vile creature who is fantastic. The bass is this very rich very loose young pan sexual guy called max wolf who has two dads and apparently unquenchable thirst for sex drugs and shit stirring and that felt like the biggest and most necessary update. I don't remember any queer or gender non conforming main characters in the original gossip girl and that couldn't possibly stand in two thousand twenty one right now. This is a great development. I mean out of soap opera. All you want is like the most people to be able to make out like just for the long term health of the show and this is just like mathematically brilliant as opposed to being progressive and. Welcome so for me. The biggest disappointment of the gossip girl is the complete failure to build any. I mean any interesting. Romantic tension like all of the relationships are as boring as like a cup of cold. T there's audrey ocoee who likes affectively and maybe even in fact or like a boring married couple like they sleep together perfectly openly. They've been together forever mac. There already suffering from lesbian bed. Death julian and obi eventually becomes zoya an. Ob like really early on. So it's not even a spoiler. There's just no one to ship for the like. I don't think that's about the new woke. Nece it's not about the fact that they know ask for consent. That actually feels pretty good. And it's not really about them not being allowed to have any kind of bullying which was a key part of their original version. It's just that they didn't manage to make any characters who have chemistry together right but this is the same thing. It's just like everything is too nice like you know. These couples are like very nice. That's not what makes interesting. Romances have no conflicts. basically they have no hurdles. the only one is between max. And you know he's become fixated on a teacher which is like sort of unseemly but like at least slightly more interesting for a wild and some. It's just it's it's just for show that is about like access and about kind of genuinely like the bad behavior and super privilege of a exalted class of new yorkers. It's kind of just like being in very insistent that they're like secretly lovely people and i'm sure they maybe they are but that's like not a tv show. No no and it's not what we want from our rich people. You know what. I'm kind of craving or more just poor people i mean. I don't know if they'll ever be truly poor people in gossip girl in the original. We had dorota blair's made complete with french maid uniform and having to do blair's bidding twenty four seven quite beyond the call of duty in this show. The only poor people are the teachers and actually we do have something to say about the teachers because they do have much more of a role in this version of the show. And we'll get to them after this break. But if you like what you hearing and you want to hear more from willa ame- on another topic check out our.

zoya blair serena julian julian half blake lively dan humphrey Royale Taipei buffalo max wolf Mr audrey ocoee Nece obi dorota blair max willa ame
"zoya" Discussed on The Valleycast

The Valleycast

04:27 min | 1 year ago

"zoya" Discussed on The Valleycast

"Yeah something like that. But i've what i've heard is that you need to if you're going to do the process it's not like a magical lose fat process like you have to actually like put work in out with this. Yeah yeah so it. All goes hand in hand with like giant and exercise. Right right so like. Let's say you've been dieting for a long time and exercising and you just like this little. Like a like a little pooch. Yeah thank get rid of. You're right that you can't get rid of okay. What it does is it helps eliminate that and you drink fuck and matt rob was telling me about this. It's areas of your body that don't normally that just way even when you work out because it's it's it's just that's where it is like in that okay and this helps find that and then break it down and then allows it to work to be worked out like all the other fac because of the process. Crying out sweat it out. You know you gotta work still. It's not mad but you can't just go in there and do me up and i'll look like like george clooney do it and then eat a cheeseburger for seven the next seven days. Yeah yeah like. You're not gonna go grab a milkshake at you. Know at wendy's yeah no. You're not. I was yelling. We should we should do that do you. Not mike this time. I know he likes to keep an eye on us. But let's go get some frosty together just like old times all right. Let me just try and spend some time with him just because we both in working like. Oh okay all right prioritize your husband that you love. I know i suck right. No you're wonderful. And i love you zoya. Anybody wanna say something zoya. Kevin says hi haircuts kevin's a haircut. I to get him before. I leave for ten days. Go get in line. Getting line kevin. She's she's a wanted woman. All right zoey. Thanks for your time. Your precious wonderful. I appreciate you goodbye. Hey guys listen to welcome to our podcast. Which is mike fell zone. Zoya podcast works like kind of like a very frustrating like it. So it's okay. They do pod. Yeah man they bounce off each other so basically. They're like an odd couple. They're they're a buddy comedy and they bicker at each honeymooner. Also like they love each other so much and they respect each other so much. It's really nice to see you guys have never seen it. It's great it's just like imagined..

matt rob zoya george clooney wendy mike kevin Kevin Zoya
"zoya" Discussed on IINK Podcasts

IINK Podcasts

04:16 min | 1 year ago

"zoya" Discussed on IINK Podcasts

"You see those other. Flowers have their touched the ground. That's where they should be. They have this crowd and they blew the wind. Dick's seeds edmark hours. Screw mother nature. She's a cycle shave. Synergy wherein combined efforts of organisms achieve more than those of an individual that is modern eater in her everything is interconnected including us but we have started breaking connections. I wanted to remind you that that is not gonna be. There is no second option. We need to live on undeserved for a long time. In latin is data german earth. Cordis herself to live on earth on dera for a long time to connect with her again. You need to block with her again. We need to build with her hurricane. Humans us while studying about nature have simply forgotten. We are just a mere part of it. We have simply forgotten. We do our need to we do. Have we do our part of nature and of arts synergism. Aeko firmness believe we should not accept the forest construction that we are separate from nature. We will not accept the false contraction that some privilege powerful men are superior the nature with sir. Nicholas bacon someone. We study in school as the father of modern signs believed. He should be called. The father of patriarch assigns. He was part of a society. The royal society. The objectives of the society was the signs of domination ways to captivate nature by making her his. Nah and making us observed our purposes thereby achieving an empire of man over nature herself. The father of modern science. I i kept of the royal. Society went on to say that the ideas that earth is like a goddess and the veneration where men. I'm beautiful for what they call. Nature has been discarding impotent to the empire man off the inferior could deters of god. They wanted to build an empire over life over life herself which is inevitably and certainly wrong and cannot be justified in the eyes of nature. Women and men we humans to accept ourselves as a part of nature remove our selfishness and get rid of our convenience work with walk for madani vandana shiva once said we define ourselves with nature in creative. I repeat we define ourselves with nature in creativity. Nato the creator life once justice but can this destruction. Dekalb no but when we see death we see new life with destruction gums evolution. How perfect call. Sagging one said extinction is the rule. Sir by is the exception and he was tight assed onto destroy cannot be stopped. The candy survived. They destroyed all only again he. She destroyed aw only to start again..

madani vandana shiva Nicholas bacon second option Nato earth german Dekalb dera latin Aeko
Moving Machine Learning Into the Data Pipeline at Cherre

Data Engineering Podcast

02:03 min | 1 year ago

Moving Machine Learning Into the Data Pipeline at Cherre

"Hi by us on tiles on a data scientist cherry. Do you remember how you first got involved in the area of data management sites good of interesting routes in my career first and foremost physicists. In my condemning track originally was aimed for working in optics tonics when i finished my started working as a tonic designer for not to go communications company and then one day one of former post. Docs invited checkout chevy's office. He started working there at school. People come to get health and it was really kind of an immediate hits so jerry really met all the criteria that i have where it's still again. Perspective projects specifically the working on a really challenging problem defining domain model for bela states. There were working on high impact issue and it was work with smart people really smart people right so type. Problems is very challenging. And then what you're doing really to think about the real estate industry state as it is right now so the would be kind of what speed trading or is dead for the stock. Market's really changing the way the real estate market's looking at tech. So all that looked good. I joined sherry and they learned about the domain afield state so then who is one of the founders and learn about functional and object oriented programming test driven design micro services from medicine. Sterling is a senior engineer i learned about. Nlp knowledge grass from the awesome john madden or head of machine learning engineering. Who you've answered before. And zoya from ron beckerman bizarre. Cdo in data science professor. So it's been really great working all these people. It's been an awesome learning experience

Chevy Jerry Sherry John Madden Ron Beckerman Sterling Zoya
"zoya" Discussed on Papo de Fotógrafo

Papo de Fotógrafo

04:53 min | 2 years ago

"zoya" Discussed on Papo de Fotógrafo

"I'll say stash racist joke though i'm at matter. Offers seeking to shafique could spoon bone. Put she presenting of is pursuing much. Well i watch kiva care fast gingy six complain of photons itchy. Deploys version was actually. Got the resentment of israelis choice. She got up his instrument of israel. Zoya gained our cash up to us. And it's normal to me don't you gonna theorized gm to coco. Jean try on contract. If i'm president clouds'll uproot clouds'll but as inching thing the stadium through dum boom contractor by barracuda their voice he into libya deportes to the double resolve seem alberta greenwich mideast copay. See the mice calipers. Luca spread out. We just could be seeing By the vvs's sober up cobu based off of fee base of sound for doger's stingl He see to my zone. Permissible his demise a photographer fear to g mice whose data for bogus. Because you talk through so casper suic- gosh oil registering for a little over. Did it for dogar for the episode to store. The elliott was so typical epa succeeded. Gca is sought he beatles. Collapse ilia watches the business suit to my was civil muddle nevada. Little see to the lava and shoes and throw boggle would visit apricot be agent in across of a soaking typical sake Of dodge opinion his of a spate of news zolt don't seem to be able to missile fake Guardian people thought this ace iki saved to a stop. Oviedo p noise dot will be joining Racial overseas e. modest Dissolved that of oversaw resorts in douglas arizona. For turn their three daughters dodgy or the things a key guilt on bay bridge. Boulevard is your to a desire to g follow overseas lachlan's other genome vehicle. Space southern army just see suitable fell. Opera mucus was new. Kids for source they wake of the main today on my sheer felarca gouvia seen anything did award yardage foresees singing. Vin diesel dying global. Bill will sit docket. I build elza through week. Dench also cisco paddle Maids will say same daming. Meanwhile about an inability to genius matt. Watch key Dog and say so and no Dispose stadium oh but i go for sason independent Followed his report. You will see simple out sixteenth Use mri seem to joke woma forum up at crispy thoughts. He's still could be dispatched so good job but offset that blossomed crafts. We tone team whip is on komo pro. Msci percentage azeem to pop the being whatever seeking on coney ask out that she got an appropriate for dog but the bang onassis into benefits saying john. Cadad- inch my macau's plumbing sheet resell in japan. The mia one passer do as inconspicuous etc said. She tony lad. This gentlemen to pressure does more duties. Yahoo com kaz network. It is not on there too but apple difficu- using traditional dogmas shittu sowings jerusalem agency women to japan. The corporates passenger towards was safe. As each about your totals records hit the so those such as yoga. Daime niceties ordure personal vigil zenia mustard on king. This are more desiccated incubus thing. No software programmer messed main cuidad wing. Cheer philip ross. Dirty dishes visine compare..

japan apple Yahoo com Zoya sixteenth Jean shafique today arizona each nevada philip ross yoga Luca three daughters Cadad- inch one passer Oviedo Daime six
"zoya" Discussed on Talentos para o Sucesso

Talentos para o Sucesso

05:37 min | 2 years ago

"zoya" Discussed on Talentos para o Sucesso

"Will seizure. Se outing guys. Yamile demille nasa the kentucky vein decibel but commute engineer versus water supplies in toil soap opera. Vive aqui jacome. We'll sick when the we'll see from sean cuomo ceremonial. Yeah yeah i it. Swings seen plays nepotism Zahed let's do spoil near the big breaking showed up at his odd v qasr knowing this is not a dodge guilty by kozloduy Spoil kit far though it out at all equality. Talk do cod for kitchen. Lean juicing the dodge as much through simplest. Asa down the campus on settlements. Zoya think elaborate. Alcon salema no desire. Watch moment downplay. Jesus but acas ikuko. Se amount to impact purchase jewish helmi. Eliza pistol national stumble. His bombay missus digest only kind of solar now ca episode ezama tutor jiechi dot follow. Take scorch moore samantha key misappropriating. Damage amoco turin squeeze. Doma does is be extinct in start ee emotional celtic so. We'll told us as those sales. David don't things custom break ladder. Thunder coins sought grupo nine percent. Blue conditions follows hit by smith aquatic. Let me saying well vanilla. She was paying to stack on there. Saying don't fill is not. How kind of face accused kitchen. They'll put fish is his years. If making disciples cathartic thouars was thinking dollars. Framework with basic skills cost-shift korea's energy to the cannot bill is did. his name is over. My civilian dodge some acoustic for kamikadzedead name key because republican leadership istar dental due process also won't e care fazon title happy the cucumber Bragging tunnels america's casino domain. Three man to g attention to alkali ancient. We'd call as in scuba dottie. Does that kills threatening oakley. Ain't you comb settlement in oklahoma. Oh moon soma salvaging yearbook that shit under the name as you can ziprecruiter sinatra atta. What they ain't you consider manno vibrato clearing ciccone simone. All was set rattus wiki. It was seventeen the to commerce week. He tragically ain't seen cinco in portentous them. Being mrs aspect was ellison's jimmy vendor. Were kip afar. Mock you will see leader. Search each sizing kaleida jacome osuna jaime Dot com soclean's intel tragedies bank that actual compare source kid all throughout the Us you know camo own some pg to enter and the reason that civic seminar a suite keep assessments the gallup Forget some opportunity digital say as sussex liquid smithville settlement quesadilla meter simply energystar by the key which is ielting and we quaint estimate out into zorzi nosso heckling asi eleven custodian sonko Architect of the most troubling to nike pennsylvania ecuador desire we can achieve because motiur shallow kalama fuzzy ebbing virtues. The precautions will say zero. Be into with my brother. Chievo missile can we saw in q. Two to boston. Cheaper than those. Those lamb Dos becomes like you can't feel preval seconds of your call casing bradsher. Jesus tai replica. Who says it adds the school pepperidge. Ancient comex for your keys shot on. Kiki get caught. A silky doj has died due process with achievable interactivities in siberia. Them's swing. But he has a my say chiku sills club. Guys is your use with success limited combat. You is designed to address. Lamberty gsa Inch spotify yes severe nebraska. Anna necessarily fairus reminds the cash..

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Clyde Butcher: Photographing the Everglades

B&H Photography Podcast

09:53 min | 3 years ago

Clyde Butcher: Photographing the Everglades

"Butcher but she was known primarily for his dazzling large format black and white photography the everglades glades and Florida environment regardless of your photographic background or your tastes photography. There is so much you can learn about his story career good example. How many photographers August do you know who actually made money? Selling thousands of prince through the Amazon of the Stone Age. Or as we sometimes call it the sears catalog he did it anyway. This episode is going to be a little bit different than normal because it's just a simple conversation between John. Inclined they touch on a number of interesting subjects including Bush's work in the swamps with large format cameras. His recent foray into Sony digital cameras paired with cannon tilt shift lenses and is mind boggling doctrine with vintage in lodgers. They'll also discussing the business models that he and his family employees to market is images his thoughts on black and white versus color and of course his relationship to the Florida landscape escape for which he will be forever. Linked Klein is a true American master. And it's a treat to have him on the beach photography podcast. Let's have a listen. You work the worth almost known for his kind of a process. Heavy work Invasions time working in large format. But let me ask you. Do you feel photography Is is more of a ways or means whether the means be adventure solids money whatever happens to be. Hopefully photography is the adventure through life that you bring happiness to people through your images in my work. I'm trying to bring the environment out the to the public because people big Zoya heavy idea where oxygen comes from yet so we you have to try to convince people that the earth is round round. Last I checked it worse worse spaceship and so we have a finite number of materials here so through my photography people see the beauty mhm Have to get into it too. We're looking at pictures a lot. Lotta pictures not really early Pictures of things feelings of things. Try to draw you in pictures of the really Nice Center. The interest is on the sides. Were you in the reason I might pictures you know. I guess you probably seem into Israel silver prints. They're up to five foot by eight and a half feet. Nine feet in. Nikki showed me the space in the back of the documentary. Yeah and the rinsing in the chemical tables. That's thirty eight foot long sink. Yeah five foot by four foot. Trees actually betrays sinking itself discussion. The jumping ahead. There's so many questions about that. Space that you create in the photo and what you want people to do in that space but while we're there are you know over the past twenty plus years now. We've seen this going away from from analog film photography and Printing when that first started I mean how did you ask yourself any questions. Like how am I gonNA sustain this helmet in a supply myself with these as Kodak shutting down as you you know Ilford is pulling back now. Little resurgence in that but at the time was ever questioned. What you're GonNa do well with digital came out in Kodak's at all we're we're out here? It was getting older is you can't. Is that thirty five millimeter. We're talking about you know why should up to twelve twenty negative Majority the five seventy Enjoys five seven eight by ten some love. Fourteen twelve twenty twelve twenty seven fourteen really silly information. Yeah but it's like it's like when you take a twelve or twenty hours like ticket television set out there ebbing subside down colored collar but at that time. Did you know what I must take my guns. This is what I do is what I love to do a mock going back because you know sales I dunno sales took a hit or whatever or you know those kind of things but it was it ever a conversation to have with yourself or or was it. When I was a little nervous I think it was in nineteen ninety eight? We start doing books. So we've always general books but I was doing that my own scanning my negatives okay so I had to learn photoshop so I could If the picture of the book I tried to teach me photoshop I went to a couple of courses. It was pretty today's picture here so I said I got underway doing this in analog so I figured analog way of doing now I can do ten minutes yeah and what would that. What does that analog method ended? Basically we you like when you burn something you burn. It ingredients a lot with the burn tool okay so in in that. Gradient can change the contrast in that gradient. Okay that's interesting so might have to race a little bit around say on a burning tree. I just raised a little bit around. Make a circle around contrast less contrast. I can do that with a gradient so I could just like what I do now. In the printing we have verbal contrast paper Blue Green Bulbs so I need less contrast the blue off in a burden with green more contrast bring with blue so do the same thing thing a digital album that interesting and what's exciting to me. I finally got the I think I got the right camera to now. I got the new the Fuji F G X one hundred year about it's got sixteen bit. You'll realizing advantage of sixteen bit gradients of it becomes smooth. Yeah Woah and you can't do that fourteen bit again sixteen. This breath camera to me is to automatic. I like the I have the fifty s Has got a little dials here. This was all trying trying like so so but I've had to figure out how adapt my Kansas to it because the apertures is done by the camera so actually Cambo makes an adapter the cameras the Fuji that actually controls the Iris independently of the camera. Yet as he worry about the camera anymore. Tanaka used by lenses. And I can't shoot without having I think this is the poodle relies the the difference of getting four gram laureate Liz. The tilting tilting. The camera down more foreground yet. I lower the landscape. I don't tell camera. Yeah okay so the perspective is correct and it's also different in perspective Natural I'm kind of surprised a little bit to hear the the embrace and the deep dive into you know from the Fuji in as you mentioned the Sony All these things in the digital world. Was this something that you brought to you based on the fact that you needed to physically. Well I'll I tell you the reason I starting bracing. It is because the camp there came out with INC ARCHIVAL PAPER EGO. So unless you have a media that she can print on this going to be around for awhile. I Media Irish printer. It was good for at at least good two months. There was dead because it was used for proof. Lean offset printing needed to so the client the through the weak- Anka in your mind's eye of the print. Maybe excuse me for even asking. This is the final product. I mean when you see what you're looking at. Did you see through the Lens through the landscape to the print at the medicine. Well I do you know you said to see through the Lens I actually everything I do is point shoot. I do not compose the camera. You can't a a little bit. More digital. But with a large format view us a widening the lens of Orange Arch format. You can't see the composition the ground glass to you WANNA to see if it's Focus on the edge have moved over to the left and then yet lowered the riot. So you really can't see the competition so I've learned about the first retro focus. Twenty millimeter lens came in the country in nineteen sixty two. The first Retro Focus Lens was made in East Germany but the flag on Appeal Roy. Milton reflect to got. So I've been using that in wider wider angles ever. Since then I've been wide-angled I mean I've got maybe half dozen shots were taken with different lines. Really I I go from if you relate to Full frame thirty five I go from about ten millimetres twenty

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Battle of The Brews Live from The Landmark In Glassboro

The South Jersey Beer Scene Podcast

08:51 min | 3 years ago

Battle of The Brews Live from The Landmark In Glassboro

"The reason why we're here today is that we have a battle the bruise news and we've invited her kyle's invited us to be here and we also have the people from three threes eighty sand. Taco brewing company and ax narrow now and we're going to have a beer off. I guess what we're having more than one. I assume the battle of the beer's battle the beer so we're going to anybody. WHO's trying to beers out there. We're going to see which ones are favor one at two o'clock. I think we're GONNA it will cub cut the two o'clock. You know there's no hard times here not in fact. We're currently forty five minutes later than we thought we were wrong. Jersey time. It's a Sunday. What do you expect. It's a I think it's probably one of the last Sunday's before football so a before Labor Day yeah well. That's true. That's when you know Ostlund. Where most of us live we get our city back. We get our city back but that's okay doc kyle. This is a pretty interesting idea that you had here so tell me a little bit about marketing Americana and their affiliation with craft craft glass bro landmark been here forever. It's really went through a lot of changes since its inception but you know the crab craft beer scene really flew up probably ten years ago and I think that the concept here's all along with that we went from having hope nope twelve fear of domestic threats twenty total realize that there's a huge demand here and we expanded that to be forty draft beers and to have a strong focus towards the area what South Jersey Breweries Tristate Breweries Philadelphia's obviously twenty five minutes away feels local to me. US Asfaw lived there as well so very local but that's really been our been a big part of that. We are going to be a beer. I lace harmonies float around beard. You know we want you to have some beers control the food you know spirits. They have a place here as well but you know I think that the heart of what our concept is is it is about the beer. It's nice to see because one of the things that's happened in the craft beer landscape is that you guys were early adopters this obviously this is. How many years is this for the festival. This is the seventh year so there was kind of a whole here for a long time with people that would have craft beer and I guess with the Robo Abo- innovation that's happened here. There's been influx but you guys one of the early adopters and do a great job with it. I noticed that you have a good representation from all over the state in Philly here which is nice and you know they do have they do have some big name beards that you know that need to have which were not averse to. We are Bir see not script but it's nice to see somebody as big as you guys. It has such a force here in Gloucester County and surrounding area really adopt the craft and kyle. You have a great list of local beers share. A great tap list of WHO actually decides on which Beers on tap is that you have a committee. I'm not that involved in the beer selection here to give a lot of the credits Nikki Nado who is here today he was the one running around getting all this stuff organized for us he does most the selections dealing with the Reps and the local guys play into his taste buds so a lot of credit on that Mitzi great job nick so when you guys are when you start to craft beer one of the things that is a not an issue but is your servers and I know that I've been here a bunch of times your servers actually know how to describe era so as the director of operations that something you guys put in the plan for your for your locations Yep. It's executed properly. All of our staff has to go through a relatively relatively rigorous training all what we offer terms of not just food spirits opinion beer and being able to actually describe the different styles is pretty very important and being able to lead people in the right direction a lot of a lot of novice beer drinkers are looking for certain flavor and you have to be able to know the list we talk yeah. We talk about this all the time so key tell me what tastes like coors light and then direct them to the Water Fountain then but there is. There's something here for everybody. Craft Beers expanded to such a point nine Clark. Even we have an article coming up or would have been out already on non alcohol beer is that are really making a big splash thing. It's against my religion the not Alcohol Beers but what's Nice is I think the breweries all making something that can get the entry level here drinking and looking your tap. Lets you do have those as well for sure. I as I've gotten older. I've appreciated that Craft Beers evolved with my tastes now. I feel like he used to be. How crazy can we make the sphere top going to beat a drink Takao happy. Can we make it. I think a lot of that now is more. What can we make that people are going to drink a lot of lottery. You know six seven beers used. BP had six arrogant bastard. You wouldn't taste for weeks now now. There's there's enough craft beer out there that they're they're making products. That are fun to try. You can have a much of different things and enjoy your enjoy summer day Zoya Winter Day whatever it is and I appreciate that they're they're bringing it down a little bit but keeping the flavor there that's true I mean I like to see a lot of five five and a half's to have a lot of flavor that you can have five or six out and still mo the lawn in a straight line. It's not going to ruin your day. Hey No long sessional. Beers is the big the big new thing we're seeing a lot of cultures a lot of fully flavored. Ip as that are coming coming up forty five percent founders kind of broke the mold on that with all day. I Ta Nea Ri Billick Seven Breweries just off of that brand we see dogfish coming out with the same thing and all all the major brewers following in suit so just natural evolution. I guess to see ready was trying to make some stuff in fact one of our friends at Tom. Foley just has a low calorie one hundred Ed coury. Ida says that he just came out with and so as the market has evolved. There's not just ten breweries. You have to be able to to bring some frog consumers so I'll glassware beer festival. That's one of the reasons that we here as well so tell us a little bit about what's going on with this year. I know that you have a big qasis on Jersey beer yet this year. I think we're we're getting close to half of the total participants being from Jersey. I think a great weekend when you can do it is to go to a town. Check out the breweries that are there. They'll give you a backbone for your trip. Yes really give you can capture that into the the festival where you're like. Why a never gets a you know all these different places from your down to the tip of Cape May up to the up to the North Jersey side the validation kind of give a good representation while those monthly's emphasis sample what they have to offer. I think that's that's good. That's experienced driving towards is trying to grade their like that impossible. We'll road trip in a day yet and done a good job this year. You have a forty five plus breweries. I believe this year. They're coming last minute adults less well. That's that's the nature of the business and the Nice thing guys do too is it's a great area but tickets really reasonable so you had the VIP package that runs from twelve to five that gives you early initiative. That's one of fifty bucks. I mean that is that is a great price. Fifty dollars for a pours two was too. We're doing according to the ABC and that report is exactly two ounce. You have no more and you're you're able to come in an hour earlier to beat the crowds a little bit. I mean that's a great great. Price for forty bucks even income from one to five last four forty five and still be able to sample a bunch of beers. VIP ticket though that's the one absolutely that's a great deal and a lot of people not take my advice but I always say that he should probably start with the food exactly and they may not with a couple beers. You get the food because 'cause you whenever knows wants to eat. There's GonNa be lines there and get the food. Go the way of good base you know cruise the rest of the day. It's all about the base rallied the beating up Tom Claver Day of an article about eight things to do when you're preparing for a beer festival and that was one of them in that was definitely one of them and there's a bunch more. You can get that on the site. Sap or seen dot com but I feel like the people that come in here that power drink for the first twenty minutes to thirty minutes running around. I think they're day gets shorter. Oh yes I think they're ruining the ruined. All the other beers ability. My mind wasted what he just says a Patriot beer festivals right down the ones you want to try after about ten of Milstar taste better yeah especially with all these people are bringing these gigantic cop toward Beers speaking of yours. WE WANNA try coming up to the stage roses Caraba Callahan of Taco brewing company. Everybody here knows him fund bobby and he brought a some beers here today.

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NFL, Twitter And Rudy Gobert discussed on FOX Sports Radio Weekends

FOX Sports Radio Weekends

02:23 min | 4 years ago

NFL, Twitter And Rudy Gobert discussed on FOX Sports Radio Weekends

"Or we're gonna talk about the NBA playoffs today. We're gonna talk about I don't know. It seemed like it was called a little differently between the between the warriors and the rockets and what we've seen all season long. I don't know what to make of it. Why don't you just feel that from who put that on their Twitter wanting to steal it from them? Come on was it. I don't know what they're saying player who played in the last series. I forget who it was Rudy Gobert had said that. Yeah. But I mean, do you disagree? You know, what you're out now. I don't I don't wanna hear Ono. No, okay. You don't I'm telling you that aren't. Jeez. Louise, man, I'm telling you then that game was called differently than ninety nine point nine percent of games have been called this year. I don't think that was you're talking about it was hard and found that the end of the game. I'm talking from start to finish that game was called differently that they had the same referees. I mean, you can't up the same type of game call if you have different referees. Even if you have the same freeze, sometimes it's not the same. I I understand that. But if this reminds me of the NFL playoffs a couple years ago last year, what am I talking about? Oh, I guess now it wouldn't be the most two years ago when they changed the catch rule as we went into the playoffs and suddenly balls that were I mean, don't get me wrong. I don't think the NFL still knows what it's catch rule is right, but they adjusted it and they called it differently. I almost get the sense as if they're taking away, and I'm not, hey, these might not have been fouls to begin with. But they've called him that way all year long. It just seems as if for one night and one afternoon things were called much differently now. Does that set the tone for the entire season? Or is that game one things change? I don't know. But it was very interesting to follow today. You know, I asked you sent your question. What happens if it's it six thousand you didn't get thrown out of the game. But anything after that was a technical foul with that help the referees. Would it take some pressure away from them? So, you know, you don't file out of Kevin Durant or Bron James or Steph curry or somebody like that. And that way Zoya technical foul with they. Call more fouls in the game. Because now they say, hey, you can't file out. So not gonna call it really close. We've got to do something. Everybody's complaining about the

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