2 Burst results for "Zion Yellowstone Yosemite"

"zion yellowstone yosemite" Discussed on Go West, Young Podcast

Go West, Young Podcast

11:46 min | 2 years ago

"zion yellowstone yosemite" Discussed on Go West, Young Podcast

"Detour there. We hear a lot about overcrowding in some park, Zion Yellowstone Yosemite. Did you did you run into that? And do you think that is a genuine problem that, that some of our parks are facing right now? Yeah, I mean, sort of one of the, the side benefits of doing ally. Speaking churches was that on my Sundays, I was often fundraising on Saturdays. I was driving there. So I really grew to appreciate visiting the parks on Monday through Friday, when it was a lot less crowded, but even on those days like I was at Yellowstone in July. And I had planned a number of days there halfway through I said, I can't take this anymore. Like it's just so crowded is your spend so much time to sing in your car trying to get places waiting for parking at sort of ruins the experience and I had been Yellowstone many years ago during may, and that was so much better. Just because the traffic is so nuts that it really. Detriment to the experience. So I think one of the things we're struggling with now is, we have a park service in a park foundation that is promoting visiting these sites rightly, so but we aren't keeping pace with infrastructure that it takes to manage this increase number visitors and especially in the popular parks, the ones that are very well known very well marketed, it really shows. So the maintenance backlog that we've, we've heard about we've talked about a bit on, on this podcast from what you've seen it's real and and urgently in, in some places. Well, yeah. I mean one thing I have to say is that the park service, doesn't incredibly good job of working with what they have as general visitor. There were a lot of things that I didn't notice or they did a good job of hiding or or masking as far as maintenance issues go because, in general, the majority of my experiences parks, I never had to say, like, oh, gosh, I wish I could do this, but it's broken. They don't have the money to fix it. So I give them a lot of credit for, for making do with what they have. But yeah, that being said there are places that really need work done to make them capable of handling the amount of visitors that get. I assume over the course of these three years, you spoke to dozens or hundreds of Park, Rangers and park service, employees. Do you think there's a message that you have learned from them that if given the opportunity you would pass along to the top leadership at the park service, or at the interior department in DC? For the department of the interior in the park service. I would just remind them. How fortunate they are to have a staff that is so passionate about the mission that they are serving. I recently got to speaking engagement with employees of the park service, who mentioned that during a recent survey of all the government departments. The park service had the highest score as far as a staff leaving in the mission of their department and that was very evident anecdotally in my personal experiences. These are people who often work service jobs during the off season, just so they can keep having seasonal jobs, because they haven't been able to become full-time. They are people who are highly highly educated, who were jobs that people might say are beneath their education, but they just love their job. They love their sites so much. So I would remind the, the department heads how lucky they are to have a staff at his so committed to the goal. Of their department and to those higher up those in congress, I would ask that they go to our park service sites because when most frustrating things is to go to historic sites in see the United States make a mistake. Four hundred years ago, make it somewhere else three hundred years ago. Another place, two hundred another place. A hundred still today in realize we haven't really learned from our history that were preserving so I sort of wish I could make congress go to a lot of these places in hopefully it would impact the way they legislate. At a great takeaway. You mentioned dinosaur national monument as, as a big surprise any other sites, you visited that you think needed promotions. The end deserve national park status. Well as far as needing promotion. I really can't speak highly enough about the Dakotas people laugh. When I talk about how much I enjoyed them even I talked about how much I like Theodore Roosevelt, national park so much that the superintendent emailed me at one point and said, I just can't believe how much you enjoyed it and how much you keep talking about it. Because North Dakota is so unvisited that their tourism board has been called the save the best for last club. Where if it's your last state visited, they give you a pain in t shirt certificate so many people just put it off. And yet, both badlands national park in theater Roosevelt, national park where some of the most spectacular experiences head in the park service of the most unique places. I saw that it's such a shame that people see that Kotas may think it's only boring prairie. That's definitely one recommendation, give those are Kaplan capital parks, however, some of my other favorite sites. Don't have that. Nation would include white sands, national monument, absolutely incredible place. Wonderful experiences, there Buckeye reef national monument in Saint Croix. Never lens was spectacular spurious, and there's some funny sites, kind of like I went to organ pipe cactus national monument. And thought it was way, better than Suara national park. And I think about all the people that go to Celaya out because it's one of the big sixty one and overlook, Oregon pike cactus because it's a national monument. And think man, are they missing out? So there definitely were number of sites like that, where I think, may be politics was different policies were different sites that have certain status would have national park status to better reflect the experience have there. You mentioned getting E mail from the, the superintendent at at teddy Roosevelt, any other favorite people, you met along the way, I mean, you must run into all sorts of characters hitting four hundred nineteen national park sites. Yeah. Well there too that. I think one of them was a ranger cat. My national park, and he reached out when I was planning my Lasca portion and he's opening gay as well. And he said, he'd, I really appreciate the visibility you're helping bring to us, especially those less than work here. I know cat is really hard and expensive. So if you need a place to stay like you can you can stay at my place in the park, and so that was really cool, just to get to know him really well for few days in this really fascinating ark. And then a few months after I was there. He got reassigned to Hawaii volcanoes and moves at the end of December, just as the shutdown happened. And so now knowing him on a personal level. I got to see the real life impact of the. Shutdown had because he had a new apartment was the deposit, just shipped all stuff. And he's freaking out in Hawaii, Nola Hawaii, so from one of the most expensive parts of our countries to another most expensive, and he went weeks without a paycheck. And so I was heartbroken for him, but also sort of honored to get this window into the reality of Park Rangers because even with these struggles are still so passionate and that brings me to another great experience. I was in Everglades national park and doing a slew slog, which is where you're hiking in, in muddy waters up to your knees could have pythons alligators in them and the Rangers explaining this in our group has all scared, and she said, well, you don't have to you don't gotta worry about nothing as I got the Lord, I got this stick. And this ranger had described herself as a hillbilly, Alabama, who served in the military to protect America while wearing green and she finished. And she wanted to protect America's nature now while wearing green, and I ended up running into her, again, in dinosaur national monument. And then again in Holly, national park because she worked seasonally and it was fun to see the second time to catch up. And then the third time to get to get an update from her on a really magical experience. I had joined this journey where a wild Canadian goose follow my rafting groups before. And so when I saw her again, I got to say what happened to the goose because she was working there with so very fun connections? That sort of spread the entire length of. So your identity covers a whole lot of ground obviously outdoor enthusiasts a gay man. A working preacher, a classically trained counter tenor. How do you balance all of that on a trip this big when everything you do is being shared with the world real time? How do you find the real mica in all of that mix? Yeah, I sort of joke that if a gay Christian male soprano from the flat state in America can devote three years of his life to visiting the national parks. Don't tell me that there is an outdoorsy type, and that you're not part of that because I sort of go against very many of the prototypes of what you'd expect. It's been a fascinating journey, not just as physical wind, but to start this trip sort of thinking I had to hide who I was for it to be successful. And then in the end finding that it's only by embracing all of those unique traits about myself that this journey, eventually survived in came to completion. So I'm positive that there were opportunities sponsors, that would have loved to work with me that did not because one or some of my densities are all were just to offensive or too risky. In fact, one of them told me in writing that they were dropping me suddenly because I was doing too much LGBT. Owlry. So, yeah, it's been hard to realize that's a reality. But also really, heartwarming to wake up every day in say even if it's Justice three year trip, I figured out a way to do something that many people said it was impossible, and for most of the journey beat entirely true to myself, and wake up every day and say, this might be harder than I thought it might be a reference than I thought it might be way more difficult to complete than I thought. But at least every day that I wake up, I know that undoing something that I feel like is making the world better place and helping others. And if sharing those voluble parts of myself is able to help others than it's entirely worth it. So your trip is obviously, it's a once in a lifetime kind of dream that I, I suspect everyone listen to this podcast is thinking, wow. Wish wish I could do that. You're now what thirty three thirty four years old. You have a lifetime ahead of you having done a once in lifetime trip. So, so what's next for you? Yeah. As you said, this is sort of thing, so many people want to do, and having done it, at least in the way that I did it. I don't do what I did if you argon gonna. Visit all the parks figure out how to have your funding ahead of time or get on Netflix show and be super famous that you can get sponsors easily because making this, my job both in fundraising and putting out a product from experience made it a lot less personally fulfilling..

dinosaur national monument Rangers badlands national park Suara national park Everglades national park Theodore Roosevelt America Park Rangers superintendent Zion Yellowstone Yosemite congress Yellowstone Hawaii Kaplan capital parks Netflix government North Dakota United States Celaya
"zion yellowstone yosemite" Discussed on Go West, Young Podcast

Go West, Young Podcast

12:22 min | 2 years ago

"zion yellowstone yosemite" Discussed on Go West, Young Podcast

"That is what Mike Mayer did an epic three year journey to not just every national park, but all four hundred and nineteen sites. Run by the National Park Service at the individual Micheals trip came to an end on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial, surrounded by friends and family and fans who followed his journey on Instagram and Facebook mica joins us on the line from where are you now have been the appaluse AM? That's correct. I are you adjusting to, to life back in the real world? It is so much harder than I thought I, I realized it took me about two weeks to verbalize sort of feeling I was having. But I realized that for three years, I woke up every day and I knew what my short term goal was that day. What a needed to accomplish in how fit into three. Three year goal and my entire life. And now I wake up not in a parking lot not innovation in with sort of this less clear sense of urgency everyday, and my brain doesn't know how to handle it. So take us back three years. This started out as a tribute to your late father, but it turned into a whole lot more than that. Yeah. You know, my dad loves road trips in that was one of the ways that we bonded before he passed. And when I was nineteen he died from his office cancer. So I never got to take the road trips with him during college and beyond that I expected I would have done one road trip every year since he passed his way to keep that connection alive along the way realized that most of my peers seem to think they were guaranteed to make eighty since my dad passed away, fifty eight I had learned that, that's not the case hardway and wanted to do something crazy, when I turned thirty that would hopefully grab their attention, share this message and I figured what more relatable way to reach the entire world than our National Park Service. So walk us through the logistics you come up with this crazy idea. But how do you actually turn that into a game plan for a seventy five? Thousand mile road dream over however many years. Yes, so I spent I spent my twenty saving up money to, to launch this project ended age twenty eight realized it was time to start planning earnest. So really spent a solid two years, doing everything from research on whether patterns who best routes to most efficient ways to reach these sites to win. Each park was opened in summer, only open seasonally, who potential sponsors. I could reach out to who the most practical way to live on the road axes sites talking to experts getting help rafting schedule sort of doing everything. I could head of time who be best prepared for launch day when that came on April twenty ninth two thousand sixteen. And then, of course, on top of all those miles, you can't drive to Hawaii, or American Samoa or Guam, or Puerto Rico, or the Virgin Islands. You've got some some planes and boats to try and both factor in and fund as part of this. I couldn't have been a cheap endeavor. Right. And that was the scariest thing was I began this journey with what park experts told me was only a fish of the amount of money of what it would take to do this in. So I sort of got in that driver seat. And drove away on, on a big leap of faith that somehow in the following three years, I could figure out a way to make this sustainable incomplete. It. So you had funding and then part of this, you were you were preaching in passing the hat along the way. What point did you realize that was going to be part of, of this trip for you? Yeah, but when I planned it, I sort of pollyannaish looked around at the world of social media in saw millennials funding. Epic travels by getting sponsors. And I thought well just do that. And learn really quickly, that if you don't have over one hundred thousand followers, nobody really cares. And particularly in the outdoors industry, there were no openly t people that had any sponsorships the recreation industry had never had a pride month add, so I sort of knew going in that I would have to fight this uphill battle of not fitting that outdoorsy image and also not having huge social following that companies would require until I figured I would crowd fund this journey, and there was a total failure at first, I would do. Media sharing this journey. And I just got nasty emails from people who called me trust fund kid, which obviously didn't read the article 'cause they would know that passers don't have trust funds. But everyone was just really negative. And I found that unless unless I had the chance to talk to people on explain the real reason why was doing this trip. It wasn't just a vacation as they assumed but the meanings behind it, once they knew that they were really excited to help. And so it took me about nine months to figure out how to do that. But I began using my backgrounds of professional singer at spent over a decade, senior professionally, including our National Cathedral, and started out, just singing for my supper and would pass out the hat, and then churches started asking me to preach, the sermon and figure out a way to, to tie the story of this journey into a message that, that spoke to the people there and hear him three years later. So on top of all that you're obviously than visit. The parks themselves how much time you able to spend in each Parker. Or did you feel like you had to, you know show up get the visitor center, take a selfie and hit the road again? Yeah. That's another thing is a lot of people assume that I was sort of Chevy, chasing my way in touching the parks, leaving that they thought I was just doing it to set a record which records were happy coincidence, that happened from its initial goal. So I was really fortunate in that when I was planning this journey just by pure coincidence, about five miles east of me lived one of the three or so dozen people who at that point had visited all the parts and so one night, he came over for dinner, and I got out my spreadsheet, I went through every single site and said, if you go back here, what would be the ideal amount of time, you would spend and those days in the data that I used to come up with this three route. So really the intention in the actual experience was to spend the ideal amount of time. That each site suggests whether that's a historic site that you can do everything in a few hours or a place like the Grand Canyon, where you really wanna spend a week rafting down the middle. I made sure that that's what I did not goats. So this is left, you then with a very unique appreciation of the park service that, as you mentioned, only a few dozen people in the entire world might have. So I want to pick your brain here a little bit of a speed round asking you to pick a few of your favorites. But with kind of specific questions, what do you think is the most under appreciated national park? I would say, our national lake shores. There are three of them now that Indiana dunes became a capital in capital park. And I'm shocked by how many people don't know about them, despite their incredible beauty? Among the A-List, the ticket national parks, which one is absolutely every bit as good as advertised. Oh my gosh. I, I stood a glacier point, and watch sunset over half dome in Yosemite and was just blown away. And I know it's sort of the opposite of some of the things I said on this journey that I was trying to share about the park sites. You haven't heard of, but that's one that you have heard of that is very well visited that absolutely delivers what is the one park that everyone needs to see before they die. That's tough. I mean, what I learned about the park services that there are so many sites that can be special to people with specific interests of people who love certain president, or like Springfield armory, that, that chronicles our nation's history of, of guns and warfare. And if that's your interests, like you're gonna love that place where than anything else. So I would say whatever site specific -ly speaks to you, as far as your, your personal interests for myself. I was really enchanted in blown away in ways. I never expected by dinosaur national. Yes. I've heard that for many people who've been don't realize that, that's one that I've heard a lot of folks suggested that absolutely deserves national park status. The locals don't like me. I've got an Email saying, stop telling everyone about our secret. What was the biggest surprise of park that you maybe went in with low expectations and came out blown away? I really had a blast at the, the site in Guam the war in the Pacific, national historical park, and the accompanying affiliated site onsite pan, which is the American memorial park. Both of them are, are technically just small parcels of land. But then they have pieces of the history of America's involvement World War Two all around the islands. So really to fully experience these parks stories, you have to explore both the entire island of Guam, and the entire island of pan. And that was just such a an incredible experience that looking at the names, designations, this historical park and memorial, park, you'd probably think it'd be like a statue in a building, but getting to fully experiences place means taking on the entire island culture. And it was really incredible. You mentioned Refn and the Colorado what was the biggest thrill on your trip? So I my family grew up pretty poor and never got to, like, I mean, even we go to arcades and it was like too much to two quarters that stuff. So it was always like the cheapest way of traveling possible. Nothing extra. And so getting to do a hot air balloon ride in South Dakota was like something I never imagined or getting to take a helicopter tour over badlands, national park or Hawaii volcanoes like these are experiences that I always looked at, at other families and saw that they could do, but assumed I would never get to do my life. So because of this journey in sort of, I would trade trade, a coverage on my blog and social media for some of these two or opportunities. Getting to do those extra special views of the parks, just blew my mind. Were there any parks that you end up ended up, hitting either in the wrong season or mother nature just didn't cooperate near? You're like I would come back to you again. If given the chance and take a do over. Yeah. One of the things I pride myself on. Is that sort of a lot of the hiccups, that I think a lot of people expected, what happened on this trip did not happen because I spent two years planning. So I really did my research to make sure that, that I could it be places. When the weather was Satistics most likely to be good. However, California roomy off because devils, postpone, national monument can only be reached basically in the li- like middle, July, August and early September. And you're only a few hundred miles away from death valley, national park which do not wanna be at during that time of year. So I actually had to fly from Alaska down to Yosemite devils post. File just so I could reach devils postponed, national monument during that temperate, I am of year because the rest of California I did in the spring earlier that year. Yeah. It's a good, detour there. We hear a lot about overcrowding in some park, Zion Yellowstone Yosemite. Did you did you run into that? And do you think that is a genuine problem that, that some of our parks are facing right now? Yeah, I mean, sort of one of the, the side benefits of doing ally. Speaking churches was.

National Park Service Guam Hawaii California Mike Mayer National Cathedral Lincoln Memorial American memorial park Facebook Yosemite Micheals Chevy Zion Yellowstone Yosemite Indiana Virgin Islands Alaska Satistics Springfield armory South Dakota