35 Burst results for "Zine"

Violent youth protests hit Tunisia amid economic turmoil

AP News Radio

00:45 sec | Last month

Violent youth protests hit Tunisia amid economic turmoil

"Violent protests erupted in several Tunisian cities as the country reels from economic turmoil police used tear gas to disperse disgruntled protesters who blocked roads by burning tires and threw stones and other objects at police and businesses the uproar is a combination of two missions anger that the country is on the verge of bankruptcy and has the higher public services many feel disappointed that on the ten year anniversary of the revolution that ousted autocratic president zine el Abidine Ben Ali there is little to show in terms of improvements police sweeps in the shops and banks were looted and vandalized arresting thousands of years according to the Tunisian form of economic and social rights more than one thousand demonstrations took place in November alone I'm Karen Thomas

Zine El Abidine Ben Ali Tunisian Form Of Economic And Karen Thomas
"zine" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:40 min | 3 months ago

"zine" Discussed on KCRW

"Another fantastic release from the Jazz is dead outfit. This is as he moves legendary Brazilian group doing quiet Storm Along with Adrian Young right before this season Zine with rips based in the inland empire. Their new album just dropped Friday. Most of it actually has vocals on it, but I just played an instrumental from that album for you also Psycho and the set with germs. That's a single And back, of course from MidNite vultures. Deborah. My favorite from that album. The album brought back to my memory from Adam, who said. He was listening to that when he was 18. If you're just tuning in earlier, I asked folks what they remember listening to when they were 18 and I'd love to share some of the responses with you because they're pretty awesome, Dale said Keith Sweat, I'll be sure and guy I was definitely I was a little younger than 18. But definitely they were well actually keeps what kind of made a comeback so Alex said Roni size new forms featuring Muhammadiyah Bahama deal was arguably ahead of her time. No female emcee. Maria said Parliament Funkadelic Bootsy Just make it funky. Oh, you know if you know me, Maria is gonna be funky. Definitely going to hear some of that later in the set..

Adam Maria Adrian Young Muhammadiyah Bahama Deborah Parliament Keith Sweat Alex Dale
How Bandon Dunes revolutionized golf

GOLF.com Podcast

07:28 min | 4 months ago

How Bandon Dunes revolutionized golf

"There aren't many golf courses in the world that are better than Bandon dunes but bannon's lasting legacy isn't as a golf course it doesn't idea. That north. America can have true links golf and even better that it can have remote golf courses that can turn into bucket lists destinations. Plenty of course have followed in. BANDON footsteps like cabot links to Nova Scotia or sand Bali and Wisconsin. It's a movement. But it sure didn't start that way. I'm to chair on today's drop zone. Here's how one course in nowhere Oregon turned into an entire movement all by accident. The story of Bandon, Dunes begins with David McLay Kidd A. Scottish. Twenty six year old who had dreamt of becoming a golf course architect but had no concrete path to making that happen. So back in nineteen ninety, four I was twenty six years old and working for the. Detail in Scotland My father was a the golf courses manager and I was working for the development division of. Detail effectively. And I was hating all the Gulf Bar and I was a wannabe golf course architect type I'd done a couple little things but nothing really of any note. And Mike Kaiser Have Franko Rick Summers who's the current owner of PGA Goldman? Zine And Mike said to rick SARS I've got this piece of land on the Oregon coast a WanNa build on authentic Scottish Irish links experience who you guys she'd higher I'm thinking of hiring you know told Vase Your Jack Nicklaus or Pete Dye or a Rick said will you should hire a Scottish golf course architect if you want something authentic in a Mike Chuckled and said, I, would but the old died one hundred years ago. At this point, it wasn't just mcclay kid who was an unknown the Golf World Mike Kaiser was to. He'd made his money by bringing a fresh mindset to the greeting card business decades before need proven to be a smart businessman. But. That doesn't guarantee any success as a wannabe course developer. As an outsider is first instinct might have been a hire a big name architect someone from the establishment to give his project credibility. But maybe he had it in the back of his mind that fellow outsider would be a more proper fit. So he invites David McLay kidd the remote site on the Oregon coast to check things out. and. So I arrived on the state. With my dad. So holding my hand and we will the sixteen hundred acres I remember. Mike Mike is wasn't there. I'd never ma'am yet. He's a caretaker shorty who even then in the seventeenth was our chaperone for the week. So David and his father walked the property with his caretaker shorty Dow and they're thinking themselves. What if you're doesn't know any better? What if he might hire a no name? But shorty keeps asking mcclay kids, business card and eventually he gives them one. In short, he pulls out a stack of cards. He's recently collected mcclay. Kid realizes that every major golf course architect has walked the same site and I realized that might Kaiser was pretty astute and he was he was looking at every possible option as an architect to do this. This set something off in mcclay kid if he's going to be an underdog, well, he may as well act like one. At that point I think I go a little a fire in my Bailey probably because I realized that this guy was never going to hire me I have anything to show I there was no way I was twenty six. So he's going to hire some big name but Hale I'm not going to leave here with my gender my chest I'm gonNA leave with my hailed high. So I went to the local drugstore I bought a dozen sheets of poster board and a few marker pains and I rule what would now be considered a powerpoint presentation. I did it on poster boards with a Marker Pens And Mike Kaiser flew in a few days later in his private jet with some of the executives from Cambridge sports and some of his buddies and I laid. half a dozen or dot com you remember no posterboards that told Mike Kaiser this rich guy from Chicago with a great piece of land, what it would take to build. A true authentic links course in America, and I did so with kind a little chip on my shoulder because I figured with my relatively limited knowledge of Link School Golf in America that there was nothing authentic I was told Pebble beach was a links course doesn't look like it to me I. I was told you know the latest Gulf course by whichever. PGA Pro you WanNa pick a that was in the mountains of southern California was a links course was the farthest thing from the truth. So when I painted I a scenario to Mike Kaiser I said, Hey, if you really want to build a true links course in America years, what it takes and I had a half a dozen points and there were absolutely critical. Such as. You can't have golf carts. There's no golf carts in the British isles, you walk. There's no fancy clubhouse I on the ocean. That's where you put the best green. The clubhouse is back in a corner. The base land is Gulf. The fairways aren't flat. They're pitching in tumbling. There aren't any lakes. There's no babbling streams. There's no car pass. The grasses we use these old style firm grasses van may even have told him there's no arrogation. Can't quite remember what if I said none on a of the bunkers aren't these or MIBA Cloverleaf shapes there these pulp bunkers. Are there to punish the bowl not to Be Up on the week. And as I went through this explanation of links Gulf. Mike had a wry smile on his face and in his. Cohorts laughed openly I load at the ridiculousness of such thought in the sophisticated Gulf market of the United States. I assume that when my father and I left the very next day, we would never hear from Mike Kaiser Regain are crazy Scottish ideas of goal in America were just that while. American. Goal for would traits all the way to the southern. Shores to play golf in the wind and rain and walk and find themselves in eight. Pulp on Kerr surrounded by facie grasses and pitching fear waste were not a single flat lies available such a scenario could never ever work.

Mike Kaiser Mike Mike Golf America Oregon Bandon Dunes David Mclay Kidd A. Scottish Gulf Bandon Mike Chuckled Wanna Mcclay Franko Rick Summers Link School Golf David Mclay Wisconsin Scotland Shorty Dow United States Cabot
"zine" Discussed on Gucci Podcast

Gucci Podcast

02:14 min | 5 months ago

"zine" Discussed on Gucci Podcast

"And a video release by my family suppress it shows the congressional officers not checking in only lean for long periods of time. In one critical moment video footage shows the correctional officers opened in my sister style and visibly Laffin just moments before she was pronounced that. The thought of her Orrin when she could have been saved will help my family and I for the rest of our lives. The criminalization of sex work rump transphobia throughout society and in workplace environments. The targeting of Trans Women and sex workers by the police The. Violence that is in the prison system. And the complete disregard of human life all contributed to my sister's stuff. We could as a society, a justice systemic barriers, accession resources like safe Housen employment and Trans inclusive healthcare that otherwise could create safety for transforming like my sister. Instead the system we currently have in place took my sister's life. But leans memory should not be one soley of violence. She is not just another Hashtag. Lillian was so caring and full of life she will give her last tour a stranger something out witness many times over. Everyone. Knew her for her bubbly personality, her life and big heart. She loved House Music, and dancing and getting on my nerves. Lilley was part of the House of Extravaganza, her second family and had many daughters she took care of. She was an angel too many of us must have included. That was lean. That was my sister. My sister was so full of life before it was prematurely taken from her, I will continue to scream her name to anyone who would listen and to there is justice for my sister. I will fight into what happened to lean doesn't happen to another person simply for being brave enough to live the truth. Thank you for listening. Discover more about chime for change and its new zine in the episodes note..

Lilley Lillian Orrin House of Extravaganza Housen
An attempted Coup in the US

True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

03:31 min | 6 months ago

An attempted Coup in the US

"Welcome to kiss myths and mysteries either host Kit Chrome today the story of a coup against one of the presidents of the United States today's Podcast is the result of myth and mystery coming together to form a truth, a truth confirmed by data revealed by both the Freedom of Information Act an archive letters regarding lawsuits against the Bush family made public in one, thousand, nine, hundred, seventy, eight. This podcast is without political bias and exists only to. demystify myth and mystery whenever possible in one, thousand, nine, hundred, thirty, three, a group of Americans wealthiest businessman powerbrokers including the grandfather of George W Bush Prescott Bush plan to stage a coup against then President Franklin Roosevelt to change the regime one year later retired Marine Corps. Major General smedley Butler revealed applaud the wait Prescott Sheldon Bush was an American banker and politician Wall Street executive partner the Brown brothers and a US senator he was the Father President. George H. W Bush in the grandfather to President George W Bush he attended Yale and was a member of the skull and bones. Prescott Bush seems larger than life and he was a business plot in nineteen thirty three referred to as the white. House. Coup was led in part by Prescott. Bush, the purpose of the alleged conspiracy was to replace the Roosevelt Administration with a fascist dictatorship, a coalition of many influential billionaires and powerbrokers led by Prescott Bush. Plan the coup the reason behind this attempt was the policies of the Roosevelt Administration towards the business world the owners of some of the biggest corporations like General Motors. Goodyear Chase Bank and hines thought the government would destroy private enterprise. Thus, they wanted to create a business friendly zine so that they could preserve their power. However, the coup plan came to light when smedley Butler a retired burning corps major general alerted authorities in Washington DC of the conspiracy. According to his statement. So mysterious bankers and businessmen approached him and asked him to command an army of veterans who fought in World War one in order to stage a coup and overthrow the democratically elected President Franklin Delano Roosevelt Butler was a popular military figure then, and he also had influence over the veterans. That's why they chose him a committee investigated the allegations and Declared that some Wall Street elites were involved in the conspiracy but nobody was charged go figure. Then there was Prescott involvement with the Brown brothers the financial architects of Nazism the documents from the National Archives showed that the bushes and Brown brothers shipped valuable US assets including gold coal steel at US Treasury war bonds to their foreign clients overseas as Hitler geared up for his. Nineteen thirty nine invasion of Poland the event that sparked World War Two is business dealings continued until his company's assets were seized nineteen, forty, two, hundred, the trading with the Enemy Act. Then there is the Bush family stronghold Jupiter Island, but that will have to be another

George W Bush Prescott Bush President Franklin Roosevelt Major General Smedley Butler President Franklin Delano Roos Roosevelt Administration Prescott United States Brown Kit Chrome Marine Corps General Motors Goodyear Chase Bank Jupiter Island National Archives Washington Poland Senator Hines
Goldman 2Q profit tops forecast on strong trading revenue

BTV Simulcast

01:51 min | 8 months ago

Goldman 2Q profit tops forecast on strong trading revenue

"Boom Goldman Sachs that with a surprising 93% surge in second quarter revenue from stock and bond trading that just blew away the estimates. Married. Similar wind force by J. P. Morgan and Citigroup. Let's get over to New York and join Suki and has been tracking these bank earnings in suit. Goldman's trading gains. What's it like to know? A $1,000,000,000 more than Alice expected? Give us the low down. Yeah, And that's because training revenue almost doubled and underwriting fees for Goldman jumped to a record. The firm's earnings results show that it clearly made the very most of the historic rebound in the second quarter. This after the Fed cord that trillions of dollars of stimulus into the market that'll look at that. The few of the numbers that stand out the firm's fixed income treating a zine mentioned more than doubled toe 4.24 billion. That is the highest in nine years, and the equity unit had its best showing. In 11 years. These kind of gains combined propel Goldman's revenue for the second highest mark ever for the firm on that income rose to a slight surprise increase from a year ago. So let's take a look a profit. It came to point for two billion or $6.26 share on as mentioned not also blew away. Analysts estimate of $3.95 share. Let's go look at a couple others stand that areas for Goldman, a large investment portfolio also would rebound. It had taken a massive mark down in the 1st 3/4 of the year, but not now on the firm's commodity unit has been on a hot streak. They did not give specific spot. It is clear that oil traders at Goldman Road that unprecedented rise from oil when it was below zero, all the way back up to 40

Goldman Boom Goldman Sachs Citigroup J. P. Morgan FED Suki Alice New York
The Incredible Singing Tortoise

Stories Podcast

06:09 min | 1 year ago

The Incredible Singing Tortoise

"The incredible singing tortoise once upon a time on a stormy afternoon Zane was hurrying home from school he had just found out it was his turn for show and tell on. Friday and his brain world with ideas of what to bring. He was so busy thinking that he forgot his coat in his cubby. The cold rain slipped over his hair down the back of his neck making him shiver can't wait to get home and dry off. He muttered. Maybe I'll even have a mug of cocoa. He turned to take a shortcut through the woods. Under the trees. The rain fell in a slower. Pit Pat but when the wind blew the branches shook and soaked him underfoot the mud sucked at his shoes with a wet slurping. Sounds maybe two cocoa's he grumbled then cocked. His head had he heard something. He froze listening to the gentle sounds of rain filtering through the forest finally from off in the woods. He heard a soft voice that bow. Scooby Doo Doo. Wow already indeed dining out but he do scuba. Zane heared into the trees. He in a forest really. It was just a strip of woods between a house and a bunch of condos. There wasn't space for anyone to be hiding. Not unless they were buried in the fallen leaves. Maybe somebody dropped their phone. He said thinking of the Joggers who always breezed by listening to music. Zane stepped off the path towards the singing. His feet squelching through the mud. Or maybe it's an old toy. He thought. Perfect for show Intel. He hunted around by his feet. Where is it? He said searching his arms and legs were soon soaked as he waded into the wet leaves. Come on play another song. Do I do as he knew that. Zane pushed aside another branch. Found not a phone but anomaly little tortoise the creature seem to smile up at him and then sang another bar. Zane fell back onto his but in the mud. What how he said you can sing. I can sing. The Tortoise said Zan's jaw dropped. And you can talk and I can talk. She agreed but I usually don't talking tortoise. Is that more impressive than a singing tortoise. Why she asked caulking her leathery head but it definitely is Zane. Said I'm Zine what's your name. Hi My name is Alicia Alicia. You have to come with me for show Intel this Friday show and tell no thank you. I don't like crowds. I'm really pretty shy. She said pulling her head back into her shell a little. You don't seem shy. Zane said he stood up and dusted himself off still staring at her amazed. Well said the Tortoise I see you walking home alone here every day so I figured I don't mind if you hear did did you like it. It was great. I had no idea. Zine said seriously. I thought that it was someone's phone playing like spotify or something in the mud a leash. The tortoise smiled. Well thank you. She said have a good day. She turned and started to walk back into the leaves. Wait no Zane said chasing after her. You're singing turtle you have to come with me. I need to show everyone for show and tell well. I'm a tortoise turtle leashes said and I'd really rather not show anyone else. It's kind of a private thing com on. He said you showed me. I need to show my sister. At least she's GonNa lose her mind. No thanks she said. I'll see you another time. No no Zane said holding up his hands wait here. He turned and ran the rest of the way home. He burst into his front door and skidded into the kitchen where his older sister was putting peanut butter on some crackers. Tayla he said scaring her so badly. The crackers went flying. You need to come see this. He clutched her by the wrist and started dragging her to the front door. Come on come on come on Zeno what she sputtered following him out the door. What are you doing? Where are we going saying my crackers? Just come on. It's worth it. I promise they got to the little strip of woods and stood in the middle of the path. The Rain Patter down and the mud-stained their sneakers. And why did you drag me out here Taylor asked wait? Just listen? They stood together in silence for a moment. Then a minute then to okay. I'm going back inside your own Weirdo. No come on Taylor turned and hurried away. Eager to be out of the rain. Zane watched her leave for a few minutes and then side turning to follow

Zane Intel Alicia Alicia Zine Spotify Taylor Tayla
BREAKING NEWS: Asia Spa Magazine Is Open For Business - Again

Trent365

01:03 min | 1 year ago

BREAKING NEWS: Asia Spa Magazine Is Open For Business - Again

"May recall back in October last year. I let you know that ages spy magazine have announced. They closing the doors as at the end of October pretty abruptly too but they've just announced that they've got new ownership and the print magazine is relaunching. May Twenty twenty maybe. She is the launch date for the New Asia. Spa Magazine. The social media channels have been activated already so you can follow online with their social media. Channels you can subscribe to the newsletter and you expect to see the magazine on shows in. May Two thousand twenty so great news for those in the spire and wellness business in Asia in general. Because there's lots of interesting updates and articles from that particular magazine. It's always been a pretty high quality magazine and I'm sure it will continue to be the same. So good luck to the folks at Ages Zine. I think a lot of people are going to be pretty happy to see these back. A lot of people were pretty surprised when they announced they were shutting down so quickly. And so it'll happen. This year May Twenty Twenty Ages Bama gazillion open for business

Twenty Twenty Spa Magazine Spy Magazine Print Magazine New Asia
Travel to Yunnan, China

The Amateur Traveler Podcast

09:00 min | 1 year ago

Travel to Yunnan, China

"I'd like to welcome to the show. Zach and Leah from Peregrination Dash Travel Dot com and the peregrination YouTube channel. Who HAVE COME TO TALK TO US About Yunan? China Zach and Leah? Welcome to the show. Thank you so much for having us. We are so excited to be here and I have to get you to explain the term peregrination because it is not a term that I knew but I like it now. That told me what it means. So peregrination is the Latin word for a long or meandering journey. And that's the type of journey we are on and the Pasadena Twenty countries and we are currently in Antarctica so we have actually done a show about McMurdo base in Antarctica. We have never done a show from McMurdo base in Antarctica. Which is where we are doing this show from. But we're not talking about. You'll have to go listen to that show if you want that. So why are we talking about you? Not Well you're not is such a unique section of China that really has not been the main focus of any tourism in China up until the last ten years or so so it's a very unique separate section of the country that has a lot to offer and mainly it has a lot of beautiful scenery that is worth seeing indefinitely worth going to excellent and we have done a show about Yunan before. But it's been at least six eight years since we did a show on that region. Can you put this region on a map for us? So if you are looking at China it's in these southwestern region. China is a very large country as we know It's bordering Vietnam in house. We're learning which one of us the geographer aren't we excellent? And what are you gonNA lay out for us? It's basically a trip from the big city of could make all the way into the mountains and back to Kunming using may differ transportations in seeing things on the ancient tea horse trail as well as things that are brand new in on the innovative side of China will. Let's get to it in somebody till you started in Kunming. We'll start conveying. You'll probably fly in. We had to take a bus in from Vietnam and that worked out pretty well. We walked across the border and took a couple of buses. It took about six hours from there. But this podcast is focused on the two week trip. So you'll probably want to fly into Kunming. Their airport is very large. It's a brand new airport. It's only been there for six years. It's one of the fifty busiest airports in the world. I've no trouble getting air routes all throughout Southeast Asia and it's very accessible for many many different places. I remember a few years back when China went to build a hundred different airports in cities with more than a million population and I don't think I'd heard of any of them. There are a lot of people in China and there's a lot of new airports that they've built in so I'm surprised. It's one of the fifty busiest in the world. But only a little I know could mean itself. It already has six million people. It's a very large city with lots to offer but as we said before it has beautiful scenery even though it's such a sprawling city now they call it the sixty of eternal spring because the temperature is absolutely beautiful all the time and so much you can do in C. inexperienced there too. Is it in the lowlands still? It is six thousand feet level. Okay it is starting to get up there okay. Yeah and technically in the region. It's in the lowlands. I guess you could say because on the western side there's that bridge which it's gigantic as the Himalayas determined easy to get around the city also so but in the last few years. They've been working on the Kunming Rail Transit which just recently they completed most of. I think they're still working on a few sections of it but this makes traveling around the city ridiculously easy and at most. I think we spent one. Us dollar each other trip. So it's very affordable which is definitely a bonus if you're on a budget or if you're not still good so when staying in Kunming we recommend staying closer to the subway line because it makes it so much easier to get around and what's cool is that it has a lake nearby and it's not just it's city by itself and you can expect what you expect from all cities that it has a lot of good food. It has interesting architecture and has an old town has the new sprawling town but it also has cool interesting things like the world's biggest flower market in the southern region called the down man flower market. We took the sub or the metro. They're in it took about twenty minutes and then another ten minute walk but it makes everything so accessible. It's an easy place to travel once you get there the little out of the way to get there but when you get there it's really easy to navigate. And what are you going to recommend that we do while we're in the city itself? Well there's a few things we did which we really really enjoyed. The University district is an interesting place to be. If you've never been to China it's a brand experience for you just because Chinese culture. They're so active. So if you go to a regular park in specifically we're talking about Green Lake Park near the university district they have so many people out dancing in groups doing exercise routines you see families. You are being stopped on the street. Because they've never seen a Westerner. It's an interesting thing to experience. Also the flower market annually. They cut in south four point. One billion stems ridiculous number of flowers. We went there one day. Be should've gone when it was during the peak hours like at three. Am but we got there a little bit later and it was still just absolutely packed with flowers and women cutting flowers. Making flour crowns also really cool river walk which is free and it takes you through the new downtown or the more sprawling city area. The huge high-rises. It's going to the old town. Also it's relatively close to the newer section but you're able to see the rapid changes in architecture in the standard of living that this city has been going through within the past thirty years. It's so evident while this city was probably so small thirty years ago and it has blown up the back they got a huge airport really helps also in the metro and the new high speed rail system. There's a lot going on and it's important also touch on the cuisine. So Union Zine is very interesting. It's it's much different than the other parts of China. It is said to be generalized as more simple and less spicy but there are plenty of restaurants that incorporate this Hunan cuisine I'm making air quotes right now. Because it's hard to generalize what it is because it's it's made up of twenty six mountain tribes different types of cooking in its this huge melting pot of different flavors. Walk around find some street food. Enjoy THE CITY ENJOY. Old Town see the new architecture and enjoy the people around you street food. Is there a particular street food that you found there? The two enjoyed? Yeah so there is an interesting kind of cheese that they loved to preparing cheese isn't really something you think about. When you think of Chinese cuisine God at all yeah exactly. It's like something that even Chinese people are like. This is weird way. You were you eating that. Yeah Yeah exactly. It's a type of goat cheese. It's different than the goat cheese that you and I are more familiar with this ferry leathery sour almost hard textural cheese that they prepare sheets so they let it lay out in the sun and Harden almost taste almost like a pro vallone Interesting tangy flavor to it. They'll put it on sticks in the grill it cover it in a suite date sauce or or sugar over top of it or it can be sauteed in simple also simple flavors like tomatoes or onions interesting base flavor for different toppings Everywhere I mean you'll find it everywhere and also rose pastries you don't think about eating flowers. Most the time but fitting that rose pastries exist in the city of eternal. Spring is the biggest flower market in the country. Also in the same city. So rose pastries in strange leathery goat. Cheese would have to be our top to

China Kunming Antarctica Cheese University District Peregrination Dash Travel Dot Leah Zach Youtube Southeast Asia Himalayas Mcmurdo Pasadena United States Vietnam Green Lake Park Old Town Hunan
Lights, camera, Oscars: Meet the creators decolonizing Hollywood

Unreserved

06:11 min | 1 year ago

Lights, camera, Oscars: Meet the creators decolonizing Hollywood

"Next guest has thought a lot about raising the visibility of the indigenous lands that La is built upon and about the indigenous tribes that have called L. A. Home for Millennia. To Not Zine Carmelo is Tova and her tribe has called the L. A. Area home long before the Hollywood he would sign mark. The hillside to on-scene is an actress. You might know her from Steven Spielberg's miniseries into the West or TV shows like Undone Z.. Z. Nation or the Sun just to name a few I've reached non seen in her home in La. Hello and welcome. Thank you could be here so when you see the Hollywood sign there on the hill something so iconic to l. a.. What do you think about? Oh what do I think about too much. Oh I don't see it like everyone else sees it I would imagine As a Tonga Person. Yes and of course the word Tonga me people of the earth and Part of our belief is that we are part of the earth. And you're part of us and so when I see the beautiful Hollywood hill I actually see the hill and feel like if you know part of me as traditional person so it's kind of part of our history and Lore but with this funny white sign on it. That's the way. Yeah no as Tong long actress living and working. LA IN LA. How would you describe the visibility of the Tonga in in Los Angeles visibility has has been really remote actually for railing on time and I think currently people are kind of starting into wake up slowly but I think that we live our ancestor lands are very were and are on highly? Highly desirable land is prime real estate and was deemed that from the very first moment we are also like I contact tribe so you know whatever happened to whatever happened to all the other tribes in the Americas happened to I've anymore magnified in in condensed and very rapid fashion Because Orlando so desirable and so. I think that's something that people have have really wanted to not think about for a very very long time and I think people are starting to think about it. You know as an turning to wake up from it all and so Our survival I mean really had to go underground and a lot of ways some of the head intermarry with the other tribes that were surrounding But still remained on our land. Some of US Had to leave the land. Some of US went away for a little while. which was my family? We actually really lived on the reservation for awhile and then came back so we all have very street a descendant so it's very complex. Dude Dude. Very confusing Do a lot of people I think. And it's very unique as well because that's part of our history and who we are as a drive was on very very desirable land. Yeah now you've been working in Hollywood for quite some time now What is your take inexperience? in regards to indigenous indigenous representation in TV and film I think it's been evolving slowly and is on its way to being a little bit more creative. Created a little less stereotypical but it has a long way to go and Yeah you know the evolution has still been Kinda a slow drip but it is happening. I do see different roles that are kind of various epochal but there twists to them. And there's new the ideas that are interjected into them that maybe people haven't seen before For instance my role in the nation. which is you know sci-fi Apocalyptic Zombie show? Oh it's different from what you typically have seen in the past. Yeah what have we seen in the past. How would this kind of role compared to something we would see ten ten or twenty years ago? Native folks would probably very marginalized and very Supporting supporting roles. Yeah Yeah and definitely not characters that had motivations in any you know that that were pertinent to the story line or name Casus ACIS right or evening exactly. That is something that we've been working towards. I think collectively as native people and It is happening but very slowly to Nancy. We started talking about the Hollywood site. But something bigger than Hollywood that you want people to know I always would like people to consider the fact that California actually has always been the home of indigenous people Historically pre contact pre European Times It actually the home to more tribes and and more people indigenous people than all of the United States put together and our presence here has always been very strong and it remains strong wrong today and in particular Tong. Land we have a religious venture that was kind of the hub of all of the surrounding Native tribe in southern California the significance religion on that was based in Long Beach and so that area has always been essentially a cultural the center for indigenous peoples. So it's just kind of not ironic but it's no accident that this is Centre for indigenous these people as it has been historically. Thank you so much for sharing with us today. Think you turn on. Zine Carmelo is a tongue. Actress reached her at her hole in. La

LA Hollywood United States Tonga Tonga Person California Carmelo Steven Spielberg Tova Tong L. A. Area Casus Acis Long Beach Orlando L. Nancy Americas European Times
Group Nine's Geoff Schiller: Legacy media organizations have caught up

Digiday Podcast

08:02 min | 1 year ago

Group Nine's Geoff Schiller: Legacy media organizations have caught up

"Welcome to the digital podcasts. and Brian Marcy. Today I'm joined by Jeff Schiller Jeff is newly minted. Ciro Groom from nine. Jeff came over from the pump sugar acquisition which just close to a couple of weeks ago a couple of weeks ago. Okay so look. You're part of pop sugar for a while as as an independent entity As a partner like what. What is the potential you see? You know joining forces with group nine and in its portfolio of brands. So it's really interesting. The marriage is such a perfect marriage at a molecular level because the brands pop sugar Seeker Dodo now. This realis- they all have a common theme very optimistic very positive. And that's a through line and so I think just generally speaking that helps for a monetization perspective when we go out to market and we say look our companies bound by optimism. You can kind of think through how one plus one can eagle three so I think on a foundational level. The editorial alignment of saying thrillers. Just wants to help you kind of experience. The unexpected whether it's from food drink or travel or pop sugar wants to help you as a female kind of just explore all the areas that Define you versus versus just being relegated to one bus lifestyle. But then he got now this but now there's a little bit of the outlier right to some extent. I mean the way that I think about. Now this is yes it is news and and News is kind of core to what it started as a couple of years ago but I think as a brand it really reflects the currency in terms of what young people care about which is issues. And so it's it's the Lens in which they consume. It is news but it's really more so for young people issues climate climate change equality etc.. Those are really what define now this and you could argue. Certainly they're potentially depressing stories. That are out there but the lens that there are lots of depressed race out. I try to be an optimist but the Lens. Now this Kind of kind of takes through who These these complex issues to really be positive and hopeful and so it is the most utility driven versus being lifestyle driven but I also again that positive through line kind of makes it easy for us as we think about the future and monetization. So we're we're recording this before the holiday break and then You'll you will be heading off immediately to to see us which I will not be on the genus. Sorry good luck with that but you'll be meeting with lots of different marketers and and stuff like this and this maybe it'll be the first time since the merger went went through Wha what's your like sort of top line message for why they should care. Wise is a good thing for are your partners so I can answer that. Through two lenses one is more from the kind of larger macro conversation that's going on and the other would-be more from a client facing perspective macro wise merger mania. Whatever we called it a lot of these companies got together out of necessity Out of survival and pop sugar and group nine got together because it made sense because it was thought you were going to say that they got together for survival survival. No no no we we. It was not under duress. You had our chief officer Brian. I did And the profitable notable pop sugar kind of playbook and you had group nine the dominant stake in in reaching young people dominant stake in social video. Everything everything came together from a complimentary perspective including Brian and Ben who have known each other for a long time but really through even down to what they're passionate about you know I. It's all super complimentary so I think that on the macro level weren't out liar because we're like I said we'll be a case study for success success in terms of merger mania also because it wasn't done GonNa State of duress okay. Are you talking about refinery. I'm not tired. Whatever are you talking about? I'm not talking about anyone in particular on the client facing side in terms of value. So you have this really big list of of consolidated media companies. The VOX is the old school ones. The Conde's the hearst the meredith the vices the bustle digital groups for us us when we talk about young people. It's number one. We reached them at scale and number two. They spend more time with us than anyone else in the entire competitive set and so that is third party. Syndicated that's not our made up proprietary. Whatever that's com score in terms of actual time spent and attention for us is that at core currency from you know what we think the future cohorts in Gen y Gen Z.? Trade on it's you know. I want to be captivated by something and captivate them more than anyone else in the competitive set so I wanNA push on the scale thing for a little bit. Why is scale still pretty important because a a lot of people have come on this podcast and sort of been like skills dude skills dead and like not really I mean scale drives a lot of this and for what you're talking about You know adding together all these different brands. you're gonNA have a single salesforce right absolutely tech stack single all these sort of things. There's a bunch of efficiencies. I'm sure that come out. Like you know everyone when they announced sees mergers. Try Not to talk about this but like there. It is more efficient. But there's a a lot of advantages to having a bunch of brands under one roof. So I think that nothing's ever truly really new and so you look at the magazine. Zine companies their portfolio of brands. They have the same shared services model. One printing press one back office. There's a reason I mean conde still trying to get there. You're for sure but other other brands. The hearst Meredith Lega those have been in existence for a really long time for a reason because in order to scale you need to have that back office support that isn't replicated across every single brand so there's the economic scale which is shared services and then there's the audience scale. which is you have to be big enough to matter absolutely critical in a world where you have facebook? It's the same narrative facebook and Google and Amazon and target and Walmart Media Group. All of those guys out there. That are huge scale is is is is I guess the way that I frame it upscale is is no longer a lead statement. It's more of a check box right so if you don't check that box then you're going to be in trouble and it's like anything. I mean we keep talking about this and these these different podcasts. Hell the the middle gets gets crunched. And it's easy to fall into to the metal but I mean I guess together. You'd think that you guys are are not in the Middle Lake are are one of the scale players. Oh Yeah No. It's not even a thought it's factual we are number one. Overall in terms of time spent from Com score perspective were number one in terms of social The Olsen Dr Com score both say the same thing so I think within our larger competitive set of all the brands is that I mentioned. We are a clear leader and that competitive set you you think it's not it's not quote unquote just the the the vox is The bustles but it's the the I'm GONNA another quote unquote like the traditional like the hearse. The Conde's absolutely that narrative of them being behind is it in my mind a two year old narrative and I'm not talking about restructuring. I'm talking more so about audiences. They were behind. They looked at digital pure place. Copied their playbook playbook and I think I think they're pretty caught up so we have to consider them a credible threat to our business and to try to take whatever share they have that is legacy and bring it our way.

Conde Brian Marcy Jeff Schiller Jeff Partner Facebook Ciro Groom Dr Com Wise Meredith Lega Middle Lake Officer BEN Walmart Media Group Google Amazon
New York Icons: The Bell Jar

Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

09:24 min | 1 year ago

New York Icons: The Bell Jar

"It's good to meet you as Clark is the author of the forthcoming nine hundred page biography of Platt I meet up with her and we take a look at the magazine Plath oversaw that summer you know what struck me the first time I looked through this was the number of ads you just can't quite believe how many ads are in this Zine it's almost page after page and of course fashion spreads to fashion magazine so in a back room of the New York Public Library where flipping through a copy of the magazine Clark points out one ad in particular it's for shape wear that's also sportswear so this Janssen add anyone for action anyone for beautiful perform an action there is a woman with a Barbie Physique wearing a hat and gloves connect with a bra and girdle as she gets ready to serve in a game of tennis this is positively the most pleasant to wear slimming trimming smoothing soothing figure maker ever devised and there's a poem called the applicant where she uses this kind of language I noticed you were stock naked how about this suit blackened stiff but not a bad it when you marry it it is waterproof shatterproof proof against fire and bombs through the roof believe me they'll bury you in it Mademoiselle had become interested in her after a story she had submitted a year earlier one it's national fiction contest but Clark says that Platt Struggle old in her role as managing editor she had wanted to be fiction editor at just nineteen years old plath had already published poems and won awards Mademoiselle published some of the top writers of its day Dylan Thomas Tennessee Williams Truman capote but instead of selecting editing short stories plan throats fashioned blurbs including one praising the versatility of sweaters I think plath found her self suddenly embedded in this fashion and beauty industry and she's become part of this vast propaganda machine that woman's women into objects and she wanted to be the subject of her own life she didn't want to be the objective someone else's life so I think that contributed to her sense of disillusion that summer suddenly it was her job to kind of objectify women bio green they were promoting it for fall title green with black bio green white bio green with Nio green it's kissing cousin fashion blurb silver and full of nothing sent up there fishy bubbles in my brain they surfaced with a hollow pop but it isn't just the limitations of fashion and magazines that got to plant she was also troubled by the limitations placed on women in the nineteen fifties even in New York City that place of possibility I made a point beating so fast I never kept the other people waiting who generally ordered only chefs salad and grapefruit juice at one point in the bell jar she says everyone in New York to reduce PAS not trying to reduce plath has an enormous appetite is her actual appetite was legendary she wants emptied out hosts refrigerator before a dinner party but she had an appetite for everything you know she wanted to be the best writer she wanted to so I'm close she wanted to raise honeybees you went to make her own honey and she just wanted it all can women have it all it's a question still asking it had just started to come up in the nineteen fifties when women who've done the whole rosie the riveter thing during the war were now expected to be homemade occurs again even though many thrived in the workforce and developed real professional aspirations it was an ongoing discussion within society about whether women could do three things at once dying Johnson got married one month after the gas ownership Mademoiselle the summer had changed her and given her a greater sense of what her life could be but then she had four children within the span of six years so I was home with these little kids but they had naps and that's when somebody said why don't you the novel about something that you can do during nap time you know that's the way things evolve house of naptime Johnson has since written more than a dozen books and been a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize for Plath during a man who would support her as a writer was a major anxiety when she wrote about extensively in her journals in the Bell Jar Esther Greenwood reflection in her sort of boyfriend a medical student at Yale who everyone told her was such a good guy I also remembered Buddy Willard saying innocent minister knowing way that after I had children I would feel differently I wouldn't want to write poems anymore so I began to think maybe it was true that when you were married and had children it was like being brainwashed and afterward you went numb as a slave in some private totalitarian state a few years later plath thought she found a man who would not brainwash her as a graduate student at Cambridge she met fellow poets Ted Hughes who she married in Nineteen fifty sex both enjoyed growing reputations as writers when they were interviewed by the BBC's Owen Leeming in nineteen sixty one you'll have to give the impression that Oh you spend your whole Mary lives thinking poems and reading to each other I think our domestic life is is practically indistinguishable from all the people who live around I'm not the only main difference is that Ted doesn't go out to work at nine and come home at five he retires about nine to to his room and and works but I certainly having a life just like all the other housewives and mothers district shopping dishes and taking care of the baby in four so for Hughes Writing was a fulltime job a career but plath was a wife and mother who happened to write perhaps like Johnson during nap time plath was actually writing the bell jar at the time of that interview she alluded to it when she was interviewed again the next year this time by the BBC's Peter or he asks plath if there are particular themes that she's interested in exploring and he rambles off this list of ingredients that she's baked right into the bell jar Robert lulls poems about his experiences in a mental hospital for example interested very much these peculiar private and to move subjects it's I feel have been explored in recent American poetry I think particularly the poorest and Sexton who writes also about her experiences I always wanted to write the long short story I wanted to rise Nawfal now that I have attained shall I say a respectable age and have had experiences I feel much more interested in pros in the novel I feel that Plath published the bell jar under a pseudonym because she was so worried about offending the people she fictionalized as characters in it one of those characters was her editor at Mademoiselle who she called JC in the Bell Jar JC asks esther what she wants to do after college and suddenly she draws a blank unable to list off for am visions of being a professor writer or an editor and a writer. I've always thought I'd like to go into publishing I tried to recover thread that might lead me back to my old bright salesmanship I guess what I'll do is apply at some publishing house you ought to read French and German. JC said mercilessly and probably several other languages as well Spanish and Italian better still Russian hundreds of girls flood into New York every June thinking they'll be editors Utah for something more than the run of the mill person you better learn some languages. JC is a tough editor who cuts her down to size in that way she calls to mind another memorable story said Ed Women's magazine in New York so you don't read runway no for today you had never heard of me now you have no style or something fashion while similar take down to Andy Sacks her would be assistant that's a complete exaggeration of winter is the longtime editor of Vogue and the basis for maranda priestly

Editor New York Clark Platt Utah Ed Women Vogue Andy Sacks Nineteen Years One Month Six Years Mill
Yasmin Khan: Stories of Recipe in a Cookbook

Bon Appetit Foodcast

14:30 min | 1 year ago

Yasmin Khan: Stories of Recipe in a Cookbook

"Yasmin I'm so excited to be talking to you today thank you for being here thank you for having me I love your book Zitouni we had it as part of our book club a few months ago and I read what about it then and I wrote about that and I'm still raving about it I find it just to be Such a great mix of cookbook that also tells a lot of really incredible story okay so I wanted to talk to you first about your own story you have a little bit of a unconventional background for food writer and I'd love to he's here a little bit about how you found your way to food from was it a law degree that you have to begin with yeah I mean it's about as dry as you can get saying they're studying you know treaties and laws it's about as far away as you can get from like the creative intensity of of a kitchen but I think that in a way my you know connection to the food world just started from such a young age because my family grandparents were farmers and think anyone who's grown up around fresh produce it just installs in you from such a young age real reverend of I mean definitely vegetables and you know when we were you know my my family would grow rice but then also all kinds of plants they eh clients and peppers and tomatoes and cucumbers and so you know cooking a meal you know would would very much be about going off getting eggs and getting beans and getting vegetables I'm getting rice all from the land we had chickens and we had cows soya milk cow like when I was like four years old so I think that's what is my love food but it wasn't until I was older when I was around thirty that I decided to make the the the real shift I was working for a British charity in London I'd been working for nonprofits throughout my twenties for different kinds of human rights campaign groups and you know often happens for people working on this quite intense subjects I mean I was working on stuff light deaths following contact with the police or Israel Palestine or the you know the continuing occupation of Iraq and Afghanistan so I mean you know pretty heavy stuff I just ended up having like a classic burn out like I just yeah you're still pretty young at that time rate thirty yeah that's pretty young really young but enough time to start a new career yeah absolutely and go diagnosed with chronic fatigue which kind of basically leaves you with very little energy to do anything but I could cook and it was during that purser healing from the illness and recovering the I. Refound my love of food and as part of my time off for my job going to Iran to spend some time with my grandmother my grandfather recently passed away and and while I was there I set myself this task of asking different family member is what their favorite recipes were and if they would show them to me and while we were cooking together I just stick my iphone down and record what we were saying and and I did the opportunity when we were in the kitchen you know chopping onions or you know at an making dumplings I do not opportunity to ask them about their lives in the history and and probably the kind of conversations you'd be wanting to have even if there weren't a recorder exactly yeah when I came back to the UK after that time I suddenly realized I sitting on a treasure trove of recipes and stories that would really enable you know someone in the asked you know someone like my friends just to kind of get a glimpse of what life in Iran was like and Iran is a place with just like the most incredible Zine which I'm so thrilled in the last is you know he's been getting lots more attention but you know when the Saffron Tales came out you know which is only three years ago that you know it didn't you know it was part of that that trend I think the Saffron Tales your first book you wrote out of those stories and recipes from your time in Iran exactly and that was definitely like part memoir very much about your own lived experience and then you your second books they tune which which we're talking today is kind of much different in a way because it's not the experience that you grew up with but it's a little bit more of an anthropological look got a region So how is it different to be working on that book after your first one yeah it was it was both weedy different and really similar I mean in a thread that's run through all of my work over the last eighteen years has been a real love of storytelling and a real understanding that stories is how oh not only we better understand the world around us but we also better understand ourselves and when I was working for Human Rights Charity israel-palestine was my brief signed so I was really familiar with the place but also the food you know I was really lucky in London like I live incredibly close to the author Langi Cafe so like you know twelve hundred eighteen years ago I remember I e in kind of food and being like wow it's so similar to Persian food but then it's got so many differences and you know food from that region was already part of my culinary repertoire so when I was thinking about what book to write next you know what motivated me really clearly to write the saffron tales was deep desired to not only celebrate the incredible culture and Food Iran but also to challenge stereotypes of how people normally perceive Iran and I think the Palestinian kitchen another place where I felt I could use food to really share stories of a place I think too often when we see depictions of places is like Palestinian communities either through very narrow political prison or it's because something really bad happened and you know of course there are huge challenges is in that region but there's also a lot of beauty of joy and a lot of great food and so you had been going to that region for work previously so that was your first exposure to it and to the cuisine there yeah so I I went in two thousand nine which is about ten years ago and I really remember it clearly because it was July so it was really hot and we was dipping in our meetings with projects that we were going to whether it was visiting olive farming communities or kind of joint and Israeli Palestinian in community initiatives and it was quite heavy stuff because it's you know region which is just yeah fraught with human rights abuse But the reason I remember it was July hi it's because I really remember in times off kind of walking through the markets and just it being packed with all this color the color and abundance of of summer whether there's that was like giant watermelons sweet Jami figs incredible like berries as I mean it was you know the the produce fell so alive and as I often say like in a region that feels like it's dying that just felt so important and you Talk a little bit about how this book is laid out because I think it's really I think it's really interesting and I learned a lot just by reading about the different regions within this region I and n how vastly different styles of food are in a in a area the size of Delaware so small yeah so talk about how you decided to put the together and how you decided to highlight these different cuisines yeah so I really see this book as a travelogue I wanna take my read on real culinary adventure through listen in kitchens so I divided the book into different chapters kind of starting kind of in the north of Israel actor I and Haifa which of these incredible seaside towns the food like how how do you describe the food there yeah so the food that and actually the food of that region the North region which is the Galilee is perhaps the most traditional Levin teen type foods so you know the the things you might think of along it's on the coast they have lots of fresh seafood perhaps likes him seabream that smothered in a gorgeous like garlic Tahini saw a recipe for that in this book there is and then just so many stuffed vegetables like stuffed bell peppers stuff eggplants Zucchini stuffed with what kinds of thing yeah stuffed cows it's I mean just like I feel like if Palestinians can stop something like they will and what are they stuffing yeah well a real variety of stuff so it can be with Rice on minced Tom Flavored with maybe nutmeg cinema and kind of a warming sweet spices sometimes it can be you know plant based with kind of chick peas and rice and and sometimes it can just be kind of rice and herbs and I think one of the things that really struck me when I was doing the research for this book is just how plant based the food is from from the both it'd be really common just to have a whole Vegan meal but without any like purposefulness about it was just an abundance of vegetables and I love the the book do divide out a whole section on the Vegan and also dairy free and gluten free menus because it does seem like it this zine just naturally lend itself to diets are particularly kind of trendy here right now I know it's funny isn't it I wonder if you know that helped to some of the trend but I think all Middle Eastern diets of very I mean the Mediterranean diet is said to be one of the best for health in the world right and I really wanted to make the book very practical because I'm a home cook you know I want people to the is this isn't a recipe book which has got you know dishes in it I mean there are few like standout dishes but it's mainly stuff that I just want people to to get home from work and unlike quickly pulled together and part of that referencing was about that because so many people I know dairy free or plant based on you know perhaps just I wanna have that choice yeah so tell me about the other regions Gallery New Orleans the Galilee and then we've got the food of the West Bank which you know if the Galilee was really green you know the the West Bank is is not it is dry it's you know it's it's you know it's huge water supply issues in the region the food there reflect that so it's a lot more grilled meats a lot more bread based as opposed to rice so we're kind of thinking about dishes such as massakin which is this gorgeous kind of marinated chicken dish that's-that's made with with all spice and Su Mac and then roasted and and the big huge flat breads and the meat juices of pulled over into the bread and then you tear apart it with your hand so interactive eating yeah or Mansa which is this kind of really Halsey lamb stew made with Jimmy which is a bit of it's kind of a strange ingredient it's it's a kind of amended way Lexus is Kinda funky the milk product yeah but fermented or dried so it's a common ingredient throughout the Middle East so you know we're talking heartier dishes and Maumee Bay and then the food from Gaza is completely different as well so Gaza is a tiny strip of land and it's on the coast the Mediterranean Sea and there the focus is on lots of like see food but also lots of the flavor palate is different so the whole eternity of Gaza and cuisine is garlic and Green Chili and dill you or beef stew that you would add these flavorings into so again just really unusual so within such a small bit of like land there were three distinct culinary identities all right we're going to take a quick break to hear from our sponsor this week's episode of the bottom teeth food cast is brought to you by targets would gather when it comes to feeding families gooding gather believes that real life and eating well should go hand in hand that good food and good people are more important then when where and how we eat that's why they created good and gather favorite flavors in selected staples made for real life in many ways we gather made with high quality ingredients and carefully crafted recipes to create better tasting food that you can be confident is a good choice for you in your family that's good engaged her new and only at target so you spend a lot of time like just talking to people while you're there I mean it sounds like from reading the book you're constantly introducing the reader to new families to people who you cooked with and telling their stories so what was the is that might be through social media I'll call out for friends of friends does anyone know anyone in an area and luckily the way the world works now you can meet people that way other times you'd be at someone's House and then they'd be like Oh well you've got to try the bakery in this town like my aunt sisters cousin runs an incredible drier and she was like just this really likes spirited young Palestinian woman you know she had right head like pomegranate tattoos like a real kind of cool artists and she was such a big Foodie so we would just drive around in her car with the windows bled down listening to music and just like visiting friends there's all visiting people I've met through social media or people

Yasmin Zitouni Milk Twelve Hundred Eighteen Years Eighteen Years Three Years Four Years Ten Years
Mysteries of the Moons Exposed

Truth Be Told

01:42 min | 1 year ago

Mysteries of the Moons Exposed

"Ford built exploded at Penn it was called tm in the ancient times according to the Samaritans and that's not discovered way back in the sixteen hundreds have been deciphered by many people before all talk the other parts of it broken into chunks became the asteroid belt Mars was a moon armone now was also a moon of that planet which now that's why we have now doesn't have any look at one hundred zero when you look at the Giza plateau off his balls of glass in the sand vitrified protocols on Mars there's a Zenana weapons-grade Zine on Mars some in space debris raining down on planets and moons you have to clear out of here

Ford Penn Samaritans Giza Plateau
Explainer 187: Who is Kais Saied?

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

06:12 min | 1 year ago

Explainer 187: Who is Kais Saied?

"December Seventeenth Two thousand ten a twenty six year old to nece- and fruit seller cold muhammed boozy and held no rallies preferring trudge door to door to speak to voters directly. He's message was simple he's clean his own man not on the hook left was an unfair advantage while getting elected as an outsider candidate anywhere is no small accomplishment it is also relatively speaking the easy getting sites proposed reforms onto the statute books will require a two-thirds majority in Tennessee as parliament also under Tunis's system as it stands country ten days after that Tunisia's President Zine El Abidine Ben Ali fled the country he had ruled for nearly a quarter of a century the which point some biographical buck ground president-elect saieed he'll be at least but if it was a success anywhere and we will come back to the size of that if presently it was in the Arab spring's birthplace this past week she to get things done at home it will also require him to apply for his first pass Bolt welts siders who often show up at these things to make some point or other rather than being a serious contender indeed he claimed he'd never even voted before city of Tunis he helped draft Tunis's new post Arab Spring Constitution but displayed little aspiration to political office until two thousand candidates backed by the established parties he turned the nickname. Robo cop from an insult into a compliment side ran almost no advertising president-elect side now has to try governing while toting a considerable burden of expectations and without a party apparatus to support him ends and which side very much wants to change the presidential purview is limited to national security defense and foreign affairs which may limit sides ability Kende Tunisia held its second free presidential election since the Arab spring second free presidential election in its history this one brought forward a few being charges of tax fraud and money laundering the result was inevitable even though site refused to campaign while his opponent was in the clink full swearing what he believes eighteen when he declared himself an independent candidate for the presidency initially cited looked and may have suspected himself to be one of the improbable committee huge field which contested the first round of voting back in September sides austere even do a presence set him apart from the noise generated by the so I need is not regrettably an altogether fresh new liberal broom in the didn't isolated act of desperation he's hostile actors are in the pay of foreigners who felt soles to extremism and terrorism manipulated from outside the country by parties rights as men it is Richard indeed in that context of Middle Eastern politics that he nevertheless appears a stretch better than the average but side account for the moment at least on Tunis's impatient youth roughly ninety percent of eighteen to twenty five year olds voted for him attracted by his detachment context of Middle Eastern politics he is keen on the death penalty much less so on gay people and believes that women should not get to enjoy the same inheritance in the end of this month is a sixty one year old former professor of constitutional law with a modest profile as a public intellectual who taught mostly at the universe to anybody when he made it to the to candidate runoff against nobile career a brash media tycoon who spent much of election season in prison pen who do not wish well on a country determined to persevere how does an island I'm room with over the Arab spring failed in general to promote the blossoming of liberal democracy across the don't to terrorism Tunisian people know how art and culture are important to understand and appreciate months following July's death in office of the previous incumbent elderly political veteran Beigey tweed essentially genesee is new president elected with a from the establishment he should also be helped along by the robust civil society which has helped prevent Yunessi from descending into post Arab Spring Kale it has made considerable progress since Mohammed boozy made his stand and his sacrifice it remains however a considerable stretch from where many unisons would prefer it to be president elect side faces both a challenge and opportunity Monocle twenty four I'm Andrew

Tunis El Abidine Ben Ali Tunisia President Trump President-Elect Muhammed Bolt Welts Richard Tennessee Fraud Beigey Tweed Genesee Yunessi Professor Andrew Twenty Five Year Twenty Six Year
How to Start a Blog or Website

The Bishnu Mahali Show

11:34 min | 1 year ago

How to Start a Blog or Website

"First question that are you might ask yourself is that which platforms would you too so this is one of the question that you should ask yourself before you start your own website the first question of course so. I had a comment your platform. Let me tell you some states that I own own on the Internet so on the Internet. Although athletes that you see ir made fifty one thousand nine percent ninety six percent up the the vet said that you see on the Internet are created using place where it is open source cms software that use use that is used to create fifty one point nine six percent of the Internet's website so that's cool and next is Vicks we just seven point zero pipe percent than doom love open to one percent and squarespace three point nine six percent sand and there are also some completely accorded websites which are made on over st panel so that stupid open three six percent and then we three point one percent and then sites like Gordon Gordon decide etc which is one point six percent so you can see that are majority of the websites are over wordpress which is fifty one point nine six percent. Oh senso is huge and of course I'm to recommend you platform so obviously my suggestion is workplace. If you are starting a dynamic website which can do anything you want. I mean you can do whatever you want with all our website. If you buy a your own hosting so that's I would recommend this though platform that I would recommend what Bruce I'm not talking about what dot com I'm rocking World War Brisk Dot. Org which is called self hosted wordpress so you should open or start your website on self hosted wordpress art press platform so yeah. That's burt is still if you don't want to use wordpress and create if you want to create just a static website with few dynamic teachers are you're not simple website then our recommend whibley or dot com so you can use these these tools to create all with a side window and it will be easier to create the these websites but it won't be a very customizable it will be a static website and not completely static but you get the idea is it's not a super customizable so oh and not easy of course so you may not want to use this if you are trying to explore things and want to create bigger business to customize the website a lot so my recommendation will be workplace and even if you don't want to. Oh you is what praised you can use or start calm so let's move on so if you will if you use wordpress take recommend then you will need hosting to host your website so let's talk about all hosting so everything is basically flat that one where you back for more stories where you host or keep your website on the Internet so that they are a couple of platforms assumes that I would recommend you but let's let's talk about. two things reported okay what you should be looking king in your hosting in hosting company or hosting package or whatever so plus will you should look for apptime or who don't they should be great or. I'm inventor like Landon and poor nine percent and hundred percent hundred one hundred percent impossible or maybe sports but our state hosting the never gives you a hundred percent up time so that's that's an issue off said hosting plans I haven't I haven't tried dedicated hosting so I'll talk about it later but you should look for up aim is it it should be somewhere around ninety nine percent and of course if Dr and will be higher than the downtime. We'll below that means your site will be online for the most of the time so second thing that you should be taking this story a lot of our hosting sites. This are hosting companies. They'll that you get unlimited hosting but they are all lying. There are no unlimited story stories available and I taught blues is very honest and they will. They'll give you unlimited. It is terrific. Give actually but your side will pass them will not function properly when you reach the rich are certain point point reaches for PD beautifully made so they don't talk about it on their suspense was clearly they're lying and similarly. There are a lot of companies with who are retired are lying about their plan. They all say that you get on unlimited stories but none of them are giving you actually unlimited storage. Unlimited story is ally so you must take other stories you get I will. I won't recommend blue hose order anything any websites which still sued that you have access to unlimited storage because clearly they're lying and I don't want you recommend our company that lies and you may all also know that I I recommend bluest alert on my website myrtle soon. NBA replacing them with Oblivion Zine or cloud with hosting or something like that because they simply lies and I don't like how companies that lie so I'll remove them are and replaced with side grout groping Zine or cloud based hosting so oppose I'll be a good hosting. That doesn't life so yeah you SORTA look for a storage homages stories are getting Macaws. Almost Aubrey hosting companies are lying and saying that you get unlimited storage but you won't get it trust me and of of course there are companies which are which are clearly telling you how much storage you will get so I'll I'll talk about that in a moment and the targeting that will start in our hosting company is customer support so customers of old would be better and I think all the companies have good customer support. I never had any any sue with the customer. Support have tried to hosting side grow laws. Even blue host is good with customer support and then and then you all look for features like catching speed as certificated et cetera so these are the things that you should look for look in your hosting packages or hosting company and now Nick Men and it's Maya condition for web hosting so I would if if budget is not a problem for you than our Iro recommend you you plowed with hosting Dublin. WB engine or side Donosti aside garnished hosting is cheaper than the the other two options since but of course cheaper options you get to quality of posting so but it's I donate not Putin or the hosting company salutes great actually and I would highly recommend US recommend to use side grown even use. I'd grown and I also I'm also trying lorries always now and I haven't read Lupien but most of the Super Creator or super blog or for whatever you would like to say out of using WPA engine so that's one of the top Oh hosting for what I saw yeah but whatever opinion super expensive so you might you may not want to buy hosting if you have budget is so in depth case in that guess you should go to cloud ways and if your budget is still bulow then you can go to side drawn hosting but none of them are our T- posting by hosting all of them are great hosting so these are three web hosting Austin comedy that I would recommend you to use if whether it is not your problem but if you are loaned by then I will recommend you to use eight to hosting I've also used this hosting and this hosting is good at at the praised day offered it's not so so great but of course it's better than bluest or hostgator et. CETERA on the very phrasing and still their services are pretty good so you can if you're long visor. You can go go with worsening alright. So will you use of hosting company or website or to create a website. You'll also need our domain. We have already talked about how you should think about your state's name and similarly how you should buy your domain so you you want to listen to the previous episode to understand that. I'll not talk about that in this particular episode but Liquid Elliot how you can bite you can all you can buy it while buying the hosting for your website or you can buy it separately if you buy it separately then you will have to connect it with the DNA records so it's izzy she's just so if you'll just search on Google or I also have all video on my youtube channel you. If you want to do these things so it's easy to connect your domain your hosting so that's not a problem you will you'll be able to do it so I'll just talk about the platform that I would recommend if you want to buy domain separately not from the hosting companies so named Dot Com because of course aw like the name suggests you'll get the cheapest domains here name to his best player. Pont du by domain cheapest rate and the second option that I would recommend his Gore daddy most of the Indian stews Gordy because it accept payments are with Indian Indian Muslims Indian cards so that's one of the go-to option for Indians so either you can either you can. I I do you buy from your hosting company or you can buy from named deep or Gordie

Dot Com Vicks Squarespace Gordon Gordon NBA Google Landon Gordy Gordie Bruce Myrtle Putin Lupien Austin Nick Men Dublin Nine Six Percent
Zine el-Abidine Ben Ali, 83, Tunisia Autocrat Ousted in Arab Spring, Dies

The World

00:18 sec | 1 year ago

Zine el-Abidine Ben Ali, 83, Tunisia Autocrat Ousted in Arab Spring, Dies

"Tunisia's long time president the first leader ousted by the Arab spring has died at the age of eighty three bears owner badly reports he died in Saudi Arabia where he lives is flowing from Asian revolution more than eight years ago. zine el Abidine Ben Ali fled the country he

Tunisia President Trump Saudi Arabia Ben Ali Eight Years
Motown's First Lady Claudette Robinson

In Black America

11:26 min | 1 year ago

Motown's First Lady Claudette Robinson

"I'm Johnny Hansen Junior and welcome to another edition of and Black America on this week's program motown sixty years of Hicksville the USA with cloud at a net Robinson founding member of smokey Robinson and the Miracles Kim black uh-huh. I just couldn't get in the gross helps eight needs today. Everybody everybody gets real excited when I say Berry Gordy but he wasn't as well known at that time but smokey actually knew who he was because smokey you look at the hit parade magazine that was out in that magazine actually had Lee had the lyrics listed of the song as well as the song writer or writers and he has seen Mr Gordie's name down there so he was oh boy. You know I'm getting opportunity to see this famous guy well. I must admit admit I had never heard of Mr. I guess really sheltered or something and I've thought who is is because smoking was so excited he he was like oh so at the end of that. Mr Gordy said he'd like to work with us on February nineteenth nineteen fifty eight miracle. I I single gotTa job was released in nineteen sixty. The song shop around became motown's first million seller that same year Motown L. Founder Berry GORDY stored on Claudette Robinson the official title of quote First Lady of motown into quote born Claudette Rogers in New Orleans. She was bright and adventurous like many contemporary. She developed her talent in the sanctuary. The family moved to Detroit Royd was she excelled academically with honors and graduated from Commerce High School at the age of fifteen. She attended Wayne State University through a sophomore year here. Before joining the Marine Corps reserves the miracles career has spanned more than five decades group has so more than sixty million records in two thousand nine commemorating their golden anniversary in the entertainment industry the Hollywood Chamber of Commerce on Miracles with a star on the Hollywood boulevard walk walk of fame as motown founder Berry Gordy stood at the podium. He's saying we quote without two miracles. There will be no motown and of quote. Ah Recently Robinson was in Austin Texas to participate in the summit on race in America and the opening of the Grammy Museum's new exhibit motown the sound L. of young America Roberson said down with them Black America for this exclusive interview born in New Orleans. You all moved to Detroit. Actually I moved to Detroit. When I was eight years old? I was living with my grandmother at the time and she passed away and my mom came for me because I was actually living doing with my grandmother at the time and we moved to Detroit on the west side of Detroit us now going back in the day in Detroit. Well you know when your kid everything is wonderful and amazing first of all I saw snow for the first time and it was a lot of fun you know because now I was with my brother I had two older step sisters and my stepsisters would take me like like to the Tigers Games 'cause one. She was just so fascinated and excited until she took me with her. All the time. I think that was one of the ways that she could get out because I don't think she was supposed to be dating so she took me as the excuse you know put the miracles together well. The miracles came together or my brother had a group which consisted of smokey Bobby Ronnie and Pete and the guys had a group firstly we the chimes chimes five times and they became the matadors will when my brother was a matador I actually formed a group of five girls and that group was matador aretz prior to that when my brother was an orchid I had a group called the orchestra so whatever you did I kinda followed his is legal. My brother decided nothing was happening with the show business stuff so he decided to join the army as a result the guys used to always practice in in our basement to rehearse in all of that so I heard all the songs and after my brother was gone a great audition came an opportunity for an audition in came about and it was absolutely fascinating you know and that maybe you get an opportunity to be able to record and as a result smokey asked me would I go to the audition with them as their fifth member and I said yes and that the idea and when we got there and rehearsed the gentleman that was auditioning us. I'm sorry I don't like I don't really like the group he didn't see say it just like that but it meant that what he wanted actually at that time he wanted smokey and I'd be like a dual and the duo would have been just he and I see and forgetting the guys Mickey and Sylvia were real popular at the time and so therefore that's what they wanted that's so he wanted will of course we weren't GonNa leave the guys of course I was knew I wasn't really a part of their group yet and we we just kind of you know the guys especially. We're so so very very disappointed because they thought this was their one opportunity. They're going to get a recording contract. Well there was a gentleman walking around and that gentleman said do you have any more of those songs and smokey spoke up and he said yes he said how many said one hundred rid so we said well. Can I hear some of those so when the piano and we started singing and performing not very much performing mainly he just singing and re. I'm laughing because I actually was in my United States. Marine Corps a uniform. I was in the reserves reserves and I was you know it was that time of the day so it was coming from our basic practice and went to the audition and you know after all that happened and then this gentleman asking us to sing he listened very very patiently very repatirated. Every song has to have a beginning a middle and end so that you know how to write property can't be all over over the place and because we went to the audition singing five original songs and after that occurred you know when we saying the gentleman introduces himself and he said my name is Berry Gordy today. Everybody gets real excited when I say AH Berry Gordy but he wasn't as well known at that time but smoke he actually knew who he was because smoking you look at the hit parade magazine Zine that was out in that magazine actually had had the lyrics listed of the song as well as the song writer or writers and and he has seen Mr Gordie's name down there so he was like Oh boy you know I'm getting an opportunity to see this famous guy I must i I had never heard of Mr. I guess really sheltered or something and I thought who is because smokey was so excited excited. He was like Oh so at the end of that. Mister Gordy said he'd like to work with us so I was you know I'm new to the group so I I don't know include me or not and as as we kept talking to him then I found out later more about him and and his family is family was really well recognized around Detroit. You know they had so many entrepreneurship businesses. They had a a printing company. They had a record company. They had yes. They have construction. They also so had Mrs Gordy senior was well into the insurance business so they were really really entrepreneurs long before leaving her. Yes yes and there were eight children. Mr Gordon being a child number seven which always that's that's a pretty lucky number so we started working with him. Of course this year is that particular year was nineteen fifty seven so Mr Gordon was saying that we needed record so our first record that was released was February nineteenth nineteen fifty eight which coincidentally is bobby and smokey's birthdays and you know same same day same year same everything same hospital as well as they actually found out later an hour apart and they met fourteen years later uh well as story went on this is now nineteen fifty eight but there is no motown yet that had not occurred and and when we see that magnificent wonderful royalty check three dollars a nineteenth since it was like Oh my God you know. Is this this this what happens with showbusiness how you ever GonNa make are you going to ever have a home or an apartment or any of the above and smokey suggested to Mr Gordy that you know maybe you should have your own record company because we certainly could not do any worse yeah and that was kind of like the start a we had had prior to that a two record deal with the record label which was our I song gotTa Job can then after that we had a two record deal with chess records of and the thing is I don't recall with the royalty check was from wound gigantic. No no it was never gigantic. Unfortunately well well as as time you know went by motown itself which is now sixty years was started January twelfth nineteen nineteen fifty nine and would made that something remarkable as far as having a company Mr Gordon Gordon what had not only have thought that we should definitely have our own record our own whatever and and so the song for that became we recorded Chaperon my mother call she said Eh on you growing up now pretty soon new take awry and then she said

Motown L. Founder Berry Gordy Smokey Claudette Robinson Detroit Mr Gordie Mr Gordon Gordon America Parade Magazine New Orleans Marine Corps Detroit Royd Johnny Hansen Bobby Ronnie Writer Tigers Commerce High School United States Founding Member Grammy Museum Hicksville
"zine" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Stack

Monocle 24: The Stack

10:24 min | 1 year ago

"zine" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Stack

"On the stack this week, we speak to Chandrika from the vine, Sal, giorno, a beautiful Swiss publication about wine, plus the editors of the fun buffalo Zine and Henry reshare. Then visits the office of the only magazine dedicated to female drummers, stay tuned for this week's edition of the stack. From the housing loan. This is the stack thirty minutes of print industry analysis, and I am was to share coming up on the show a magazine with a tagline drummers music and feminism and we'll talk wine in print with Chandrika. But before that we start the show talking about the clever and fun by annual title buffalo Zine, which invents itself every issue for the latest installment they decided to pay tribute to a couple of Cornick independent magazine titles with covert aiming to recreate the visuals of those magazines I said down to speak with the magazine's publishers Adrian, kansallis Cohen and the V Skiba. It is a lot of work in practical terms, it's time consuming, but it's very exciting to have the freedom to do whatever we like every six months. It's a project that it takes, you know, like a lot of work impassioned to do because so far is not like we are become. Enrich making it. So it's obviously very good portfolio for our workers are they're actors and for all the people involved in the issues, but they're only like way that I see that we could keep doing this is because we have to start from zero every time, and we have done motivation because if we were having, you know, like a structure lay out or like, a loc- or something like this like the magazines have for me personally. I don't think I would be able to get the strength to go through this like every six months for you know, like not getting that much. I think we both have this tendency to to change things and to reinvent. So it's quite natural. And it's fun and people love it. I mean, I was looking at your website is more important. Yeah. I mean, you have ten different covers this time. And most of the actual quite so out of the website. You have to say to our listeners. They're still some copies of halo. But I mean, there's a lot of people looking for this product as well. Yeah, I guess people are looking for something new. So if you offer something surprising, and mysterious every time, you don't know what's going to be revealed. What's gonna be next that keeps people hooked on it? I guess that's why I say is big selling point. Because it's like, I think it's something people appreciate to find something completely different every six months in the shop. Can you explain the latest issue? It's kind of almost few. It's like attributes to magazines because you have ten different overs, and they're kind of well imitating like very famous independent fashion titles where the came from. And how was the reaction of the original titles that you've kind of copied or something like that? I don't remember like how exactly the came. But to do this theme for this issue came, basically, you know, in fashion people it's constantly like pointing like this is referencing these or this is copied by that. And there was like specific episode of Dogra for the photo shoot. Like inspire in concept that was done by another photographer years before I explain this in little later. And then you know, like it was like a pretty like popular photographer now and printed in a popular magazine. So there was like lots of comments on social of many people from the industry, which is something very similar, which what happens everyday like in things like diet, Brad? I know that everybody goes and jumps like commenting. And you know, when I see like the comments in the people that I follow most of the people or the biggest names that I followed. They specifically comment in. Things like that. All my God. That's so embarrassing like they really love it, which is very bitchy. You know, going like point one dollars whatever and we both working in the creative field for years. We've always been dealing with these with being copied we've been accused of copying. And we wanted basically to exercise all of this and celebrated its mainly that coping it's like a natural thing of human beings. And we can hide from that. We all getting Spiderman that's why we read. That's why we watch things you know, what I mean. I agree with you in society days, especially in the online world have this kind of tendency like over this. I saw it twenty five years ago in this civic occasion. I mean, this is quite reductive in because now we have the technology to reference of Daren target and comment on before. It wasn't so possible. There wasn't so much transparency. But yeah, like everyone was saying we been thinking about this. You're saying that it's. A tribute to magazines, and yes, it's true. We have always been looking at a lot of magazines collecting them. So it's in our minds and because big taboo in the creative industries about copying. We wanted to go deep into it and say, it's it's okay in to something fun copying shamelessly things from other magazines. What was the editors reaction because you told me that you've sent the picture of the Kovalenko week before was it negative or the mostly kind of enjoyed, and if he can mention some of the titles that actually copied on the cover we got response from nine out of ten litters and they loved it. They all got it and thought I guess they took it as a tribute or they just were flatter authority was a fun idea. So it was very positive. I remember, for example. Most of the reactions were very I would say like relaxed in cute. Everybody was like I used to amazing. This is so cool. Cool Lola Lovett blubber like, you know, very like easy. We just like we sent like a little letter with the cover of each magazine and also the cover of the other magazine. So they would see no like in the context, and we were just saying that we hope that they would like it because it was coming from a place of respect and love for what they do the, blah. It was casual by bit serious. But all the replace of them were like mega casual in all my guy can't believe this an we publish them on our feet because people were constantly asking that like say, no. And they were all expecting that. There was going to be people like mad or whatever. But it was just the opposite like super easy and super like on my guy, you crazy scene. Stay and like, so you can actually relate our Instagram publish the responses. I mean, we're talking a lot about the imagery of the magazine is over one thing. I personally doesn't change the much is actually the content has the same kind of tone to it very different stories. But you know, there's kind of sometimes humorous, and for example, also have your previous issue, which I absolutely adore. You know, which is the buffalo since holidays in Spain. Which is where you guys from. I mean, this I noticed that it was made with love. And and you wanted show this colorful side of Spain that people sometimes my want to I don't know how they just want. So all the cool, you know arty south, but this is super fun as well. Four hundred fifty pages of C sacks and fashion. I mean. Yeah. That was fun. We wanted to celebrate that aesthetic of trashy holidays in Spain. That no one is really proud of for us. It was you know, like, I moved here three years ago. And we started doing the magazine biannual they beat the Aeneas buffalo, we've been, you know, like interacting with a lot of people from the UK from France from all Europe, the states, you know, who are all our contributors. And there was also like, you know, obviously, these Brexit tension everything and for us. There was a moment that we thought it was fun to look at our identity in a different way. In also in the way, that this new friends foreigners that we have perceive Spain because we usually with them, and they're like, oh, I love visa or I spend many summers live with my family in coastal saw ano- highly. Where were telling me the words that she learned a lot of the or things like this. You know? So it was like, okay. Let's do an issue about this about this vision that people have of Spain when they go to Spain which is usually for holidays and involving some happy hour something like that. What's your kind of media diet? You guys do you like brain or do you? Check your news online. I mean, I'm very curious. I'd like to ask our guests on the stack even some Spanish titles as well. I have a very poor media diets have say, I realized that I don't really read. Many Marissa's I used to and I don't read the paper smart, maybe online few times week. So I would say that is pre pour. Who would you go for as inspired by the guardian and the New York Times mostly online I worked in by? So I will say. I like hell prices have to say and guys that you're ready when I mean, it's very early days, but you guys are BI annual. Yes. So next issue coming out in September. Are you ready thinking about a completely different concept? We know we've you guys I expect anything it's our it's our tense tissue our aniversary. So we're starting to work on it right now issue nine of buffalo scene is out. Now. Hurry up to buy it. Some covers are sold out ready. To

Spain Cornick independent magazine Chandrika Henry reshare New York Times Instagram Dogra Adrian Brad Daren kansallis Cohen Lola Lovett Europe UK Marissa France six months twenty five years thirty minutes
"zine" Discussed on Unladylike

Unladylike

11:17 min | 2 years ago

"zine" Discussed on Unladylike

"There. So what are the scenes that are kept down? There are they like fen see one or they secret one. Yeah. Those are the the million dollars scenes are kept on. No. So basically, it's where they keep a second copy of all scenes for preservation or some scenes that they only have one copy of live there permanently. And they have to be fetched by an archivist. If you wanna look at them. So did Jenna show you any of her favorites? Well, Geno is very clear with me that she doesn't pick favorites. But like part of the librarian, I think it must be. Yes. She said one reason that she can't pick a favorite is just because of how many scenes Jonah has read. Have you read all scenes in this room? I actually have. Yes. Yes. So she she's literally read every single Zine in their collection. And that's so that she can tell people about them help researchers find what they're looking for. And so that she can write about it when she's like putting it into the system and giving it like labels. Jennifer did show me a few special scenes in the collection though, like one Zine by Kathleen Hanna from nineteen Ninety-three. So a bikini kill Zine. She's that it was one of the oldest ones in the collection. Probably gen a also showed me some scenes by one of her good friends Selley up Peres said that my favorite scenes are very often the kind of lowest rent easiest to reproduce. But like what really? Moves me is sometimes when their individual elements like soon. No that sell you had to paste each in every copy of this. So the Zine that she was showing me is like the size of a half sheet of paper, and it was handwritten and photocopied, but then on different pages where these little kind of like personal prizes. Here's a bag of constant comment tea that is taped or otherwise adhered in which you know, archivists wouldn't like, but, but yeah, there were like little interactive elements that you could actually like take out of the scene that Celje had like handmade and put inside of the scene itself. Like, here's an example, within I'm talking about where there's like a little envelope that's pasted in and I just opened it was sealed with washy tape and inside it is another little tiny thing. Legs Zine Russian nesting dole. Russia nesting Zine. Yes, exactly genocide, she loves elements like this, which honestly I did too because they just show the care and attention that Zine creators put into these things that they're making and the cool thing about seeing her friend Celje scenes was that she is actually the person who inspired Jonah to start making an readings scenes in the first place. It was sort of a revelation. I was like, oh, this is what scenes are all about. Because what she'd given me was a personal Zine or what's shorten to Pershing. And I think people sharing their individual stories touched me in a way that like the literary compilations Zine hadn't. So this was almost twenty years ago, and before that Jonah had really only seen like political jeans or poetry's ins and sully as personal Zine inspired her to to make her own and her Zine is kind of this. You know, like the annual newsletters that people send out at Christmas time about their families. Yeah. Every year. My dad's since like a massive letter with like literally like taped on scanned in photos on it. So, hey, that's all that's kind of Zine, I know stroke. Zien Strobe, but Jenas scene is sort of like that except it's a collection of art and writing that she's made throughout the previous year. And then she sends it out two of her friends and family, and she also recently made a compilation Zine called are you there? God, it's me menopause. Yes. There's like Zine for everything. I know. Yeah. And and also there's kind of a Zine for every one, which is sort of the point, you know. And that's what Jonah says makes Zeman's so important to her and what what makes preserving them so important to her is so often they're made by you know, folks from marginalized communities, and we might lose those stories if we didn't take the time and effort to preserve those eons, no matter how small or how personal they might be Zine redefine what success is. So like, maybe they don't and will never have a huge reach. But there's they don't have to. There's like this intense sharing that happened. And that's like really what Jenna wants the collection at Barnard to be four. Like, she wants the Zine 's there to be saved and stored and read and used for research. Yes. But she's also trying to make sure that some of that sharing is preserved to why is it important to you that this library exists not students can engage with it. We'll few things one of the things that I love about the Zine library is you walk in. And it's predominantly female space. It's a default queer space. It's a space that's intentionally people of color. So it's like making the world that I think a lot of Barnard students want to see. And then I also liked that it is Ziane's are very often written by people that are closer. To the age of college students, so it reflects back their experience, you know, it's like an accessible history. You might get to read about someone who is in your situation in other books in our collection. But they'd probably be mediated by a psychiatrist in a case study or by journalist or by like someone else. So they're not really the person speaking in their own words students have this great knowledge that they can apply critically designs that they may not have. They may not have the skill or they may not have the confidence to do with textbooks or with other published material, but because scenes are kind of peer publications. They can look at it. They can relate to it. They cannot not relate to it. And I think that academic libraries can be a place of expertise and knowing and it's. Kind of nice to find something on the shelf. That is also questioning well, and it seems like it lowers the barrier of entry kind of going back to what Kristen Torres told us at the top of the show about kind of Zine removing our need to be kind of precious about our art, and our creativity and only publish things when they are perfect, which is something that I struggle with our by our truly so just thinking about publication in creativity from sort of the opposite vantage point of not expecting, you know, hordes of people to read it is sort of empowering in a way like kinda gives gives you maybe the kick in the pants to just make it already. Totally. Yeah. And that was like an inspiring thing about being in the library and just being surrounded by like what basically look like pieces of copier paper stapled together. And but like that being. In a real library and around the corner from literally the classics and Jenna sort of telling the world by having this collection that like these scenes are just as valuable as all those other books and all those other ways of knowing so Abigail did visiting the Zine library give you a little inspiring for wanting to maybe make some scenes yourself. Hell, yeah. It made me what to grab a pen and some copier paper and get to work, you know, send something up to the library. I would love that. I know I really hope to see you in a library day to Abigail. Well, thank you so much for for going on a little Zina adventure. Yeah. This has been really fun to listen to thanks for sending me up there. All right. So this brings us back Caroline to Saint Susia and the bigger picture of why Zine like that that lasted for almost five years and fourteen issues is worth preserving. And and what lived experiences are being captured in all those archives in Zine, libraries across the country. That's right. And we asked Isabelle an attache to share a favorite piece from Saint Suseya and the one they chose it. Honestly, couldn't be more perfect closer for today's conversation. Totally agree. So y'all here's motagim reading a poem. She wrote for the scene. Okay. So this is from issue to this is called them Seattle without of the. It's too late for me to write a story of the struggle of my flesh life story of that Lucho that got them wouldn't. Yes. My weta grandma called me. And I've learned to hate that where are you from? But I'm not just skin. It's too late for this to be about hair a woman's crowning. Beauty is not lengthened style. It's not smooth legs and undone puberty. It's not eyebrows. At a bitch instead of free, though, it's too late to tell the story of Spangler of how might tongue is too aggressive for what the mullahs and to proper for south, Texas bar fights, novato Chinga, sue mother, no known. It's too late in time in my history in our history. This is a new era. These are our days to take our culture and make it our own take the good and toss the bad Lethem on and tossed the husk we can decide to walk away from chice mall. When I got on this Betty, the two specific gender roles. We can say childhood to hint there. Don't take care of their partners or abused their kids. And Furthermore, Fuxing at least he doesn't hit me. He doesn't deserve a cookie for not hitting you and you deserve better. We can leave the dogma and guilt that comes with your first communion and follows you through the doors of Planned Parenthood. Leave it leave it in our past. But while we're picking and choosing we gotta keep the good keep the respect for life and death. That means a million times more than Mike all of at a handbag in sugar skull t shirt, keep the recipes. Whether that means you've modify it with olive oil because your dad has diabetes or throw bacon fat on your beam. So your kids will eat them. Keep the violin. Even if you only dance at weddings and Keane says keep the music, even if you're putting most only listened to black Sabbath Ozzy is Mexican as fuck for pissing on the Alamo, and we are so much more than muddy cheese, John Chetta's, and we are so much more than those assumptions, we are Mekki Gunness. We are a medic Gunness. And we decide what that means to us because it's too late to complain about other people's ideas of what we are. In are not. It's time for us to define ourselves. Eat that the.

Jonah Zine library Jenna Barnard Abigail Celje Geno Russia Kathleen Hanna menopause diabetes Peres Pershing Mekki Gunness Jennifer Jenas Seattle Ziane Kristen Torres
Finally we can complain about the Apple event

Latest In Tech News

09:07 min | 2 years ago

Finally we can complain about the Apple event

"Top content there is while supporting the rest of the newsroom, they'll just cherry pick. What they want via news. Plus an apple shave off a few cents over to the publisher. While owning all the data customer relationship and power. Why subscribe to the publisher I already pay for apple news. Plus should. Be the question haunting journalists nightmares for readers ten dollars per month. All you can eat buffet from three hundred plus publishers sounds like a juicy deal will end it is. But it could accelerate the demise of someone outlets leaving society with fewer watchdogs, the storytellers if publishers agreed to shake hands with the devil. The dark or it will just garner more followers flip over a few pennies laugh maniacally runoff into the evening, making ruin a sponsor that much more tempting, but they won't know it. It'd be running off maniacally laughing. There's so many horrifying aspects of apple news. Plus for publishers best to just list each one and break them down number one. No relationship with reader to succeed, publishers need attention data and revenue an apple news, plus Kitson away of all three readers. Visit Apple's app not the outlet site. They give it free rein to promote conference tickets merge. Research reports in other moneymakers publishers don't get their apple news plus readers, Email addresses for follow up marketing cookies for ad targeting. Content personalization or there. Credit card info to speed up future purchases at the bottom of articles further. This is annoying. Apple news, plus recommends post by an outlets competitors readers end up without a publisher's bookmark in their browser. Toolbar amp on your phone or even acts easy access to them from news pluses default tab, they won't see the outlets creation at highlights. It's most important content or develop a connection with its home screen layout. They'll miss call outs. The follow individual reporters chances to interact with innovative new interactive formats, but perhaps worst of all publishers will be thrown right back into calcium of attention. They'll need to debased voice. Amp up the sensationalism of hotter. Headlines. Look or risk. Noor users strain an inch over to someone else because it's literally tap away. And they tell you to go to somebody else at the end of the article, anyways, it's literally click bait two point all over again have no control of how to surface number two. They're at the mercy of the algorithm, which outlets earn money, apple news. Plus will be largely determined by. What apple decides to show a no first few curatorial? Slats on screen anytime apple could decide it wants more visual photo based content or less serious world news because it keeps users even if they're less informed. It could suddenly preference shorter takes because they keep people from pouncing and. Yep. Or more generic shallow dives that won't scare off casual readers who don't seem even care about that outlet. Anyways. What if apple signs up a publisher's biggest competitor in all the pension decimating? The first discovery while still exposing its top pay world content for cheap access and buy cheap. I mean pennies remember when Facebook wanted to build the world's personalized newspaper and delivered tons of referral traffic than abruptly decided to favor, friends and family content. All even publishers starve, well now the outlets are giving apple news plus two same iron grip on her businesses. They might Harry you're a ton of talent to give apple what it wants only for the strategy to change. The Wall Street Journal says it's hiring fifty staffers to make content specifically for apple news. Plus those sound like some of the most precarious. Jobs in a business right now. Now, remember when Facebook out the Wall Street Journal guardian and more to build social reader apps in one day just shut it off and then shutdown whole Pat form while news plus revenue will be a drop in the bucket of phone sales. Apple could at any time decide it's not thirsty anymore. Let news plus rat that eventual realization of platform risk and loss of relationship with the reader, led the majority of Facebook's instant article launch partners like the New York Times, the Washington Post and vox to drop the format entirely publishers would be why succumb to that. Same conclusion now before they drive anymore eyeballs to news. Plus, so. Yeah. That along with the fact that okay? So for the nine ninety nine a month that you'd be paying to have access to three hundred outlets end the articles in all that stuff. Apparently apple taking a fifty percent cut. The remaining fifty percent gets divvied up to whoever happened to have the most eyeballs clicks taps links. Anything interested through that? But. Realization apple news. Plus really isn't built for news the third and final point at least in terms of the article that'll be reading fused far. If you wanna read the article in share your thoughts. Some you can certainly do that let us know on Twitter Facebook or YouTube in comment section what you think apparently apple acquired that make Zine industry's self distribution app. Texture a year ago now is trying to cram in traditional text based news with minimal work to adapt. The product that means, National Geographic and Sports Illustrated gets featured billing with animated magazine covers N ways to browse the latest issue. News outlets get demoted far below with no intuitive or productive way to skin between articles beyond swiping through a chronological stack. I only see Wall Street Journal's content below my Megan's a massive at home feature from architectural digest a random gadgets and gear section of magazine articles, another huge call out

Apple Publisher Facebook The Wall Street Journal Sports Illustrated Twitter Architectural Digest Kitson Harry Youtube Megan New York Times Washington Post Fifty Percent Ten Dollars One Day
Jeff Bezos 'blackmail' claim puts focus on National Enquirer links to Trump

Orlando's Morning News

01:58 min | 2 years ago

Jeff Bezos 'blackmail' claim puts focus on National Enquirer links to Trump

"Jeff Bezos, the world's richest man is claiming he's been blackmailed and extorted by the owners the owner, I guess, I should say of the National Enquirer. And there really is Aaron Katersky a political angle to this every every story these days seems to have a Trump angle and this one has a Trump angle too. Well, in a sense because remember was am I that ended up in a plea deal with federal prosecutors here in New York Joe related to Michael Cohen, President Trump's former fixer and attorney they were implicated in a campaign finance violations with Colin who pleaded guilty himself. Paying off these women at the behest he said of of Donald Trump now am I is accused of extorting Jeff Bezos, perhaps related to the Washington Post coverage of Saudi Arabia and the the whole Jamal Shoghi. Am I was publishing in Niagara Zine for the Saudis, and there may have been some kind of effort to get the Washington Post to quash negative stories about am I and then and then somehow some way, and I guess this is the part of the intrigue here that the National Enquirer ends up with some pretty private racy photos of Jeff Bezos, just say. She was going through a divorce and there were photos of him and his mistress some of them in. I guess they were rather risque and kind of back and forth. Text messages and AM. I according to a letter that Basil's published on media. Threaten to put these pictures out there, if the Washington Post, and and beige himself didn't kind of cease with this whole investigation of business practices, and the I mean, it seems like outright blackmail and extortion. There's no crime that's been alleged. This is just Basil's. But something prosecutors must be taking a look

Jeff Bezos President Trump Washington Post National Enquirer Basil Colin Aaron Katersky Jamal Shoghi Saudi Arabia Extortion New York Attorney Michael Cohen JOE
"zine" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"zine" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

"Restarting merger talks with Viacom for the third time in his many years. Viacom CEO back is in a stronger position. This time around Bloomberg reports that with less moon best gone back. It has expanded Viacom's online. Tv business signed a deal to sell movies to Netflix and started rebuilding its own studio. Tesla CFO is leaving the company Elon Musk announced Deepak who just departure on a conference. Call after Tesla's earnings report post market earnings missed estimates. But recent job cuts did keep tesla. Profitable and Facebook's results for last quarter show data privacy scandals. Haven't heard business shares sharply higher in late trading. This could get you upgrade your iphone a new three D cameras coming next year. Sources tell Bloomberg it uses a laser scanner to create three dimensional images on Wall Street. Stocks were already making healthy gains. After Apple's earnings report. Then fed policymakers said they'd be. The patient on interest rate hikes in stocks really took off the Dow up four hundred thirty five points, the NASDAQ up one hundred fifty four in the SNP up forty one. We check your money at twenty and fifty after each hour. I'm doing Burks Adrienne Mitchell. KNX ten seventy NewsRadio Oregon's marijuana growers facing an unusual problem. We'll tell you about that in ninety seconds. It's six twenty one. The suspect took out the window of southern California. Santa Barbara county firefighters assisted by Washington. The Democrats go against whoever to the world shooter scare. Check in throughout the KNX, ten seventy NewsRadio. Valentine's day. I hate it. When I go to hug, someone really sexy and my face smashes right into the mirror your top reasons to visit Morongo. Get your tickets to see the fabulous Inglewood Zine. Rondo coming February fifteen and the number one reason to go to Morongo casino resort and spa this week screens for the big game joins us for the big game. This Sunday, great food, cold drinks photo giveaways in the Morongo ballroom. Morongo good times..

Viacom Tesla Morongo Bloomberg Morongo ballroom Morongo casino resort KNX Elon Musk Facebook Inglewood Zine Netflix CEO late trading Apple Rondo Santa Barbara county CFO California
"zine" Discussed on Kinda Funny Games Daily

Kinda Funny Games Daily

03:32 min | 2 years ago

"zine" Discussed on Kinda Funny Games Daily

"I don't care about it. And I just dealing and did the I did the whole thing. But now where I can play on the same count everywhere. So I'm just playing with my switch account everywhere. Which is where the lion share of my right? But I did it over the weekend sunk everything up. It was super easy started playing and then to go into my friends list and have it be. You know, here's your PlayStation Zine inside a fortnight, PlayStation, friends, then you shrink that let's see my epoch friends and then last call my friend pose my best magazine cog or do. Download this place. With me this week. And last night we played for like four hours, and it was just like. Even when we play with like Kevin Joey, Andy we're actually playing we're trying to win. We're doing the Bob but like to jump in with somebody last night. It'd be like cool. There's a shot. We're gonna win. You have no idea. How to play? I'm not even that great at it. You know what I mean? It was weird thing of and I know this is such a common occurrence for every other Gamera who plays online and does all the stuff. This for me. In PO was the first time really since I've moved away that we were playing a game together. And we were just hanging out. Like we used to hang out in the basement. Did you see that threat on Twitter recently? It was in this past week about how is not so much game as it is a place. So that what you described his exactly that. Exactly. Yeah. I forget who wrote that. Yeah. It was a Twitter threat by someone told him at how he was. He was watching his kid. He he's in watched his he played with them. Right. Yeah. Some of his kid friends. It was his kid and some friends twelve and he was saying they won't even really they were playing the game. But they want they went. They went signed go over here build this. So you, you know, someone's on your show. They would just talk and it, and it becomes the new lays. It's the new basement where kids hang out and talk about gossip they they're playing songs they weren't who likes to what's the latest gossip at school. And it's and it's just become that place that that commute a place where kids hang out. So it's transcended the experience of the game. And it made me think of it. 'cause what you just described is exactly that totally in. It's again, the power fortnight where when I talk about a mainstream, a, casual whatever you wanna call a gamer who isn't like us that listens washes, these podcasts, and cares about everything. Reading gene every day or reset air. Whatever that's po- po- has PlayStation for he plays. Everybody's playing black flag. He's just happy as a clam plain old. And so whenever something comes around where I'm like, dude. I want play I'm getting so excited invested in this game destiny to or I'm excited for the division to. I've bought him those games giving him, but he's a professor and he has a kid, and it's like that thing where he'll try to hit me up. But I'm off doing something or he'll miss that. We have to say he'll miss that week window, right? Where I'm all where last night was Yates free. Just download it over the weekend. It's free. Is it free timers are special mcnutt free all time. And then the last night to jump in. And explain everything to him and see him start getting interested in different skins Dame. This you see. Did you see the name that has been going from Infinity will over a strange and mantle? And the strangest thing from the movie says I looked into the future. And I went forward in time in so fourteen million different view, and Tony stark says in how many of those do sync up so we can play games together on line one. True. Yeah. Totally it sucks. But hey, no. It's it's amazing. What phone is become a used to be that with warcraft with me just enjoy playing world of warcraft. But when when I was in the guilt, and I got some no those those are my friends, those those online group of friends as excited is that when you play a what exempted when you play golf. I suck at golfing. Terrible about it. But it's less about playing the Gulf of more badges hanging out with. I've had that before I've had the DC universe. Online guild..

Twitter mcnutt professor golfing Bob Kevin Joey Yates Tony stark Infinity Andy four hours
"zine" Discussed on Outside Podcast

Outside Podcast

02:26 min | 2 years ago

"zine" Discussed on Outside Podcast

"Scientists who studied this stuff have two categories for fatigue central fatigue means the signals coming from the brain getting diluted along the central nervous system. Peripheral fatigue means that the muscles themselves aren't responding very well to the signals from the brain that are making it through and I should jump to the punch line, which is it's almost impossible to distinguish one from the other. It's not like there's this clear neat line between. Oh, that was the brain in that was the muscles. Because it turns out that the signals from your brain their ability to travel to your muscles are affected by what's going on in your muscles. Because there's all sorts of nerve signals passing by back and forth between your muscles in your brain. So if you're really tired if your muscles are damaged. They're sending signals back up to your central nervous system, which helped block signals from the brain saying don't send me any more messages to contract. I don't wanna contract anymore. So this station. We know is feeling tired. This really our brains inability to tell our muscles. What to do? And that's partly because our muscles have started blocking signals from the brain essentially throwing static on the line to keep from receiving messages. They don't wanna get for example, that burning sensation that happens when you exercise you probably know it is lactic acid, but that's not actually what it is. You don't actually have lactic acid in your muscles, and lactic acid doesn't actually stop your muscles from contracting. But your muscles. Do have sensors that detect the metabolic byproducts of hard exercise. These byproducts are lactate which is a molecule related to lactic acid hydrogen ions, which is also of our lactic acid and Edina Zine triphosphate or ATP which is actually part of what the muscle uses fuel and on their own. None of those metabolites do anything bad to your muscles. But you have sensors that detect when when levels of these metabolites are rising, and if all three rise at the same time, then that. Alarm bell that sends back a signal through these nerve fibers back to your brain, which your brain interprets as severe discomfort. So your muscles are still at that point perfectly capable of contracting. But they've detected worrying levels of these metabolites related to hard exercise. And so they sent back this signal that that that tries to change your behavior. So it's not that your muscles are failing. They're trying to alter your behavior in force you to slow down..

feeling tired Edina Zine bell
"zine" Discussed on Well This Sucks

Well This Sucks

04:33 min | 2 years ago

"zine" Discussed on Well This Sucks

"And as far as like doctors or certain articles, it's kind of one note. So this deadly dives into more like lifestyle and other aspects of a diagnosis that you don't generally think about our know until you're actually affected by. So when you're like researching all the time, you're like googling stuff and always like reading on the computer and it. Seems. Yeah, intangible, and you're just like, okay, I, I'm reading this and I know it's one sided in a way, so it's nice to have something in print until like feel feel more connected to it. Yeah, yeah, great. Yeah, greed. But I was trying to say, sorry, another. Yeah, this feels like warmer cozier him. You know how to sterile, you have. Yeah. In just feeling more connected to it because you're physically touching it and looking at these gorgeous photos of link people or people associated with it or just reading these beautiful articles and feeling connected in a way that you hadn't before where it was just like a sterile medical environment. Yeah, I, I appreciate you saying that. I also think that there's something different about reading a magazine in your hand. I don't know about you guys, but I tend to read a magazine so differently than I read books because I dip an Al times start at the end and work back to the front or maybe just looking for something specific and it's nice having imprint because you can do that and then you remember to come back to it, whereas maybe maybe others have mastered this more than I have digitally, but I tend to read and then I'm gone. You know, I move onto the next thing. I don't necessarily get back and forth the way I do with Booker Zine. That's true assembly, true. Sometimes I have the intention. I'll have a good, Jillian tabs open. Like I'm gonna read this. I'm gonna read this. I have so many I were to open my. Yeah. My internet right now. My internet internet's open. Siri. No don't call don't call right now. What would we would of what? Oh, my gosh. But yeah. I mean, you touched on this a bit, but do you want the future of wildfire to look like mail? You happy where it's at, you just wanna see where it goes or you want it to be. The the big one. I don't. You know the Bigler. Bigler. I know she's flailing arms. World dominy. Kim, the brain. Yeah. Well, so when I first started it, the print going to print with kind of the big goal and it was amazing when it happened, and I should say, I mean in case people haven't really been aware of wildfire for very long that the print part of it is relatively new that will just, I guess we're in September already well, but it just started in January that became available. And so that was kind of the big, you know. Next frontier for me was the print now that I'm there, and I've kind of ironed out son of the issues around the printing and the mailing, and I mean, that's like a whole different thing than when you have a digital product. But now that I feel like I've got that a little bit more sorted. My next goal I would say to go to actually monthly right now I publish every other month, so it would be great if it was coming out monthly and to do that would probably need to grow the team. And then I do. Have plans, and I d as for sun in-person, meet up where we could talk about writing, talk about getting your story out. People could practice writing if they want, and kind of just facilitate some of that in-person things that are growing with the magazine and you feel this connection but put some faces behind not as well as as the ultimate goal. That's amazing. Like I feel the goose, we've got the good feels running hearing about it, like goosebumps in a good way, if that makes sense. I have visceral real, right? Yeah. Pathetic. You've been lucky actually, because when I do finally get to that point, it'll probably California. So I read trip in your in your. Thinking that exact. We are. Convenient. Good fast. Are you comfortable talking about.

Booker Zine Siri Kim California
"zine" Discussed on Coffee Podcast by Cat

Coffee Podcast by Cat

01:53 min | 2 years ago

"zine" Discussed on Coffee Podcast by Cat

"Saying especially like the first issue because a lot of the first issue is art from folks in denver just because that's where my you know my network really lives but yeah people have been like oh this is so cool because i can look in there and i can see you know on page whatever let's say let's say page thirteen there's a there's like a a piece written by emily orndorff who's at boxcar coffee roasters and so people have been like oh you know i go to box car but i didn't know that emily wrote or i go to boxcar but i didn't know who emily was so now i can go there and be like hey who are you an you know so people can connect with the baristas who are like making them their drinks and then i've also from people who aren't for people who are coffee professionals the the biggest feedback i've gotten from them is well a lot of people have been like oh i really want to submit something but i don't have anything or like a lot of people are super like i think superstock done it but are like a little hesitant because they think they're stuff isn't good enough or isn't professional enough or whatever but i try encourage people like that's why i made a zine like zine can literally be anything you don't have to make it fancy it doesn't have to be polished it doesn't have to be perfect just send me send me all the things so i can make more books i think there's something really beautiful about something that's just kind of gnarly for lack of a better word or just so kinda raw it's everything contend to be super polished in the digital space and it's like look at how perfect my existence is and there's something refreshing about hey this is me just deal with.

denver emily orndorff boxcar coffee
"zine" Discussed on Coffee Podcast by Cat

Coffee Podcast by Cat

04:55 min | 2 years ago

"zine" Discussed on Coffee Podcast by Cat

"Once each other to do well it's not like cutthroat at all it's all it's all everyone loving each other i don't that you're setting the example as it turns out for everybody else listen everybody get it together go denver forget about it totally come out to denver in check us out we do it up i wanna come out to denver i actually had cation open up this is a total sidebar but we're planning on going to this trip to austin and then it got cancelled but my mind is mentally prepared to go somewhere so i've been looking at states in the us where haven't been yet and where can i go and have a weird experience dan van sure yeah i don't know it's next month sometime i have no idea what's happening well heck if you do find if you do find that you are going to come to denver let me know and i can i make sure that everybody would be happy to have you i will absolutely let you know and i would absolutely love to hang out with everybody yeah so you're you're going to throw downs you're getting you're getting second place at this awesome competition which is a magical surprise come on no way so by this time it feels like you're just you're part of the scene that's happening is that fair to say yeah i think that's totally how old is like i feel like i my discovery of coffee and interest in being involved in the coffee community kind of evolved at the same time as like the denver seen really started to solidify and take off i mean i don't know i don't know if that's just because that's my perception because i was getting interested in it then so it seems like that's when the scene was coming up but from what i've heard of other people like it it's kind of in the past five or so years and even more in the in the past three years denver coffee has really come to and really colorado coffee i have to say like i can't exclude colorado springs who came out hard at the coffee champs this past year so yeah i just like i been in the right place at the right time in the right community such a good feeling when you find what you feel like are your people yeah such a fun thing so now you have this zine which i'm really really intrigued by which kind of was part of the conversation that we had when we talked over expo weekend at the lommers oko cafe which was awesome and you're into your second issue which just released just came out on thursday and it's got a ridiculously awesome cover of what looks like ice cream cone being doused with a bunch of coffee it was super fun i was a really fun shoot so like basically i had this idea in my head like i want this big ice cream cone with a ton of sprinkles i wanna pour a bunch of coffee on it and i reached out to two of my best friends actually my best friends from like junior high and high school who live out in colorado right now and one of them is a photographer and the other one she actually works at google hello abby and blair hi guys but i was basically like hey do you guys want to go get ice cream with me and they were like yeah sure that sounds great whatever and then i was like abbie bring your camera blair paint your nails of pretty color and they were like what are you talking about unlike just just trust me so yeah we went and got ice cream and i like brought some cold brew so i didn't like skuld my friend's hand and i basically like we we tried to find a white wall and the only one we could find was in the back alley like back behind this weird like his weird area in denver because that's close to where the ice cream shop was but i was basically like okay blair hold this ice cream cone and abby get ready to shoot i'm just going to pour this coffee on this ice cream and they were like okay so we all ended up covered in coffee because it splashed a lot more than i thought it would but yeah it was super super fun what who inspiration behind visine because even though it's if you pick it up it's a typical zine which i kind of missed because skate companies used to make a lot of.

three years
"zine" Discussed on Coffee Podcast by Cat

Coffee Podcast by Cat

04:33 min | 2 years ago

"zine" Discussed on Coffee Podcast by Cat

"Some like if i had a couple of times like my baristas will text me and be like hey the espressos tasting a little off today like what is did something change or whatever and a like look back at my row slog and lo and behold like that espresso like we used a new bag of brazil or something so i can like trace back but if i didn't have my baristas like engaged on that then they wouldn't be like they couldn't tell me what was going wrong like what i was doing wrong or what was off at the row story so important totally everybody gets feedback loop it's so real so you arresting copy work of our a couple of days a week and you also run this zine participating really heavily in the copy community was airport in time of like a point in time in your journey to where you felt like you were part of this larger community or more than just an individual with a coffee job or i want to explore going sea or seeing a breach the competition those weird things that we do right yeah i mean i think the first time that i went to throwdown i was invited by el and it was it was like right after amethyst head opened and it was at this other new place that had just opened and i had no idea what was going on i like went and they were all of these people standing around and there was a triangulation also like the first round was triangulation and then it was like a throat on after that and i i had never done triangulation i had never really like tasted coffees like at that point i was still like in the very heavily in the today like world you know coffee is lachaise and so i like saw these people standing around like sipping from these three cups of coffee and i was like what is this thing it's so weird and like the the denver coffee seen is like very very welcoming and just like super super friendly and so i saw a couple of people that i knew from other shops and it just kind of like was super intriguing for me because i was like what are all these coffee things and also everybody seems to know each other and they're all like friends with each other and the same so nice and yeah so i just kind of like that that drew me in a little bit and then just like yeah continued to go to throw downs and coffee events and hanging out at amethyst as much as i could and yeah i a couple years well when was it it was think last year i well oh so then cherry rose started have you heard of cherry rose so don't know tell me about it oh it is the all female slash non binary slash fem identified competition that we have in denver every year and this started three there have been three of them and elegance started this cherry roast in amethyst and it since the last two years it's been at commonwealth coffee roasters up in denver and yeah it's basically it was just like a competition but not a lot to throw down to encourage women and like folks of gender identities who are not in the majority at competition basically just like to get up there to do it to try to get involved so i did that my first the first year that it went on and the goddess breezy sanchez one i got second place which i was like i had i was like i didn't know that i could do coffee like that i guess thanks to praise with your skill level yeah yeah yeah i went in being like oh god i'm going to get out in the first round because there are all these super bad ass coffee babes who are going to like kill it and then i ended up getting to the final round and getting second i was like oh god weird competition i'm trying to figure out now yeah.

three cups two years
"zine" Discussed on Reliable Sources with Brian Stelter

Reliable Sources with Brian Stelter

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"zine" Discussed on Reliable Sources with Brian Stelter

"About international foreign affairs but through food through culture through zine and i think after so many of those episodes i can only imagine how many people he continued to stay in touch with and connected with are two of them and and he continued to more than the support that he gave and and advocacy that he did while we were imprisoned continued to be a good friend us after our release counseling us privately in our interactions with him professionally but also in how to get through what was really a tough reintegration that's the part people don't know right now he he was advocating for you when you were in prison he was on cnn demanding release but then after you got home he's dade in touch and didn't his book imprint actually even even acquire your book you're working on a book about your time there yeah and and you know i had several offers from from other publishers that wanted to publish it but it was a very personal email that i got from tony at really the last hour one i needed to make a decision that put it over the top from you i got it and read it to yankee back in late two thousand sixteen and we just kind of agreed right there that that we're doing this with tony we've been with them on this journey for for a couple of years and we're gonna keep going and what do you think it was about storytelling that stood out so much i saw a lot of people on friday saying you know iran other countries he would go to that sometimes seem hysteria inaccessible or sometimes demonized as evil he made it personable he made it human well in our encounter with him in iran i think it was very clear that that he let himself be open to the experience and not overly influenced by what he had heard over the years about that country and and just let himself be there and i can only imagine that's what he did everywhere you want yes indeed.

cnn iran tony
"zine" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:06 min | 3 years ago

"zine" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I'm rebecca carol in this is mid day celestial and roy are a recently married african american couple living in atlanta as with most marriages they have their ups and downs whilst lustral is pursuing a creative career roy is gaining success in his executive role things are looking up soon they may buy a bigger house start a family but all this is stopped short when roy is convicted for a crime he hasn't committed in her newest book called an american marriage to harry jones gives us the story of what happens to the newlyweds when roy is incarcerated received a lot of early praise from writers such as michael chaban and jacqueline woodson jerry jones last novel is silver sparrow was named in any a big read and chosen as best book of two thousand of 2011 by oh the oprah zine slate another literary magazines and american marriage was published by a gulf quick alqom quinn all gone quinn books and i am very pleased it has brought tara jones to our show hi ari tehri how are you i'm good how are you it's great to have you think here so this book is about is about marriage between two people but it's also about testing the boundaries of friendship we need to talk about andrei we we must talk about andrei we it sort of like i mean without kind of giving anything away i mean you start you start to get a sense of what the dynamic is sort of like love basketball right but there's a really close friendship between a man a man in a woman that isn't well you tell me if you have described old honestly i don't think as a spoiler to say that um and american marriage ultimately is a novel about a love triangle as a matter of fact i feel like if you don't say at the you're not really saying what the book it's about okay see i heard oprah say that by the way back to us about that was hoped for said that today about your book but and i i didn't expect i was quite surprised because i read it as a galley as well and i was quite surprised that it went in that direction but i do think that what i've heard any way is that that relationship between.

rebecca carol atlanta roy jacqueline woodson jerry jones tara jones andrei basketball lustral executive harry jones michael chaban ari tehri oprah
"zine" Discussed on SOFREP Radio

SOFREP Radio

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"zine" Discussed on SOFREP Radio

"Happy situations that require someone to respond would weapons so yeah i get in a it's a hundred percent to 100 percent right i think what they're fearing is you know having that that that direct open acknowledgement of the veteran being able to help in a situation like that and also having to accept that's that that arena comes with guys were meant to issues and and i think that's the big problem and no one wants a dressed out no one wants to separate the two and i've been a big advocate of separating the two were those guys that are completely distraught at some can't function i get it there's some veterans at a really tore up you know i get it and it's a scary thing you know having to separate that there's veterans are not tour a perfectly fine wouldn't be unfair to say that if you want to conceal carried or veteran go through psychiatric evaluating whom sorted if you want to do it i don't think it would be unacceptable thing and also you're about to use your look nypd or great we love them but you do hear about in instances these crazy shoots where they just they eddie a whole rag zine and yet and i hit a guy like toll and an economic news not going to do that none so anyway i figured we clear that went up this one the right wing thing i could at least see this guy's response here so this is from bob sent to soccer that radio software dot com as well and i take issue with a little bit of what you said what here's over here we'll get into it because i like to read the positive and the negative guys i i read all the emails it seems that both of you i guess meaning both the boss yet says in adjacent still don't understand that there are many liberal democrats that are serving activeduty an all the armed forces branches and jason still doesn't understand that the us military is not a private republican party club that it's exclusive to only right wingers you in never coal monte shit because of whatever fear you may have of delgado as a dad you that fears and accuse my ass i like four times a week i'm on the other lying i.

economic news bob jason us delgado soccer hundred percent 100 percent
"zine" Discussed on The Ben Shapiro Show

The Ben Shapiro Show

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"zine" Discussed on The Ben Shapiro Show

"Bruno fleas zine said the war darn his jobs do bad news on the contrary come why more turn and they probably a horse there's no real passenger seat in your towards two diet okay more h arriving for the vote and then it got worse will remove here's the the first lesson to be learned from what happened in alabama last night were roy more narrow narrowly narrowly lost doug jones i mean like lost by twenty thousand votes out of a hundred out of one point two million votes cast something like that i did the first lesson we learned is there is a line for voters is a point where voters just will not show up three now the line for at what you'll vote for gets raised by the impact of the election so let's put it this way this war if there's been a dog catcher election no one shows up to vote for roy more it's senate election so six hundred thousand people show up to vote for run more if the presidential election then you can be donald trump and you can lend because the stakes are so high at that point the people are gonna show up regardless because they feel like they must show up out of necessity but for senate election even for presidential election there's a line beyond which americans are not willing to go one more crossed that line it really is that simple who's an unpalatable candidate from beginning before there are any of these allegations about the the the sexual molestation of of underage.

alabama doug jones roy presidential election Bruno senate donald trump
"zine" Discussed on We Paid To See This

We Paid To See This

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"zine" Discussed on We Paid To See This

"Zine gave that from the only negative review and he and it was so great and i feel like that go i was waiting for the lakers ladybird what i don't even know if it's to 100 percent around tomatoes but i was waiting for that one guy to give ladybird a rotten score like a but you know it santrac was incredible is it is it's he takes other stories and moulds them to fit his i just feel like everyone bowed ira if it has to be innovative all the time i think he is going to be irradiated i think that's the problem like visual overload for me it was just it was just too much too much green too much like he's one example all how this stuff i didn't understand how this stuff serve district what it says about characters why was her character obsessed with time she had alarm clocks shed time is and she was often light for were why either miller the said nothing about her character and the end pay off so why you you know know michael shannon's character so decisive makes decisions and he's the boss someone talks him into buying a car that he didn't even like the color of why but i think that spoke to him because even when he has those things with his boss you realize that oh he maybe the vilna this movie but he's not the boss but he's the boss of every single person in his life how can a car salesman convinced him to get a a car that's green because i don't want to green car and the guy says is not green at steal and he says okay because i think he didn't want that combat i think he's weaker than it's a first it was a facade it's all a facade he's trying to play it being this thing i think that's what that spoke do a k just didn't play for me just didn't ring true i just i just didn't understand it are just i didn't i didn't i didn't end again i know i'm wrong it's funny you went up you're not right now.

lakers miller michael shannon vilna salesman 100 percent
"zine" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

KTLK 1130 AM

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"zine" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

"Some transition money that will allow vis vis farmers too quickly in in in large scale start to uh support the organic emergence i don't wanna just grows smell what's going on with corn and some of these high levels of future seen and cadaver rain oh you don't want to what they're doing to corned right well words by the way yeah i know i know it's like they've that's that gives the foul smell of a rotting dick body that's in my santos round that's when we got putrid slaver exactly and then and then those are actual terms and in in another in another type of corn there was a i switch on of a gene it's normally silent and it produces an allergy and so it doesn't tell you on the label these corn contains gamba zine which is a known allergen have you would know what it is anyway but if you're getting a reaction to bug santos corn you will know 'cause it's not even labelled as gmo and you don't know that you are allergic to corn but it's not all corn it's just a genetically engineered variety likewise in mind santos soit there's up to seven times the amount of an hour jin called trips and inhibitor which can reduce the wave it or allergens are broken down so if you're taking one santos soy you might become allergic to a lot of other things and it's interesting that in the five years after genetically modified soya was introduced peanut allergies doubled and and the we have we written the book in genetic roulette ways that that might explain that where the relationship between the gm soy the peanut allergies might be uh supportive international line.

allergic genetically modified times gm