37 Burst results for "Zimmer"

Fresh update on "zimmer" discussed on Behind the Bets

Behind the Bets

00:34 min | 1 hr ago

Fresh update on "zimmer" discussed on Behind the Bets

"That would be impressive. Well, you know what? You know what that means. That means that the sports books are going to be hung out on all these money line parties. We didn't get a lot of that last week. If you look at last Sunday, there was very tight point spreads across the board and the money line parlay action wasn't really there because there weren't that many big favorites for the public to parlay together. This week, very different Minnesota, Arizona Tampa Bay, the colts, the chiefs, the eagles, maybe even the rams, I don't know about that. But there's a lot of favorites for the public to throw into parlays and we're going to be just inundated with these money line parliament. We're going to need one of these underdogs to win outright. We've seen road teams dominate ATS this year. Now it's a predictive who knows. 57% is the cover win percentage or whatever you want to ATS win percentage. This season. But I feel like we've been talking about road teams the last couple of years. Just because everyone reacts to the home team, just kind of that old school thought, like, oh, they're going to play better at home. I just feel like the road teams have sense of urgency sometimes. And you're getting value in the home sort of situation has been inflated in the point spread. And I agree with you, but I also think equally important is home field advantage is really disappearing in the NFL. Not at every single not at every team, but there's a lot of teams who don't really have a home field advantage. That I'm from the Washington D.C. area. I don't think Washington has much of a home field advantage. I don't think the teams in Los Angeles where you're from have a home field advantage. And I could list a whole bunch of a whole bunch of teams across the league. They really make a huge difference. It doesn't make a significant difference if they're playing at home. Well, in some of it is just the travel, because a lot of it just not necessarily crowd noise, but its adjustment. Just travel whatever. But the travel conditions so much better as well, private planes, nutritionists, all that stuff, the advancement in technology and advancement in health nutrition is certainly leveled that playing field as well. And then the communication, once you get to the technology component, once the games arrive. So that's part of it. But let's break down some of these games. You know, we talked about Khmer being out for the saints Vikings might be shorthanded in Detroit Detroit hasn't been that terrible against the spread even though their winless on the season. So I leaned Detroit here plus the full 7. I was a weird game last time Vikings wander they were down in the whole game until the final few minutes Detroit almost won that game after a fumble by Madison who might play with the Dalvin cook injury. Any sharp or anything here? Detroit does not have a win, but you should mention they do have a ton. I don't forget about that. I'd just like to wedge in the references to ties. Wherever I see you, an opportunity. Yeah, there has been a little bit of sharp money on the under 47 and a half from a very respected account here. And we're down to 46 and a half to side right now actually surprisingly enough, there's a fair amount of money on Detroit. They were taking 7 and a half with Detroit. Now by the time we get to Sunday, we'll need Detroit big because the public is all going to be on Minnesota. But right now, there are early in the week. There has been some money on the lines. There's definitely some sharp money on the under in this game. And you're right. The first matchup between these two teams, the Vikings were just coasting the whole game and all of a sudden they found themselves behind. They rallied for a late field goal to win the game, but Minnesota, the best thing they can do is when they get a lead is just keep pressing, because their aerial attack is really one of the best in the NFL. So that is the package. For some reason, they get these leads and Mike Zimmer starts to clock watching and it takes his foot off the gas and in a number of cases he's blown these games. He didn't blow that game against the Lions that week, but he's blown other games and he's going to do it again. Just let their offense keep scoring. You've got great receivers. You've got a quarterback playing at a high level, but he just doesn't do that. Ten of 11 games. Ten of their 11 games have been decided by one score. And you get the full 7 here's the dog is a productive maybe. I mean, we talked about the Zimmer shooting himself in the foot, getting too conservative with the lead. They've held leads, I believe in all those games. It's just truly remarkable. Interesting you say on the under, I actually leaned that way too, but Vikings games have all been shootouts on the road and then home they've been going under except for that package gave a couple weekends, but obviously that's just a little bit of a trend in this season. So let's go to another similar spread, Arizona now up to 7 and a half. We're expecting Kyler Murray to return as the birds fly to soldier field, the Chicago team, not exactly..

Detroit Washington D.C. Vikings Minnesota Colts Tampa Bay Rams Chiefs Eagles NFL Arizona Parliament Khmer Los Angeles Mike Zimmer Washington Saints Madison Lions
Fresh update on "zimmer" discussed on CNBC's Fast Money

CNBC's Fast Money

08:04 min | 20 hrs ago

Fresh update on "zimmer" discussed on CNBC's Fast Money

"For a fast money exclusive interview is lift cofounder and president John Zimmer, John, thanks so much for joining us. Thanks for having me. Have you seen any changes in how people are booking their rides or the pace at which they're booking? We have not seen any negative data around rides related to the new variant. And in fact, we remain extremely confident in our outlook for Q four as well as going into next year where we believe we'll have faster revenue growth in 22 than we did in 21. So no signs yet of any negative impacts. What are the sorts of precautions or lockdown measures that you that you'll hear that will make you think we could see a slowdown at that point? Is it going to be travel bans? Even if it's international because that limits airport business, restaurant shutdowns are more requirements for masks and vaccinations at restaurants. What sorts of things? Yeah, absolutely. I think you named a lot of them. Talking about airport rides specific to Thanksgiving. This year we saw twice as many rides as we saw last Thanksgiving. So I think there is still a general trend towards people coming back being safe. We now have the means to we're requiring masks inside the car for driver and rider. More and more people are getting their vaccines. I think as we get more information about this variant, we'll have eyes open around those measures you talked about. But so far that hasn't shown up in the data. So, John, last quarter, Q three, when you guys reported, you know, there was a lot of really important things coming out of the pandemic. You guys were onboarding more drivers, riders were coming back. The pricing was really stable. Is this thing again? I just heard what you had to say about avocado. I think we're going to be moving back. These sorts of trends that you expect to really build in 2022 going forward despite COVID. We do. Yeah, as I said, I'm confident in both the outlook for Q four as well as what we're going to see in the full calendar year next year. Of course, there'll be both reality and narratives that shift things and create volatility in a week by week basis. But overall, people are coming back wanting to go out and finding safe ways to do so. But we'll keep looking and listening to make sure we're doing everything possible to keep drivers and riders safe. When you look at next year, John, what are you anticipating? What are you forecasting in terms of the cost to bring on new drivers, the cost to keep them in your margins? Yeah, and so we look at drivers actually one of the metrics we shared on our last earnings call. If you look from January to September over this year, our drivers return 5 times faster than workers to the hospitality or retail sector. And so it's happening. The pandemic did affect labor across many industries. But we are seeing increasing return of drivers activation of drivers in Q three was 60% greater year over year. And those trends have continued in a positive way. So when you report I think it was November 2nd, we talked about it on the show. I thought it was a remarkable quarter for all the metrics you just talked about was record quarter in terms of rider profitability and those types of metrics. I thought the stock was easily headed north the 60 bucks. I think a lot of analysts did as well. Here we are $38 and quite frankly, the stock has been a disappointment since the spring. I'm not looking to play stock market here, but when you look at what you're doing and then look at the stock price, does it make sense to you? No. I think it's a big opportunity to get in right now at the value. We have before it was expected. We had adjusted EBITDA profitability in Q two. We grew that in Q three. In a market where we have 65% of the rides that we had prior to the pandemic happening. So we just massively improved the unit economics and the cost structure of our business. And that leverage is going to get better and better as we go as we scale up. And as we come out of the pandemic. And I am, as I've said, confident that both in Q four, we're going to hit our outlook as well as next year haven't even faster growing revenue year than we did this year. So we're fired up about what we're doing. We're excited about the numbers we're putting up on the board. And we feel confident that the stock will follow. It's hard to predict when. But we'll be patient and keep our heads down, grinding away on the business. It's not often you get an executive saying that the stock price is too low. They often say no comment there, John. So we appreciate your openness and your honesty there. John, great to see you. Thank you so much. Thank you. John Zimmer of Lyft. I don't know, Karen, would you agree? Would I agree that we don't get very often someone to come on and say, yeah, it's about opportunity. It's interesting. Right. No, I like him and it's not like, you know, they aren't a wildly over promise under deliver. I would say the opposite, right? So that is interesting to me. I think that I don't know an Uber or Lyft. I've always preferred lift to Uber, but I mean, they've done what they said they would do. That deserves something. So I think it's interesting. I would probably be a buyer here, but I don't own it currently. Yeah. Tim, but with the uncertainty of COVID in general, it's usually by the rumors sell the news or in this case sell the rumor and buy the news. So what do we do here? Look, we've seen this playbook at various times for the last two years, but certainly just punctuated by stock action from the first round of COVID. So ami Kron, and there's going to be something to follow it. These are buying opportunities lift long-term as a business. I mean, transportation is a service ride share isn't going anywhere. It's growing. The fact that the unit economics got better and we've always said nothing like a good crisis to get a company to run better and look their active users active riders were up 51% year over year. We know, obviously, getting to a normalized number is still some time away. But it's a question of when not if and better on business. I think it's the big debate on Lyft versus Uber, not whether transportation and rideshare as a service is something that people are going to continue to pile into. It's a question of what's the better business model? And Uber fans are going to tell you they want that super app dynamic and they think this company is going to be a much bigger platform. But Lyft is getting their business right. So that's impressive. The stock is up by one and a half percent now in the after hour session. Dan, what do you like it here? Yeah, I do. And I'll just say this, you know, we were just talking about valuations. We were talking about some of these mega market caps. This has an 11 and a half $1 billion enterprise value. They have a ton of cash on their balance sheet. I think they're taking the steps to really focus on North American rideshare, and you know, we didn't even get to this deal that they announced with Argo AI in four and over the summer where they're going to be deploying these autonomous fleets. And they're not in that business anymore, but that's a great partnership and that's something that I think should be reflected in the value once they really start rolling that out in cities like Miami and Austin over the course of the year. So I just think there's I think it's a cheap stock and I think they're doing some things right and I think the trends as Tim just said will start benefiting them as we get past this virus in 2022. So again the lift CEO just telling us you're on fast money that they're not seeing any impact on bookings from autocrane and also the CEO of things that the stock is cheap at these levels. The stock is up 2% on the back of that. Coming up, shoulda cut a water..

John Zimmer John Covid Ami Kron Lyft Karen TIM DAN Tim Just Miami Austin
"zimmer" Discussed on The Astral Hustle with Cory Allen

The Astral Hustle with Cory Allen

04:54 min | 2 months ago

"zimmer" Discussed on The Astral Hustle with Cory Allen

"Connect with people around these ideas. Where if you don't know anyone that is interested in these Yeah 'cause i wanna talk to other people about them But i just don't like of my friends in. None of my family are really interested and so being able to connect in a group like that is so powerful. Because you really you know six of people in the group you times your own experience by five and that way Totally yeah i think it's a really powerful part of the program and i've been. I've been thrilled that it actually has worked in allowed people to create those relationships. Because just like you. I at the same sort of questions a lot and one of the things i've i've is been on my mind for years getting to know people who listen to the show. You know getting the chance to work with some of them in one on one. Coaching and just getting emails from or in you know. Even people don't become coach. Coaching clients. I talked to on an introductory call. After meeting. lots of people. Over the years i went like these folks would all love each other. Like they're i mean they're wonderful. I mean and and this idea of like how how. how could. How could this thing that. I've built here. This podcast this community. How could it actually support. Each other. background of recovery was in twelve step programs and twelve step programs. I have i have my issues with some of the parts of them but when they work they are possibly some of the most beautiful things on the planet when you see people truly loving and caring for each other simply because it's good for them and it's good for the other person it it's a model. That is beautiful. works. And i've often wished like that people who aren't in recovery but but are spiritually minded had something similar and so this is kind of an attempt to help create that at least you know on a much smaller scale right now..

"zimmer" Discussed on The Astral Hustle with Cory Allen

The Astral Hustle with Cory Allen

04:28 min | 2 months ago

"zimmer" Discussed on The Astral Hustle with Cory Allen

"How do i devote myself to what i know to be true. You know so when we hear podcasts. Like like this one another's we hear this wisdom and we go. Yeah it resonates. It wakes something up in us. We're like yes that feels right. It feels true. It feels but knowledge alone isn't enough. It has to become action. And how does it. How does it work. Its way into all aspects of our lives and so meditation is the sort of spiritual habit that most people think of and it is a spiritual habit and it's a. It's a very good one and unless you're extraordinarily devoted meditation practitioner. It's probably the most an hour of your day. So you've got twenty three other hours and and how. How can we take transformational spiritual principles and we've them through. The rest of those hours is is really what the courses Intended to do and why i created it. Yeah that's a beautiful Thing to be putting in the world because just as you said people kind of Load up on on ideas and good feelings and can think. Oh well if i had the that true feeling than that was the work that happened and i'm getting somewhere which that's step one of it right and just by i'm sure it's there's no random chance whatsoever but right before we started talking about this. That feeling is when part of in the engagement of that feeling step to so. It's really cool that you've you've woven in those insights in spiritual practices into a functional system of extra being able to put those in your life where they're going to grow and expand and have a real traction and real effect. Yeah i mean there. There is a lot you know. Fairly foundational spiritual wisdom out there The perennial philosophy. Some of these ideas of like the same principles. Show up over and over in all these different religious traditions philosophical traditions right. There's a lot of crossover so so we can look at that and go okay. Those seem to be pretty profound principles that people from lots of different cultures in lots of different eras and lots of different viewpoints landed on and went these. These are pretty good ways to live. So we we've got that and we also know a lot about how people change these days. There's been a lotta great work done on this and so so yeah i just. I tried to put them together. Yeah right and so. How do you kinda guide people through it all.

"zimmer" Discussed on The Astral Hustle with Cory Allen

The Astral Hustle with Cory Allen

05:19 min | 2 months ago

"zimmer" Discussed on The Astral Hustle with Cory Allen

"The hangover of living in the of being conditioned human being his grown a materialistic culture that really everything in in western culture but specifically in america is predicated upon marketing. Right like is all marketing fund capitalism and so forth and then on up to the banking overlords in the central point of never marketing. Really start doing. Its thing was when figured out you know in the nineteen sixties or something like that like hey if we tell people if they have this that they'll be happier and they'll be living a better life and if we take someone who's famous because of their famous than they must be doing something right and we get them to pose with this product as well will say. Hey you can be like this person you've been told in grooms to admire if you have this thing. The way in that started working and so of course it got exploited like crazy became sort of the foundation of of all marketing practices. And what happened. In that is the natural response of people within being born after that sort of landscape unfolded. That economic landscape unfolded in america and the people being born after that. Then grow up instinctually believing because of the conditioning that i am missing something like as a person. I'm not good enough. I'm missing something right. And so one of the. And that's why a lot of people feel empty and look towards material things to fill them up or or lifestyles or status is because all was in that shit and so you take that sort of dna model and then apply some someone of the same ilk then selling these mystical states of badly translated eastern ideas. And if you will get really far off the path because they're like oh. I need now. I need that. And i could be happy if i just have this experience and to bring all this together you know what you articulated so beautifully earlier is it's like well. There's an element of the process of those miskel states which are invaluable but does your only an element of the process in real..

america
Sunday Surprises: What Went Wrong With the Vikings?

The Lead

01:34 min | 2 months ago

Sunday Surprises: What Went Wrong With the Vikings?

"The team you cover. The vikings appear to have a pretty favorable matchup to start the season facing joe borough in his first game back from acl surgery but a theme we saw on sunday was a lot of games not going as expected. So take us through. What was going wrong for the vikings and what was going right for the bengals for much of this game. Yeah i think the biggest thing that went wrong for the vikings had to do with the penalties twenty four already. Four penalties is opening drive on the vikings after that holding call. I think that there were. I wanna say five false start. Penalties and five holding penalties along with defensive pass interference. Most of those occurred in the first half but the vikings racked up over ninety yards of penalties. It turns out. They got five sacks on borough they forced the bengals to three and thirteen on third down kind of all the fundamentals that you look for me there were decent in the red zone the fundamentals that you look for like a good defense or even a good offense were there but a lot of penalties just took them back. I mean the first drive of the game. They gained forty yards of offense only gained three yards on the field. I'm sure you know mike zimmer. Being the vikings head coach is notoriously intense probably was extremely relaxed in not furious at all about any of these penalties right. Yeah of course i mean. He just rolls with the punches. You know you figure that they will probably take care of themselves now. He was as you would expect. He was pretty vocal at halftime about all of the issues that he's coming up but again most of those issues did occur in the first half. So i guess you know for whatever that's worth. I guess whatever's halftime speech was about cleaning things up. May work voice

Vikings Joe Borough Bengals Mike Zimmer
"zimmer" Discussed on From Scratch

From Scratch

05:10 min | 2 months ago

"zimmer" Discussed on From Scratch

"Focus with you is on non human driving cars for example. That's one of things. So yeah they're obviously large investors They're doing vehicle access providing drivers with vehicle so when vehicle comes off lease Maybe it's a three year lease and then it. It's a great vehicle that a driver could use on our network And then we have multiple autonomous vehicle partners dot that were working with his. Well you know how i asked before like. When did you know. Lift was working What what about from the fundraising perspective in the early days when you became lift. Was there that moment where you're like. This is getting a little easier. No maybe in the most recent fundraise. It felt a bit easier than in the past. There was a narrative out there that this was winner-takes-all and we weren't in the lead and so we were fighting against that narrative which which we've done and and people were gaining marketshare. We're growing faster than anyone else. The simple answer is no maybe in the last round it was a little bit easier it's a fallacy to think that there's just room for one player in this market that you know people talk about network effects and technology and they're applying generic network affect us to a point there's network effect but once you hit three minutes as a city It there can be multiple players this is similar to kind of three bars of coverage with. At and t. and barisan. Let's it called supply. We call it the supply network effect versus a demand side network effect which facebook would be. Maybe the best example where the more friends you have connected on this network the better and better and better it gets you know forever and so that leads towards having one major player but in on the supply network effect side. I'd like an more to kind of the wireless carriers just going back to what. What is christine. Do your wife christina christina. So she she worked in microfinance And more recently We just had a baby. So she's been care of our little baby and she's been with you this you know throughout the trajectory because you met her while you're in college is that right. What does she make of all this. What has been her informal involvement with a company. She's incredibly helpful at keeping me balanced about what's important Like our our family. She's both you know My biggest fan and by big critic In a really helpful way. Because i know. I'm always gonna get an honest. What's a good example. Well show her something. We're working on with A new new marketing program. Whether it's a video and she'll she'll tell me you know unfiltered you know what she thinks of it All work through problems with her. Say hey i think we need to hire someone for this specific role And she's just agree sounding board She tells me when. I don't look good in the morning. That kind of thing boxer. Are you like to have a. i'm using boxing. As a way to to work out for the last year to live boxing. I was living in the dog. Patch neighborhood of san francisco looking for the closest jim to my house and it was a boxing gym and so i kind of stumbled onto. It really enjoyed it and then Now have a boxing trainer and a weird way. I found it to be a form of meditation. Where when i'm sparring with the trainer i can't be in my head. I have to be present. i have. It's really like very physical. Obviously a lot of us have teachers or a lucky teachers in our life that you know we remember so fondly and you were talking about how rob young. Your professor cornell taught that class. Are you in touch with him still. He's he actually officiated my wedding. That was christina's idea. He did a phenomenal job. And it's because he the the strong impact that he had on your career on broader than career. I think on on my life. He helped me to think differently. He helped me to have a better perspective on things why he has this beautiful mind in this beautiful way of seeing patterns and themes that are so obvious yet. No one's looking at what's an example. Why thank the history of the world in thirty minutes requires that you come up with some really simple themes and he is one of the most. Well read knowledgeable people i've ever met. And so he can tie things together and he can bring in history in ways that i've never seen before for the for the wedding he. He talked about spanish american relations as a way Because my wife spanish in a way that was just really beautiful. What did he say He talked about how the two countries have always been inextricably connected And and then like in the relationship. Thank you very much for joining us. Thanks for having me. I guess has been john zimmer. Co-founder of lift. I'm jessica harris. this is from scratch..

christina christina boxing rob young christine facebook san francisco jim christina john zimmer jessica harris
"zimmer" Discussed on From Scratch

From Scratch

06:07 min | 2 months ago

"zimmer" Discussed on From Scratch

"Cities are built around people and not cars and and so now. We're spending a lot of time now on the adding new products like lift line reserve shared. Ride we're testing shuttle service in san francisco. We really want to give you everything you need to. I don't need to own a car or even senior citizens. You know helping them get to their doctor appointments that yes we're doing a lot of Non emergency medical transportation There's just a lot of situations where Having help from someone from the community. Getting you where you need to go is much easier than you're driving yourself since you were focused on reinvention and always kind of self reflection as a company. At what point did you feel like well. You know what this is. This is working like. I'm getting traction. With the way things are in this model versus a prior iteration with lift. That happened pretty quickly. So zim ride was five years of really really difficult trying to get people to carpool and it really not clicking to the degree we wanted it to with lift we had people pulling for and we had to create a d. a weightless because we had so much demand. We couldn't keep up with it but then we had the issue of there was no regulatory framework and regulators. Were trying to shut us down. But pretty quickly into the lift experiment We felt that this was very different than zimrights. We say oh you pivoted. But it's not just snapping your fingers. How did you go about doing that. Just technologically. We had an amazing Early few team members That that were instrumental on that. So sebastian at ward though there's two team members that built the app in three weeks frank designed it harrison came up with idea. Lift the name as an intern at the time. Dean and emily Helped lead the community driver on boarding so it was a core group. I'm probably forgetting many people That in the early days while others were working on zoom ride spent their time on the list experiment. What are some other memories that you have of. You know those real seminal. I remember doing Logan i would do all the driver interviews. We were meeting Incredible group of early drivers many of which we still know and See yet in san francisco so would meet them We would do driver on boarding talk about hospitality. Tell them to be themselves and bring something unique to the right experience. I remembered the the government relations battles Early on remember having a headache for the first month and didn't know what was going on. Because i was to balance the idea of. What are we going to do. With the zimmer business when this lift opportunity was taking off in that that was our baby that we were done for five years and we had to make a tough decision to divert all the focus to this new idea. What else did your days look like. I remember also before we launch. I remember sitting in a car with necemettin and logan and trying to designed in-car experience. So this idea that we used to suggest people sit up front. We were we were saying. How do we solve for the fact. That getting into someone's personal vehicle is not normal and so i remember sitting in a car together trying sitting up front trying sitting in the back talking to each other shaking hands saying hi fist bumping all these different ways of reimagining. What that experience could look like the idea of putting pink mustache to help make people smile into identify. The car is a lift. It was a incredible fast process in building and launching. The app said three weeks three months away the mustache by the way we funny website car stash dot com. We decided on. Zimbabwe would do giveaways when you're at conferences and we thought it was funny. We'd give away this car mustache and then we were trying to sell this of. How do we identify lift vehicles. And we had this giant. It was orange mustache that we had zim ride in the office. And i just thought this would be funny. It would also create word of mouth marketing where people would see what is that. I saw two of those today. I saw five of those today. What the hell is going on. And what about you know. Just in terms of like the goofiness like frog and beaver costumes. Or what was the slightly embarrassing. But the first purchase we made with investor. Capital was a frog and beaver costume This was zimmerman and the idea was we needed to convince college students to to ride with each other and when we were standing at plaza on a college campus dressed normally known. Everyone would avoid you when you're trying to hand out quarter cards. We were like what if you put on a costume. What would happen and it. It completely changed. The dynamic people were coming up to us taking photos and then asking about what what we were doing so that was just a maybe the the precursor to the mustache. Now since you're playing in this extraordinarily competitive landscape your taxes have had to change yet the scale of what we're working on has obviously changed and broadened and i would still argue. Were in the early days if you combine. What lifton uber doing today in terms of miles traveled. It's probably about point. Four percent of all miles traveled in the united states are on the services point. Four percent seventy five percent of miles in the us happened in cities in urban environments. Twenty five percent happen in rural environments. Our belief is that the majority of miles in the us within a not crazy time line. Call it ten ten plus years. We'll be transportation service. Which is what we do it live. And as a corollary to that in two thousand sixteen half of your billion dollar investment came from gm and their focus with you is on non human driving cars for example. That's one of things. So yeah they're obviously large investors They're doing vehicle.

emily Helped san francisco necemettin sebastian harrison zimmer ward Logan Dean frank headache logan Zimbabwe zimmerman lifton us gm
"zimmer" Discussed on From Scratch

From Scratch

06:02 min | 2 months ago

"zimmer" Discussed on From Scratch

"Vacation last holiday season so in december and there was a wedding happening in the hotel i was staying at and i was thinking this would be a fun wedding crash and then i found out the next day that the two had met in lift line. Had they known that you were in the hotel we. We ended up figuring that allow. Because i was talking to someone. Who's at the wedding and they explain the story said. Oh well i work at lift and then then we met and you two are a lift driver. Every new year's eve is that right every year. How often are you telling them that. You're the co founder. If they asked where i work. I typically say lift and then if they say what i do i what do you do there then i tell them but i don't i don't come out with it right away. There's some very sharp elbows obviously in this industry on you're dealing with. Tlc the taxing limousine commission in every city and jurisdiction that you enter. How much of the company's head space is just dealing with those regulatory legal hurdles in the early days. A lot so an early days i was spending the majority of my time on government relations. We received multiple cease-and-desist after the first couple months of being in business and we had to create a new regulatory structure. As i told you we were governing ourselves with criminal background checks and driving record checks and million dollars of insurance per per driver per incident but We also understood the need for someone else to validate that we were doing all these things as well as to create a structure for others to do the same and so when we got this desist we asked to go in and talk to them about creating a new category that would fit this new form of transportation and that was not always easy. You know the first answer was that they weren't going to do it in that they were going to shut us down and so we had to work through that and we talk about uber being your sharp competitor But in a way was there some copetition where you helped by uber because they were also trying to knock down some of these same hurdles we should have been more on the same page than maybe we were because we were both interested in expanding the type of of transportation options that existed but we have very different approaches to regulators. And so we weren't always on the same page just speaking of a buber Yes travis colonic just has a different personality I'd say one example of kind of their sharp elbows is that they would call investors to invest in uber rather than lift when they got wind of the fact that there might be investors. Investing in lift was. Is that a true story. Yes we've heard that any more color around that. Because of how much capital they had raised there was a moment where they have three times the amount of capital. Then we did. We also needed to argos to build a business based on the best service when someone has three times. The amount of cash is you and is trying to squash you You have to go out and make sure you can also raise a good amount of capital but in that process There was certainly Forces fighting against that you know calling folks that they somehow found out we were visiting And and trying to make make deals so that we went We wouldn't have that opportunity. It made us stronger. It made it made people realize that you know there. There was a reason why there were worried You know that we were coming coming up. That was my impression too that this was a compliment that they cared enough about you in the first place Another example is that they held six thousand rides on lift and then canceled them. Just upset lift drivers in the hope. That lift drivers would go towards to uber Any any other examples. There's multiple but we've decided to focus on what we're doing. And i think over time that's been best for us. I would imagine raising one billion dollars in capital which you did in two thousand sixteen. The series f was different from your first round capital When you raise six million dollars can you talk about the earliest days of raising the initial round of capital. That was zim. Ride really i. The first amount of capital we got was thirty thousand dollars from the from sean investor. I mentioned before. And then i do remember raising our first million dollars From an at floodgate we were saying many of the same things we are saying today about changing the way our cities are built by getting people to share rides. She was just only one that believed us and saw that vision as possible. She's on our board Today and Has been has been very helpful investor meetings. Did you have in the earliest days with logan. Would you say many many many meetings most of which. Obviously the answer was no. You're crazy let were some other reasons. That they gave side you're inexperienced. You've never been an entrepreneur before this doesn't make sense people aren't gonna get in strangers cars. What was your emotional response to. You know getting that first million dollars it was it was very logan makes fun of me i have this weird reaction after fundraising though. Which is it's like a strange letdown. I guess i like i like that. That chase and then when they do invest okay. Now it's next. I'm jessica harris. You're listening to from scratch. My guest is john. Zimmer co-founder of lift a transportation company And you know. I say it's it's a. It's a company with peer to peer mobile app. But you're trying to do things you know. I'd say even beyond that you can you give examples of how you're thinking even just more globally beyond just the the peer to peer model of hailing a car. Yeah i think you know one. It starts that vision of making sure. Our cities are built around people and not cars and and so now. We're spending a lot of time now on the adding new products like lift line reserve shared. Ride.

travis colonic Tlc argos logan sean jessica harris Zimmer co john
"zimmer" Discussed on From Scratch

From Scratch

06:21 min | 2 months ago

"zimmer" Discussed on From Scratch

"Who need rides so you carry this germ of an idea for transportation innovation with you after you left cornell when you went to work at lehman brothers was at your first drop out of college in the real estate group. You gotta. How much was this desire this yearning to start a company present while you were an analyst. Basically it was very present so actually told one of my best friends jeff. That if i don't leave in two years you know smack me because i wanna learn what it's like to be at a large company. I wanna really become proficient at finance. But that's not what i wanna do for the rest of my life so about a year into it Or even a few months into i started a group within leeann To to have conversations around getting folks interested in investing in sustainable or green real estate and then a year into it i met logan and started working on zimrights actually logan i started working together. Halfway through the two years i was at lehman. And at what point did you say you know what i'm going to pursue zim ride full-time was it. The situation of layman. You know you left in two thousand eight when things seemed precarious or was it just the drive to actually just jump onto this forward thinking company. I was going to leave after the two years. I didn't realize that. Three months. After i left the company would be bankrupt. We got excited enough about how we were approaching solving this problem that i felt like it was time to move. And why did you think. San francisco was the better place versus has come to new york. So one of our investors. Sean early onset. If you guys are really serious about this you'll come out to the bay area. How long after you arrived in san francisco and were operating zim. Ride where you felt like you know what i'm we're itching to pivot. The idea away from college focused campuses to a more general uber like model. We've always been solving the same problem. We've always been trying to make car ownership optional trying to make our cities designed around people. Instead of cars. And so zimmer. Many iterations we we started doing carpooling for companies as well as universities and then five years into it actually probably about four years into it. We started doing these exercises where we would have ourselves in a few team members. Say if we were starting over what would we have created and yet uber existed at the time but they were only doing black cars and taxis and reset said that's interesting you know maybe one percent of the population Who are using these black car services but what about these cars that aren't being used and the big challenge was if we're going to create a new form of transportation using people's personal vehicles you have to overcome this concept that your parents told you your mother told you never ride strangers so we started with criminal background checks. Driving records checks a million dollars of insurance that went above and beyond many of the standards that were required of of taxes and limousine and then it was just an experiment. Coming of zimrights as we were gonna call it zimrights instant Luckily we didn't call it that Think lift is a a better name this idea for reinvention internally And always kinda shifting is what one does in life even Informally was it. Somebody who kind of gave you that advice to do so or you. Just kind of instinctively had that inclination. I may have heard it as an idea from from someone but it's become a super helpful exercise. You can't do it. every day. That can be quite disruptive but people do it every year In the new year. They asked himself if i was going to do something better or different this year. What would it be. And so i think in that you know whether it's every year every two years i think that's a really healthy exercise for both You know individual as well as a company enterprise bought zim ride And when they bought sim right. They bought like the customers of today but the The contracts and the technology. I think for them. The value has been that. They're they're building out there university business to have cars on campus for students and this was complimentary so see you were making this shift towards a more appeared appear general model away from the college demographic or the college service at a time. That smart phones were becoming more ubiquitous. So what else in the environment was sort of the wind at your back. Smartphones having operating systems like ios and android so that developers could build off of that And then the ability to create identity and trust online and while on paper you. An uber seem similar Culturally the community feel of lift is emblematic of of lift. Can you talk to me about the culture behind lift that you wanted to create from inception. Sure serving the from day. One the the tagline of used to be your friend with a car and so that ethos has been viewed throughout the experience and so for us with my gun and hospitality. I was thinking about. How do we make sure we take incredible care of the driver community so that the driver community takes incredible care of the passenger community and to me that simple straightforward and obvious and. I think that's really helped us create a better experience for passengers. Can you talk to me about just anecdotally Some of the people who drive lift cars. Yeah really diverse Driver community so people that are doing it. fulltime and enjoy the flexibility Which allows them to maybe. Follow another passion. There's a a singer And rap artists sir the baptist from chicago who was a lift driver and what lift allowed for him to do. Is you know he could make his own schedule for recording and actually he said he was inspired by a lot of the rides he had by meeting a bunch of diverse Folks he was getting new ideas that he wasn't gonna have otherwise. You have the kind of artist in la there's a lot of actors and actresses you've single parents who use it Because they have they have to be able to turn on and off work when they need it and what about stories of people meeting each other through lift actually..

lehman brothers logan zimmer jeff bay area Sean San francisco san francisco new york chicago la
"zimmer" Discussed on From Scratch

From Scratch

06:19 min | 2 months ago

"zimmer" Discussed on From Scratch

"Two thousand thirteen lift is available across the united states and through partnerships with ride sharing companies throughout asia. John is originally from greenwich connecticut and his mom wears a necklace with lift logo. I read that somewhere. Is that really true. I think sometimes i tell her embarrasses me is the she wears it with pink mustache which has changed. I heard she's stores here. She has a pair of earrings to wear sources. Yeah thank you. So in order to understand the lift story we have to go back to what lift grew. out of. which was zimmer. Zim ride is a car pooling company predominantly on college campuses for long distance driving. Can you tell me a little bit more about that. Sure zimrights was for long distance. Car pooling like an old college bulletin board where people used to post. I'm going from ithaca to new york and we brought that online you Have a partner logan green. You both came to this idea from two different sources really. Can you describe where logan came to this idea from. Yes sure so. Logan grew up in la so the center of traffic hit being stuck in traffic and he got really into technology and transportation. He went to uc santa barbara and he wanted to make an experiment out of himself which was not bringing a carter school and seeing how he could get around and so he wrote the bus used. Things like craigslist. To find carpool rideshare partners. Then while he was in school he took a trip to zimbabwe and he saw people which is true in many developing countries sharing rides out of necessity and they have lots of different names for In zimbabwe i believe they call it combat system. And it's interesting. When i was researching zim ride. I was like oh how generous of logan green to allow the company to be named after your last name. But in fact zim ride is named after zim. Bob way correct yeah. He named it before i knew him. How did you in logan meet. We have a mutual friend Also named john. I was on facebook one night and saw that logan had posted on john's facebook page that he was starting a website called zim ride and so i reached out to john. We call jonjo and called juancho. I said how well do you know logan. Do you think you could connect us now. You at the time also had a transportation innovation in your mind. Where did that come from for you. I took a city planning class. My senior year When i was at cornell hotel school and had this amazing professor and he. His first lecture was the history of the world in thirty minutes is called rob young and he. He now teaches texas but the classes called green cities and he walks through history and by zooming out in only thirty minute lecture. You get to see these really large themes about the importance of geography the importance of resources and the movement of those resources from geography to geography. And then how. People have organized themselves throughout time. And you come to realize that we're really in this age of cities now you see how we've built our cities around cars instead of around people and to me. This is really unfortunate Because we have all these roads and parking lots for cars that are used only four percent of the time and they're part ninety six percent of the time. The average cost of owning a vehicle in the united states is nine thousand dollars per vehicle per year. There is no greater expense for the american household except for the house. And we only use this thing for percent of the time that to me is a failing transportation hotel four percent occupancy and really high rent i started thinking what could we do to make our ownership completely optional. You didn't grow up in a city. I you grew up in a suburb of new york. City greenwich connecticut. What did your parents do. My mom was literally a bean counter. She works for a coffee. Company and Does accounting what coffee committee. It's caller menia coffee coffee importer. And then my father worked for dixie cup. Doing customer service and marketing. Did you have a sense as you were growing up in this household that you wanted to you know be have entrepreneurial life. at least. In retrospect. In retrospect i think it makes sense. I like fixing things solving things. But most of i like making people happy and so as a kid. My first idea was that i wanted to be a donut maker. My mom would take me to dunkin. Donuts and get a maple frosted donuts many mornings when she'd get her coffee And i saw how happy it made myself and others to get that donut. So i thought i'd be a donut maker. And then i loved magic so i went to magic camp and Those are my early interests before. Realizing i loved Hospitality as a way of delighting people. When you say you wanna make people happy. It's such a nice hallmark thing to say but it so earnest. My goodness That's really nice. What are some other examples of of. You know the happiness that you created in in people's lives before lift. Would you say well. I think i get a lot of joy from close friendships from being close to my family My parents always made The family very important. My my dad's father was an orphan. My mom's parents were separate. I think so these. These factors led to them really wanting to create a close family. And then i just get a lot of personal satisfaction around Being around people which i think most humans do incidentally you mentioned your family and you have current family as well. Your wife What is her name christina. You met her in spain. Correct how. I asked her for directions. I was studying abroad and sylvia in Southern spain and komo's savar alamosa the us which the street's name was the love of god. She said. actually. I'm walking that way and we started talking and then actually two years later began dating. I'm jessica harris. You're listening to from scratch. My guest. John zimmer co-founder of lift an app that connects drivers with passengers..

logan green logan rideshare partners jonjo juancho zimbabwe cornell hotel school rob young connecticut john zimmer greenwich ithaca facebook City greenwich santa barbara Logan
Indians Homer in 19th Straight; Beat Sox 11-5

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | 3 months ago

Indians Homer in 19th Straight; Beat Sox 11-5

"Transylvania's E. Indians in the record books with a solo home run to help Cleveland avoid a three game sweep of the eleven five win over the red Sox radius is third inning blast was his twenty sixth of the season for Cleveland which homered for the nineteenth straight game to match a franchise record set back in two thousand it was race a second home run in as many games when you use stay on on your plan you go one by one buying a used take to our plan you can also say ask Bradley Zimmer had a two run single for the Indians who broke the game open with a five run ninth JD Martinez had a two run Homer and three RBIs for the red Sox who maintain their four game lead for the second AL wild card I'm guessing Coolbaugh

E. Indians Cleveland Transylvania Red Sox Bradley Zimmer Jd Martinez Indians Homer Coolbaugh
"zimmer" Discussed on Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

04:46 min | 3 months ago

"zimmer" Discussed on Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

"Years ago. When i was in houston and i did some volunteering at the houston. Food bank Not long after hurricane harvey and they talked about the ways that they supported the community and one of the things they built into the houston. Food bank is a grocery store. But it's a grocery store you come to and you you do your shopping at where everything is free. And they talked about what it means to a community to be able to come in and have a quote normal experience and how empowering it is and one of the ladies. I met there who was also volunteering. Their said you know. I used to be a recipient of the food bank. I used to walk through this grocery store. And i would do my shopping and leave without a bill and what it meant for me to do this. Once i found out i was eligible to you. Know benefit from this program is that i could keep my full time job but i could quit the part-time job. I had which only enabled me to buy groceries. And when i quit that job because i could come here and get food. I was able to go to night. School said now. I have a full-time job. That pays me three times. What my crappy old fulltime job used to pay me and all i needed was a little bit of help to get a little bit of space and i think about what this is gonna mean for so many families who will be able to afford childcare so that night school is an option who will be able to afford groceries so that they don't have to worry about where their kids next meals are coming from. Who will be able to afford dental care. Whatever it is that a family needs. And that's a place where you know as you referenced. Your son we're looking at a great systemic solution. Yes and it's only the first. It's the first piece of the puzzle that you referenced. But i'm excited that we're doing things like this and my hope is that yes. We can also push for systemic changes in solutions that can enable space for mental health and access to mental health.

houston hurricane harvey Food bank
"zimmer" Discussed on Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

04:08 min | 3 months ago

"zimmer" Discussed on Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

"You know it it. It gives more people access to therapy but it doesn't support therapist very well. So you're like oh well okay jesus and we all right that got a little bit better but that you know and so i think these things are are tricky. What i'm really interested in and what we've been trying to figure out all along as how do we build communities that support each other. A is a marvellous institution in a lot of ways. Twelve i mean they. The twelfth step world revolutionized things and millions and millions of people are sober. That would not have been if it were not for that and there's plenty of problems with it. It's not for everybody. And so i'm interested in my little corner of the world of how do i build communities of people that can support each other. That can afford to do so. The spiritual habits group program when people do that they get matched up with a small group of six other people and that group is. There's if they want it ongoing some of those groups still meet year year and a half two years later. They've become a beautiful support for each other. So i'm interested in. How do we do that. What are the ways that like minded people can support and care about each other and then the other problem. I'm really interested in figuring out is we are so busy fragmented. We are so distracted and it's challenging. It makes emotional and mental wellbeing really difficult and i don't know what the way back for that is again. No so many of these things become questions of privilege in advantage. Maybe i can afford to say. Well i'm going to go on a week long silent retreat but lots of for lots of people. That's just not a not a possibility and so you know. How do we continue to offer you know. So that's what with the spiritual habits program. The problem i'm trying to solve and i'm not saying a habit solved but i think it's a question that we the people in my world need to keep asking insolvent is what interventions work for really busy people..

"zimmer" Discussed on Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

05:20 min | 3 months ago

"zimmer" Discussed on Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

"And then we did another one with a guy named rutger bergman recently he's he's a hopeful person about the state of things and i think i like you. I think there's a lot of things that really concerned me. Worry me. make me frightened. And holding the opposites. There's lots of ways that the human condition is getting better for lots and lots of people. And i feel like we have to hold both these an and we primarily get served the diet of everything that's wrong and i think at sometimes helpful for our own mental wellbeing in our ability to go on helping the world and serve in the world to get a little diet of. And what's what's working what's happened. What progress have we made because because we need that to go on you know And i think he's he's an eloquent spokesman for that. So those are a few of the recent ones that i think are are good but i learned long ago that we have four of us that that participating getting an episode fully out and done and we can be like one of us can be like okay. Another one could be like. This is one of the best ones ever. Another person would be like. I didn't think it was that good so even amongst the four of us that are closest to it. We can't agree on. What are the best one. So i think it's what what speaks to people where they're at. You know it's like some days. Bob dylan's great and other days. You want you know you want something else. Totally totally and i love that. I think it's one of the great things about this medium is it enables us to open these spaces. For so many people to get exactly the kinds of fulfillment that they're looking for to be able to explore curiosity. And what a cool time to as you said. This is one of the great parts about being alive. Today is is not to do something like this where you and i can sit on zoom and look at each other while you're across the country and we can have this beautiful conversation. We couldn't have done this ten years ago. Yeah yep and the other inspiring thing i think about all this is that i do think technology in some ways though disconnecting us helps people who can't find connections sometimes find it you know we. We've got a view of the world when we were all these small communities that like life was really good. It was good if you fit in that community. But if you didn't write it was miserable and now if you don't fit you can find your people somewhere. In one of the coolest things is that people are able to create new kinds of villages. What do you think when we talk about holding that space. The both and the things we need to do work on society and and the places where we are making wonderful advancements whether they be communities enabled by tech or.

rutger bergman Bob dylan
"zimmer" Discussed on Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

02:53 min | 3 months ago

"zimmer" Discussed on Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

"We can just turn our attention to just starting so like if i'm having resistance when morning to get an on the bike i will be like i get on your bike clothes and your bike shoes. That's the first thing just do that. And i often can do that. But if i think about doing an hour long workout and i know how hard it's going to be mike. Where are you kidding me. I can't do that. And so i think our brain does this little calculation where it's like. I'm sitting on the couch. And i feel like i have one unit of energy and i need to go do this workout in. That takes ten units of energy. I only have one. Forget it when i deconstruct it to just put on your bike shoes on like that's one unit of energy. I've got a unit of energy. Great i can do it and we often get motivation. After we start we think we get motivated than we start but often after remove a little bit. Motivation comes along so just getting unstuck so now. I know what i'm doing. Push myself to start. Oftentimes that's just enough. That just gets us often going if not then what we need to do is look at what's happening at that moment of choice. And what am i feeling and thinking so i often say behavior change takes you gotta start with the very practical tactical. What am i doing. What am i doing it. How do i trick myself to get started. How do i set up my environment to make it easy all these things that we can do if we do all that and we're still stuck then i would say it's a failure of emotional regulation and what i basically mean by that is some feelings or thoughts. Come up that we don't know how to work with and so we turn away so now we just if nothing if we've tried all that and it's not working now we consume into that moment and say okay. What am i saying to myself. What am i feeling. What's going on here you know. Oh every time. I think about writing. I just think to myself like i can't do it. You know i'm not any good. So now i can work to coach myself through that and i can say to myself. Well you know. We don't know if you're good or yet if you don't do it you'll never be good. You know so. So let's try you know it was. We talked to ourselves. We support ourselves. We'd coach ourselves through it or we find somebody who can do that for us. But that's what getting specific also does is allows us to target specifically. What's our resistance about now. A word from our sponsors who made this show possible guys..

mike
"zimmer" Discussed on Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

04:19 min | 3 months ago

"zimmer" Discussed on Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

"Really in what i was doing and how i was using it. It was just that the external drug policy that we've chosen to have made one a whole lot more dangerous and destructive than the other which is a whole nother conversation and that is really interesting too because we look away at a lot of what i think you're referring to the dangerous and addictive behavior. So many people in our society really are showcasing with alcohol. We go out but it's just a drink. Well it's legal. And i think it can numb us to people's suffering and to what people are using a substance forward to try to escape numb at cetera. And i think you're right because street. Drugs are unstable. I suppose you could say people od. They're they're incredibly dangerous and they require dangerous behavior to acquire We we much more quickly. Say that's bad that person needs help and and it's interesting that there's probably a lot more people who need help than than we acknowledge. I wonder at that time because you talk about beginning to get sober at twenty five. What was the experience like. What's it like to be. Twenty four years old and to be experiencing homelessness. I mean what what is the day to day reality for a young man housed man. Are there things you wish. People knew or understood about what our unhedged communities are going through. I feel like a. I'm a long way from that You know it's been a lot of years. I don't feel like. I could speak to the reality of what it's like to be on housed today. Twenty five years later. I also think that my version of an housed was Different than a lot of people's you know once. I decided to go into rehab. I suddenly had a place to stay when i came out right. My parents were willing to take me back in. I had a safe place to go so my my middle class upbringing. My white middle class upbringing gave me a normal advantages in navigating. All of that. So i i would hesitate to speak to people there. People is experiencing did not have those advantages like. I didn't go to jail. Because i was in upper middle class white kid if i was not i probably would have been in jail for a long time. That's just the reality of the situation. I was given options now. I wasn't let off scot-free. I i was given a diversion program. I was on probation for a lotta years. And i had to meet very strict criteria. So i mean if i had screwed that up i think i would have had consequences but the to even be given that opportunity. Yeah speaks to the privilege that i had that privilege followed me from that initial arrest through through every part of getting sober. It was i had advantages. You know even to have been educated. In the way i was at a high school just allowed me to come out of addiction and be somebody who knew how to go on a job interview knew how to go in and talk to people had apparent. I mean i just had advantages and so so. That's why i would be hesitant to speak to that issue for people who don't have them. I really appreciate that. I have to say. I'm so grateful for your willingness to share that part of your perspective because we are in this moment where we're trying to unpack privilege as it affects systems in our society. And you know you just said it. You said i'm fifty one. You are a fifty one year old white man from ohio view. You are not suffering in any way by admitting your privilege. And i i really appreciate you modeling that for other people because there's been a lot of pushback on this notion of what privileged looks like and i think it's so important for those of us who have it in whatever relative way we do to say..

ohio Twenty five years later fifty one year old Twenty four years old fifty one twenty five today one So many lot more people lotta years
"zimmer" Discussed on Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

02:50 min | 3 months ago

"zimmer" Discussed on Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

"Hi everyone it's sophia and welcome back to work in progress on today's episode. We are going to talk to someone who.

NFC North Football Preview: How Do You Judge in a Small Sample Size?

Bet The Board

01:58 min | 3 months ago

NFC North Football Preview: How Do You Judge in a Small Sample Size?

"It didn't take us long in twenty twenty one to get our first best bet winner this season. Remember that yes. We keep track of these things around here. We don't just sweep them under the rug windsor losses. I know it was a unexpected quarterback. That was not supposed to play that showed up but fortunately he didn't have much to offer after just two or three days of camp. That was an interesting story because we didn't think callum on was going to play. The actual vikings team site reported at seven. Pm on the twelfth that it was unlikely he was gonna apply. No one who is going to play. Except mike zimmer who threw him in there and played them almost three quarters after jake browning threw up all over himself so it was a good start to the season getting that out of the way we kind of talked about this a little bit past the the wind right like that's what everyone wants. Everyone wants to win a game. We gave out a pick close three. And i think that's really the important part of this when you're trying to figure out information to follow because there's never going to be a long enough sample size of anyone your tailing for singular season if you're listening to him on the radio or podcast or video. Wherever you're consuming your. You're gambling information. There's never going to be a long enough sample size. So how do you judge in a small sample size in. It's like are you beating the closing. Are you listening to information that might pop or break days after that information comes out and i think that's the interesting part about this podcast because last year i'll be candidate off top of my head. I was looking at the sheet earlier. And i think we released forty six best bets. Last year we won a third of a position for the entire season. It was our worst season today. But of those forty six best bets only to move against us and one was covert related. Every other game moved in our favor so while it was our worst season it was one still profitable in to the thing. You're looking for over short sample sizes. We crushed the closing line. Virtually every single time.

Mike Zimmer Jake Browning Callum Vikings
Jiménez Hits 3-Run HR, Rallies White Sox Past Royals 5-3

AP News Radio

00:40 sec | 4 months ago

Jiménez Hits 3-Run HR, Rallies White Sox Past Royals 5-3

"Hello we are meant as belts a three run Homer in the top of the eighth to lift the white Sox past the Royals five to three minutes playing in just his second game of the season hit a Homer they couldn't have come at a better time for Chicago which trailed three to one before scoring four times in the eighth Kyle Zimmer served up the three run shot a what he called a slider that got away he suffered the loss which negated a quality start by Brad Kellar I don't make excuses it's just really unfortunate but I just I felt like that that could she slipped out and yelled out and that cost us the game the bullpen failure snaps a six game winning streak for the Royals will the A. L. central leading white Sox win for just the second time in the last six games I'm Danny cap

Kyle Zimmer White Sox Royals Brad Kellar Homer Chicago Danny Cap
Rapid City Boarding School Continues Unidentified Bodies Project

Native America Calling

01:40 min | 5 months ago

Rapid City Boarding School Continues Unidentified Bodies Project

"Work continues on a boarding school project in rapid city. South dakota as discoveries are made of burial sites at former residential schools in canada. Mike mohan reports almost a decade ago. Volunteer driven effort was launched to verify details about native children buried at a former federal boarding school. On rapid city's westside that research pave the way for an historic agreement with the city to establish parcels of land for native purposes project volunteer valerie. A big eagle says news out of canada and the remains of two hundred and fifteen children found their as an emotional element to the local effort. We tried this horror stories of children. That were you know killed and buried and we've heard this from others and it's really really challenging new details about the land. Transfer will be shared at a public meeting this thursday including converting some of the property into a native american community center that follows a resolution approved by the city council. Last fall acknowledging that tribes were never given a portion of the land along after the school closed. fellow project. Volunteer eric zimmer notes. The non native population can share in this experience as well what we're talking about doing. This undertaking work that sort of raises the quality of life for everyone in the community through a long careful deliberate process of trying to understand and respond to the more challenging. Parts of our history in volunteers were recently recognized for their work with an honorable mention in the outstanding public. History project award issued annually by the national council on public history. That was mike

Mike Mohan Rapid City Canada South Dakota Valerie Eric Zimmer City Council National Council On Public His Mike
"zimmer" Discussed on Vroom Vroom Veer with Jeff Smith

Vroom Vroom Veer with Jeff Smith

04:58 min | 5 months ago

"zimmer" Discussed on Vroom Vroom Veer with Jeff Smith

"Stock tsinghua oginga ga helu welcome to the show. so this is probably one of my favorite interviews. I think i did a little bit of fan boyish. But i am a huge fan of eric. Zimmer's podcast though one you feed If you're here you're probably familiar. But i'll give you a little low down. It's based on a of How a grandfather is telling his son of a story about how people have to wolves who live inside of them a good wolf and a bad wolf and you know it gets a little bit deeper into it but the grandson asked the grandfather which one wins. Because they're always battling and the grandfather says the one you need. And so eric show is all about how to feed your good wolf. So i love that. I love parables and metaphors. So i thought eric would be a great guest for this show and This is this is really raw sort of wide. Open kind of talk Where eric shares a lot about his days in and out of recovery and his fight with the not only alcohol addiction but addiction in general and And then how we started there and how he hit rock bottom. And you'll you'll hear it. But i mean it's it's interesting because i can totally relate He was also he. Also was depressed clinically So i did that too. So this is fun In one of those sort of like not fun ways. It's it's not as morose as you might think because you know we're both over it now and were were on the other side of Of the pain so were. We are a light hearted about the whole conversation. But it does get a little deep so you know You are warned but at the end were laughing. And and it's all good. So please prepare yourself gird your. It's not that bad. But here's my chat with eric zimmer. Of the one you feed podcast.

oginga ga helu eric Zimmer eric zimmer
Interview With William Hung, Former American Idol Contestant

Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

01:54 min | 8 months ago

Interview With William Hung, Former American Idol Contestant

"When we started this podcast in two thousand fifteen i compiled a list of what i call the white wales and these were guest that i hope to book someday. People like george decay and margaret show and sonar so forth. And we've actually had margaret and george decay on but one of the white. Whales did eluded me until this very moment is my guest. This episode william hung william. I want to welcome you to our show. Highly meet you oswal for some of our listeners. May have heard of some of these other people that i just mentioned. But maybe they're not familiar with you and and let me just briefly. Explain to the audience. Why you were on my must book on this back. When i wasn't even watching american idol. So this is i think. Season three of american idol. Early in two thousand four. You auditioned and i heard about the audition so not even watching the show. Your audition actually kind of went by role and it sets up the next seven years of your life and then even what you've kind of transition to so. Could you give our audience in idea about what led to the audition san francisco for american idol. And then what happened there. And then we'll talk about the next part sir. So i always enjoyed carry your in my life. I started singing karaoke. Gave the my parents. I was tenuous on the back in hong kong and then in college i studied at uc. Berkeley i studied zimmer engineering I wasn't doing at school. So i thought i needed to try something new then one day. I thought his poster for a school talent show. And i thought watching and studying the music videos from ricky martin's she bangs

White Wales George Decay William Hung William Margaret George San Francisco Zimmer UC Hong Kong Berkeley Ricky Martin
Carl Zimmer on Defining Life

The Book Review

02:50 min | 8 months ago

Carl Zimmer on Defining Life

"Carl. Zimmer joins us now. He is a columnist for the new york times and he is the author of many books. He was last on the podcast for his book. She has her mother's laugh. His new book is called. Life's edge the search for what it means to be alive. Carl thanks for being here. Thanks for having me all right so right now. You're kinda busy. You've been reporting on corona virus for the times. What is that leg. It's kind of overwhelming You know i am kind of startled that you know the whole world wants to read what we at. The scientists have to write about. You know this virus. But i will remember this experience of the past year for the rest of my life really. It's been exceptional as a as a moment in science journalism as a science journalist. Is this an area that you had been looking at for years and years. Were you especially interested in epidemiology or was this sort of switching gears for you. I've had a obsession with viruses for a long time. I'm actually wrote a book called the planet of viruses a few years ago. So you know. I've reported on ebola and influenza over the years of have done the virus thing. And so you know i i felt like well i can bring my experience to bear on this and and so basically it just started doing the same kind of reporting about this virus but now of course this is a virus that was causing a kind of pandemic that we have not seen for one hundred years. You're not the only journalist covering this pandemic obviously not even the only journalists covering this pandemic on the scientists at the times. How do you all kind of divide it up. Do you have an area in particular that you are looking at specifically yet. None of us can do this alone absolutely and we have to really roll with the punches. You know i was focusing a lot on vaccines for example in the fall overseeing our tracker and then we started to to see these variants were popping up. Then we're of serious concern so i basically had to carve out some time to work on variants but mental really. My colleague has also been writing about various. Like crazy and ben muller and we actually have several people who who just try to keep up with the variants. You know and and there are other people who are handling the store. All the stories of vaccine distribution geopolitics and long cova. There be other people handling that. It's it's such an enormous story. What about it most interest you personally. Well i'm most interested in in The pandemic ending besides that that and not being sick. Yes yeah is unsettling jim how this pandemic has played out exactly. As scientists had warned it would

Zimmer The New York Times Carl Ebola Influenza Ben Muller JIM
How the Coronavirus Pandemic Shaped Our Language in 2020

60-Second Science

01:55 min | 11 months ago

How the Coronavirus Pandemic Shaped Our Language in 2020

"Pandemic has transformed lives and livelihoods. But it's changed the little details to like the language we use peppering our everyday speech with scientific terms like social distancing superspreader and asymptomatic ya. I mean we've all had to become Amateur epidemiologists i suppose and familiarize ourselves with these terms that normally you would expect us to be in in some in some journal article somewhere. Ben zimmer is a linguist and language columnist for the wall street journal. He says a lot of the words that came up fresh too. Many people in twenty twenty head existed in scholarly literature for decades. So for instance contact tracing is actually attested from nineteen ten There's there's an example from australian medical journal talking about School epidemics back in ten in. They're talking about contact. Tracing as something that the school nurse would need to do to figure out you know who had been infected and the term quarantine which derives from a renaissance era italian word. Meaning a forty day. Waiting period for ships arriving from plague-stricken ports dates back centuries. But it took on new life during the pandemic. everybody's talking about quarantining and then and then it starts generating all sorts of new forms as well. You know you can drink your quarantine e you can grow corn beard and on and on and on as people got creative by taking taking these words and Forming innovative new expressions. Out of them zimmer. Also chairs the new words committee for the american dialect society at a recent virtual meeting. They voted on twenty twenty word of the year from candidates like doom scrolling or social distancing an unprecedented the group ultimately chose a different word which unlike the others was newly coined in twenty twenty and truly defined. What turned out to be a terrible year.

Ben Zimmer Australian Medical Journal The Wall Street Journal American Dialect Society Zimmer
Dow Futures Gain, Tech Rebounds as Vaccine Bets Drive Stocks

Squawk Pod

00:27 sec | 1 year ago

Dow Futures Gain, Tech Rebounds as Vaccine Bets Drive Stocks

"Futures are building across the board here at the open at. We'll see if the dow but it may be on pace for the best monthly gain since nineteen eighty-seven goldman with a bullish call on stocks next year in the wake of that recent vaccine news a bond markets are closed. On this veterans day a roadmap begins with the covid vaccine optimism fueling this market rally into a third day but with us cases Continuing to hit records the feds. Eric rosengren says we may be in for a very choppy six months ahead.

Goldman Eric Rosengren
Trump and Biden debate their climate and environmental policies

Weekend Edition Sunday

03:42 min | 1 year ago

Trump and Biden debate their climate and environmental policies

"A lot at Thursday's debate. There was this telling exchange about climate change. Would you close the have a transition from their own industry? Yes. It is a big statement, President Trump again boosted the fossil fuel industries contributing to global warming. Joe Biden is campaigning on a plan for Net zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2050. NPR's Jeff Brady has more on his $2 trillion proposal. Joe Biden's climate plan is ambitious for an economy is big and complex as the United States, but even those connected to fossil fuel industry say it may be doable. Scott Siegal with the energy focused law firm. Bracewell says the plan is pragmatic and includes both regulations and incentives for the growing list of companies focused on using cleaner energy in the future. One thing that makes Biden's approach somewhat comfortable is that you can sketch out that linear commitment to additional resource is to achieve these objectives, which I think most people in business, believe me. Are going to be the future anyway. The country has one example of meeting an ambitious climate goal. The Obama administration's clean power plan aimed to cut emissions from power plants, about a third by 2030. Even though court challenges stopped the plan from going into effect, the country is ahead of schedule. David Doniger is with NRDC Action Fund, The political arm of the natural resource is defense counsel. The power sector is already undergoing changes that have reduced their emissions by more than 30% 10 years ahead of the target that the Obama administration thought was aggressive. In 2015, a big part of that was the collapse of the coal industry. Coal fired power plants continue to go out of business, replaced with cheaper natural gas and renewable energy. Still, the bite and climate plan faces significant hurdles. It relies on technologies that haven't been developed or may not be commercially viable. That's why the plan includes $400 billion over a decade for research. With the economic hit from the Corona virus pandemic. Biden's campaign updated the plan this summer. It includes billions of dollars to hire people for things like plugging abandoned mines and building electric vehicle charging stations. Steph Feldman, with the bite and campaign says the plan also focuses on environmental justice. 40% of the benefit of those investments go to community, the color and low income communities that have been disproportionately harmed by pollution and the effects of climate change. This is especially important to the most vocal climate change activists. While Biden has distanced himself from the green new deal, it is popular, especially with the left wing of his party. Jenny Marino, Zimmer with 3 50 actions as this's thie strongest plan yet from a Democratic presidential nominee, the Biden campaign has committed to doing some really great things like ending leasing of fossil fuels on public lands. We'd like to see them go further and create a true phase out for the entire fossil fuel mystery over Of course of the next decade. Biden's plan has a longer timeline for a transition and includes a role for fossil fuels with offsets and carbon capture. Amy Myers Jaffe manages the climate policy Labatt Tufts University and says overall, this is a credible plan for addressing climate change. The Biden campaign has listed the right things. But the difference between listing things and implementing those things is a big difference. If Biden is elected, he'll likely need a Democratic Congress willing to pass laws and allocate money

Joe Biden Obama Administration Fossil Fuel Industries Amy Myers Jaffe Jeff Brady NPR Scott Siegal United States Bracewell Steph Feldman President Trump Nrdc Action Fund Labatt Tufts University David Doniger Congress
Breaking Down Joe Biden's Plan To Make The U.S. Carbon Neutral

Environment: NPR

03:44 min | 1 year ago

Breaking Down Joe Biden's Plan To Make The U.S. Carbon Neutral

"At Thursday's debate, there was this telling exchange about climate change. Would you close the? Transition from oil minister yes. I was trying to. It is a big statement president trump again boosted the fossil fuel industries contributing to global warming. Joe. Biden is campaigning on a plan for net zero greenhouse gas emissions by twenty fifty and peers. Jeff Brady has more on his two trillion dollar proposal Joe Biden's climate plan is ambitious for an economy as big and complex as the United States but even those connected to fossil fuel industry. Say it. May Be Doable Scott Siegel with the energy focused law firm Bracewell says plan is pragmatic and includes both regulations and incentives for the growing list of companies focused on using cleaner energy in the future one thing that makes Biden's approach somewhat comfortable is that you can sketch out that linear commitment to additional resources to achieve these objectives which I think most people in business believe are going to be. The future anyway, the country has one example of meeting an ambitious climate goal. The Obama Administration's clean power plan aimed to cut emissions from power plants about a third by twenty thirty even though court challenges stopped the plan from going into effect, the country is ahead of schedule David. Doniger. IS WITH NRDC Action Fund the political arm of the Natural Resources Defense Council, the power sector is already undergoing. Changes have reduced their emissions by more than thirty percent ten years ahead of the target that the Obama Administration thought was aggressive in two thousand fifteen. A big part of that was the collapse of the coal industry coal fired power plants continue to go out of business replaced with cheaper natural gas and renewable energy. Still, the Biden, climate plan faces significant hurdles it relies on technologies that haven't been. Developed or may not be commercially viable. That's why the plan includes four hundred billion dollars over a decade for research with the economic hit from the coronavirus pandemic Biden's campaign updated the plan this summer it includes billions of dollars to hire people for things like plugging abandoned mines and building electric vehicle charging stations. Steph Feldman with the Biden campaign says, the plan also focuses on environmental justice forty percent. Of the benefits of those investments, go to communities of color and low income communities that have been disproportionately harmed by pollution and the exit climate change. This is especially important to the most vocal climate change activists while Biden has distanced himself from the green new deal. It is popular especially with the left wing of his party Jenny Marino Zimmer with three fifty actions as this is the strongest plan. Yet from a Democratic presidential nominee, the Biden campaign has committed to doing some really great things like ending leasing of also feels on public lands. We'd like to see them go further and create a true phase out for the entire fossil fuel mystery over the course of the next decade. Biden's plan has a longer time line for a transition and includes a role for fossil fuels with offsets and. Carbon Capture Amy Myers Jaffe manages the climate policy lab at Tufts University and says, all this is a credible plan for addressing climate change. The Biden campaign has listed the right things but the difference between listing things and getting those things is a big difference. If Biden is elected, he'll likely need democratic congress willing to pass laws and allocate money to make his plan a reality. Jeff Brady NPR

Joe Biden Obama Administration Fossil Fuel Industries Jeff Brady Jeff Brady Npr Amy Myers Jaffe Natural Resources Defense Coun Nrdc Action Fund Jenny Marino Zimmer United States President Trump Scott Siegel Congress Steph Feldman Bracewell
How I Built Resilience: John Zimmer of Lyft

How I Built This

05:24 min | 1 year ago

How I Built Resilience: John Zimmer of Lyft

"We I spoke with John back in two thousand seventeen but now fast forward a few years and like most of us John is dealing with challenges he never anticipated. But when we spoke a few days ago, he sounded pretty optimistic. Personally, I'm doing okay I. Think you know the business has had a tough time but has seen some really strong recovery since the bottom? We were down about seventy five percent at the peak. In terms of rideshare rides, we now return to little. Half. down. which is actually good progress. We've always been a very long term minded company. We've had hard times before we've always been the challenger brand, and so actually I think moments like this are opportunities for us in our team to shine and so happy to share some of that with you. Yeah I WANNA I wanNA talk about that. Let's let's first talk about like kind of drill down to some of the challenges i. There's no question that this has to be the most challenging time in your you know in your leadership of lift I think it's the most challenging time for any business leader founder around the world today for variety of reasons and as you mentioned, it's been a tough year four left to have some layoffs in May I think about thousand. Layoffs which could not have been easy for you to go through. So as you began to see the pandemic having a significant impact on on your business, what kinds of conversations were you having with your your leadership team with your co founder Logan about ways to kind of begin to to build resilience? What are the conversations that we've had or one of the challenges throughout is how many different audiences groups of people that were working to take care of throughout this right so we have our drivers, we have our riders, we have our employees. With an employee's, there's those that are working in person to help drivers at Parisian centers and there are those that could work from home. So all different populations that we want to take care of. Investors as well who who are judging those decisions we make. So I think that's been a really interesting conversation also the conversations around short term thinking versus long term thinking there are short term decisions we need to make in order to preserve the long term mission that we have as a company. In. Those have been really key decisions. You talked about the dot was very, very difficult. It forced us to make hard decisions some of which I think actually. In hindsight were very healthy for the business but very difficult to make especially for people that are all in this tough time where where the market is difficult those were not easy decisions. Let's talk about some of the short term decisions that you had to take. I mean you are publicly traded company So you're obviously countable to investors and it's everything's on the table you have to review can't hide anything first of all, just to keep the business operating and to. Get. You through this time because this is going to be a challenging year and maybe a recovery next year for you we'll talk about that a moment but you knew this was going to be a tough year. So was one of those decisions to retain as much cash on hand was that one of the initial decisions that you had to take? Yeah obviously. So we look at the cash that we have on hand. We also raised our first debt to add cushion. Quite, a strong position where lucky that we went public when we did. Have a you know near nearly three billion dollars in the bank. What we did to start as we ran all different scenarios we said Okay if we were seventy five percent down for six months or two quarters, you know what would the situation be like for cash if we were down, you know for four quarters what would it be like for cash? We ran the the worst case scenarios, the medium case scenarios and the best case scenarios, and then made the decision that you know raising the debt was kind of a no regrets move but then also to your point preserving the cash that we do have on hand. Making decisions about expenses that we had in the office that were more of a luxury making decisions around certain teams. That we needed to tighten up for example, on on the operating side there were some markets where we had to close some of our centers. What are you finding out from users like why what is what is it? That is preventing them from using lift? Is it basically that they just don't have anywhere to go or is it? Is it the fear of being car with somebody else? It's a mix of both you know. I I think it's people changing their transportation behavior, their actual transportation behavior, and then secondarily It's obviously the questions around health safety and I'd love to walk through what we're doing on on that end as open. The APP we ask both driver and rider to confirm that they're wearing a mask. We ask driving rider confirmed that they haven't been in contact with anyone has covert, and we ask everyone to keep their areas clean and open. Windows if possible. So that's gone a long way. If you zoom out actually the fact that half as many rides are being taken now as before I'm actually quite happy within a strange way because I know many people that are they're not going into the office that's a huge change in transportation. So the fact that one out of two rides are still present even in this environment show some flexibility in the model because we've seen different. Types of rides we've seen a lot of essential workers using this way more because there are other options. Potentially public transportation are things that they're more concerned about from a health safety perspective,

John Founder Co Founder Logan
How I Built Resilience: Sandra Oh Lin of KiwiCo

How I Built This

09:26 min | 1 year ago

How I Built Resilience: Sandra Oh Lin of KiwiCo

"On these episodes, we talk with entrepreneurs and other business leaders about how they're coping during this very challenging time and today we're gonNA hear from Sandra. Olen, the founder and CEO of Kiko Kiko makes arts and science projects for kids and ships them out in monthly subscription boxes or crates in March when students began learning from home Sandra's company a spike in orders, and it's now shipped over twenty million boxes around the world I spoke with. Sandra from her home. In the bay area is trying to keep up with demand. Tell us a little bit more about Kiwi Co for people who don't know what what you do tell us about your your company. Yeah. So we design and deliver hands on experiences for kids, kids of all ages. So we have different experiences and products that we develop for Newborns and infants alway through to kids at heart. So teens and even grown ups and these hands on experiences they range. So science experiments, games, kids making play projects that encourage imaginative play. And they're all center around this idea of how can we encourage kids to see themselves as makers And I. Think the the best known as the Kiwi crate and inside like you get pipe cleaners and different OV- like Styrofoam balls and I think that's probably the best known product that you guys make. Right the Kiwi crate. Yeah. Yeah. I mean that's our flagship line. So qe crate is geared for early elementary age kids. So five to eight and it's very project base for Kiwi crate. There are at least two different projects and it's usually one that's a science and engineering focused project and one. That's more be more of an art in creativity designed focus project. So let's say one project overall. It's about arcades and one project might be you create a mechanical arcade cloth that you can actually grab things with and the other side of the crate might be a project where you're making your own yarn pom Pom Creatures, and then you're actually taking your claw, you're trying to grab those creatures as well as whatever else is around your house too. So it's a combination of discoveries along with hopefully A. Little Bit of delight and a whole bunch of fun which I love and tell me I i. know that you launched this in twenty eleven and at the time I guess you were like you were in charge of the fashion portfolio. For Ebay. How did the idea come to you? So it was born mainly out of personal needs. So my my career has spanned consumer products and technology mostly ECOMMERCE. So it started my career in India proctor and gamble and then had been at pay pal at. Ebay but when we started the company, so two thousand eleven, my kids, my oldest two kids were almost three and almost five and I really want to give them especially the hands on activities. It was a way for them to really see themselves as producers and not just a passive consumers as kids who could actually kind of problem solve and make something, and so I started to pull together different and inspiration and I was like, Oh, my gosh, is taking a long time like I need to. Amortize. My effort and so I would invite friends and their kids, and one of the MOMS actually said, you should start a business around this and it was one of those things where I think long story short is that we found that there are a lot of parents who are well intentioned very busy. They want enriching activities for their kids and if it can come. To them in a convenient format from a trusted brand, and that's something that actually really resonates and then if you think about it from a business perspective, if you can get a subscription service to work, it works really well right and so if you consider all the elements of subscription service or you're considering lifetime value if you're able to drive down their cost of Acquisition then you're able to provide something that is not only valuable to the customer, but ends up being something that works really well all the business side to I I imagine when the Middlesex business for a moment I mean I imagine that when it became clear that the pandemic was GonNa shut down huge parts of the economy like most business owners you probably. Anticipated a downturn for Your Business and first of all, how did you prepare for that possibility? Well, to be completely frank, it was a little bit of madness say kind of the beginning. So we were a little bit ahead of the curve and having folks work remotely. But then as people started to shelter in place was definitely a scramble you know we had to see. What the impact would be to the business, and so we've definitely became more conservative. So very quickly we decided to basically pull back or remain conservative on marketing spend. We were looking at things like hiring and figuring out what we wanted to do that. So we held on hiring but then we're also tracking the business and what we actually started to see pretty. Quickly is a pretty decent uptick in the business. I think the combination of parents being home needing something to engage kids we happen to be a good solution, and so we started to see an uptick in the business and then accordingly had managed to the business based on that demand at a pretty dramatic to I think, right? Yeah. So I think you had mentioned. I kind of in the beginning that we shipped out over twenty million crates now, and so if you look at the first ten million crates, we hit that Mark Actually in January twenty nineteen, and then in the next eighteen months or so we actually shipped out another ten million crates and you can imagine kind of the celebration of the business and some of that. Is Because of acceleration that we saw on the business given the pandemic and the demand that was their I'm not surprised spoke with the CEO of dream box who told us that they have seen a doubling of on boarding on onto their platform it's a math platform for elementary school kids. I spoke to Sal Khan a few days ago of founder, the Khan Academy. I mean, they're seeing record numbers of students on their platform I mean as you have seen this kind of surge in demand, how have you been able to meet that demand? I mean, for example, have you had any challenges sourcing supplies? Yeah. So we've definitely had different challenges associated with with meeting the demand I. Think the great thing is that our team has been incredibly responsive and making sure that we shoring supply chain putting in the appropriate orders to make sure that we had the inventory available and I think when it's kind of regular times. To a certain extent, it's almost like your utilities or you know you expect the water to be there in the electricity work and similarly expect that you're going to have product to ship, and so we had to be very proactive about making sure that some of these things that we may have taken for granted and pass were there available to us that we could actually serve the community fulfillment was definitely another area that we had to really shore. Up and make sure that we have the capacity and then customer care I. Mean Obviously we WanNa do an excellent job of serving the customer and making sure that their questions are answered etc and so there was a certain amount of capacity that we were planning for in March April Etcetera May June, and so we had actually scaled add up pretty significantly. Let's go to some questions we're getting in from folks watching system cows, Zimmer he asks via twitter. How do you develop your kids and how do you test them with kids? Yeah. So we have interestingly to product design and development teams. So we have a physical product design and development team, and then we have a digital. So the digital is creating ecommerce platform or content platform. So the software and then our physical product design team is really comprised of folks with mechanical engineering backgrounds, industrial design. We have someone who actually worked on space satellite system. This is, and so these are the folks who are accepting the different projects that could to the kids prototyping testing, etc, and a big part of what we've done at Kiko even since you started it in my garage actually is that we are always testing but children. So in every office that we've had, we have a sizable room and four to eight times a week kids are coming in to test the products at various stages and that is. Something that is absolutely critical for us. We may assume that a project may be engaging. It may not. We may assume that a material is something that is malleable enough for preschoolers hands, but it may not be, and so it's just a critical step in. So as we've actually been working remotely, that was a big challenge to figure out, and so it's been pretty amazing. We quickly decided to actually purchase three D. Printers, laser cutters, etc that we. Then distributed to different product designers, and then on the testing side, we ended up actually either shipping or having a hand off locations for kids to pick up and test materials, and then do them via video conference and so we actually ask for different camera angles to see what the kids are doing because depending on the age of the kid it's not so much that they're going to tell you what's going on you actually have to observe. What's going on in? So that's definitely been an area where we've had to figure out how to get things

Sandra Mark Actually Ebay Kiko Kiko Kiwi Co Founder And Ceo India Olen Sal Khan Khan Academy CEO D. Printers Frank Twitter Zimmer
Uber, Lyft may shut down temporarily in California

Daily Tech News Show

00:28 sec | 1 year ago

Uber, Lyft may shut down temporarily in California

"And lived were ordered to convert their California drivers from independent contractors to employees with benefits. San Francisco Superior Court Judge Ethan Schulman agreed with California Attorney General Hobby Sarah that Uber and lyft violating assembly bill five but pause the injunction for ten days. So the companies can appeal the preliminary injunction which both companies said they'll do uber CEO Derek does Russia he and lift President John. Zimmer. Both said the companies may have to suspend service in California if forced to reclassify drivers.

California Ethan Schulman Superior Court San Francisco Zimmer Derek CEO Attorney Russia President Trump
California sues Lyft and Uber

Daily Tech News Show

00:19 sec | 1 year ago

California sues Lyft and Uber

"President John. Zimmer said lift will suspend operations in California. If it is forced to reclassify drivers as employees Uber said, Wednesday would temporarily suspend operations if forced to reclassify lift the more open ended California is suing both companies over the classification based on new, California law passed on January first.

California President John Zimmer
Uber would likely shut down for over a year in California if new ruling not overturned

BBC World Service

01:00 min | 1 year ago

Uber would likely shut down for over a year in California if new ruling not overturned

"Lift and uber say a California judge's order could put them out of business. The ruling that bride hailing drivers in California must be reclassified as full time employees with benefits. As NPR's Bobby Allen reports uber and lift insist their most of their drivers want to remain independent contractors. The judge's order follows a new law in California aimed at regulating the gig economy that made it more difficult for tech companies to rely on contractors who work without health insurance and paid sick leave. In a call with investors lift President John Zimmer echoed Uber and saying If the order isn't paused on appeal lift will stop its Reid handling business in California reclassifying tens of thousands of self employed drivers would be a significant challenge. In normal times, and in the current pandemic environment Thea about that would be nearly impossible. California voters will be asked on the November ballot measure whether the gig economy law should stay or if workers should remain independent contractors. Bobby Ellen NPR

California Bobby Ellen Npr Bobby Allen NPR Self Employed John Zimmer President Trump Reid
Who is Alex Cintrón, the Astros hitting coach who instigated brawl with the A's?

Drive Time Sports

02:52 min | 1 year ago

Who is Alex Cintrón, the Astros hitting coach who instigated brawl with the A's?

"Brawl in baseball yesterday. Ramona Reynaud went right after Alex Cintron, who is the head coach for the Houston Astros, And this whole thing was bizarre to Maine. We know that there is a beef between the athletics and the Astros. Mike Fires used to pitch for the Astros was on the on the athletic still is on Lorraine. Oh, gets hit twice in the Siri's that the 2nd 1 I didn't see the first of the 2nd 1 was not intentional. But he was walking to first base is so John boy pretty much tryingto figure out what was going on. And I guess Laredo was trying to tell the picture had to throw the ball. Cintron asked, get suspended from saying his name correctly, If now I apologize, but the bench the hitting coach has to get suspended, has to get a lengthy suspension. Because he is basically egging on Lorraine. Oh, who's at first base? And it was gutless. What the hitting coach did he goes? Oh, yeah. You come over here You come over here. The guys 41 years old, if this is not A 60 70 80 year old heading coach. This is not who is the Mets pitching coach? That's your Phil Regan. This's not him or or the late. Great Don Zimmer with Pedro Martinez, where you see potentially an older person get thrown to the ground. That was not this. This a 41 year old yellow Nazareno basically, Tom come over and fight him, and he did the ultimate Gutless move off. I'm going to tell you to come fight me. But the minute when you take a step forward three for my players are going to step in front of me. And then I'm going to become Mr Hold me back, bro. Type of guy. That's the worst person in a fight. Someone that instigates the fight and then doesn't throw the punch and doesn't actually fight when someone comes charging at you because of you just being ridiculous in the dugout. That guy doesn't get popped if Joe Kelly gets it with what it was an eight game suspension. If this is it, the heading coach here for the Astros doesn't get At least eight games, then that's ridiculous. Albay have no clue how to figure this out. They'll mess it up. Did you agree with that? Then we have a heading coach, basically telling Laredo to come over and fight him. Or Laureano. Excuse me. To come over and fight him. And then he lets what 34 of his players take care of it that was weak. Yeah, it's weak and it's like extra dumb when the league is begging you not to have a bench clearing altercations, and then you instigate won as a coach, not even a player for seemingly I don't even understand the reason. And it even begins. So, yeah, you would think he's going to be in big, big trouble, too. We

Houston Astros Alex Cintron Laredo Lorraine TOM Baseball Ramona Reynaud Phil Regan Mike Fires Siri Mets Don Zimmer Maine Pedro Martinez John Joe Kelly
Dunkirk Awards

Filmspotting

06:36 min | 1 year ago

Dunkirk Awards

"Welcome to film spotting, we will get to our Nolan Review Awards. Later in the show, we might have an for those awards picked out by. Then we might not. We will share our awards for favourite supporting performance and lead performance from this retrospective of the work of Christopher Nolan will also share our picks for best Nolan moment in the overall best moment or seen after we have revisited all ten of Nolan's films and that will culminate with our Christopher Nolan rankings. The definitive Christopher ranking for each of us one to ten will there be some shifting Adam Gimme a tease. Shifts definitely from the last time, I posted a Nolan ranking on letterbox. There's been some movement Yep me too one I think you'll like I don't know if you'll like it enough, but you will like it I though the World War Two movie from Christopher Nolan that we didn't know we needed dunkirk. The enemy tanks stop. Why? Why waste precious tanks when they can pick from the. Barrel. Their full hundred thousand men only speech. Your position. Josh, coming into this rewatch was that done kirk is Christopher, Nolan's best film and there's at least one longtime listener and regular commentator who agrees with you that we are culminating this overview triumphantly with the filmmakers greatest achievement Adam Grossman in Vancouver says like many of us. I've completed my Christopher Nolan Review. Biggest takeaway hoover is a really hard were dispel. Well, second takeaway. I've decided dunkirk is Nolan's career highpoint while my heart loves interstellar the most good on you Adam and I. Hugely Admire. and. The Dark Knight for what they meant to Action Cinema and Superhero movies respectively dunkirk is his masterpiece got laid down for you tenant. I just don't know how anyone could argue that the legend of dunkirk could be told any better the setup and the first eight minutes alone from the falling paper from the sky to the distress. Cry of where's the bloody air force is a wonder of a short film. In itself, the lack of dialogue works perfectly for what this movie wants to achieve with. Hans. Zimmer's relentless scored doing all the audio work that's necessary among all the chaos. There are frequent moments of grace. Kenneth. Branagh face as Commander Bolton as the cavalry arrives in the form of the civilian vessels the empathy as Peter Tells Killian Murphy's PTSD soldier. The young George will be okay and no moment more than the shot. Be Okay and no more than a shot of Tom Hardy's planes silently gliding over the beaches of dunkirk knowing his job has been done. dunkirk is also uniquely Christopher Nolan Movie One where his signature use of time has never melded together better and more cohesively than it does in the final twenty minutes of this film while Dunkirk will understandably never be a wholly enjoyable or easy rewatch. It's one that gets richer and richer with repeat viewing. Now, Adam Mention Nolan signature use of time, and that is one aspect of dunkirk among others that certainly connects to his entire body of work. But there are other aspects that Mark Dunkirk is unique. It is only film that is based on historical events, which means it is inherently rooted in the past and yet I'd argue it is only film that truly feels present tense meeting there are no. Dead parents or wives or forsaken children or other tragic events haunting the air's barrier played by Tom. Hardy the Moles Army private Tommy fiene whitehead or for the most part the sees Mr Dawson played by Mark Rylance like all Nolan protagonist there's plenty of personal sacrifices on display but no guilt no sense of futility about toning past actions just the seemingly futile need to survive the current event that they. Are Tragically experiencing here's something else that argues unique about dunkirk as we every other commentator on Dolan's work is discussed in some form or fashion for all those dead parents and wives and foresaken children. There's nothing so emotional or borderline sentimental in any of his previous films as the climax of inception and yes, mileage may vary there which led to interstellar and not only mcconaghy's crushing breakdown watching twenty three. Years Worth of miss video messages from his family but the verbalize message love is the one thing we're capable of proceeding that transcends dimensions of time and space. Maybe we should trust that even if we can't understand it, it's hard to imagine any character in previous Christopher Nolan movies saying something like that which led to Dunkirk am I crazy josh this is his most blatantly sentimental and even heart film. And if so is that what establishes Dunkirk as his best its balance of coldness the sober portrayal of the hell of war of life in the misguided choices, some men will make when facing death with warmth. In the compassionate inspiring choices some men will make to maintain a way of life. So a lot of subtleties in that question and you're onto something so you're not crazy I think I would distinguish. The word blatantly, I. Don't think this is blatantly emotional or moving, but I do think you're onto something in the fact that it is maybe his most heartwarming in where it ends up and let me kind of try to parse those. You're right as long as the Nolan Canon has convulsing McConnell. Interstellar is going to be his most blatantly emotional I mean you can't have a scene like that without registering that on it surface. That's his most emotional movie. But I will also say that I find Dunkirk to be his most emotionally affecting movie maybe even more. So than inception, which we about how I did find that very moving especially in the character of Mal. So yet dunkirk is really a unique thing even as it's working within the strands and trends that we have been tracing in Nolan's other films, I. Think the heartwarming aspect is probably a part of that. You've nailed it there in that it brings us to a place that. Is One of Constellation and I think it's earned because I think up until that point we have just been suffering alongside all of these other characters in so many ways and we've also been recognizing as the movie does that this is You know a an account of a military failure, a huge defeat and so for the movie to kind of offer, some sort of solace at the end of that I think is. In proportion and well

Christopher Nolan Dunkirk Mark Dunkirk Adam Grossman Nolan Canon Tom Hardy Josh Hoover Action Cinema Zimmer Hans Kenneth George Moles Army Tommy Fiene Whitehead Vancouver Branagh Dolan Kirk
"zimmer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:53 min | 1 year ago

"zimmer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"They were called Zimmer's now obviously there's a whole new thing hold a meeting to read only layer so instantly become this outsized has size cultural role how do socializing aspect yeah it's it's something that we really wanted to explore an article because there is like why do why everything all these names why not Google hang out why not both you know this is the sort of face to face and why I mean one apple facetime or Skype and part of that is that the couple that the the service just works it's very intuitive and seamless and you know it's it's fairly new so it was designed more recently than some of these other things so it's you know kind of mobile first that has a lot of the design features that I think younger the younger generations need to but I think another piece of it is just that it was already in school and I was already in a lot of businesses and the people were sort of using it by default and it bubbled up that way and then there's a little bit of a brand thing to it as well I think it's just because of the independent about patches from big tech company that has already kind of gotten a bad immediately John G. reputation you know teams are necessarily aren't really known for loving Facebook and and you know Skype on by Microsoft and it's really does not sound like a bit of business focused so and there's a confluence of factors but I I think it's all of those things and yeah but mostly it's just but it's really really simple this is a little bit of a speculative question but as someone though in this business and as a reporter who watches things come and go and see which companies stay and which ones fade away what do you think the future resume looks like after the pandemic we can all go back outside it is a good enough to survive it I think we're going to appreciate the faith and human contact more than ever however as soon as the business is kind of happening because right now they're actually they're getting a lot of they were getting a lot of good will now they're getting a lot of criticism they're learning what it's like to be to ride the hype cycle eventually for her hot company they're not necessarily getting a lot of new business out of this because they they made the service free for schools they are leaving you know extended to how long this phone call could be for free users and so they're they're not the people who are all the people who are doing hang out then you know happy hours they're not paying for the service and so it's not necessarily leading to a lot of customers in fact it's probably gonna cost them a lot of money because they have to pay for all the bands that this would be getting up but I think there're strategy is like this will hopefully help them with their branding in their good will that from day one and all these college kids you know getting jobs out in the real world and I have to choose a video conferencing service they're going to remember them and take them I think I started playing this for the long term and so you know that that's pretty priceless as far as business goes I don't think that as humans we're going to be choosing to do them call with our friends and we can actually see them in person but I know only for me personally you know this is the provides me facetiming my members and people from that are you know in different cities a lot more than I normally would so I think you know it's created a new habit that it will be supplemental but I I still don't think there's there's a replacement for face to face contact that we all are really missing right now Erin Griffith it covers tech start ups and venture capital for The New York Times Aaron thanks for explaining them to us thanks for having me okay we'll just learn about zoom that's more apps.

Zimmer
"zimmer" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

02:41 min | 1 year ago

"zimmer" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

"<Speech_Music_Male> you know <Speech_Music_Male> what we do in our lives <Speech_Music_Male> is encapsulated <Speech_Music_Male> in these <SpeakerChange> genes that <Speech_Music_Male> we inherit from our ancestors <Silence> <Speech_Music_Male> And <Speech_Telephony_Male> then yeah then there are people <Speech_Music_Male> who just WANNA fight <Speech_Music_Male> against it <Speech_Music_Male> You know part of that <Speech_Music_Male> sometimes <Speech_Music_Male> feels like you know <Speech_Music_Male> it's sort of a displaced <Speech_Telephony_Male> fight. They're having <Speech_Music_Male> with their parents. You <Speech_Music_Male> know like I'm <Speech_Music_Male> not going to be like you <Speech_Music_Male> are you know <Speech_Music_Male> and and I don't care <Speech_Music_Male> if I inherited genes from <Speech_Music_Male> you. I'm going to be my own person. <Silence> <Speech_Music_Male> <hes> <Speech_Telephony_Male> I would say in my own experience <Speech_Telephony_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> You know <Speech_Music_Male> I <Speech_Music_Male> got my genome sequenced <Speech_Music_Male> and part of the research <Speech_Music_Male> for this book and <Speech_Music_Male> and I really looked <Speech_Music_Male> at it very deeply. <Speech_Telephony_Male> It's been a fascinating experience. <Speech_Music_Male> But I can't <Speech_Music_Male> find <Speech_Telephony_Male> anything in <Silence> there that <Speech_Male> is <Silence> quote unquote <SpeakerChange> me. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Telephony_Male> I <Speech_Music_Male> think that <Speech_Music_Male> is <Speech_Music_Male> just not <Speech_Telephony_Male> there. You know I <Speech_Telephony_Male> I <Speech_Music_Male> will look at the genes that <Speech_Telephony_Male> I inherited from <Speech_Music_Male> neanderthal. You <Speech_Music_Male> know tens of thousands of years <Speech_Music_Male> ago and you <Speech_Music_Male> know I which is <Speech_Music_Male> fascinating <Speech_Telephony_Male> but then I say to these scientists <Speech_Music_Male> like okay. You <Speech_Telephony_Male> giving me this Cadillac the <Speech_Music_Male> end all jeans and let's talk <Speech_Music_Male> about them like <Speech_Music_Male> what does it mean that. I inherit <Speech_Music_Male> the this <Speech_Music_Male> like. Here's one gene. <Speech_Music_Male> Tell me about <Speech_Music_Male> it and <Silence> be like well. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> It looks like no <Speech_Telephony_Male> one actually knows what <Silence> this gene does <Speech_Music_Male> at all. <Speech_Music_Male> You know <Speech_Telephony_Male> you're just left <Speech_Music_Male> there with the state <Speech_Music_Male> of the science you <Speech_Music_Male> know. May <Speech_Telephony_Male> I found that I have <Speech_Music_Male> any anatole? Gene <Speech_Music_Male> that <hes> <Speech_Music_Male> is linked <Speech_Music_Male> to an increased. <Speech_Music_Male> Risk of nosebleeds. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> I don't <Speech_Telephony_Male> I don't know what to <Speech_Music_Male> do that. You know <Speech_Telephony_Male> And I it also <Speech_Music_Male> makes me wonder neanderthals. <Speech_Music_Male> Might have nosebleeds. <Speech_Music_Male> But that's a <Silence> separate issue. But <Speech_Music_Male> you <Speech_Music_Male> know I <Speech_Telephony_Male> I I don't <Speech_Music_Male> i. I <Speech_Music_Male> can't say that anything <Speech_Music_Male> I've done <Speech_Music_Male> looking at my <Speech_Music_Male> own. Dna <Speech_Music_Male> has given me <Speech_Music_Male> some deep inside <Speech_Music_Male> about my <Speech_Telephony_Male> inner self <Speech_Telephony_Male> as a person <Speech_Music_Male> you know as <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> much more <Speech_Music_Male> relevant to me to think <Silence> about you know <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> how my parents <Speech_Telephony_Male> raised me. <Speech_Music_Male> And what experiences <Speech_Music_Male> whereas the kid <Speech_Telephony_Male> and what? It's <Speech_Music_Male> been like you know <Speech_Music_Male> being married. And <Speech_Music_Male> and and being <Speech_Telephony_Male> a father <Speech_Music_Male> like the lived experience <Speech_Music_Male> matters <Speech_Music_Male> much more to <Speech_Music_Male> me than <Speech_Music_Male> Than <Speech_Music_Male> the details <Speech_Music_Male> of the genome inherited <Speech_Telephony_Male> from my parents <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> And <Speech_Music_Male> that's <Speech_Telephony_Male> that's kind of where <Speech_Music_Male> where it stands <SpeakerChange> for me now. <Speech_Male> All <Speech_Male> right Yeah <Speech_Male> we'll we'll thank <Speech_Male> you so much Carl it's <Speech_Male> been a real pleasure talking <Speech_Male> to you today and we <Speech_Male> appreciate you <Speech_Male> taking time to speak with <Speech_Music_Male> us. My pleasure <Speech_Telephony_Male> my pleasure. I really <Speech_Music_Male> enjoyed the conversation <Speech_Music_Male> and I'm glad you enjoyed the book. <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> So <Speech_Male> there you have it. Thanks <Speech_Male> once again. To <Speech_Male> Carl Zimmer for coming <Speech_Male> on the show and <Speech_Male> having this Just <Speech_Male> wonderful chat <Speech_Male> with us about his <Speech_Male> new book <Speech_Male> she has her mother's <Speech_Male> laugh the powers <Speech_Male> perversions. And potential <Speech_Male> of heredity again. <Speech_Male>

Carl Zimmer