17 Burst results for "Zimbardo"

"zimbardo" Discussed on Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

03:54 min | 1 year ago

"zimbardo" Discussed on Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

"Just go online welcome nation. I think it just her project org and you could contact us if you're interested in having a trial lesson and And then then what we do is we said even me or one of our people that i've trained we send to the school to train to train your trainers and so it's been very effective. We are in a dozen countries literally around the world and in hungary has this right wing. A dictator president That we are in every high school in all of hungary. Because i work really close to its and i would be before the pandemic i would literally Every year the heroic imagination project in its online. It's a nonprofit research and education. Based i mean it's extraordinary what you're doing and so we're definitely definitely wanna support people to go there and if you had one thing one thing that you would like people do on top of complement giving what would that one thing be. Oh maybe it's a practice in but something that you do on a regular basis that has helped you be the man that you are In san francisco. Which i love this live all my. I grew up in new york. I live in san francisco. One of the problems we have that people have in. Many places is increased number of homeless people and and so An all the neighbor say it's a blight people living on the street sometimes whole families. And so what i do is reasonable. I changed the definition. They're not homeless people. They are people without a home. That's really a critical difference. Once you categorize people as in a negative way. Homeless people is negative. but there are people. Don't have a home so you could. You not have a home. Your home could burn down in a fire and suddenly your perseverance. And so when. I go down town to bicet by some they went could go downtown. I would always imagine in advance. I would take a two dollars. And i would see a homeless person. Typically older person. And i go over to them and say hello. I'm i'm my name. Is philip zimbardo What is your name. I put out my hand and then they would shake hands at a. Tell me the name. And i said do you live. Did you come from san francisco. What city to come in they tell me then i say his at doll. I wish it could be more I hope i hope you luck improves. In every case they'd be into europe because no one has treated them like a person rather than as a beggar and so his. So it's a little thing. I mean so. It doesn't change the home almost problem but it's it's having an impact on one or two people each day in in this really very positive way. So that's what i encourage your europe. Your your business. I never would have imagined your depth of intimacy your Your veil ability to to share from a vulnerable place. About like what matters most you. I i know you. As having a big mind big imagination pushing limits great writer ends like a paragon in the field of research and so I appreciate this other side this openness this curiosity this deep imagination that you've trained As well as like a very clear line of thinking that has made sense for you and your life and so again beautiful thank you. How is always i say goodbye. Thank you michael for a wonderful our chow chow..

hungary san francisco philip zimbardo new york europe michael
"zimbardo" Discussed on Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

07:07 min | 1 year ago

"zimbardo" Discussed on Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

"We all knew that going home and they died. But it's what you want in most in life is to go home So i'd night. I we pray to god You know let me go home that way. Not oil ltd woke up morning. I'd say thank you god to give me another literally. You're praying for another day of life as a sicilian. So i've got some family sicilian roots as well. I imagine that the church was important part of your foundation. And that's i guess. I haven't heard to talk about that. No it was. My family was not religious but but coming out of the hospital. I became religious. I would bring my brother's eye. Tuber young brothers and sisters i. We bring them altered church to mess day and i was religious. Oh i to college in high school. I even saw. When i was at brooklyn college. I was the captain of the track team. I just popped up a picture of the track team and and at brooklyn college eighty ninety percent of the kids then jewish and i had a cross. I didn't remember. I was wearing a necklace with a cross on it So so at least through college. I maintain a religious orientation. How'd you finish this thought. People are fundamentally good in a goodness engendering situation. So much left to that you know. So so people are Are you would you say people are blank slate. More than they are inherently good or inherently evil. Well i wanna believe there. I don't believe anybody's inherently evil. I believe inherently good and until they get put in a bad barrel and And there are a lot of bad barrel a lot of jobs that we encourage us to cheat lie. If you're you're you're an old fashioned used car salesman had salad clunkers that that was your job. If you're a prison guard afraid. That prisoners are going to attack you and you have to have to create a false illusion that you you're domineering. Dominating them you you'll you'll shoot to kill Then then the nets image. But i believe i believe in the goodness of human nature And it's being put into situations that corrupts that poverty situation at krupp said Living in living in a war zone. I mean there's never been past. Two hundred. years is never been one year with has not been a war somewhere in the world You know so. Wars wars are for me. Evil wars are designed From one one group to try dominate another group and dominate means. Destroy choose your life work in your life has been remarkable and so as a contributor to so many psychologists in the people that they touch. How do you think about the path of master. Do you see yourself on the path in like how do you think about it in general made. I don't see my life. As a path i see it. Is i get an idea and say let me follow that. I get another idea. It might be a little bit of link So i don't see myself as it going this way. a so. It's really is really lights. All around stars all around. Or because i'm always looking for something a new idea something that will excite my imagination. Then how do i change that. That imagination and two words and words into deeds deeds into ideally experiments. That have resolves that i can share clear. I mean you are in many respects in a emblem for psychological agility howard. You help others be agile. how would you. How would you help some folks do that. Why don't you do that. it's As i was saying that learning to juggle which i didn't do it just people have said learning to juggle objects balls in the air is one way to learn to have confidence that at first year it falls at the point. Is you begin by saying. I will do this until i can. Keep both balls in the air at the same time and then you've had And then you eight even if he juggled three balls at a time you begin to have self confidence that is. Here's something i can control something. That's not in me. It's something out there and And then and then you take a brisk a fourth one then is may even be. Ideally we don't do this duck juggling and pears you. You're doing balls and somebody else. Then you throwing one to the other he's throwing one to you That's something. I just thought about on the moment would build certainly way to bill sense of mastery baton mastery. It is doing something that you never done before. Says not just build a on some old habits skills. What a treat. Thank you for your time. Thank you for sharing. What what. I've been looking forward to this for a long time. And yes the thank you so much for all your contributions and this hour has been a kid alabama kidney candy. Thank you again. Yeah the last thing is heavy list is go on my hip project. Heroic imagination project Is something i've been doing for the past ten years and now we're being revived. We just we just coalesced with with another group called the heroic construction company. They had been working more with younger. Kids might program developed lie. I developed lessons on. For example i had transformed. Passer by san is active. Heroes had transformed prejudice and discrimination and understanding accepted about this who had different and similar lesson and we license..

brooklyn college krupp nets howard alabama san
"zimbardo" Discussed on Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

10:40 min | 1 year ago

"zimbardo" Discussed on Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

"The people give us that gives us a positive inner feeling. But how did that people know that we appreciate what they did for us unless we express it now sometimes expressed with a smile and not of your head but give it words give it give it meaning the say. I thank you for such and such. I appreciate how you did this. I value you. People don't say that And for me that is what creates at this meaningful social bond and i say it starts with an a family It starts about within your nuclear family. Your your expanded family you you and your neighbors you and your friends you and your buddies union classmates so it should be a series of circles of of of grateful expression And and the same way. You hope that if you do it it'll come back to you to say michael. I really appreciate how you orchestrated this program that i find it really made it interesting for me whereas normally this is kind of boring just repeat. Tell me about a tell me about you that see so. In fact michael peres has made this hour more interesting permit value. That and i thank you. I'll know rome with that for the rest of my life so So and i want to honor your time. And i want to share a quick story and had just a few more questions for is hit. I was close to this. I didn't say it as eloquently as you did about compliments but i would ask athletes to go into public setting and with all the right benevolence. Give a compliment to somebody. Oh and yet a so. This is probably fifteen. Years ago. That i started this because i was. I wanted to help them with vulnerability because i think everything was in everything that i was looking for to help an athlete. Being the present moment more often experienced vulnerability so that they could express a moment of social courage and that courage can be used in other arenas in their life as well and awesome to give a compliment. And what i found. I think this is gonna go right to Some your work with with Males is that they could do it much easier that could give a compliment to another male much easier. So then i i watched that and first of all they would come back after i give them this challenge say right go do this for the next seven days give a compliment and i'd say three compliments a day and they come back and they would say right. That was hard. But i did it with a couple guys. That's okay well. Let's think about the the other gender and i'll tell you i got in trouble with it in a minute and so they're coming back. They're like man. I was a rack. And i said okay in the i was on the internal external compliment as well. If you just need to start start by something external but really the work has to say something internal about their internal life and They would be iraq. Now here's these six foot three six foot six grown alpha looking men as vulnerable and scared as you can to give a compliment to somebody. And what i didn't realize Because i was it was coming from a benevolent places that there might have been some intimidation that could happen from the woman's perspective. Like this man coming up to me giving me this random compliment that there's so much social stigma around That feels more. Like a predatory experience or something that is threatening. And so. I've i've pulled back from it because i don't want that was never the intent but the beauty in exchanging a moment of vulnerability and kindness and compliment I think there's so there's so much there that it was one of my core staple go to's for folks but again. I'm not doing that now. Because i'm right now i'm going. Oh thank you. Dr zimbardo of kinda sharpening that. Because i feel like. I can go back to it now in a way that isn't So socially Perceived as predatory because that was not the intent so on share that with you like maybe that is the one concern is that had is the recipient. Know that my complement is Does not have a hidden meaning. I'm not. I'm not complimenting you. Because i wanna get a date or at least competent Because i want you to do your favorite turned. It seems to me that it's by practicing often enough. It becomes a habit. That's what you want. Competent is not stem. Rare thing that you do on the risk circuits writing you do And and it's it's and you say you do everyone even even if now. I started this when i was a little kid. I i was a quarantine back in nineteen thirty nine ahead w. ammonia and hoping cough and and was there was also polio endemic at that time and i was in a hospital filled with hundreds and hundreds of little kids ages two to sixteen who had contagious diseases and and were in one thousand nine hundred eighty nine. There was no selva drugs no penicillin. that means. There's no treatment. It means that every day many many kids died and my only link to reality was the nurses and i learned very quickly to give compliments. I was i was five and a half i was there. I went in for thanksgiving. I came out free. Create an upper east side. Almost six months i learned to give compliments to the nurses say many. They always wore masks. And i would always say as a little kid. Oh i like your is the you have such beautiful is you know Or beautiful hair so saw as a little kid now. They knew not making out with them. They they knew there was nothing special. Maybe they would give me a extra dessert or something but it just was intuitive that i wanted them to take care of me. I wanted them to identify me as different from the other. Two hundred kids so that that. If i had a need they would. They would be more likely to come like during the night. If i pressed the bell something so comments has been part of my makeup. It's what you do routinely As a teacher. I would give compass dudes who gave a good good question that gave a good answer so students asoka class question in class before i answered the question. I'd say that's really a good question. It makes me think in a way. I hadn't sort about you know The law of effect or a pavlov or whatever it is so. That's i'm telling you you'll guess practice. Giving compliments they could start with innocent innocent ones start with people in your a family of friends circle And and if people think does anything suspicion about them just tell them no. I really want you to know that. This is how i feel. This is this is why i enjoy being with you. Working with you Have you done any research around that to see if there's some sort of magical number i don't expect there is where we start to see some psychological or near chemistry exchange the takes place for people that provides a net positive for them. And and i don't imagine there is. But i'm wondering if there's any recite done around him i don't i don't think i don't think there's any research on common giving but again huddle so you young psychologists out there make that a project Yeah at scale would be phenomenal and so complementing was one of your survival. Tactics also read that imagination and prayer. Were also part of what you attribute to getting out of that one of the most sterile conditions. You could imagine as a five year. Old i mean sterile from a psychosocial standpoint. Oh yeah yeah so Quote i was advance for age Partly i had two younger brothers and later youngest sister and my mother would always say my job was to be like the father. These kids to take care of them. So i would always in ben games we would we really poor and so we didn't have things so i would make up imaginary games and as a kid in the hospital. I would do that again to to you know so for example. I'd say you know who wants to play a game a pay expiration and the kids around. Yeah yeah and then. I would say okay. We're going down the nile searching for white alligator. I think i had read that someplace. Maybe it was a comic book has some. I'd say you'll be to look at it and so for for one hour so we would. We would lighten up the environment where kids are dying all the time and and give them you know a focus. It also meant that. I was practicing another issue of leadership skills that the leader is somebody who initiates a program an idea an act a set of actions and then soon after kids and say hey z. Z. as e what. What should we do today. And that that sharpens up. That people need leaders to give them ideas or actions that make make life better and then of course i. Br given that kids would die all the time. Like you wake up in the morning and say to the Nurse mary you a whiz whiz little billy. He went home with james. She went home and and and then curiously. There was a conspiracy of denial. We all knew that going home and they died. But it's what you want in most in life is to go home So i'd night. I.

michael peres Dr zimbardo rome michael polio iraq cough asoka billy james
"zimbardo" Discussed on Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

08:35 min | 1 year ago

"zimbardo" Discussed on Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

"It certainly was a way to quell some anxiousness but was also probably the thing that promoted anxiousness and when my work with you know some of the best performers in athletes in executives in the world they tend to run high on that future positive but there's an underlying anxiousness that that is part of it so what are some of the Ways through you know that you recommend for folks so that they can take the good parts of thinking about the future in a positive way but also work with the anxiousness that sits with a degree at a slight degree of apprehension is always valuable you don't go with fools rush in so and so you realize that practice makes perfect but excessive practice becomes an obsession so so essentially it's how do you get a true a good fix on what who am i. What am i want in life. How much effort do i have to put in at any one time and anyone project How do i. Balance the time. If i If i'm writing a new book Is that all. I do in life while i'm a father. I mean i have to spend time with my kids to spend time with my wife having dinner together and talk about what she is doing so so the key is in life it said unless you live alone unless you be. You are You know a self absorbed which is never good than it's really trying to understand. How do i balance. What i want what. I'm good at what i like. What i wanna be better at with. Who fills zimbardo is social creature So i have to make time in my schedule for a podcast with michael j. bays well if i'm spending an hour there that's an hour i'm not spending Preparing a new lecture. That i have to give tomorrow. The at stanford university started to society is going to present the fiftieth anniversary of the same. Ferment So then when i say well the hour i spent michael. I'm going to have to make up by spending another hour tonight at doing the thing. I'm gonna jabbar. So life is really a balance balancing your time allocation to get to get the best fit and jibing able to do that fairly well. Well it's an obvious note to say thank you again for your time and then so can i ask you just a little bit about people's opinions and why do you think they matter so much as a social psychological scientist what people's opinions matter so much to well most of us want to be like by other people. I mean as little kids. All the kids want to be popular popular means. How many other little kids like you minus. How many a kids ignore you or don't like you and that goes on in life is As social beings you know we want to be a. We want to be accepted that we wanna be recognize we exist. We don't want wanna be ignored. And then you want to be like on people like you for for good things about yourself. Things that you work at And On the other hand. Not all of us a likable. Some of us have developed character. If you will flaws that you might be dominant. You might be maggie. Somebody who instead of asking for help he begs for help or yells for help or says i don't need help So so there's a bunch of components that go to make up a positive social creature. Who knows how to interact and link with other people actually invites other people to interact with them And it's not skill that you learn easily not as skilled that anybody teaches you but to be funny. it's a kind of dynamic social creature dynamic is you're always changing. You're modifying your behavior. Based on the feedback you get from other people Based on the feedback you get from yourself and again one of the things in my heroic imagination project which is the big. I'm obsessed with currently for the past ten years. Is we teach people how to be socio. Cedric the enemy of heroism. His ego. centrism can't do about it. Has to be bad we so we encourage people especially young people. When i might give what. I i do online lectures these days virtual lectures high-school college kids and i say your job in life is to make someone else feel accepted feel respected feel. That did their identity matters. How do you do that. You'll always ask people their name. You give your name You shake hands or do l. Bob bob whatever And and then you give them a compliment in the complement can begin with external things about them What an interesting scarf. You have Interesting Curious eyeglasses sunglasses. And then you go from the external to the interns eight cut. I really liked the way you phrase that question or That was really funny. I mean i you make me laugh so so you give compliments about the external aspect of people and then internal thoughts feelings etc and in doing so. Giving compromise is a rare skill that skilled at israeli practice. People don't give compliments as authorization. I taught at stanford for forty years and i was really good. Teach took classes of two thousand kids. I devoted my life to teaching me. I never gave the same lecture wants even an introductory site. I always thought of new things dimension. And i would make make my lectures exhilarating that that was the gold. Not just a good and every once in a while thirty years later. Forty is ada. Somebody will ride to say. I was a student in your class in one thousand nine hundred two. It changed my life on and on. And i would write back and say. Aren't you glad. I didn't die before you sent me that complement. Why did you wait thirty years. Why don't you tell me. Nineteen eighty to ninety two too. But again it's just think about. I want the audience to think about that cow. Rarely we give compliments and how much we like to receive a compliment. And so i'd like audience audiences say starting today i'm going to start giving compliments and give compliments at home and you thank you mother for the dinner. He's thank you your wife for having done something special So that that you don't take compliments means you don't take for granted the actions of some other person that nobody. Nobody has to do things for you that they do and so so again. It's it's being as being a person who appreciates but other people do especially when they do it for you so this is maybe an extension to gratitude training so gratitude training is becoming more aware of what your great love and then this is the expression of it. The gratitude both external and internal that. You're seeing for others and so this is. If if i play this back correctly you're suggesting this is knock yutian to egocentrism. And potentially a proponent of heroism a training mechanism for people to be more heroic. Because if they're focused on others And practicing focusing on the wellness of others that may be a time of need we will express ourselves more as a hero to quote unquote As opposed to a selfish fill the blanks. Hit it. exactly. Mike is that we should be grateful for what we have. We should be grateful..

zimbardo michael j stanford jabbar Bob bob maggie Cedric michael Mike
"zimbardo" Discussed on Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

08:09 min | 1 year ago

"zimbardo" Discussed on Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

"You introduce Is at six is at six different perspectives for for time and I i'd love for you to just. I'd have to go through a little bit if you could give a description of past positive polly. Yeah so essentially it's Things that came out of the prison two things came out of the prison. Study is my research on shyness. And i am not a shy person. I'm obviously always been an extrovert. I've always been focused on helping. Other people enjoy life more fully in the process. My enjoying life fully but coming out of this study. I began to think about when talking to by students. The next year and stanford Up shyness as a self imposed psychological prison now unlike most other phenomena. Nobody says you are a shy person us. I say i am a shy person. And therefore i can't raise my hand in class. I can't ask arrays. i can ask the girl for day. So you limit your freedom of association and your freedom of speech And and as the guardian you you you put the constrain on you. Say you don't do it. People are gonna laugh at you. You're gonna fail so i'd be using that. Metaphor began to study shyness and in nineteen starting nineteen seventy two. I was the first person psychologist study shyness and we did cross cultural research experimental research and then i created a shyness clinic at stanford which is still working. Fifty is forty years later at palo alto university in which we get one hundred percent cure. What kind of therapy gets on percents. You're very simple by understanding what it means to be shy. I mean three things one. You don't have the basic social skills communication skills secondly you say negative things about yourself. I'm i'm too fat. i'm too ugly up too. Dumb and served is a physiological. I blush i get a i. Get a emotionally aroused. I can't function properly so we have a treatment for each of those three things. We teach you social skills. We teach you a cognitive behavior modification. And we teach you Self control and meditation. And when you do that and we do therapy only groups that we have been one hundred percent successful now. Wrote a book called shine as what it is what to do about it That was that is not a research paper. It was ordinary trade book that climb han thousand people more used so that i'm probably most proud of me out of the out of the presidency really unexpectedly and then the second thing that came out was an interesting time because time was distorted in prison study. No one was allowed to wear wristwatches. There were no clocks. There are no windows so we couldn't tell the time of day or night and you know. His guardship won his guardship to guard ships. Three and i actually never left the prison setting. I slept in my office at stanford on the second floor so i could be called down on. A prisoner broke down when it was some emergency when their parents day or or A priest visiting day and and so time got distorted and ibn to think about time in my own life. Time as a kid when you're a kid time stretches because what you do is playing But when you when you studying for exam time gets contracted And so i began to think about time and develop a scale called the zimbardo time perspective. Inventory z. t. p. And it's a if you look at a time paradox. i think dot org dot com The scale is there. You can take it at score. So what i came up with. His the obvious fact is past president future but each of those has a positive than negative component so For some people. When i say when you think about your pass what comes to mind for. Some people was the good old days my best friends. All my successes The good grades. I got in school Good girlfriend i had proud people. It's the opposite. It's failure rejection abuse. And so we call those pats positive versus past negative for some people in the present These people say nothing. I do ever makes the difference. I work. I work hard and i. I still can't save any money. I try to be good to friends and family. But they don't accept me and that is a sense of fatalism that it doesn't even pay try. That's nothing i do makes a different. So that's present negative present hedonism. Is you always try. Always try something new. You enjoy life forty you. You live for the moment of And you make friends. You're funny you're happy So that's the positive side of president not in the future. Education is the key to a positive future that people who people we show that people who are more educated tend to be more future-oriented. You're always planning you not living for the moment. Not hedonistic you planning. What do i have to do today to get to mardi be more successful at these. Are the people who invest wisely These people continue on righetti as much education as possible. These are the people who if you're a performer ballet performance or baseball player bathroom. You put in a lot of time practicing And so so so that's the positive side. The negative side of futures. What i might not succeed. I put it in all this time and all his separate and i could fail. There's examples of people failing so is the future next future. Negative is anxiety about not succeeding So so each of them has a positive negative. And what is a lot of research done now choosing it my my my original research and the books a time paradox that he did with my colleague. John boyd has gone. International people are doing research around the world on this topic and there's an international time perspective conference that means every year every other year around the world in different countries except for this year And and people share their ideas. She the research now. People are interested not just psychologists psychotherapists counsellors People in business for all time is critically important unless they are mentioned is what is ideal ideal is a ballot be balanced time perspective bt p. That means high on past positive. Low past negative moderately high an unprecedented low President fatalism high on a future orientation positive low on future orientation negative and that combination turns out to be a lot of people done research beside me ideal for success in life for enjoyment of life for for many many many good things so i definitely run high on the future positive so i took the safe route many respects in in in. Probably you thought about the future took the educational path and looking through your lenses..

palo alto university stanford polly righetti ibn John boyd baseball
"zimbardo" Discussed on Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

03:41 min | 1 year ago

"zimbardo" Discussed on Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

"The prison study and the pandemic. If we could try to stitch these two together and both experiments i mean one was purposeful and the other was natural. Both experiments are both conditions revealed something about human nature and both revealed that we can get with this knowledge. We can get better or we can just kind of explain things away And minimize right but certainly from yours but also from the pandemic what would you say is the great takeaway from both but in particular looking through the lens of twenty twenty. I mean partly it's great news about human nature is adaptability. We wait the reason. We are here in twenty twenty after generations and we had pandemics in nineteen eighteen. We've had polio epidemic diseases so The positive news about dependent make is the creation of vaccines So this is part of the creative aspect of human nature and then not only creating a vaccine but be able to manufacture them So he is a again human ingenuity at work and then being able to transport them to various sites And then have healthcare workers working round almost around the clock to give people explanations so so the positive part of me of the pandemic is looking at the creative creativity that it inspired in developing back seen in developing transportation and delivery And and that is what's gonna literally abi literally saved us. The the negative part is that for some people they may never really fully recover. that is During the time they were isolated the relationship to their spouse You know was terrible or in some cases a relationship of parents to kids was terrible. But but i hope. In retrospect the positives outweigh the negatives. Yet my my takeaway. There's so many but my main takeaway is that it showed us that we weren't prepared to deal with both chronic and acute stress compounded together and we're barely dealing with chronic stress As at least in the western world prior to that end over life vibrance was not an all time high. Because we are you know glorifying the work ethos and not really glorifying. Peace in fulfilment Purpose and meaning. And so. I think what it showed us is that we've got to get our psychology right to deal with stress better and when i say psychology for me is just a loose word at this moment for our inner life and our skills to be able to deal with difficult environments in situations. Yes again. I agree entirely with that. Michael is that some people they realize. I am more than my job. That has you know before. Yes somebody you know. Hello who are you what do you do. I'm an accountant. i'm a bookkeeper et cetera et cetera. And suddenly realize you the break between you and your home and your place of work and that's going to change. i mean. many many companies already shutting down their offices permanently realize you could work from home now died now.

polio Michael
"zimbardo" Discussed on Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

01:50 min | 1 year ago

"zimbardo" Discussed on Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

"On audible definitely recommend getting both of those and so as an audible member you get one credit every month good for any title in their entire premium selection those titles are yours to keep forever in your audible library in their newest plan. Audible plus gives you full access to their popular plus catalog. it's filled with thousands and thousands of audio books and original entertainment guided fitness and meditation sleep tracks for better rest podcast as well including ad free versions of your favorite shows and exclusive series all are included in your membership so you can download and stream. All you want credits. Needed new members can try audible. Plus for thirty days for free just visit audible dot com slash finding mastery or text finding mastery to five hundred dash five hundred to take advantage of this offer. So again that's audible dot com slash finding mastery or text finding mastery to five hundred dash five hundred and finding masters brought to you by athletic greens by now. I really hope you've had the chance to try athletic. Greens even if you're only recently started listening to this podcast. I think you know by now. How much i believe in what they're doing. Their daily green supplement has been my flat out absolute go-to for the last six plus years and i choose them and choose this product for staying healthy and getting the vital nutrients that i normally don't get in my regular diet and listen. I try my very best to get my diet right. This is my insurance plan to get it right and you know what else i love about them. They are relentless to improve this one holistic formula and they're making sure that they're connected to the latest research they've even produced fifty three iterations over the last decade and counting..

"zimbardo" Discussed on Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

09:38 min | 1 year ago

"zimbardo" Discussed on Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

"How do you take your insights there and your study of evil the lucifer effect. And how do you snapped onto the insurrection. That happened on the capital just recently in the united states showing a funny way hadn't thought about it. A great question michael It really is the combination. Pilgrims obedience to authority and zimbardo z- Social situational power. The party links to bill. Graham is donald j trump so donald j trump was a powerful authority. He's the guy in the white lab coat who In at one and one element. He's a cartoon character and it was a cartoons about him in another now. The way he's embodiment of self-serving egotistical evil And so he he literally because he because he had this allusion is not a delusion that he won the experiment and one to experiment. He won the election even know all the evidence was that he lost spoke wide margin. He could not accept that He somebody who can accept failure. He's always been dominating domineering number one and so at what was happening. January seven was the electoral college. Vote was really you know. The officials official statement that. Yes joe by one and donald trump laws and for some bizarre reason. He thought if you could prevent that from happening he he might still win. You know so it's all a delusion and and really delusion almost personally become mad and so essentially what he sent a message is we must stop the vote by all means necessary And it again. It's the nazis you know we we must we must Destroy jews by all means necessary and so he gave the his followers and they're under a sad to say there are millions of them a reason to go to the capital two stops about now the capitalist close. So so what happens is they have to get into the capital in order to stop the boat. So they breakthrough and there's not. A lot of resistance is not enough fleas there. They didn't expect such a orion and and then and then you have the the riot mentality that is. You're going from point a to point. B anything in between is a barrier that must be removed including human lives so they they gassing and shooting killing killing wounded policemen and and then you have the group. The group eruption the excitement of being being in a group of kids. Playing you know a coup- said robbers and then and then my we saw was He he at trump. Never never now that you have to stop. You have to go back. and he. He sure he never expected that kind of violence but his his family must stop. The vote was what triggered the violence and was was disgrace. Certain in disgrace. Americans around a around above america around the world. Do you see his as evil or do you see the mob. Or the group's action as evil. Or do you see. I'm using that word purposely or do you. Do you rationalize it. Because you understand human nature in social context and say No it's actually been documented. This is somewhat predictable when people are following leadership now no able is anything which harms other people harms hurts kills so the situation. That trump ignited. That's what he did ignited the situation that it was evil because he was smart enough to know that bad things could happen that he had to know that the that the Capitol please had to resist this mob so that trump did was really evil and also what mob did was evil. Because you know you know that that you're trespassing on government property you're breaking windows tearing the doors and then once you get inside then is evil unless from from it's from it's hinges it your st you be to steal things from offices a little kid. Some of it looked like little kids. You know You know in jamboree. I mean stealing things robbing stuff. But then the other thing which was also horrible was the the guy guy wearing a shirt about auschwitz. I like i forget what it was like auschwitz prison ground. You know denying denying or make light of the horrific murder of of millions of jews. And then somebody carrying confederate flag. You know that you know Gainsaying the south will rise again. That was as been a theme in america forever. So so it's yes. It qualifies for evil. What trump did was surely evil with the mob did was surely evil and the good news is not been follow up they write densify Two hundred fifty two four hundred individuals who have documented as having broken the law. And they will they will. They will be brought to trial you know. When were those trials. Be whale day. be Who where is that list of people amen to that and when you roll that back just a little bit as a social scientists. One of the brightest in our field How do you think about twenty. Twenty one of the great social experiments ever in our lifetime at least at mass where people were battling for their livelihood for their lifestyle they were locked inside the social isolation the physical isolation That was taking place in the financial. That were Looming and so along with obviously the the concerns for health. So when you put your lenses on twenty twenty how do you make sense of. It's hard to make sense of it. Is that here is something. The pandemic is is kind of evil. It's it's a biological evil which which has killed you know by five hundred. Fifty thousand american lives five hundred fifty thousand millions it will go to three million globally allies losses pandemic. But but it's it's had the biggest impact on changing the quality of life every person in every country around the world so for many people for one year they were quarantine they could not see their grandparents could not see the rest of that family They could not visit with with relatives. Who were dying in hot in hospital hospitals and but also it meant that People were now couldn't go to work from most for most workers Part of your life is going to work. Being at work. Coming back from work And and so the link between home and work at broken down some people who were more educated. They use that time to read to write do zoom zoom calls with fellow workers But it also meant that p This was awry for young people Always is definitely been an increase in a drug taking Drug overdoses increase has been an increase in spouse abuse. Couples did not have a very good relationship before. But we're only together short time now were forced to interact with each other. So all the indications that i've seen that more bad has come out. More bad about human nature has come out from the pandemic. Then then good has okay. I wanna take a quick break right here to talk about audible for those of you. Unfamiliar with audible. They are the leading provider of spoken word..

donald j trump america electoral college donald trump Graham michael joe
"zimbardo" Discussed on Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

01:51 min | 1 year ago

"zimbardo" Discussed on Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

"So i want to encourage you to go. Check them out. Visit get or ring dot com forward slash finding mastery again. That's get ged dot or ring and the way you spell it is. Oh you are a. r. i. n. g. dot com forward slash finding mastery and finding masters also brought to you by juve. Now when it comes to technology geared towards human flourishing juve is one of my favorite companies. They are leading the way when it comes to red light therapy and it's something i use nearly every day from my home and they are absolutely on it. So what they're doing is they're utilizing red and near infrared light to stimulate the maddock andrea in yourselves. What that eventually does is it. Helps to produce more core energy and return boost performance recovery as well so there's been some interesting research where red and near infrared light are involved in supporting mental acuity. Better sleep healthy skin and those are just a few common benefits that are in the research. And if you're in the united states with winter months coming is a great way to make sure that you're getting the right light for your body to do the right stuff and so what i love about what you're doing is there is natural benefits that come from red near for light. And what they're doing is they're saying okay. Listen here's a way to get that stuff. In without getting exposure to sunlight. Obviously sunlight has some great properties. But it's also got some harmful ones as well. So what i want encourage you to do is go. Learn more about the benefits of light therapy and also check out. Jews next generation of devices at juve dot com ford slash finding mastery the spell. It is j o o v dot com forward slash finding mastery and you'll also get access to an exclusive discount. When you use that link again it's juve j. o. v..

"zimbardo" Discussed on Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

03:46 min | 1 year ago

"zimbardo" Discussed on Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

"You know you hear you hear the learner screaming or not And and and and the authorities say you must go on. You must go on. I don't see an analogy in the real world. I mean we we all play roles. I mean You could be a used car salesman and the boy says you've got to sell sell everything on the line even though you know a lot of John cars but but almost never had an authority. They're saying go on. Keep doing bad things keep going keep hurting people etc so i was so i thought i'm gonna prove the power of the situation but when i wanna do is put. People docket renew our ordinary good people who were intelligence. So they're all gonna be college students not just old man And we're gonna pre-test them to be sure that physically psychologically normal unhealthy and that we we want to put them in a situation where the roles are predetermined. Everyone knows what it means to a prisoner and guard. If you are in a prison setting so says i said my social situation in a way is more powerful than milligrams because it's more it links to things in the real world that everybody knows. We know we've seen movies about prison. We read books about prison and we know that in prison. Is this Three three roles. There's a superintendent of the prison. There's a superintendent of warden guards and prisoners to end. The roles really spelled out very clearly and and so. That's what i did. I created a prison The study was the stanford prison experiment And but made it work was. I persuaded local police chief to allow His offices to make a mock arrest actually went around to all the places we told Would be a prisoner to wait and then arrest them charged with a crime. Bring them down to the palo alto. Police station and book them fingerprint. Them take a picture put them in his a real prison cell. Put a blindfold on and then my graduate student craig. Haney would come take them. Drives him down to the basement of the psychology department which we had created where where we had created our prison yard. And then this study would be okay. I want to take a quick break right here to talk about aura. Aura is a wearable health tech company that delivers personalized sleep overall health insights. To help you go into each day rested and ready. So or measures heart rate heart rate variability respiratory rate skin temperature and more and they do it all from your finger so i've had a handful of conversations with their lead scientists. I'm bullish on what they're doing bullish on how they're thinking about this stuff and i'm bullish on their tax the form that they're using. Which is it's the only wearable that sits on your finger which has a really great form function to it so when it comes to tracking hr v. heart rate variability. I wanna make sure that. I'm getting the most dependable data possible and i found ordering to be one of the most accurate wearables available. Okay so how do i use it first thing in the morning. I do a morning routine. Where i'm checking in with myself. And then i check in with aura. So once i tuned kind of wake up my brain and my body and you know the whole thing and then i check their app. It's great. it's a great little calibration tool. It's super intuitive. It's simple to use and their feedback is remarkably actionable. And so aura is.

heart rate heart rate variabil Haney stanford John palo alto craig Aura
"zimbardo" Discussed on Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

06:08 min | 1 year ago

"zimbardo" Discussed on Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

"Super serious he's always talking about Could the holocaust happened again in america Could he and his family end up In a concentration camp and we say Stanley lighten up and and then he was saying could it happen. I said you know. I can remember saying to him when not that kind of people. We're not like the germans. And then he said quote. Have you know what you'd do until you're in the same situation so that's the mentality of us a social psychologist as a high school kid. You know saying the situation is what matters is not what you think is not your personality. It's when you're in that situation then then let me see what you do. We don't do And so so in high school he was a situation as and that's the link between him and his work and my word so so nineteen sixty two. He did the infamous obedience to authority study which studies he actually tested a thousand men in new haven connecticut. Yale university is on the east coast. Sanford is on the west coast He tested a thousand men in sixty different variations and the basic carter study was To people came to to the laboratory they signed up to get a five dollars for one hour which in sixty two is reasonable and but it was at yale so people did it because they wanted to be connected with yale. New haven connecticut deals all there is and and so they draw lots and one of them is chosen to be. The teacher and the other one is chosen to be the learner and the premise of this study. Is we know that if you reward Positive outcomes loosening improves but nobody has studied. Whether if you punish eras memory will also improve. So that's what we're doing teachers going to give the learn something to learn on the learn it gets it gets right. He says good reward learning gets it wrong you give him a shock and the shock is on a is a big shock. Box with thirty switches starting with fifteen volts and increasing at fifty bolt increments. But it's so it's shifting thirty forty five and in the middle one hundred two hundred and three hundred and then at the end is for fifty bowls and so the question is you know And of course once once the shock it's really high. The learner who's in another room is yelling and screaming. And i should mentioned the learner was a confederate. It was really not getting hurt so so in a funny way that it's not unethical. Nobody was suffering but the but the learnt that the teacher believes that what he was doing was causing suffering. And and what happened. Is that when milk goodness ascribed to study the way. I am to forty psychiatrists at newhaven medical school. They he has. What percentage of all americans would go to forty fifty balls and their combine average was one percent they said only psychopaths who do that and in fact as everybody knows who knows psychology. The answer was not only wrong. It was so wrong that it was sixty. Five percent tool of every three people in his study went all the way he also did. One one replication with women and they behave exactly like men so his study laid the groundwork for the power of social situations. They make good people do bad things in. There was a authority peace in that too. I think right were there was a white coat that was also also part of the study. That said hey you know you shouldn't really essential parties. The guy in the white lab coat. I mean You know in those days We'll still today. Medical students Met medic people. Medicine go to hospital people in white lab coats so as the guy who was running experiments actually a biology highschool by. Gt over it very funny. But it was the white lab coat which is was the symbol of authority But also the guy in my lab cub was the one that say you must go on my shot more. You may shot higher And and what mill melgren also always wanted to filmmaker and later in his career. He made some some interesting film but he made a film of his experimental obedience and it was one of the first films ever made in psychology. But in that film is where you could see. The suffering of the the teachers saying to their experimented authority. I don't wanna go on. I don't wanna. I don't wanna hurt anybody and it's already saying you must go on. You must you must continue. You have a role to play you on your the teacher And so because because the audience could see the suffering of the teacher that's what milgram study was labeled as unethical early on Probably even before it was not certainly before the he published a book on obedience Already and so when you saw that will i. It's like. I mean i'm trying to imagine i wanna know what you i read that study or became familiar with like what you uniquely did with it but just cooking up. That experiment is requires some sort of Stretching limits for sure. But i'm much more interested in what you did with when you heard about that study. Yeah at when i heard about this study i mean i contacted no grim I already at stanford. But when i when i read that research i said you know. It's so rare that that his situation is really unusual. Because you sitting in front of his shock bogs you press a button..

connecticut newhaven medical school Yale university Stanley new haven Sanford New haven east coast west coast america mill melgren milgram stanford
"zimbardo" Discussed on Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

06:48 min | 1 year ago

"zimbardo" Discussed on Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

"Michael i tell you what. I don't say this often but there's been a handful of psychologist you and dr ben. Dora one of your colleagues that. I just feel like a kidney candy store there's you know so. There's something that about our science and our art. That when i watched what you've done and i've learned from you from decades that it is so disruptive and so innovative what you've created an added to the world of humanity that i just it's hard to know exactly order start but i want to start with a compliment which is thank you for what you've contributed to the fields in humanity in general or welcome. That's a lovely compliment. I mean you are one of the legends in the field and you've captured an incredibly interesting notion about time and Heroism and the lucifer effect as well as you know. Probably the work that most general psychology students would recognize you from which is the The prison experiment. And so when you think about your body of work how do you think about it Well I recently did a memoir stamford historical. Society sent one of their members here and we did four to our dialogues. Asking me about my my earliest memories in life and what i was doing a teenager on and on until the present day. What am i doing now. And what is one of my envisioning and this is just been published memoirs by famous publisher in florence italy. Judy and it's now come out in chinese italian polish and english and it just it. Just zimbardo memoir. I don't have one right here but to show you Anyway so some excited about the english version that i could share with friends and family but in it One of the things. I it said is nasa me. How come i've done. So many different things. That seem unconnected i mean stanford prison study and evil and my work in abu grave and prison And then shyness and time perspective and now heroism and part. My answer is i'm just really curious about human nature and that that you know i asked i keep asking myself a question. I'm wondering what would happen if for. I wonder why people did that. Or what would happen if we change this element so so i just have this mind of an experimental social psychologist and it's really wondering that's i wonder what would happen if wonder what why they did that the way they did that. And so i've been criticized as being Not a generalist but jumping jack jumping from one thing to another back and forth. But it's really not is that My early were on the prison. Study came out of my interest in understanding the psychology of ego. How is it that good people do bad things. And so. When i was a kid i was very very religious partly because i was born in poverty in the south bronx ghetto and there was evil. All around many different kinds and i so i was always as a kid able to step back. Never get involved in gang stuff never get involved in drugs that my friends were doing and observed you know why. Why did this good kid do this. Bad thing and and What do you have to do not to get engage in involved in in that saying it's never doing anything easy money. The idea is money is something you have to work to get. So i worked hard all my life so now. In fact on august fifteenth nineteen twenty twenty. One is the fiftieth anniversary of the stanford. Prison experiment fit in years. Like goodness field both old and proud that this is probably the most famous slash infamous. Study in all of psychology. Y'all without without without a doubt. Were you friends. I think i read somewhere that you are friends with milgram. Is that accurate. Yes we were high school classmates. Who are in the same class at james monroe high school in the bronx new york. Nineteen forty nine nine Together for two years in the class and milligram. Smartest kid in the class. He would just brilliant But nobody likes it because he he he made. Everybody knows that he was brilliant and he. He went all the metals you know in in science math etc. But i was. I was the most popular board. You were okay. I wanna i wanna get to that in a second because it's not lost on me that There's a little bit of a epicenter between the two of you guys and all of the studies that have flowed from your relationship. And maybe if you could start with just a general. I'm sure you're fatigue by talking about the study but the relationship between your study and milgram in that relationship on fascinated by. Because i'll tell you why. The study in itself is innovative disruptive. But the epicenter piece is fascinating to me. Because we've got now if you think about were brilliant ballet dancers. Come from and think about where. There's a Hotbed for basketball. It's like maryland or virginia. And so you know so. I think about hotbeds in the two of you guys kind of crack something open. That was disrupted. So could you. Would you mind starting with just the basic overview. Yeah so so milligram so we will. I met him nine thousand nine hundred seventy nine and it's not that far from the end of the second world war and was a little jewish kid. I was a little sicilian kid and grim so way school kids. Meanwhile you guys wanna do is have a great day on the weekend and milk them on the other hand.

dr ben zimbardo Dora Judy florence Michael james monroe high school milgram south bronx abu nasa italy stanford new york maryland basketball virginia
"zimbardo" Discussed on Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

02:36 min | 1 year ago

"zimbardo" Discussed on Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

"Psychology and life that's textbook shyness. The lucifer effect the time paradox. The time cure and most recently man interrupted his current research. Look at the psychology of heroism asking. What forces push some people to become perpetrators evil while others act heroically on behalf of people in need so as founder and president of the nonprofit foundation heroic imagination project hp he does training globally in schools institutions and businesses. Now it would be impossible to cover all of his work over the course of our conversation but we discuss what gave him the idea to conduct the infamous stanford prison experiment and how that shaped some of his future work which includes studying topics. Shyness the conception of time and heroism if you're not familiar with the stanford prison experiment. I definitely want you to check that out. We give some context to experiment in the conversation. But it's important to understand the fullness of that. I'm so excited to introduce this conversation to. He's got a beautiful mind and he's really pushed on the edges of psychology. He's been on public display and poke dot and he's been he's got a lot of errors daggers in his back for sure but he's definitely changed the way we understand psychology and if you are familiar with his work i think you might walk away from this conversation just feeling a bit different about the man that you thought he was. This is an awesome conversation and one more thing just as a segue. If there's one item that's been pretty much stay glued to me during the last few months during the summer seasons for us in the states. It's been my dragon sunglasses. I love what they're they're an amazing. I work company. And i think you'll love their premium polarized flow -able sunglasses. I bet most of you have a story of losing sunglasses while on the water. I've had plenty. It's never fun. My original solution was to just buy some cheap pairs and but then the quality's not right. They don't fit right lenses. Don't kind of have the clarity that i'm looking for. And so there is where dragon has created a great solution. So they've got a premium each to afloat -able collection and what they've done is they constructed. It from a specially formulated injection moulded resin with identity. That is lower than water and so that basically just allows them to float. How cool is that. So they're designed with a special coating also to ensure that they are resistant to water dirt and oil and other elements while maintaining that crystal clear view that they're known for..

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"zimbardo" Discussed on Science Salon

Science Salon

03:59 min | 1 year ago

"zimbardo" Discussed on Science Salon

"How do you know what you would do until you in the same situation. So he was a eighteen year old situation then and then he went on the sixty to do his blind obedience to it's already study And it was fascinating but my follow up was It's it's very rare that you're in a situation as sorry tells you do something bad And that typically. You're in a situation where you're playing a role. Get your your used car salesmen and the boss tells you you can sell certain number cars a day and you know some of these clunkers and you've got to sell a bad car to somebody who's can't afford can't afford to pay for anything more so the prison study really came out of that background Trying to understand how when you put good people in us. College students use just a adults from new haven connecticut ages twenty to fifty and wanted bright intelligent college students that we were gonna. They had just finished some school at berkeley and stanford and i knew they had two weeks free before In those days The fall term started after labor day. I knew that two weeks free and i study was going to go for one to two weeks and they could use. We've paid fifteen bucks a day at which they could use during that downtime. So that's how we that's that was the background doing the prison study. Yeah i should point out That when i lecture on these topics. I asked the students. You know how many of you would would Flip the toggle. Switch all the way up to foreign fifty volts when i show them milligrams video tapes from the nineteen sixties. And of course they all. I wouldn't do that then. I show a a remake. We did we sort of did a replication for nbc. dateline twenty ten and You know and we had six people four of them Through this switches three of them went all the way and And i also ask them. How many of you would become nazis. Or how many of you would have been abolitionists during the eighteen fifties in america and they and they also ally would definitely stand up to slavery. I would have been an abolitionist than to me. This is just delusional. No no you wouldn't. Most people would not have been abolitionist in eighteen fifties america particularly in the south. You know we we. We're all modern. Lightened thinkers thinking. We would do this. But until you're actually in that situation you don't know how you'll you'll act and i should point out to you. You make a point of this in your book. By the way i reread the lucifer effect. And we're gonna plug that even though this has been out now since two thousand seven. I still think it's a great book. that You're welcome now that It you know you're you and milligram and others are usually considered politically liberal and that your theories are supposedly you know liberal type arguments in in a way as i started off saying excusing the criminal. Or whatever that's not what you're doing but in fact as you note the broken windows theory of crime which is endorsed mainly by conservatives is exactly what you're arguing that if you have a rundown situation in which the local norms are graffiti and broken windows and and turnstile jumpers and so on and that it kinda enables or allows or encourages other forms of crime..

stanford berkeley connecticut america nbc
"zimbardo" Discussed on Science Salon

Science Salon

04:44 min | 1 year ago

"zimbardo" Discussed on Science Salon

"Access his twenty page response to the several criticisms of him and his stanford prison experiment. In which if you only read the Critiques you would just want to basically cancel. Zimbardo defenestrate all of his work from psychology. Textbooks i've had several guest couple of guests on this podcast say essentially that. I think that's a mistake. If you re go ahead read the criticisms but also read his point by point rebuttal There are legitimate. Criticisms of the stanford prison experiment which really wasn't even an experiment. More of a demonstration. But even if it's all wrong as i point out in this episode abu ghraib is kind of a natural experiment. In which pretty much everything that happened in the stanford prison experiment happened in spades in obliga- so you still have to explain that in in that context. Anyway we talk about not just that i. I open discussing some of that. But i didn't want to put him on trial. You can just breathe the document himself and didn't wanna go through point-by-point but we do discuss some of that but then also get into the nature of human nature. What does it mean to say. The situation causes people to get people to do bad things situations too broad concept. What exactly are they doing. What are the factors at work and in which situations lead to bad behavior in. Which don't because most people don't join cults. Most people don't become a hot season and do evil things. Why not if that's in our nature so we drill down into all of that and in discuss free will and determinism moral culpability if all these factors are so powerful. How do you hold people accountable. But we do he does and And and look at all that in the context of the attempt by social psychology to explain how germans became nazis. How any evil happens how. Genocides happened why Derek shelvin did what he did but but more importantly why were there other police officers standing there. Why didn't somebody intervene..

Zimbardo obliga stanford abu ghraib Derek shelvin
"zimbardo" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

11:44 min | 2 years ago

"zimbardo" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

"Phil Zimbardo with us as we talk about his works the Lucifer effect the Stanford prison experiment and we'll take your calls this hour with Phil Phil when you wrote the Lucifer effect was it based on the Stanford prison experiment or was there something else there that you saw how good people turn evil no no it was it was it was as I said thanks I had to be earlier it was the first time I was able to present in great detail what happens have a prison setting when you do a research article you're limited to am I fifteen pages so in this way I can have a chapter of what happened and what happened and what why do we how do we set up the experiment I could have a whole chapter on that then I can have a chapter what happened each day and then I'm a whole chapter on is that say ethical or unethical she had not been done should have been last longer and and and and and and and so I have all of the everything you want to know about the prison studies in there and then I expanded at to say okay let's look at other prisons let's look at Abu gray prison where Americans have prison guards did even worse things to Iraqi prisoners over a three month period and and so I have all of that in great detail so I'd miss fifteen chapters of that about how good people turn evil not only in the present study but in real life what's that old saying absolute power corrupts absolutely in I believe that totally that happens to people to doesn't work absolute power without oversight not in Abu grade for example if it seems like a long time ago but Hughes is present in Iraq where and and any any Iraqi who and the military so I've had information about terrorism which tended to stay at the prison and then they were interrogated and and they were tortured waterboarded Wednesday yeah and and essentially it's you know and they were told do whatever you have to do to get the information we want to the higher ups gave gave this yeah please get that you know ordinary as soldiers their permission to do anything and what they did was horrendous and as I was an expert witness one of the guards who did the many these terrible things and he was a really good guy before it before he got involved in that in that in that prison a torture chamber when you got into psychology for the very first time what was it that Shearer juror interest into that field well and I was interested in psychology since I was a little kid I grew up in the ghetto in the south Bronx in New York in poverty at and gang fights there were kids from different neighborhoods blacks against whites and whites again sat in quote like chinos Asians so felt as a little kid I was in I because I was skinny and and weak eyes more and observe that was not one of them and fight is when the bomb is at but I was always what wondering why the question is why do people do that you know what and why oh why do you have kids I knew were really good kids you know could could talk to somebody else because that they have given skin coloured different different name a different look at inside I guess I was I was like a natural born psychologist observing and then trying to understand you know how how how kids I knew who are friends of mine really an at and in some situations could do really really bad things all right we're gonna go to calls for you now Dr and we're gonna go with our first caller is a regular listener of coast to coast his name is Cornelius season Alexandria Louisiana and I wanted to preface it by saying he's a former correctional officer in the prison system Hey Cornelius welcome you're on what doctors embargo Hey Jordan Dr Zimbardo George said I was a former correctional officer and I was a military police officer also Dr Ammash wow if I'm heading senior it's where I knew about it when I was at Louisiana tech university I studied psychology and sociology I'm one of them maybe in behavior with my main thing that I didn't graduate I'm one of those guys that we're going to gradually waiting category they call so I never did graduate but I'm glad you tell your story if you're a little kid and you were more or less an observer of everything going around in your neighborhood well I came in with this kind of incident at the federal correctional institute at Oakdale won Louisiana always treated the inmates they are not in since the and I'm African American and I got a call in the it makes the N. word the white officers and stuff well no need to stop all it so I basically Bob charges with the FBI and stuff like that George knows this and Tommy in the call in listeners following paperwork with lower paid work what about congressman senator William is why we go help you know like there now well they could mail not tired of them threats and stuff like that wow and so finally I wrote some about my cell if there are you threatening to kill award yeah the show is on there yeah lied to the federal judge who refuse to address widespread and kill ward okay years later I've gotten his paperwork what I call the FBI on their hotline they recall all it's the does take me twenty years to get this paperwork to prove that I did contact the FBI a real B. F. B. I guess who was there to be had in with Muller that's going after trump yup so instead of the same bank when going through I went through twenty years ago get me going back here in may it's created me for an article in my look we will let you out of prison if you say Mr Weiss M. six we are either he's bringing in drugs or paraphernalia they wouldn't do it doctor wound so I just treated the inmates prayer in honest I'm a godly man and the what are some ungodly things happen to me and the reason why pleaded guilty because they live Sydney visually arresting and set up Britney gill ward they put a piece of rope in my food oh my god that's like saying here again the noose around your neck so I gave up I plead guilty but then the federal judge was so nice he said your record is spotless you never been in trouble before and I had never been interested in try Kerr I'm gonna let you go I had a five year sentence that I was going Sir but they kept me locked up for almost a year and she said I'm a let you go the prosecutors all no good you can't let Mister white crazy tried to kill warning in may of this and that and the judge said I'm put my gavel down we go let Mister white girl Tuesday his prayer to right here he's going home now we're trying to get him a presidential pardon Chiles that's your money yeah you're right yeah I mean you deserve a presidential but I'm so sad to hear that yeah I'm I'm happy to hear that what kind of man you were and are and how is his that's again our situation can turn against you that's right and you know and again it's it's a worse so what what prejudice and discrimination does you know every day every day somewhere it just it is remarkable that he's kept his composure through all these years centering the things that have happened to want let's go to Joe in Long Island New York K. Joseph go ahead so secular this movie falling down where the campus of the movie was LA and the central character was Michael Douglas was frustrated that started with roads grades and you know he he he did resistance pulses it all started to fight back against everything and got silent and I don't know if it was like a lord of the flies I don't know what you thought of that novel and how it ended with the the you know the guy from the ship coming and looking at the kids gone crazy and that he works with and he's looking at a warship yeah making a football players I never played tackle football formally but I can't see how they hold back their impulses to maybe five after getting hit it you know they just follow the rules maybe they get paid money maybe they're not but they just had a whole back from that knee jerk reaction just ahead someone when they get hit by three people maybe as pleasing angle yeah yeah but that that's that's that's in the training you're right I mean we're all trained to and and when we hit we hit back but if you're a professional football player for example or rugby player eight eight believe your trains you know that you know you don't you don't want to make the mistake of I was at it getting a penalty because that's going to cost you a team so that you know if somebody tackles you get up and hit him with some education retirees will do that then you're going to get a penalty you fifteen yards or something and it gets you could harm your team so you you have to learn really how to control the anger but essentially if you're a football player you want to play with anger you know because the and at that at that moment the other team is you're the enemy and your job is to dominate them not to destroy that but to dominate and their job is to dominate you and and so it's it's and it's learning how to control your range you know and and most sized but occasionally you'll see a set some play will lose it and you know I guess punch somebody out and then again not only not only get kicked kicked in out get kicked off the field but then your team gets penalized as severely still in the movie the Stanford prison experiment one of the guards seem to be the instigator to get everybody to follow him and do their thing right does that happen a lot of real life for that one person that you know like a Hitler creates this stigma in people follow that person yeah it in many situations I mean in many cases especially with the situation and the US we look for somebody to take the lead and it does it doesn't always be you know to do Headley does always greeting me bad but we're looking for we're looking at what we all want leaders not that we want to be followers back you know leaders assuming they're good leaders we need to have at least they they note good leaders will meet us in the right direction and so that's that's what all of us one in life you need to be in the right direction some of us are willing to be leaders because leaders can also be taken down if you make a mistake but but essentially it's it's this this search for.

Phil Zimbardo Phil Phil Stanford
"zimbardo" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

01:37 min | 2 years ago

"zimbardo" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"To leave and to even be led to think that you couldn't leave which is apparently the idea that spread throughout the prisoners that would be like keeping someone against their will yeah he did leave but was supposed to agree to come back supposedly to like play a different role as a prisoner who like maybe escaped and came back I think okay but didn't come back right and I think five people were released early before the the whole experience call of all prisoners no guards let the experiment which is telling yeah it while they were working in shifts that which is important okay that is a big one too but but if you consider that no one asked to be a guard they all eyes to be prisoners but then none of the guards left the experiment right that's to me that's interesting on its face treasure something to that but there the the whole thing just kind of falling apart after Zimbardo his girlfriend at the time came the idea that up to this point these people had engaged in this fantasy and thought that they couldn't leave when they really could that's controversial in and of itself sure because again there's evidence that they were led to believe they they couldn't leave and that's different that changes things entirely yeah so you want to get other breaking them pick this person more yeah let's do it kind of fun.

Zimbardo