35 Burst results for "Zimbabwe"

An Expert's Guide To Curly Hair

You Beauty

04:33 min | 10 hrs ago

An Expert's Guide To Curly Hair

"Welcome to. I'm sharon hunt and this week's look dropped by. Guest is the incredible ruby aka the guru of curly and afro hair. Ruby is originally from zimbabwe but nowadays. She calls australia home. The originally self-taught stylist fell into hairdressing by accident. After witnessing friends and families struggle to find someone that understood this strands so she wound up doing it herself in her lounge room eventually she took up an apprenticeship began stalling out of multiple salons before finally opening up her own place. Rooming co in two thousand four room. Be thanks for dropping by. Thanks so much for having me sharing now. When i was a kid i distinctly remember being told if you ate all your crusts. Yo hey would go curly and i really badly wanted. Kelly has a you better believe i was gobbling down the crofton. I of course realize it was an old wives tale. That parents just tell you to eight year food. But i have to say. It's not the only myth that i've come across when it comes to curly hair. So why do you think there are. So many misconceptions about kohl's. I think something is misunderstood. There's a desire to want to make it a lot more palatable to each individual like answer for that very reason people come up with their own anecdotes around what this complex appendage actually is so people come up with so many things now yes i mean you told your cross for me. It was like eat your vegetables. And your hair is going to be straighter. You know what i mean like. Oh my gosh eating those so yeah. I think it's just because people really want to understand something that is complex and so yet this is where a lot of myths have come along and i hear them all the time. I've got lots of them to ask you about. Oh let's go. I guess to start with with. Kelly has to understand that. There's not just one type of co run us through just as an overview the different types of kohl's because you can tell by looking at someone calls not the same to the next. So why should you treat them the same one colleague on one hundred percent. So there's three curl types wavy curly in africa's how we sort of break down but then when you're looking at the typing system you've got type two which is wavy and that's lusa curls and there's three subcategories of that you've got to a to b to c and two c would be the tightest within that range and then you've got type three which is curly and within that again. Abc and c. And seeping tighter and then same thing for africa harrah's well after or coyly hair. Because i guess everyone who has coyly hair has an effort background. He is another curly myth. I've come across curly hair. Shampoos a marketing hype and normal shampoos worked. Fine let's start right there fact or fiction fact. They all marketing hive. Well okay no no no let me put it this way curly hair. People shouldn't shampoo their hair. That's a myth. Okay great stafa. Let's start there because that's actually. What's more commonly said trump who your hair. I've heard condition as well really. Yeah stop it. Maybe straight hair. How should you be carrying the curly hair. When it comes to washing its really simple. One of the things that i say to my clients often is you have to get rid of straight hair tendencies right. And how do you do that. It's just simplifying it. And which is part of what we do. We try and simplify everything for our clients. Because if you don't do that it's as though you're eating soup of the fork and that's gonna be very frustrating. And so how do you shampoo we take people through this whole process and it's like pretty much. Get the right shampoo first of all what you need to have the right product. Because not all sham periods would then be the same. Most shampoos actually stripped your hair. Which is why in some way. Yes don't shampoo your hair. I get with people. Come with that myth because it doesn't leave your hair as hydrated but then when you've got shampoo that is specifically designed for curly hair. It's supposed to cleanse but also hydrate to leave your hair feeling very moisturised. Soft supple and clean as well without streaky. Feel that you get when you get a deep cleansing shampoo

Sharon Hunt Kohl Kelly Zimbabwe Ruby Africa Australia Harrah ABC
Zimbabwe Must Overcome Anti-Vaccine Sentiment as Access To Vaccine Becomes Imminent

PRI's The World

00:52 sec | Last week

Zimbabwe Must Overcome Anti-Vaccine Sentiment as Access To Vaccine Becomes Imminent

"The african countries have started importing the covid nineteen vaccine. Zimbabwe's government says it has been offered to one hundred thousand three vaccines by china. Officials are also asking for assistance for fans to pitches the vaccine for the estimated fourteen million people. But there's a problem with that not everyone's looking forward to the vaccine as soon after the singer. Come as fantasies if it is true. That developed similar leaks dania. Grateful by the their is about this vaccine that ministries who we are sure we are. Not confidence. thought is another federal. That is bob. We has to jump as part of its efforts to find the coronavirus for the world. I'm columbus guy nari

Zimbabwe China Dania BOB Columbus
Goodbye to Alcohol - Series 3 - Episode 10 - Mary Anne Shearer - the Natural Way - burst 01

Goodbye to Alcohol

27:17 min | Last month

Goodbye to Alcohol - Series 3 - Episode 10 - Mary Anne Shearer - the Natural Way - burst 01

"It was his guys talking roland hydra one year and end the sky was the and he came up to me after he said like. I'm here to help me recover from alcoholism. I don't want to rehab. I've just come to detox. My buddy what. Can i do to stop caving. Alcohol acid right. This is what you gotta do. Every morning you get up and you have as much fruit and a nice handful of narrow nuts or seeds with just eat as much food as you can stuff. Your face doesn't have to be early in the morning but it must be a first meal of the day and eat as much as it. If it's a box of mangoes and eat the box of mangoes op done that. Eaten a box magazine taya watermelon. And you might do that for three months and eventually what happens. Is you end up eating one mango in. It's really sweet sausage. I into stuff your face. Full of lucas. In every natural glucose fresh fruits nuts every time. You crave alcohol. Just reach out for some dates or some raisins or even like a hundred percent pure grape juice or you know have sparkling grape juice. It satisfies your cells needs for glucose that craving will stop welcome to goodbye to alcohol about calls from wealth without wine with you. Want to say goodbye to alcohol. Revie said goodbye. Twelve called over the on just so this is the podcast few. We've got recovery stories to in spy experts to inform you plenty of advice on how to drink and change your life. Hello hello and welcome to the good. By twelve coal podcast. My name is john goran. I'm the founder of wealth without wine. And i'm your host for this podcast. My hero wealth without wine we help people to change their relationship with alcohol over the past five years. We've helped hundreds of people to do just that and we created world without wind because we believe it's really really halt to change your drinking alone so wealthed without wine wit all about community each week we're going to feature a community voice just to give you a flavor of the also. Try his somebody from one of Subgroups hello everyone. So i have a little friday when which happened last night Myself my family celebrated thanksgiving with our american bamiyan states Remotely and it was the first time in twenty-six days at i would becoming face to face with an actual bottle of wine so i was a bit concerned and i knew that i had to have some safety precautions. Set in place for myself. So i had my phone Close by me. So i could contact group if i needed to My also got some alcohol free wine that was recommended by this group and And the support of my family so my mom and i enjoyed some lovely alcohol free wine. Which actually wasn't as bad as i thought it would be. We served at super chilled and it was actually super delicious and refreshing. We skype with a family overseas headed delicious meal and i didn't have a drop of alcohol And then at the end of the evening we weren't bid. I finished off my class of savvy. Rich in the candlelight listening to some chile music Went to bid and the biggest one of all was waking up this remembering exactly what happened last night and without a headache I'm super proud of myself. Never ever in a million years thought that this was possible. But it did it and today is day. Twenty-seven machine all a fabulous wonderful weekend wherever you are in the world if huge cut to join our woman welcoming community and get a bit of support. Just go to weld without wind dot com and click on the membership top. So let's get my guest today into being a lady who's pretty well known here in south africa. Her name is maryanne sheera now. Maryanne is a woman before had time. She wrote a book called the natural way more than twenty years ago. An only now is the way of life. She advocates going mainstream on apart from being an author. Marianne is a motivational speaker. And she runs a very successful pekan restaurant as well as running natural health programs. I'll begin by asking maryanne satele to bit about herself. I had serious health problems which included being bipolar had kids at had ear infections tonsillitis runny noses that was high blood pressure so we had these kind of. I call him normal health problems because it wasn't like the big three cancer heart disease diabetes. It was just all like niggly stuff that was affecting our relationships and was affecting the way we functioned from day to day. And i have always been interested in the human body i prob- i might have become a doctor. But i'm i'm glad i didn't because it made me look for answers and other places so i was fascinated with the human body studied physiology anatomy and chemistry in the sciences and i was fascinated with the how the human body worked. So we're not. We started having these problems and we were being treated traditional medical way with anti anti-inflammatories and antihistamines for a head allergic dermatitis. On my hands and the kids with antibiotics just didn't make any sense because nobody actually got well. all it doesn't seem to do is suppress symptoms. And then they'd come back two weeks later. I saw the athol up. Gotta find answers. This was long. Before the era of google that really dates meet And just go and do a search on google. And the closest i've got to google was on several occasions sneaking into the fits medical library in johannesburg and he are trying to find says there and looking at books in the archives and just like nobody really had answers to my questions had to find the myself now. I really believed because i could see the. You'll buddy actually repays itself if you cut your finger to paint it stop. You don't need to go and you know cost a spillover it or go to the doctor. My fingers cut itself. Please can drug. I mean unless you chopped to finger off you'd want to beg on but just a cut finger. Paper cut irritate you. It hurts but you it just eventually repays itself and and if you study the human body like a did you find out that the liver you can actually cut off your liver out. Remove it entirely donated to somebody else. Give the small lobe to somebody else in the big global grow and then you've donated your smaller that logo groesbeck like this is the most amazing thing and yet when it comes to lever cancer you told is no cure for it. You're going to die while you would because you're going to be given all these drugs and you live a second will just get sick and pick up than you will die so i was looking for ways to correct the looking for the causes and then ask trying to fix the causes. I did find that. Nutrition made a huge difference. When i changed my diet. Took after find sugar and my by pella symptoms when my crazy periods of manic unbelievable highs. We are could take on the world. And i was going to change the world and i'm actually by nature very idealistic person and my mission in life is i want to change the world. One person at a time. I want to get them healthy enough. Got the goal to reach. A million people wrote a book called the natural way it came out in nineteen. Ninety-one was a runaway bestseller according to the publishers and it sold as i say of three hundred thousand copies it's been published in the united states. The funny thing is it seems to be taking of now first published in the states in two thousand five fifteen years not getting traction. So it's like if it does take off and i happened to reach the new york times. Basically nobody can ever say was an overnight success at this pathetic years. So you're a woman before your time. Someone emission to really help people if i can get rid of my bipolar symptoms and be completely sane And and thinks straight and have a brain in and and bow bowels and bladder that works properly all the time and be living in that sweet spot of health than anybody can do it. Because i had terrible problems. Janet listening to all calls from weld without wine. Marianne take me about you just mentioned alcoholic parents. It that intrigued me wondering if that was one of the reasons why you want it to research to health unle- to healthier lifestyle was that of a trigger. I think it. I think it was. I think you know even mentioned to some one time that i want to try to get drunk when us fourteen and jank moms cara pheno one and didn't like the way i felt i felt out of control and i think that sense of not being in control of my immediate environment and i wouldn't say i'm a control freak but i needed to be common working properly and audley at the sense of order i think that comes from growing up in the chaos of alcoholic appearance at home and my mom was a party animal. She was functional alcoholics. She could party all night and go to work the next day in absolutely fine my father however party will not and he wouldn't work for six months and that was you know he'd worked for six months and then not work for six months to a year or two years so we grew up with that sort of chaotic and then my parents got divorced because my mother said she had four kids anita fifth one. My father married. Somebody was crazy as he was. You know do things like pour petrol over my stepmother and threatened sitter a lot this crazy stuff that chaos does makes you want to live an ordinary that the thing. That really got to me when i was a kid. My mom had this medical encyclopedia. And i would pour over at the age of four hundred. All these gory. Pictures of people as innocent large thyroid landed was like the size of pumpkin and the knicks and these open ruins and at sit there and cringes kind of not. Wanna look at them. But it's fasten. The human body fascinated me from a very early age. My mom was kind of forward thinking as much as she was a party animal. She told us we couldn't chew gum or drink. Physical because our brains would fry and and we went lottery comic books either. So i had the sense of trying to do the right thing I think it also grows up with you know you grow up with a parent. That's a bit narcissistic. i think. Alcoholism in a sense is a narcissistic habit. Because you just carrying about a million myself. And i'm trying to numb my pain. You know not thinking about the responsibilities of life you know growing up with it. I had the saints. That i wanted to please my mom and do the right thing so i was considered the goody. Two shoes in the family just always trying to do the right thing in an nfl had to take it back to pregnancy was a need to just have off in my life Feel like yeah. Things went as chaotic. As they've seen. We moved a lot as kids. You know doing a geographic alcoholic. Parents do that things. Don't work you just move somewhere else. Yeah i've i've come across two different reactions when people have Parents they are do what she did. And react against the kale. Some won't control an order in their life all they they tend to say well. You know sin family. I'm bound to be that as well and then kinda give up unsolved drinking as well so Is that been your experience as well. Do you think people tend to go. A different one of two was party. Animal ended in two brothers. That partied hard. I mean they crashed a few calls when they were aided. And that god they've grown up and grown out of it and They've so but very working my two brothers especially very sober and very hard working And and i just think. I think what you you learn the learned behavior sydney. I look at myself is it. I may not have been addicted to alcohol. But as very addicted to sugar so ahead addictive side to me that anita to the sugar made me feel good in that space. So i suppose in a sense. I was doing much what people do with alcohol when us feeling unhappy or was feeling sad or on feeling like a done something. Well i would reward myself or console myself with suga whether it was fragile candy or cake. So is scream. It didn't really matter how much as i said. Even propane sugar staying out of the sugar bowl. As i got older. I became health conscious. South for made fudgy using brown sugar. That was really good. But you're that that that needs that sense of of you don't you you know parents at properly as if you growing up in an alcoholic home so you learn. The navy is that that it's a k. To satisfy yourself for full let need with a something in a with some people it could be gambling. All pornography will with made was shook end and food as a compulsive overeater. And the only reason we're glad clinically obese of always been physically active and and if i was not eating properly and exercising. I wouldn't ever sleep. I would. And i think that looking at having dealt with so many people in our family and with people have met of the years that alcohol sometimes puts people to sleep just eventually knocks you out so eventually do sleep when you're very active brain not taught how to look off draw brain. How what does alcohol do to bring. What is caffeine due to the brain so one minute drinking coffee over here and then that's like over stimulating central noticing. Make all your nerve cells five. Ab rapidly and then you'd having alcohol too. Because that's a natural depressant than you take the to calm you down and put you to sleep and then you wake up the next morning and you hung oversee start with the coffee again in the brain goes into overdrive. Then you would lots of sugar into the coffee. So you just getting on this treadmill and i think i think if we were taught the staff about how everybody body reacted to sit and things from when we were kids. Part of the reason assorted school is that we would understand how our body worked and figure stuff out pretty soon and make good choices. But that's me probably being idealistic as well if you were talking to someone. That was drinking super too much. They weren't really aware of what it was doing to that office. That brains. what what would you tell them. How would you summarize the home that it does to us. Gee i'm the first thing we know. Is it really damages the central nervous system in the brain. And we've now these quite a lot of research showing that parkinson's disease which michael j. fox got a really young age and he has a. He was a big drinker. Huge drinker everything. I've read on him. The alcohol played a big role in. He's laughing was younger. That can damage your central nervous system. and it doesn't do it alone. Units alcohol and sugar and bed diets and bed living but alcohol plays a huge role in that. It really affects a whole lot of things affect your central nervous system in your brain so you don't handle stress well and lacewell you handle stress. The more you're going to drink because it numbs you. Eugenic feel you can just numb yourself. you stop feeling in dozen courage assistant behavior because it becomes all about my feelings and my stress and my money to numb in. I mean we all know this. We would go without food in a hassle appearance drink and i've seen it in other families. The mother a single mumble drink because she's lonely or because she feels a failure whatever. Her reasons are and there'll be no food in the fridge. Another normal alcoholic friggin. Look on his nets moke in there in a piece of cheese. And that's about it if you lackey Most just don't have food in them. And i know as kids if they was cheese enough ridge. We would flatness in like half an hour because he's a no win. The food was going come which didn't help but encourage things like a compulsive over eating so a central nervous system and that's the one side the other side that in a fix and impacts really badly as the indicating system and that's a system that controls every single part of the buddy janice it controls your liver your lungs your kidneys digestive tract your muscle tone. You sleep your menstrual cycles. Your facility these nothing. It's not in your breathing. Your lung function your hair. Growth your nails. You'll skin it it. It affects every single part. The endocrine system produces hormones in different parts of the body in those hormones may chemical reactions take place which makes the body function properly. Have alcohol's interfering with it function because what it does is it actually pushes your blood sugar up really really high so you feel like good on alcohol woo and then your blood sugar over produces your body produces over produces insulin. 'cause you're about to go into a diabetic coma and in your body's designed to repeat itself over produces the insulin brings it all the way back down and as it starts to slide mcdonagh feeling really tired immaculate and sleep and pass out if it gets really bad And then you you. You might have something like coffee or tea or another drink to try and raise your blood sugar again so when you blood. Sugar fluctuates fitting brain and central nervous. System your endocrine system and your immune system and you can understand the not explaining this very well with the whole covid. Nineteen they send. People are drinking and having caught accidents but alcohol suppresses immune function. That's what it does. So the government instead of educating everybody in showing us adverts over and over which i think would help better than just locking everybody down and telling you you know these content touch alcohol reagan so ridiculous. You can't buy alcohol during the on the weekend so everybody's just by way more so every restaurant selling wine under the counter to the clients you know because they can't make money selling food during lockdown. It was bizarre to see the activities that going on at the end of the day understood. Exactly what it does. And how it suppresses immune function we must take these things a little bit more seriously than being wrecked on the knuckles suck educate people that teach them the stuff so i think other thing that it does and this is fascinating. Refined sugar does exactly the same thing is alcohol does just desert loose something called reactive hopper blah seamier. Which when the blood sugar shoots up to high we over produce insulin and brings it right down so down so far down your blood sugar that the part of the brain your frontal lobe that controls moral behavior planning and forethought will just shuts down completely. Okay and the part of the brain that takes over as part of the brain that controls aggression appetite and sexual function. And i think this is probably really important to help people understand these blackouts that they have so you can have a blackout but you not passed out you just living life. I mean. I know a girl that poured wax all over yourself. Hot wax in that state couldn't remember how she got burned from this x. She took all our clothes often. Did this is absurdity. Because the people that were they told her what she does. She could not believe she did something like that. I had a woman that came and spoke to me. Because i was when i speak often speak about the stuff because it played such a role in my life and how important it is to make. Sure you're getting the right kind of glucose about in a while. And she came up to me after she said. I'm embarrassed to raise my hand and tell you what i do but cannot speak to you privately. Acid short can understand when she told me the story. She said i'm going to tell you. I'm very very committed. Christian person go to church regularly. my husband's actually involved in the leadership of the church. We go to bible study on wednesday nights. We go to between one and three services and the sunday we we're involved in the charitable work and stuff but she says periodically. I wake up in another town or another suburb in strange man's bid. And i have no recollection of how i got the and i say to you consume and she said. Nah don't i said are you a sugar addict. And she said yes osama title sugar addict and it does the brain. What alcohol does we. You just black out completely. Obviously you've got to be extreme amounts of sugar to do this but alcohol does the same thing you drink. Extreme amounts you'd binge drink and the knicks thing you wake up and you in somebody else's bid and like how the hell did you get in the shame of all of this is worse than you start drinking again and this whole thing goes on so what happens is when the primitive brain takes over. You either going to get aggressive. You're going to just eat and eat and eat canoe appetites. Just nothing's gonna be enough or you. Could your sexual function could take over. And you become extremely promiscuous and that's clearly very dangerous because besides possibility of fathering all mothering a child you could end up with terrible sexual diseases. So it's it's a huge problem and people don't know this until somebody like me comes and tells him and nobody studies this. Because you take the average psychologist or psychiatrist. Dr they studying medicine and how to cheat you when you sick with medicine and surgery than looking. And what is the cause of all these problems and vivian often. It's a physiological or physical course an and utrition is something that's kind of just ignored and net. That study was done with reactive. Hoppy glycemic was done by women. Called baba read stood. She lived in the united states and operated in stable municipal area and she was in charge of the juvenile delinquent and criminal juvenile delinquent and the prisoners. The adult prisoners in the end the juvenile delinquents and she found that of them something like ninety three percent of the people that she'd work with suffered from this reactive hypoglycemia and in that state of blacked out. Where you can't remember what went on people will kill the family. They'll the children we ask you. Yeah then they will beat somebody into coma they'll be do the most. They'll they'll commit a crime. And they have no recollection of course when you committing crimes being something people like as easy to say you lost your mind and you can't remember but it's an actual condition where you had no recollection of went on. It's completely blacked out. You listening to reply to alcohol. The podcast from world without one if eat lights join our tribe. Please check out website. That wine don't cold so yeah. Apparently those many people in child but have done that have a blackout killed somebody. You cannot in jail recollection too. Many people in jail i mean. Can you imagine Horrendous but blackouts very common in all community. We talk about the loss of people have blackouts. I used to have the have them as well Boston is like all it was a walking talking blackout because I was with some friends for afternoon. And apparently i seem quite normal. You know i was walking around talking. We'd walk quite a long way together. I have no recollection. I mean we'd been drinking since frightful Drink but i. It just hit me over the edge. I lost an entire. And you know i used to have blackouts where the end of the evening was a bit fuzzy Quite remember how it may be. But this one was really serious Hated the idea thought woking talking blackout the fat my brain was so alcoholic couldn't even make memories nazi Absolutely terrifying and here's the thing that people don't understand is that you'll cells and your buddy a designed to consume glucose. Nothing works in your in your at salable. You got thirty seven trillion cells in your body. They desperately need glucose they needed to make. Atp a denison triphosphate which is what creates energy your monaco andrea desperately. Need that your every little organ nelio in the plasma critical in these tiny little things inside the cell that you can't even see with your naked eye it needs glucose your brain and central system can't work without glucose and if you're not getting enough you going to crave alcohol or sugar and barbara read stood say we knew feed children refined sugar growing up on any level. She said you're actually preparing them for alcoholism because they get into the cycle. The blood sugar going up and it's coming down and they feel that the sugar satisfies and then you you graduate from a kid to adolescence or young young person in your twenties wait sitting stuffing faced with ice cream and chocolate says locked kind of interdict so will have a drink and it does. What sugar to to you. And now you recognize that. Except that the alcohol gives you even a bit of feeling takes you higher disrupts you lower so if we understood that we need need proper glucose for body's natural glucose and and so often when i've done a talk i actually say to the audience and i remember reading this one year at a secrets convention at sun city outside johannesburg. The were probably five hundred people Woman and i said to them. Okay if you do any of you crave sugar and they've just everybody put the hand and i said when you craving sugar. What is it that you put into your mouth. What is it you put. And what is it that you actually craving an attempt to get the point across. Imagine yourself in the garden of eden and you craving something sweet. What would you eat. And there was a stately silence and this woman blonde voluptuous woman sitting in the front rows in this deep voice. Adam evan rumor osc that christian. I'm thinking this woman. It was really funny at the time. But it's just interesting because i've often christian in los angeles of austin in the republic of hot bay of austin zimbabwe of austin the uk. Austin all over the

Roland Hydra Revie John Goran Maryanne Sheera Maryanne Satele Cancer Heart Disease Diabetes Allergic Dermatitis Marianne Cara Pheno Google Anita Maryanne Tonsillitis Parkinson's Disease Knicks Lucas Johannesburg Skype Headache
Black Man Dies After Beating By Security Guards, Sparking Outrage In Brazil

Not Too Shabby

00:31 sec | 3 months ago

Black Man Dies After Beating By Security Guards, Sparking Outrage In Brazil

"Guards outside a supermarket the incident on Thursday night in the southern city of Port Allegra was caught on video and witnessed by many people, including the victim's wife. They said the guards used the same controversial knee in the neck hold that killed George Floyd in the U. S. Earlier this year. The case has caused outrage across Brazil, occurring on the eve of black consciousness, Day or holiday in many states. Zimbabwe's high court has granted bill to the journalist Hopewell

Port Allegra George Floyd U. S. Brazil Zimbabwe
Pandemic power-grabs: autocrats seize Covid opportunism

The Economist: The Intelligence

07:15 min | 4 months ago

Pandemic power-grabs: autocrats seize Covid opportunism

"At the beginning of this year, protests were roiling India. For one hundred days, hundreds of thousands of Indians raged against proposed changes to citizenship laws that would discriminate against Muslims. It was the biggest campaign of civil resistance in decades. But the protests swiftly died out after local curfews were imposed in response to covid nineteen curfews that were particularly strict in mostly Muslim neighborhoods. Too many these new it seemed like a calculated move by the Hindu nationalist Prime Minister Narendra Modi quashing dissent under the cover of the pandemic we'll muddy don't believe. In. A televised address to the nation on Tuesday, he underscored the dangers of the virus and called for renewed vigilance as the country heads into it's festival season. Eve. The bobbly. Deployed but behind the scenes, there's growing evidence that he's been using the crisis for his own partisan ends. Last month citing the risk of covid nineteen spreading within India's parliament. He announced measures that severely hampered lawmakers questioning the government the opposition walked out allowing this mody to Ram through twenty five bills in three days. These kinds of authoritarian tactics are on the rise around the world. The think tank Freedom House counts eighty countries where the quality of democracy and respect for human rights have deteriorated this year. The pandemic has been terrible not only for the human body, but also for the body politic Robert Gassed economists foreign editor. With everyone's attention on covid nineteen, what a crats and would be autocrats in many parts of the world have figured out that they can do all kinds of bad things safe in the knowledge that the rest of the world will barely notice let alone object and where are the countries where this is the most worrying it's a completely global phenomenon. A one end you've got China, which was a dictatorship before the pandemic but has really cracked in Hong Kong the human rights abuses against the we have gotten worse this year we're finding a lot of places is that the pandemic gives governments very reasonable cause for tightening down on on civil liberties for reasons of public health. But. What then happens is that many of them have taken it further than that. So it's not just that they are restricting public gatherings to stop people spreading the virus. They're also using those rules to prevent demonstrations and protests against their own terrible policies and what does that kind of repression look like in practice So you take in Uganda for example, it was an opposition member of parliament called Francis. Zach. Who noticed that? He's constituents we're going hungry because of the recession caused by nineteen. So he's the give them some help you know packages of rice and sugar just to get them through the hard times. Government had said that only the government was allowed to give out food and if anyone else tried it the government said they do incompetently, the crowds would gather and that would spread the virus. So the president actually said, you know we will charge you with murder if you try to hand out food aid when you don't the government will from. The opposition member of parliament. He was very careful to do it in a way that wasn't going to spread the virus. do packages and have them delivered individually to people's doors on on the backs of motorcycles the day off the he did it the police came to his home. He says jumped the fence while he was showering through minivan dragged him off, put them in prison tortured. Him are unbelievably horribly and they said to him while doing doing it we can do anything we want to you because no one can come out and protest because there will look down because of the pandemic. And that's something we're hearing. All over the. World. And it seems in a lot of cases though that it it's these leaders are doubling down on the kinds of populist attitudes and policies that put them in power in the first place. That's exactly right now, one of the strange things about a panic about a contagious disease, and this is something we can see from academic work that's been done on prior pandemics is that people become a bit less rational and a bit more xenophobic if your political persona is someone who is going to stand Up to external threats, then pandemic is a great time to double down on that. So you see Narendra Modi is government in India has always named Muslims for many of the problems in India, and now they're blaming the most super spreaders of the virus in Bulgaria seeing Hauch lockdowns on Romany neighborhoods and others are Turkeys religious authorities blaming gay people first spreading the virus Malaysian officials are blaming migrant workers, some of whom have been caned and deported. So you're seeing lots of this stuff it's a strangely Popular response when people get and I suppose pandemic conditions make it somewhat easier for for autographs for governments to control message. Well absolutely you're seeing a significant increase in the number of restrictions on the press and it's usually done in the name of public health. So people will pass a law against spreading fake news about the virus, which would, of course be be dangerous and they used that to criminalise any criticism of the government's response to the virus, which is completely different things. So you think all over the place. So in Zimbabwe anyone who disseminates wall, they called false information that impedes the. Response to the virus can get up to twenty years in prison and they're arresting people for things like trying to visit in hospital opposition activists who've been been by the ruling party in. El. Salvador they purged seventy journalists and relaunched a state TV outlet on the the president said I. I'm am watching a very balanced news cost with grin and then adds i. don't know what the opposition will see because of course, what they will see is something that's actually pro ruling party. But look innocence global freedom was slipping autocracy in general sense was rising. I, mean how much of this? Can we definitively pin on the pandemic? You'll right global freedom has been declining since probably just about before the financial crisis of two thousand and seven to eight. So this represents a an acceleration of pre existing trend and with each individual violation of human rights you can never say I mean, it's it's like weather and climate change. You can never say this incident could not have happened without the pandemic I mean would would China's rulers still have inflicted such horrors on on the weekends this year without Covid nineteen with Thailand's King of grabbed nearly absolute powers. would. Would Egypt executed fifteen political prisoners in a single weekend this month maybe they would have done those things but these these outrages would surely have faced stronger opposition. If the whole world's attention had been focused on the pandemic, which is tossing everybody's lives in chaos and sucking up all the attention is much easier to get away with these things without the rest of the world looking at what you're doing. So we can be pretty confident that his a significant factor in why things have gone worse this year.

India Prime Minister Narendra Modi China President Trump Covid Freedom House Uganda Hong Kong Robert Gassed Zimbabwe Zach Egypt Salvador Editor Murder
Where Does Bitcoin Fit in the Global Reserve Currency Game?

Let's Talk Bitcoin!

05:45 min | 4 months ago

Where Does Bitcoin Fit in the Global Reserve Currency Game?

"This is going to shake out how disruption manifest in real life is really hard to predict. But at this point, we do at least know what appear to be different paths that this thing could take if some sort of cryptographic. DIGITAL MONEY OUR future. So Andreas I'd like to throw this one to you to start us off. You've got privately issued. You know literally anybody can do it crypto currencies. You've got so-called corporal coins like the Libra, you've got national digital currencies like we see coming out of China, and then you've got things like bitcoin. So like what are kind of the attributes of these different things? What are the strengths and the weaknesses of each approach or perhaps I'll ask it a different way. What could actually work and what do we know won't Well I'd like to just take a brief that back and say you know even though the US has abused his position, the dollar, and even though there are a lot of contenders for the kind of multipronged geopolitical power structure that doesn't mean the US dollar is anywhere near losing his position as reserve currency in it may lose some of his control but the problem is that there is no good alternative in traditional currencies, not the not the. Ruble the politics. There are two fraud together. One likely contender is not a crypto currency or digital currency at all but is some form of synthetic currency built and managed by the International Monetary Fund's so some kind of SDR based synthetic basket currency that is constructed, which may or may not have a blockchain is kind of unnecessary. It would be a centralized currency that emerges to replace the dollar. But again, you know the IMF isn't an independent organization. Ezer and the problem is there's a vacuum right now in terms of something to replace the US dollar and so we might end up with a brief period where in fact, there are a number of competing monetary and payment systems because it's not just the reserve currency social, the payment system, the US dollar as reserve currency goes hand in hand with swift as the international wire transfer settlements and payment system and control of both gives the US. Enormous geopolitical power now, Europe and China have tried to build alternative versions of swift. So they can bypass controls. The US imposes unilaterally a great example of that would be the embargo on Iran, which Europe, and many other countries under the previous agreements have essentially allowed Iran to sell oil, and yet the US continues to maintain an embargo on his backed out of its treaty obligations. So in that particular case, there's a need for an alternative payment system. The payment system going hand in hand with the reserve currency actually gives us a hint as to the importance of blockchain's in this base, and because of blockchain is simultaneously a payment system and currency and the consensus rules govern both. Now, whether a nation states could make a central digital currency CDC, it's called whether corporates currency could survive or whether it would be some former crypto currency that emerges to fill that vacuum I mean that's a really loaded question and I don't think any of us can answer right now I think what's going to happen is we're going to simply end up in a world where there's a lot more fragmentation. Will Continue to work for some things. The you on and Euro will work. For other things. We'll be libra other corporate currencies that will be central bank digital currencies like digital yuan or digital euro. They'll be her tow currencies and we're going to enter a period of massive fragmentation where things are going to be complicated, and there's going to be more limited liquidity more complications in trade and more exchanges happening across all of these different forms. At. The beginning of this episode, we talked very briefly about how one of the sort of use cases of global reserve currency is to store value in some form other than the one that your government has control over, and we've seen this sort of throughout history with different episodes of heavy inflation hyperinflation in some cases where the money that people think they've saved and have simply goes down in value and can buy less effectively at the end of it that I think is really important part of this conversation and I have increasingly been thinking that. Lacking an alternative lacking a system that actually has neutrality Bilton as a base level assumption you're looking around for what's the best option of all of these bad options right because again, like using the US government's money as your reserve currency when you're in Zimbabwe will, that's much better than using Zimbabwe's hyper inflating currency. But on the other hand, the US is integrate situation either it's essentially the cleanest dirty shirt one of the things that I've really been curious about. With regards to the Central Bank digital currencies. As you said, so called CBD's is whether or not these could behave like a truly neutral system or whether we're just talking about taking the existing very slanted system, which is in favor of whichever country has sort of, as it's called the exorbitant privilege of being able to just essentially right blank checks that you don't have any money to backup, which then people use as their own form of savings in their local country. Whether that changes the equation here whether having something like Bitcoin that although it's neutral and available for use by everyone can't be influenced as we used to say a lot more, you can't hold a gun to the head of math, right? Like there's some protection that's built into that neutrality and I just wonder if that's something that we could ever see or that any government would ever allow to happen in a nationally issued central

United States China Us Government Europe International Monetary Fund Andreas Zimbabwe Fraud Euro Iran Ezer CDC
Zimbabwe elephants died from bacterial disease, say experts

KYW 24 Hour News

00:23 sec | 5 months ago

Zimbabwe elephants died from bacterial disease, say experts

"Elephants in Zimbabwe or dying because of a bacterial disease. It's previously been reported in other parts of Africa as well as Asia. So far, it's killed 30 for elephants in Zimbabwe of the country's wildlife management bosses, many more still could die in the short term tests point to a disease known as hemorrhagic septicemia. That can kill in a few days to just hours.

Zimbabwe Bacterial Disease Hemorrhagic Septicemia Africa Asia
Over 330 elephants suddenly collapsed and died. Scientists now have an explanation

Michael Wallace and Steve Scott

00:48 sec | 5 months ago

Over 330 elephants suddenly collapsed and died. Scientists now have an explanation

"And for months, scientists have been baffled as to why hundreds of elephants have died. In Botswana. Alarm bells rang when 330 elephants were found dead in Botswana earlier this year, many near watering holes. Now, scientists say a microscopic algae called cyanobacteria is to blame. So we know the elephants to really be the only animal, for example, that is drinking below the surface of the water. Just really wear the growth of the cyanobacteria. He's the blue green algae caused the animals to run in circles and dragged their hind legs. According to eye witnesses. Samples were rushed the laboratories in South Africa, Canada, Zimbabwe, and the U. S to determine the cause. CBS is Ian Lee with that story, and that same bacteria is turning up in lakes across the Northeast and ponds to

Botswana Ian Lee South Africa CBS Zimbabwe U. S Canada
Zimbabwe to return land seized from foreign farmers

BBC Newshour

00:37 sec | 6 months ago

Zimbabwe to return land seized from foreign farmers

"Zimbabwe says it will return farm seized from foreign citizens during the often violent takeovers that began 20 years ago. Qing nine Yoka reports from Harari. The plan involves removing some black farmers who received land under President Mugabe's takeover program. Hundreds of mainly European farmers whose investments were protected under international agreements will benefit It's an important step in repairing relations with wisdom countries and avoiding international judgments against them Bob Way, But thousands of local white farmers will still only receive compensation for lost assets, excluding the

President Mugabe Harari Zimbabwe Bob Way
Phil - Growing up gay in South Africa

Coming Out Stories

04:14 min | 7 months ago

Phil - Growing up gay in South Africa

"It can tell from Phil now. He grew up in South Africa where he knew from a very early age that he was gay, and he got bullied for it from the age of eight I think I always knew from a young age, but for me it was different levels of awareness so when I was really young I found myself getting those butterflies in that shy feeling by looking at old is so you know when you see little schoolgirls and they all shy when they see their friends older brothers Zoll. Things like that! That's how I felt and it felt. Different to looking at my other male straight friends, who would get the same feelings for girls? So I had the awareness that they was a difference there I was getting that feeling by looking at guys, but they were getting that feeling looking at girls, and what's certain Cevennes near young mind that there was anything wrong with that, or did you just sort of acknowledging and and run with it I think as I got older Changed the way I. I thought because the majority of the people I was hanging around with were attracted to the opposite sex so I then thought okay. There must be something wrong with me because I didn't know anybody else. Who has in the same situation as me? Let's put this in a setting. Then how old were you? Where were you growing up? I think the awareness really started when I was four five and I grew up in South Africa. That's young, isn't it? Yeah, well I mean the thing is i. that's why I had different levels of awareness as about myself as I was growing up. So I mean yes, I had like kiss catch with girls, but then I had the feeling. Oh, I want to play catch with boys. You Know I. think that would be a little bit more exciting. And then I got a little bit older and. It was. Should I be having these feelings and I think you are actually the first person on the podcast from South Africa. Yes, so I don't really have much of a sense of what it's like growing up being gay part the Elliott Bay Community in South Africa what what was it like south? Africa I find is a little bit more. Conservative than here in the UK. And at that time it was quite homophobic. Very traditional men do this woman do this. That really affected me and I found it quite difficult. There were slows thrown about about being gay I can remember being a kid, and for those the listeners who have some experience in South Africa the word was more fee, which was fag basically and Offie Molefi. So. I was called that a lot I didn't even know what it meant. My mom tells me about the story. When I was young, I must've been eight or nine, and and I would go to my mom in our say mom, how do gay guys? And she said to me I know Philip. How do gay guys walk and I said I don't know, but the people at school are are teasing me because they say that I'm gay because I walk in a certain way and I didn't even have a label for it, but it was really really hard, even for my mom and Dad. They never really had any experience in lgbtq stuff and they've learned a lot through me. Yeah. It's a similar story with a lot of people are told to. Kind of like a lot of parents learn as they go on, which is why sometimes their first reaction isn't always the best one because they literally done what to say, they have gotten a reference point. They haven't met any other LGBT people until that child comes out. This is what it was like with my mom and dad because they grew up in Rhodesia and Zimbabwe. and. It was a lot more conservative than over in the UK, so they didn't have a reference. They didn't have any friends and relatives that were comfortable in coming out and saying who they really

South Africa Phil UK Philip Cevennes Rhodesia Elliott Bay Community Offie Molefi Zimbabwe.
Living A Wild Nomad Life With Uwe Allguer

Extra Pack of Peanuts Travel Podcast

07:32 min | 8 months ago

Living A Wild Nomad Life With Uwe Allguer

"Hello Travel nerds and welcome to the extra pats travel podcast the show that teaches you how to travel more while spending less I'm your host Chavakacheri and joining me today as someone who is a founder through and through. He's founded a CO working space in bonds go, Bulgaria, a nomad sailing retreat, and he just started another project called wild nomad safari. I goya from while nomad safari dot. COM did I. Get that right. Awesome. You did very well Travis. I'm so happy to be on your show. Thank you so much. Thank you for joining me, and it might be the hardest pronunciation I've had. You helped me out before this I, asked you to say it I. Spelled out phonetically, so I probably won't say your last name again, but who? Else, I can say the first name I've got it going on. Thank you. Thank you for coming on and the first thing I'm gonNA. Ask You because I get asked this all the time because I like you I have ideas, and I want to do them and a lot of them I. Do and a lot of my don't do. Why so many different projects like? Why did you feel called to do so many different things? Oh Man, this is a this is a hard question, but I just love to do things and I love to do things together with people I love to you know actually I started traveling I always traveled since I'm young since I have a passport I obviously. I had this urge to go somewhere to find out. You know not to run away from something, but to go somewhere I was always drawn to fireplaces. Across the Atlantic duties. And Yeah So. Then I got to know my mom. Go friend at the time on a sailing trip, and so I got into sailing. And saving was just. It's amazing. I love saying I love being out at sea, and so forth and Yas, so I love to do different things you know, and I think adventures If you if you are on adventures, it's where life happens. You know out of the comfort zone. Many tear down walls of comfort zone is like Benue, fee your life, and when you do this like it. And you go, and you'll find out you explore. This keeps me going this your life actually yeah. I think one of the neat things about entrepreneurship. Just you know and starting different things is it gives you a similar feeling too? When you're traveling right because it's new, that's that's that's. The rush were probably after his. Yes, we like to see new places. Eat New foods, but the key is that it's something that we are not doing our regular life, and so these new projects that you're launching and trying out and starting, it's again. It's a new thing even if it's even if it's not getting out and traveling you starting a co working space is a new thing. It's something you haven't done before and I. Correct me if I'm wrong. That seems to be the draw right of just of a challenge. I think you'll like the enterpreneurs. We have a problem you know. So the thing is. We have to Shiny Object Syndrome okay, so there's something POPs up and you're like all. It looks Nice, and I think the problem with me is rather not to do things than doing things, so it's. More challenging for me not to start something, but although I think I have time and. I was working in most of my time. I worked for a corporations. Had good jobs I was well paid I was like I had a great life. Work life and it was really cool, but on the other hand you know I was wondering what is out there what I can do what I haven't done yet you know, and for whom do you go and work? You have to eight to five and you know like. It's it's the daily grind, and then you know at some point. I I asked myself. Why should I do that? And now I have the time to do different things and I laughed. I laughed to be the master of my time. I think this was always my biggest goal. To Mazda my own time. Yeah, we have a little quote or are saying that that Caitlyn and ricky who were parts of our location in the community, brought up, and and we kind of adopted it as well, and it's this idea that freedom is our currency, and so it's not saying that we don't grab the money, and we don't do businesses to make money, and we don't want to be good business people, but it's prioritizing freedom and one of those kind of people don't think about is time. Right is like we we talk about. About Oh, I wanNA make enough money, so I can have enough saved away so I can retire, or I WANNA be location independent. We hear that a lot and I talk about that a lot rate, but the other. The third part of that is the time and that's something that I think people don't prioritize enough is saying okay well, what am I if I'm working towards something and give out my time? What am I getting back and is that as valuable as having my time? Because a lot of times, the answer would be no. Yeah. Absolutely also triggers if you don't mind I want to tell a little bit of my story, so the thing is you know like the background? I did lots of stuff. Also jobwise I couldn't keep longer with the company for two years I had to. I was always drawn by our stuff anyways, but one time I thought you know like I was so disappointed by by one of my bosses. Said I'm going to create. That's for sure, but I didn't want to quit in the blue. I wanted to do something meaningful brings something meaningful to my life, and then I thought I. Want to learn a language better, and I want to work overseas and this before monster or chop search online. You know this was like. Two thousand six sexual, I can say to you, and then I was like applying like. Randomly basically to find a job overseas I talked to my friends to my travel friends, and so on support, and finally I got the job as development aid worker in Zimbabwe in southern region of Africa. So this is stockton and. So I really got the job and I went to symbolic and I so guided the project and ahead them to to do ICT to bring computers into rural areas in. Coastal Lake Kariba. And this is where I found out. I really got grounded. This see the people in Africa and you see their problems, and you see their lifestyle, and you see what they do, and these you know, somehow these really shook me in a way. It awaken me you know like. The people are happy. Their basic natural, being state of being happiness, which was completely I couldn't understand that at that time I thought pulling my leg. I. Thought They Make Fun of me. You know, but their natural state is happiness and I saw this. It was so interesting and the people are so grounded, and this is when I started more intensely traveling, and you know like and very got more grounded and looked at things. Rather on the lifestyle. Then then on. How much Kanai accumulate. Of, because this doesn't bring you any. By the end you know like when you look back on. Your Life is not what countered on your bank account what Collins is. What

Africa Bulgaria YAS Travis Chavakacheri Founder Mazda Coastal Lake Kariba Zimbabwe Stockton Caitlyn Collins Ricky
What Bungee Jumping Taught Me About Visualization

Optimal Living Daily

03:48 min | 8 months ago

What Bungee Jumping Taught Me About Visualization

"What Bungee Jumping Tommy about visualization by mascot of free to pursue DOT COM. It's one thirty in the afternoon. The weather's perfect. The crew at Victoria Falls Bungee have just wrapped me in. They've done all the necessary safety checks to ensure good to go there now helping me move to the edge of the platform, because my ankles are secured with tight straps around too thick layers of folded towels to protect my legs from jarring. They're about to receive. My toes are over the edge I. Look out over the Embassy River, and then I hear it three to one bungee. Jump off the platform with a grin on my face and start screaming, Hoo. I take it all in my initial weightlessness, my rate of acceleration, the of the cliffside, the rushing water below, and finally the deceleration has the Bungee saves me from a much shorter life than I would like. I bounce up and down another half dozen times before the experience comes to an end is the best one hundred fifty seven dollars. I've ever spent the not just because of the Bungee jump was even more valuable. Was the lesson I learned in preparing for this experience? One day earlier. On the morning of August twenty, second might travel Buddy Michelle inform me that due to a tight travel schedule, I'd be jumping on August twenty third, not August twenty fourth, as at initially prepared for I didn't say anything at the time, but it didn't sit well with me at all. Up to that point I'd been confidence. I played out the day in my mind for weeks and I felt in control this change tip. The scale and fears favor the reality now. Is that Bungee jumping? If it were still on, the table was to happen number one a day earlier than expected number two after a morning flight on a four seater Bush plane. Those are always eventful number three shortly after we arrived at our lodge, rob our bags, check in and take a shell to the bridge and number four with no. Way To get oriented or settle in. Let's just say that I wouldn't be in my happy place. Later that evening my friends started speaking enthusiastically about the jump, and stopped her dead in her tracks, and informed her that the change made a significant difference to me the sense we were rushing to get in and the fact that I felt I lost some control of the situation changed my jump status from green to amber with a tinge of red. She struggled to understand and I struggled to explain. Processing the change. I've told many crazy stunts over the years. Bucket list does not lie. Bungy was far from the toughest, but of needed to feel that I was in control of the variables surrounding the experience, which both insured I felt safe, and that I can enjoy the moment if anything didn't feel right at all is giving myself permission to walk away Guilt Free I. Guess You could say that I needed to feel that I was free to participate in the experience, not bullied into getting it done by people or circumstances. That night I thought long and hard about what could happen. The next day I worked through all the variables, old and new and processed what the day might look like. I thought about the transportation to the new lodge, but close I would wear the bus ride to the bridge getting a bridge pass at customs to Zimba's a natural border between Zimbabwe and Zambia paying for the jump and finally. Finally getting the gear on and everything involved in the jump itself the sights, the smells feel the wind on my skin, feeling the harness, my heart rate that thought process took the better part of an hour before falling asleep, and in our lying in bed, the following morning that mental preparation made the difference the calmness about me that morning, and thankfully Michelle did not bring up the jump. Indeed. Our understanding of my need to decide on my own terms may have made the difference.

Bungee Michelle Victoria Falls Embassy River Zimba Zimbabwe Bush Zambia
Why Was a Doctor Once Ridiculed for Recommending Hand Washing?

BrainStuff

05:53 min | 8 months ago

Why Was a Doctor Once Ridiculed for Recommending Hand Washing?

"Even, when there isn't a pandemic gone, we all know were supposed to wash our hands especially before we eat or after we've touched something gross, but that wasn't always the case. As recently as the eighteen hundreds, a doctor was mocked for even suggesting that physicians wash their hands before working with patients, and that dear listener is how we begin the strange and sad story of Nets, some of ice, a nineteenth century doctor sometimes called the father of infection control. them vice was born in Hungary in eighteen, eighteen and graduating medical school. He started a job at Vienna. General Hospital in Austria in eighteen forty six there there. He became a gas to the mortality rate of new mothers in one of the hospitals wards. In this ward up to eighteen percent of new mothers were dying from what was then called child, bed, fever or pure berle fever. We know today that this is a fever caused by infection of the reproductive or urinary tract in new mothers? Yet another of the hospital's wards where midwives instead of doctors delivered all of the babies, only about two percent of mothers died of this then mysterious fever. similize vice began reasoning his way to the root of the problem. He considered climate and crowding, but eventually ruled those factors out in the end. The midwives themselves seems to be the only real difference between the two wards. Then Zuma vice had an epiphany one of the hospitals doctors, a pathologist accidentally nicked himself the scalpel that hit used during an autopsy of one of these unfortunate mothers. The doctor was sick and with child bed fever and he died. Zamel vice made the connection that doctors were performing autopsies on patients who died of child, had fever, and then immediately afterward going to deliver babies without stopping to wash their hands. He suspected that this was the source of the deadly problem. We spoke by with Dana Towards e eski philosophy professor at Purdue University whose name I hope I'm pronouncing correctly. She explained, basically has hypothesis here was that it was cadaveric matter from scalpels, the entered the pathologists blood, and caused the infection and same material could be transferred to the women on the hands of the doctors, because the doctors do autopsies, and then go straight to examine the women who had given birth without washing their hands, changing their clothes, or basically taking any hygienic measures at all, he then tested this hypothesis by requiring people who had performed autopsies to wash their hands with chloride of lime, a disinfectant before attending the weapon and this, the mortality rate in the first clinic fell to that of the second. You'd think that some of fellow doctors would have lauded him for this discovery, but you'd be wrong. You see in the eighteen forties. Germ theory hadn't been conceived yet. That's the theory that diseases are caused by organisms, not visible to the naked eye and people still suspected the diseases transferred from one person to another via toxic. Not Bacteria or viruses, this was called miasma theory in washing their hands. They probably wanted to be rid of whatever was causing a bad. Not to kill germs that might wreak havoc on them or someone else. We also spoke by email, but Michael Melanson, an adjunct professor of medicine at. University he said physicians of Vices. Time simply did not understand or believe that something microscopic could be wreaking such havoc on their patients. They literally believed their own is less. We feel too smug. Consider how many people currently embrace a lack of COVID, nineteen deaths among people like me geographically racially economically or otherwise as evidence that scientists are overestimating the pandemics risk. Better hand washing regimens dramatically improved death rates at the maternity ward, but some vices colleagues were at best miffed at the implication that their ignorance was killing their own patients, and perhaps implication that midwives were better at delivering babies than they were. It didn't help that Zimmer Vice essentially laid the deaths of the wards mothers at the feet of his superiors. His own supervisor countered that the hospitals new ventilation system must be the reason for the decline in maternity deaths. Also, Zimbabwe's was a Hungarian in Austria A. Working in country in the throes of xenophobia. So those doctors rejected his theories and some of ice himself as being inferior, they opted to stick with their miasma theory, and for good measure in eighteen, forty nine did not renews vices appointment. As vice eventually got a medical position in Budapest where he according to the British Medical Journal quote publicly harangued doctors nurses about hand, washing and reduced maternal mortality. He eventually published a book on the subject some fourteen years later, but it was poorly written and poorly received. Possibly, experiencing mental disorder or extreme stress from his rejection by the medical establishment, Zim of ice ended up a patient in an asylum in eighteen sixty five weeks later, he was dead of an infection from a wound that he received in the facility. She was just forty seven years old. similize left behind monumental legacy, but the tragedy of his story has made it Garner a few minutes. One of those being that demo vice was the first suggested theory about doctors transmitting germs. Kaletsky said he wasn't really a pioneer. Other people before Zamel vice had hit upon the idea that child bed fever could be transmitted from doctor or midwife to patient for example Alexander Gordon of Aberdeen showed in Seventeen Ninety. Five child had fever was almost always transmitted by doctors or midwives, and also that it was connected to a kind of streptococcal skin rash. He also thought that the best treatment was copious bleeding.

Fever Zimmer Vice Zamel Austria Vienna General Hospital Hungary Nets Zuma British Medical Journal Purdue University Kaletsky Zimbabwe Professor Garner Michael Melanson Berle Adjunct Professor Supervisor
"zimbabwe" Discussed on Get Sleepy

Get Sleepy

08:00 min | 10 months ago

"zimbabwe" Discussed on Get Sleepy

"On our to you. Think with a grain it takes us to table think about detain industry as people to Matthew wars of ood truly spectacular time and as in humans a pillow panini issue is a welcome three. You come resist paying back for a moment Clothing you feel US drifting back through the seams of time when you open your eyes again back into library of Time. Partido by Tanga Queen Catherine book lanes closed in your lap You place it on the table next to you to turn on tearing back. Close Your eyes ons again. Patties time who thrived comfortably off to sleep with memories of Great Zimbabwe cutting through your mind..

"zimbabwe" Discussed on Get Sleepy

Get Sleepy

03:21 min | 10 months ago

"zimbabwe" Discussed on Get Sleepy

"Squeeze you're saying against Mon- More as a woman pussies. She passes by with just a few inches to spare. As you'll remember that nobody can see or hear you in the past. You continue on the path for a few minutes. The band you see allowed to commence area with several secular houses people besting thing around a scripting carving in cooking guard is being smitten down nearby yacht as men truck to furnace and skim the unwanted imperfect since our optum Martin mid this coup liquid gold out and parade into claim various shapes and sizes. These will become bracelets pendants and all manner of Shimmering status steam bars. Move closer to get a bitter at one of the roundhouse his own damn metal and make sure grabbing and thatched roofs. The outside of the House is policed. Two perfectly smooth finish and pen tidiane. He's an arranged. Try running around the entire house. His top foreign moment to contemplate team of curves the artwork One DATI's around. This must have symbolized to sean happy. An intricately carved wooden door stands open at the front one house. You step through the door and wait a moment for your eyes to adjust to the lower light inside. Slowly begin to see macy's the Cheung Kong and animals pen teed across the wars in view cars. Them your raps completing around the inside the house in continues moving picture of you. Who didn't beams slammed accord into point? Creating D- cone shape of thorough along one side of the house is a fireplace course. Crack hunting side from the midday cooking.

West Seattle Bridge to remain closed to traffic through 2021

News and Perspective with Tom Hutyler

00:27 sec | 11 months ago

West Seattle Bridge to remain closed to traffic through 2021

"Be paid a fifth of Seattle's population will have to find a new way to get downtown to the end of twenty twenty one after a prediction that's that's the earliest possible re opening of the west Seattle bridge we need more information to determine if the the repair of the bridge is feasible yep it's not Sam Zimbabwe at the Seattle department of transportation says the entire span would have to be replaced the bridge connecting west Seattle with interstate five was closed in late March after cracks were discovered at its

Seattle West Seattle Bridge Sam Zimbabwe Seattle Department Of Transpor
Racial Slurs And Swastikas Fuel Civil Rights Pressure On Zoom

NPR's Business Story of the Day

03:37 min | 11 months ago

Racial Slurs And Swastikas Fuel Civil Rights Pressure On Zoom

"In Zoom meetings racists slurs and hate speech. Keep showing up today. A civil rights group is meeting with the company to demand. Do something about that. Npr Tech correspondent Shannon. Bond has the reporting but first let me know. Zoom is an NPR sponsor Rashad Robinson I encountered the term zoom bombing on social media. We started seeing people posting things and Particularly knee and others aren't at color of change in what they were. Experiencing Color of change is a nonprofit that advocates for racial equality and Robinson is its president. People were tagging him in reports of Zuma tax because so many of them involve racist slurs and harassment. Black Lemay having a church gathering and have people come in drawing You Know Genitalia and calling them. The Edward Robinson's group and others found evidence of organized campaigns out in the open on twitter and Instagram as well as message boards popular with the far right there people shared links and passwords to coordinate attacks on unsuspecting zoom users. This all comes as zoom is being increasingly used for online school Passover Seder town halls. Now Color of change says zoom must take more responsibility. You know we want them to release a specific plan to combat. Racial harassment on the platform among Robinson's list of demands. A chief diversity officer who would focus on how technology impacts bowl normal people also better security and he wants a formal apology to victims in a statement. Npr Zoom says it takes security extremely seriously and it looks forward to the discussion with color of change but other groups are renewing alarms to the anti-defamation League has traced to attacks to a known white nationalist both involved virtual events held by Jewish groups. As more and more people are spending time at home. So are the extremists who are looking to find ways to leverage the technology to harass people. Oren Segal runs the anti-defamation League's Center on extremism. He spoke during a presentation. The group gave Zoom bombing. These are moments where people are trying to find community trying to find opportunities to create normal discussion with colleagues with friends with family. And that's why this is particularly disturbing law enforcement is watching Michigan. Prosecutors worn hacking videoconferences is a crime and there could be jail time in recent weeks. Zoom has taken steps to make it harder for intruders to get into meetings the company blocks Ip addresses of attackers when people report harassment. But critics say it should be more proactive given these are problems that plague so many tech platforms zoom CEO Eric. Yuen appeared on. All things considered where he was asked whether he should have anticipated such attacks by harassers. I never thought about this seriously. That answer reflects how you en envision zoom in the first place it was designed for business meetings but now it's having to grapple with what happens when society at large logs on even more troubling this new form. Virtual harassment doesn't end with zoom meetings themselves. Joan Donovan Studies Online extremism at the Harvard Kennedy School's Shorenstein Center. A lot of these folks are taking video or taking screen shots and then sharing them in other places. So we're seeing the artifacts of Zimbabwe. Show up on Youtube and on takeoff and another video sharing platforms and that happens. It's hard for zoom or any single company to end the vicious

Rashad Robinson Harassment NPR Oren Segal Anti-Defamation League Passover Seder Town Zimbabwe Bond Black Lemay Youtube Yuen Harvard Kennedy School President Trump Shannon Joan Donovan Twitter Shorenstein Center Officer
Where Do We Get $2,000,000,000,000?

Planet Money

08:29 min | 11 months ago

Where Do We Get $2,000,000,000,000?

"Keep reading this number with an astonished voice but I feel like I have to do it every single time to it two trillion dollars just like it just stops me every single time. It is a lot of money. Obviously if it saves the economy from collapsing into another great depression it is worth every penny so the number one question. I think that a lot of people might ask when they hear two trillion dollars. They know that the federal government does not have two trillion dollars sitting around. The federal government is already in debt so way. Are they going to get the money in the next few weeks? So okay we can think of this in terms of two buckets very very big buckets. One bucket is money that basically already exists out there in the world. The other bucket is money that is going to be created out of thin air. The magic bucket. The magic bucket was afraid. You were going to say that. Let's start with the money that is already out there in the world basically the US government is going to borrow money by issuing treasury bonds. This is something that does all the time. If you have money in a retirement account you are probably lending money to the US government whether you know it or not investors all around the world are all the time lending tons of money to the US government but these are not normal times the US economy is functionally shutdown. I worry about the integrity of the US government. Why would investors around the world still give money in uncertain times to the US government? Why would they lend money when they could just sit on cash by golder? Yes so Robert. When we set out to work on this show I called up Alan blinder. He was the vice chair of the Fed back in the ninety S. He's a professor at Princeton. And he's he's one of the smartest people I know on this stuff and I asked him that question like why would people buy treasury bonds right now. There is a huge market for. Us Treasury debt for the simple reason that it's considered the safest asset money can buy and this is a time when the safest asset money can buy. Sounds really good. You Bet you know I understand this Jacob and we say this all the time the strength of the. Us Treasury bond is that it is the safest asset but in my heart. I do question whether there are two trillion dollars worth of takers out there. Ready to stand in line for this asset when we need it the most. How do we know it's still true? You know the answer say it you gotTa talk about interest rates. You Bet so right now today the. Us Government can borrow money for ten years at an interest rate of left than one percent a year right so this is trillions of dollars of smart investor money begging to lend money the government at a super super like historically low interest rate basically giving the government money for free because they trust the government so much because they are desperate to lend to the US government because if they were worried at this point like literally if they were worried today about the US government they would charge a much higher interest rate. And you only have to look back at the euro crisis in Greece When Greece needed money investors demanded a very high interest rate the same with Argentina any of these countries in trouble. If you're going to lend the money you're going to ask for ten fifteen twenty percent return if you're asking for less than one percent return you know you're gonNA get your money back. Yeah it is still one of the safest loans you can make on the planet even with all the debt people trust the US government with their money. And if I were to wake up one morning during this crisis and find that the. Us Treasury interest rate had skyrocketed. So that is probably not going to happen. And the reason it's probably not going to happen is actually like the next hole sort of chunk of the show their big thing. Oh it is the other bucket yes. It's the unfortunately named magic bucket right. That is the money created out of thin air bucket. So so now is the part where we talked about the Fed the Federal Reserve America's central that the Fed the Fed cavalry. So you and I did a show last week about the Fed rate so just to be clear the bill we're talking about today the two trillion dollars. That's Congress right. Congress is in the middle of passing that Bill. The president is almost certainly going to sign it. That's like one whole set of things k. The other big thing going on in the world the other big response to this crisis in America at least economically and financially has come from the Fed The feds doing a bunch of things. But what's important for? This show is the Fed is buying tons and tons of treasury bonds which is to say the Fed itself is lending hundreds of billions of dollars to the US government. And and you know one question. I had here for for blinders. Wait if everybody around. The world is so eager to lend the government. Why does the Fed need to be getting in on doing it to the Fed is GonNa do that? To the extent it is necessary to keep interest rates from going up so in other words if everyone in the world is clamoring to lend money to the US government interest rates. Stay low. That's great but if people get nervous about the United States then the Fed is there to keep buying to keep that rate. Low argued example if you went back to World War. Two which is the last time really. We had a mobilize the where we have to mobilize now. It does feel like right. I KEEP COMING BACK TO WORLD WAR. Two I you should so in World War Two. The Fed was very explicit that they were going to keep the interest rate on government bonds. Very very low for the duration of the war. And that's more or less what they're doing now. Is this time. It's the war against the virus. Yes hopefully well. It'll be a much shorter war but it's hope so yeah The Fed has said it's going to lend money to the government without limit. Bright more or less. Where does the Fed get the money? Oh that's the neat part about being a central bank. It doesn't have to get the money. It just creates the money something you and I wish we could do but only the central bank can do that so all of this money these hundreds of billions of dollars the Fed is going to essentially lend to the government by buying bonds. Is that like new money that the Fed is creating new money. That's why it's sometimes we still sometimes use the phrase printing money but this is electron. Ix handover dollar bills to exchange for pieces of paper. That money will be irrelevant to this whole thing. So to recap the two trillion dollar stimulus. Rescue package is being paid for by investors like you and me investors all over the world as well as the Fed making sure that everything runs smoothly and interest rates remain low. Yeah and and what that last part means is the Fed creating hundreds of billions of dollars out of thin air and using them to buy bonds. Now this is where I start to worry a little bit because I remember when I took high school economics. Which was my last sort of formal economics. Train Ish The one thing. They taught us the one thing they taught us was. If you print too much money as a government the thing that inevitably happens is your money which is flooding into the system becomes worth less and you start to see inflate hyper even this. Is The story APOR inflation? They always tell the story of Germany in the nineteen twenties wheelbarrows full of money. Zimbabwe with its trillion dollar bake notes hyperinflation that cripples the entire economy. You can't even put a price tag on an item because it'll go up in two minutes and I mean the short version of what happens is ordinary investors. The people in that first bucket get scared about lending money to the government so the central bank that second bucket they start printing more money to lend to the central government and then investors get even more scared so the central bank prints more money and more and it and it turns into this spiral where inflation just goes up and gets totally out of control and completely destroys money. Basically and that's where you get this crazy. Runaway inflation with prices doubling every week and the value of money completely breaks down. So that's the story and I want to say just as clearly as possible. That is very very very unlikely to happen

FED United States Federal Government Alan Blinder Treasury Congress Jacob Zimbabwe Germany LOW Golder Greece Robert America Vice Chair TA
It's a Major Award: Literary Medals and Prizes

Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

08:27 min | 1 year ago

It's a Major Award: Literary Medals and Prizes

"For today's episode. Yes I decided. I know that we're like we're kind of an award season. Yeah absolutely will talk about the Grammy's and the Oscars and all that stuff but I'm not talking about that and more highbrow highbrow. Today's episode is. It's a major award literary medals in prizes so ooh I don't think I know a lot about those great great. That's what I'm here for. Thank you so I feel like sometimes there's different there's different prices that are for specific genres of literature will cover those on their certain prestigious swans. There's ones that are for like a specific work published during a year or sometimes prizes honor a specific person and take into account their whole body of work. So it's not just like a book award. Sometimes it's just like an author award or -actly exactly in the field of literature so cool the first one. I'm sure everybody's heard of this won the Nobel Prize in Literature. Sure to this. Is that Swedish literature? Prize awarded Bennett ordered annually since nineteen o one It can be to an author from any country who has in the words of Swedish industrialist Alfred Nobel produced quote in the field of literature the most outstanding work in ideal direction so while individual works are sometimes cited as being particularly noteworthy. The award is actually based on an author's body of work as a whole so literature is one of the five Nobel prizes established by the will of Alfred Nobel in Eighteen ninety-five Lauren. I know you hate it when I do this year. Can you name me? Can you name me the other Nobel? Prizes okay Health and services. That's a cab. No there's is there medicine yes okay. There's Oh God chemistry biology astronomy. Shoot up down just naming science physics yes okay. And then one more big one engineering. No and the big won the Nobel Prize. Yes these species so the fit. Sorry I know. The five Nobel. Prizes are literature chemistry piece physics and physiology or medicine. Okay I'm economics is sometimes considered under the name of the Nobel prize but it was actually added by Sweden's central bank in nineteen sixty eight and is actually named Nobel's memory. It wasn't one of the original prices. Okay so it's kind of a with an asterisk. Yes okay okay. So for literature specifically Each year the Swedish Academy sends out requests for nominations of candidates and members of the academy who are members of Literature Academies insiders professors of literature and language often sometimes for former Nobel winners and president of freighters organizations. They're all allowed to nominate candidate. And you cannot nominate yourself By April that year the academy narrows the Field Down to about twenty candidates and then a month later. There's a shortlist of five names so for the next four months everybody everybody like on the panel is supposed to read and review all the works of all the candidates like like you got four months. You have to read every book this guy ever Bro. If I know anything about academics. It's that they're not going to do that. Really really tearing back the veil here exactly so by October that you remember how to vote and the candidate who receives more than half of the votes is named the Nobel laureate in literature so no one can actually get the prize without being on the list at least twice what's unclear and so many of the same authors reappear and are reviewed repeatedly over the years. Maybe that's how they get around having to read all that stuff because they're like. I did that three years ago. I'm not doing. I'm not doing that again. So the judges are composed of an eighteen member committee. Who are elected for life. Why up until two thousand eighteen? They were not technically permitted to leave. But I can crawl can carl. The Sixteenth Gustav Amend the rules of the academy and made it possible for members to resign if necessary but at a certain point. It was like you're on the committee for that's very ominous so a literature. Nobel Prize laureate earns a gold medal. A diploma with a citation and a sum of money. How much money you ask. The amount of money awarded depends on the income of the Nobel Foundation that year but for twenty one thousand nine hundred it was nine million Swedish krona equivalent to nine hundred thirty four thousand two hundred ninety dollars and ninety cents American. That's nothing to sneeze sneeze out my man. No one hundred twelve Nobel prizes in literature. I've been awarded between nineteen o one in two thousand nineteen to one hundred sixteen individuals that has been to a hundred men and fifteen women. Geez it's been actually shared between two individuals on four occasions and seven times. They decided not to award at anybody. So the laureates have been writing in twenty five different languages over time so it's not just like not just English not just Swedish. Whatever the youngest ever to receive the Nobel Prize in literature was registered kipling. Who was forty one years old when he was awarded it in nineteen? Oh seven and the oldest. Was Doris lessing? When she was eighty eight. Wow got it in two thousand seven. Two Writers have actually declined the prize. Boris Pasternak in one thousand nine hundred eighty eight and John Pulsar nineteen sixty four assaults right but the most recent winner. And that's in this whole episode. I'm going to go over the most recent because if we talked about everybody that's ever wanted a frigging a word. That'd be boring. It would be boring and fun but that would be so. I'm going to tell you about the most recent winner. Sometimes it's a twenty twenty word sometimes. It's twenty nineteen. Sometimes it might be a little earlier than that so so anyway. The most recent winner Nobel Prize for Literature Twenty Nineteen Peter Hannukah. Who is a German novelist? Playwright and poet For an influential work with linguistic ingenuity that has explored. The periphery in the specificity of human experience is how is they declared it? So Peterman Kiss for twenty one thousand nine. Was your most recent winner of the Nobel Prize in literature. Another big one is the Booker Prize for fiction. Yes okay so this. One is a literary prize awarded each year for the best original novel written in the English Language and published in the United Kingdom so the price was originally established as the Booker McConnell prize. After the company Booker McConnell Ltd began sponsoring the event in nineteen sixty nine and it became commonly known as the Booker Prize or simply the booker in two thousand and two. The title sponsor became the Investment Company. Man Group which opted to retain booker as part of the title calling it the man. Booker Prize from two thousand to twenty nineteen. So you've heard that I'm sure yes But the prize money awarded with the Booker Prize was originally about twenty one thousand pounds and subsequently raised to fifty thousand in two thousand two under the sponsorship of the man group making it one of the world's richest literary prizes in two thousand nineteen a new sponsor crank start announced it would sponsor the award for five years with the option to renew for another five so at that point they just changed the title to simply the Booker Prize because the crank start prize. No historically the winner of the Booker Prize had been required to be a citizen of the Commonwealth of Nations the Republic of Ireland or Zimbabwe but it was announced in September twenty thirteen that future booker prize awards would consider others from anywhere in the world so long as their work was in English and published in the UK stomachs. The winner is usually announced at a ceremony in London's Guildhall usually in early October nineteen ninety-three to mark the prizes twenty fifth anniversary. A Booker of Booker Prizes. Given so three previous judges the award met and they chose Salman Rushdie's midnight's children the nineteen eighty-one winner as the best novel out of all of the winners and in Twenty Eighteen to celebrate the fiftieth anniversary. The Golden Man Booker was awarded so one book from each decade was selected by a panel of judges and the winner by popular vote. Was the English

Nobel Prize Booker Prize Alfred Nobel Nobel Booker Nobel Foundation Booker Mcconnell Ltd Literature Academies Swedish Academy Man Group Grammy Salman Rushdie London Oscars Doris Lessing Investment Company Boris Pasternak United Kingdom Bennett Sweden
The Zimbabwean Mastermind: Paul Le Roux

Kingpins

09:37 min | 1 year ago

The Zimbabwean Mastermind: Paul Le Roux

"In early two thousand nine thirty. Six Year Old Paul Roux was just beginning to branch out from pharmaceuticals into into more ambitious criminal. Ventures larue was high on his own power but he was also getting paranoid. That paranoia was making him distrust. Trust even is most seasoned employees like Call Center Manager Moran Oz as had no idea that he'd somehow run afoul of Larue. In fact all signs pointed to Larue liking him after ause arrived in Manila larue drove him out to the coast in his own. BMW AM W on the way they stopped at McDonald's for breakfast. Oz knew that larue was a rich man but he wasn't surprised by the breakfast choice. In in fact is was more surprised that larue actually treated him usually win. Larousse employees met him at restaurants he would only order food for himself so their next stop was the Subic Bay Yacht Club where larue paid in advance for houses hotel room. Oz would stay here overnight tonight and then meet the other employees as he headed out to the island of Seibu. The next morning is entered his hotel room that afternoon feeling buoyant. Not only was his boss having him oversee and expansion of his company are limited but he was finally treating is like a peer paying for his food in high end lodging of course as was wrong the entire story about building an Rx limited call center in Sibu had been in a trap now as was in the open ocean with a rifle pointed at him. After a few seconds of gunfire fire. Oz took a breath of relief. He wasn't hit a voice from ondeck shouted down at him. That was to frighten off the sharks. Don't think think I missed the next time will be for you. Dave Smith the talkative British man finally relaid Larousse orders from the satellite phone. When he told is confess and will kill you? Keep denying it and will wound you and leave you to the sharks. Your choice is wracked his brain. What could he possibly need to confess to? He insisted that he done nothing wrong. He hadn't stolen Dolan from the company he would never do anything without Larousse permission. Smith said something into the satellite phone Struggled to stay afloat while larue rude determined his fate after a few more tense moments. One of the muscular men climbed down the yachts ladder. And pulled is back on board is never knew what Larue said on the other end of that phone. Perhaps he only meant to scare him that day or perhaps as had managed managed to talk his way into a stay of execution when Smith brought is back to Subic Bay Yacht club he left him with one final warning. He said we are like an octopus. We have tentacles all over the world. You need to understand that we can reach you everywhere aware. Even in Israel you are not safe anywhere. The following day larue picked up is to bring him back to Manila as got into the car hesitantly. He didn't know what to expect from his volatile boss but his ride with Larue was his only way back home to Israel Summoned the courage to ask why he'd been taken hostage and tortured larue shrugged. He claimed to know nothing about the incident but he also showed no signs of surprise or concern. Instead he told is that he couldn't be held responsible for what is partners might do he said you. Don't want to deal with these guys. They will find you do whatever they say this. This was emblematic of how larue like to handle as business. He rarely solved problems personally. Preferring to issue commands from his phone or laptop up he controlled the action from afar like he was playing a video game like he was God larue also like to use mixed signals and subterfuge fused to keep his employees off balance. No single person ever knew how their role fit into the larger operation and they never knew how larue through really felt about them lose. Employees were doing a wide variety of work all over the world from fielding customer service calls in Israel L. Transporting gold in the Congo to scouting real estate in the Philippines to assembling a militia in Somalia but despite their different skill assets. They all had similar impressions of their mysterious boss. One of Larousse. fixers tim them back as best described Larue as a constant threatening threatening presence he said it was almost like the guy never slept and you never knew which personality you get on the other end when he called he never said who he was but you knew it was him sometimes calm and other times irate and most of the time you never even knew why when Larousse employees finally met him. They didn't know what to expect because there were no photos of him on the Internet but the first thing they noticed was his size is he was white about six feet tall with an enormous girth. The source of Laura's girth wasn't a mystery. He was known to favour fast. Food food like Domino's McDonalds at his desk rather than going out to eat a steak in most aspects of life he prioritized efficiency over quality. He usually dressed in a T.. Shirt cargo shorts and flip flops. The effect was disarming. One employee said nobody has ever thought the the first time they met him that he runs global criminal Empire Larousse accommodation's reflected that as well. He owned a series of high. End condos in Manila Hilla. But all of them were mostly unfurnished aside from couch bid and television but they ran up unusually high electricity bills. That's that's because of course he was constantly running fleets of servers. We're larue was casual about his home and clothing he. He was obsessive about his computer setup. He worked off an ancient laptop operating Microsoft software over ten years. Old sounds announce counter intuitive but he preferred this setup because he was able to fully encrypt the entire hard drive the moment he closed the lid of the laptop laptop the contents would be unreachable by any outsider. Programming and encryption had preoccupied larue since his youth in fact act computers were his. I love Paul was born on December. Twenty Fourth Nineteen Seventy two in Bulawayo Rhodesia Asia today known as Zimbabwe as a child a relative said that larue quote was fought over. Everyone wanted him. Our grandparents grandparents worship the ground. He walked on when he was a teenager. Larousse family moved to South Africa in search of better education larue resented and having to learn Afrikaans. The local language spoken in school. He felt superior to his classmates referring to them as halfwits and and morons his elevation came in his first computer. As soon as Laura realized he could build entire worlds in code worlds were governed by his rules he was hooked. One of Larousse Cousins Remembers Teenage Larue as quote completely antisocial Dole. Every time we went there he was always hold up in his room. I remember going in and seeing lines and lines of numbers on the screen and it didn't take Kim long at all to figure out how coating could start bringing in money illegally of course in nineteen eighty nine. The police leased showed up at Laura's Johannesburg home and arrested the sixteen year old for selling pornography in these early days before the Internet it appeared heared larue had revolutionized pornography distribution by going digital but the specifics to his operation. Remain Murky to this day. What we do know for sure was that Paul's parents were appalled but he himself just laughed? When Larue retold this story with with a plumbing pride he would recall how silly the entire situation seemed to him? Everyone would have praised him if he'd found a new method of selling books or Lennon's all this fuss just because his commodity was porn chip as long as Larue was making money. He didn't care what he was selling and even as a teenager he didn't care about breaking the law he didn't care about exploiting others later on that instinct would have disastrous stress results. Not just for larue himself. But also for his employees and the entire country of the United States

Larue Manila Larue Paul Roux Moran Oz Laura Subic Bay Yacht Club Relaid Larousse Dave Smith Sharks Israel BMW Call Center Manager Larousse Mcdonald Sibu United States Manila Hilla Ondeck
"zimbabwe" Discussed on Messengers

Messengers

03:02 min | 1 year ago

"zimbabwe" Discussed on Messengers

"Aw there is water in that whole now. Remember missionary. Steve's dad personally gave the money that paid for that well so when when the water came in the well he flew out at almost eighty and he was there for the dedication and I'm telling you he preached and dance with those people. It was just a really special day. Water came up through the hole that the expert said that there would never be production of water. Yeah Yeah Yeah I love. I love the thought to of what he said he said. You'll never get one well but I I love the the thought that with Jesus there is no never it's he. He's he's the god of miracle so whatever never has been declared over the people's lives we're talking to right now now. Whatever never has been spoke? Maybe a a child or a spouse that's wandering from God you know whatever they announce never well just remember the story. Sorry God God works was was more than ten years ago. And it's still giving water still pumping water. They've been able to get their church. Built that they were able to have before all because of the blessing ten years later at this well site in Zimbabwe well is still giving water in the church is still there. Oh Yeah Oh yeah. It's still. Yeah the Miracle Well in Buluwayo Zimbabwe Missionary Steve and Glenda Evans leaders of Africa Wastes Project. Thank you so much for sharing this report Tom Murray reports from missionaries. Who bring the message of hope around the World This messengers from Oak Creek Assembly of God? We're a church near Milwaukee Wisconsin on mission to reach our world for Christ as we lead people to discover become who God created them to be find us at Oak Creek. Ag Dot Org pray give and go pray passionately. The spiritually lost to find Christ give give generously to missions through your local church. Go when God calls you to go. We want the world to know ellwood God is doing through missionaries. I'm asking you to take a few seconds right now. To rate this podcast better yet. Right Quick Review. This helps others find messengers injures. I just recently had a conversation with a friend in our church family who has a huge heart for missions and missionaries. But she had never listened to a podcast before so. I took thirty seconds to show her how to find messengers on her iphone. Listen and subscribe it. Sure does make my day. It means so much when you share messengers on your socials or in person..

Steve Zimbabwe Buluwayo Zimbabwe Oak Creek Tom Murray Milwaukee ellwood Wisconsin Africa Glenda Evans
"zimbabwe" Discussed on Between The Lines

Between The Lines

04:27 min | 2 years ago

"zimbabwe" Discussed on Between The Lines

"Because he speaks about respecting democracy. He says he's committed himself to free credible listens. He's repeatedly stated that the Newseum, Bob. We is open for business democratic human rights for all fair point. Evan tom. It's very unfortunate that ZIM, Bob. Wade does not look any different Andom Nagwa as it did under Robert MU. Gabbay and as much as the speech is coming out of MSN was mouth may be about change in Zimbabwe being opened for business. The evidence on the ground suggests completely on the wise. And there's a few indicators about this the first of this indicators is that Emma, someone Gago when he came into power did nothing chew include all Zimbabweans in running Zimbabwe in a new government. He had such a moment where he could have capitalized on inspiring new spirit of unity, and when he took over power the first thing that he did was to literally not acknowledge everyone who had taken part in this new change and just went back to appointing Zanu PF people the same people that Robert Mugabe had appointed. And this was the strangest thing the exact same people who corrupt the exact same people who were involved in adulterating, our democracy, and our constitution he reappointed into places of power. Then we move onto the elections or. August at the first one day after the elections this year, we saw things that we never thought that we would see in Zimbabwe ever again. After people protested the way the election had been run, the military was deployed on the street, and they shot live rounds into protesting unarmed civilians killing six people, and that sent a chilling message to every Imbaba, Ian that it was business as usual, and quite possibly could be getting worse and the final piece of evidence against any form of change. That may be counted by Amazon mnangagwa's is the state of the economy right now, we are worse off one year on than we were at the time that Robert Mugabe step down. The is no fuel available in the country is no food on the shelves. They is no money in the bench for people to have. And the inflation seems to be up on the rise again. So this is not a very good stunt if any more things have got worse is interesting. I read an article by giant Flanagan rotting in the London Times. And she actually says that the. Zimbabwe crosses that. You just mentioned bread Bing rations process Rausing body. Our motorists queueing for fuel oil that this is the worst crosses in Zimbabwe in a decade. And that's true. What is tragic is that a decade ago? Like you said we went through exactly the same situation. We had inflation running up to the thousands of percentages. We ended up with a one hundred trillion dollar note on our hands citizens, which was worth nothing. Everyone who had saved money in the Bank lost it within hours. And of course, the constitutional rights of people in Zimbabwe in two thousand and eight at their worst and hunger has said Zimbabwe's open for business. I think the question that we continue to raise is that once Imbaba is open for business is it open for freedom. Well, on that note, tell us about Nelson Chamisa, he's a forty year old leader of the movement for democratic change Sohn's, the hub absolutely signs for hope. Nelson Chamisa has take. Taken over the running or at least the headship of the movement for democratic change, which is the opposition party. That was started in one thousand nine hundred nine from union base by the late Morgan get Morgan try and get I passed away in February this unfortunately, relatively young to roll. Yes. Oh, yes. Relatively young compared to all the people around him that he was fighting against it was very young and Nelson Chamisa literally to Cova just in time to be eligible for the elections. You have to be forty for you to be able to stand for president. And this young man any giant index cited this Imbaba again for the first time since two thousand eight to hope for change to participate, especially the young voters and Nelson represents the future of Zimbabwe all the best of the future. And I'm glad that the strong authorities. Let you into the country for the script if university conference Evan. Thank you so much. Thank you so much. God bless you. Evan rewrite. Is a leading campaigner against rampant corruption injustice in poverty in Zimbabwe..

Zimbabwe Nelson Chamisa Robert Mugabe Evan tom Bob Andom Nagwa Zanu Flanagan Gabbay Robert MU Morgan London Times Emma Bing Wade Ian Amazon mnangagwa
"zimbabwe" Discussed on Between The Lines

Between The Lines

01:50 min | 2 years ago

"zimbabwe" Discussed on Between The Lines

"And welcome to between the lines on Tom Switzer on the show. Did I prime minister Scott Morrison sets out for summit season in East Asia this week a major test of his foreign policy abilities. Now, this comes just as the previously fractured China. Australia experiences of oil. So how should we take the relationship forward? I'll be asking China experts Lynda Jakobsen and Richard McGregor later on. I was frustrated. I was now that into fail to put food on the table for my family and just out of anger and frustration picked up my phone and recorded video where I spoke about the fact that Zimbabwe is not way, it is supposed to be fifty seven years after independence, and that the reason is corruption and the solution is asked to citizens, but loving Zimbabwe enough to stand up to this rampant corruption injustice and poverty. And so that's what this video was all about. And of course, it went completely viral Zimbebweans from all. Walks of life. So it and joined in many began to make their own videos and began to make the feedings in known about their frustration with Zimbabwe, the how they found things should be fixed. That's Imbaba in pastor. Evan Walla rewrite on the hash tag campaign. The play a role in bringing down the former President Robert Mugabe that's one year ago this month. Well, not so long ago relations between camera and Beijing were frosty to say, the least in two thousand sixteen the tumble government rejected. China's bid to buy Australia's largest trinity network last gee thwarted by jeans plans to establish a link between investment in the northern territory and the built in road initiative few months ago, Cambridge band, while.

Zimbabwe China Tom Switzer Australia Robert Mugabe Scott Morrison East Asia prime minister Beijing Lynda Jakobsen Evan Walla Richard McGregor President Imbaba fifty seven years one year
"zimbabwe" Discussed on Business Daily

Business Daily

04:34 min | 2 years ago

"zimbabwe" Discussed on Business Daily

"So we'll plan to get this company off the ground while for starters, finding everything there is to do in in the country and in creating a platform where people can find out what these things are book ships to these places, and really just make it a little bit more competitive with everyone. And you've had a lot of experience of the tourist attractions here in Zimbabwe. What would you recommend people go and see apart from Victoria full which they might already know about? There's Amanda pools which is a national heritage site grateful game viewing. Canoe, safaris days, one good national park, which has probably the biggest game viewing in the country. Gunnar show in the low Veld has amazing cliffs great scenery and wildlife. The eastern highlands should actually be bid venture capital of Zimbabwe, in my opinion, stunning scenery, amazing activities, and it's a lot more reasonable than the Victoria Falls. More tourists coming into the country. If something stone, sculptors, man, and Lloyd savannah would welcome. I made the father and son team in that outdoor sculpture gallery, not far from the Victoria Falls where abstract shapes, animals and faces stand tool on the graph. Almost Mike giant chest figures carved from smooth black and white. Starting popping is a craft which can be traced back to great Zimbabwe. The historic civilization that existed in what is now modern day Zimbabwe from the eleven to be things centuries. Sorry, some sculptures were discovered they so is kind of art that has been done by our forefathers for quite a long time up to now. It's not easy to make a living in the aunts in Zimbabwe today. Lloyd and math face the added challenge. If the heavy sculptures being damaged by animals, which one to into the gallery at night. Now I'm fixing. It might not image which has caused by animals. Here, we problems of animals sometimes elephants boons and what does the possible, this garden and these they knocked down the trust. So when Steph. Damaged. We repaired them where I'm being swayed. Loyd tells me the disappointing tourist because main sales are hard to come by business is slow. It's not that much. It pick. It depends with the flow of a tortoise within the country. If we have more tortoise, the chances of us having a lot of business, he said it's maximum, but win. Tourism is style. That means the new chances of charging. Stone, sculptor Lloyd Savan new. So Zimbabwe is at a crossroads the country is ripe for investment, but what does president mnangagwa's? And he's government need to do to convince the international community that Zimbabwe is a safe bet. He is docked child's Laurie from Microsoft. Again, one of the first key steps you can take is to extend an olive branch to the opposition international community doesn't want some Bob to be as DP politicized as it has been and by including key opposition members in his new cabinet by ensuring that keel position members take-up posts throughout his government. He can send a clear signal to the international governments that as Imbaba is different from what it used to be. What individuals are looking to see is that this is not a government that's run by the rulings on a PF party that it's a government that is run by the laws of the state. As far as the sense I got when I was in Zimbabwe is that it's a very sad country and that there is so much potential does a lot of people who are unemployed, all. Underemployed selling things on the street. There is a lot of potential there if they were to go into new jobs, if there was better business development is at the sense, you have the sense. It's one of the frustrations, one of the tragedies, but one of the points where individuals can get excited as well. This is local Zimbabweans the international investment community as well. There's tremendous potential. You have a relatively high, highly educated population. Infrastructure is not great, but it's it's a new sufficient for many businesses to take off what the country needs as good leadership, and that's what won and God was going to need to demonstrate very substantially Dr Childs, Laurie. That's the end of this addition of business daily. If you'd like to let me know, you'll thoughts on the program. I'm at Vive newness on Twitter business daily is back at the same time tomorrow..

Zimbabwe Victoria Falls president mnangagwa Laurie Victoria Lloyd savannah Lloyd Twitter Bob Gunnar Mike giant Imbaba Steph Loyd Dr Childs Microsoft Lloyd Savan Stone
"zimbabwe" Discussed on Business Daily

Business Daily

03:06 min | 2 years ago

"zimbabwe" Discussed on Business Daily

"That's the sound of protesters taking to the streets of Harare an August. I two days after Zimbabwe held national elections. The governing Zanu PF party had won the parliamentary rounds, but there was the presidential poll hadn't yet been announced and many were frustrated by the delay. Security forces opened fire on a position supporters and six civilians were killed two days later president Emmerson Mnangagwa announced he'd won fifty point eight percent of the vote at his press conference. He again repeated the mantra he'd been pushing since he came to power during a military backed coup last year that Zimbabwe is now open for business, but for foreign observers and potential investors. The elections were litmus tests to see whether Zimbabwe had moved on from the oppressive regime of former President, Robert Mugabe. So what did the international community make of the violence and what will that mean when it comes to attracting investment? Dr. Charles Lori is head of Africa. At global risk consultancy, maple Croft other one has to remember that the international investment community doesn't know Emmerson Mnangagwa very well, and certainly in the run up to the election, all eyes and ears open to understand what his proclamation of a news Imbaba would actually look like. And initially the signs would looking quite positive on election day. The proceedings of the election were we're going quite smoothly, but the prospect of investors having confidence in manga was news. Bob, we have been severely dented by the violence that we've seen over the past weeks. It demonstrated that they're real profound questions about his ability to proclaim that some Bobby is a new country. I mean, these were the actions all the old government that he was looking to distance from, and certainly not the kinds of actions you would see from as Imbaba that is looking to make it self. Attractive has quietened down since then. President mnangagwa's has spent many months since he took power. Our Thang Zimbabwe is open for business, but what proof have we seen on the ground that the business environment has changed other than what needs to be realistic about what one and Gaga could have achieved in the period leading up to the election. He can build bridges he can make promises, and in fact his approximations on extraordinary turn around from the Mugabe regime. So what we've seen and heard is quite promising and indeed some of his actual practical changes. For example, beginning to dismantle the indigenisation laws are positive signs for investors. Indigenization law is being that foreign companies had to hand over fifty one percent of their ownership choosing Bob wayans. That's correct. And what that essentially does for international investors as make some Bobby no-go country. There are plenty of other promising countries to invest in in southern Africa, and if they're going to concede fifty, one percent of their controlling assets, this simply won't choose them. Bob, we, and they'll take. Investment dollars elsewhere. That's as you say changed now though, what risks remained for investors in Zimbabwe. A fundamental risk is.

Zimbabwe President mnangagwa Bob wayans President Imbaba Robert Mugabe Harare Zanu Bobby Gaga maple Croft Africa Mugabe Dr. Charles Lori two days fifty one percent eight percent one percent
"zimbabwe" Discussed on Super Station 101

Super Station 101

02:16 min | 3 years ago

"zimbabwe" Discussed on Super Station 101

"Be from bob way were to happen to have gone to school with the new zimbabwe was to go back to zimbabwe did he graduating from high school with uh and tell him that he uh we would really like for this bob wake government to do uh i do this but i think an opposite plan would be better for the people of zimbabwe he would be in violation of the logan act i believe so that would be correct because if he disagreed with american policy no matter what he was saying to zimbabwe lack hey quit saying bad things about america or uh how 'bout you invest in america instead of investing in great britain even though the american policy was a uh we don't want investments from zimbabwe yes he would be in violation that is how vague in weird and strange in in the logan act was named the logan act because it had a specific person in mind and here's the rest of the story on the logan act the guy who supposedly is responsible for the logan act being passed ends up being elected i believe us senator from pennsylvania and he goes to the us senate tries to get the logan act named it after himself overturned never is able to so apparently the people of is his state were not too worried about his violating our will what he did to calls the logan act to be passed sort of like in alabama how is that what we're not too concerned if roy more did or did not right now because the truth of the matter is is unblessed way more is elected we'll never know that's exactly right brother feel i gotta go big guys making me take a break it up so you buddy thanks for listening merry christmas murphy icu there we're gonna take a break we'll be right back you are listening to a scott gleason radio hey this is nick the market or with using one marketing as a business owner or an employee reading else one.

zimbabwe britain pennsylvania us alabama roy business owner bob logan america senator senate scott gleason nick the market
"zimbabwe" Discussed on Global News Podcast

Global News Podcast

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"zimbabwe" Discussed on Global News Podcast

"The empty mdc off the disputed elections in two thousand donate announcement agugua was the man who was put in charge of a tremendously repressive campaign against the mdc which saw rebel gubbay back in power also oversaw the security services during the matabeland massacres absolutely these were some a terrible massacres after independence during the 1980s of one particular ethnic group in matabeleland the end debeli people and people will not forget that he is a man who has a very tainted history so even know there's all these hopes that zimbabwe they will also be fear at the back of people's minds that may be not a huge amount will change mary hoffa events in zimbabwe are being closely watched across africa the chairman of the african union the president of guinea alpha conde said he was truly delighted that robert mugabe had stepped down but he added it was a shame that such a great fighter walls as he put it leaving through the back door in south africa which is currently ham too many zimbabweans who fled across the border there is intense interest in events in harari as i have my correspondence in johannesburg milton cozy the reaction in south africa particularly from zimbabwe ones who've made south africa their home for the last few years since they zimababwean economic crisis has been of jubilation excitement and you fora most people i met tonight where excited happy to see the back of robert mugabe because they said he had presided over their own misfortunes when he ran the corner me to the ground but as far as the government is concen the hasn't been any official reaction now you've watch events in zimbabwe for for many years what do you think this means for africa the end of an era of one of the giants of the independence struggle this is a very peak moment not just for zimbabweans but for the continent as a whole to see one.

mdc security services zimbabwe chairman african union president conde robert mugabe harari economic crisis government africa south africa johannesburg official milton
"zimbabwe" Discussed on Global News Podcast

Global News Podcast

01:45 min | 3 years ago

"zimbabwe" Discussed on Global News Podcast

"Feel that does that tightens really need to do in each was fiction because if they kept this man even after he had done the kind of atrocities that indeed i wadi with that they will be the kind of people who tentative and really deliver to the people of zimbabwe a democratic country that clinton's me at that what is me opposition mp priscilla misihairabwimushonga so what does the future hold for zimbabwe i spoke to our africa regionalism mary harper and started by oscar who's in charge now well at the moment in the military i spacing still in charge they basically took over zimbabwe last week better the two cases the sucked vice president emerson managua will be the next president of zimbabwe within the next 48hour sir he's the man that we should be setting our sights on at the moment but i think this evening as has been made abundantly clear by my colleague julian keen isil maze the people of zimbabwe's time to be in charge at least for an evening of celebration and also some more poignant thoughts about robert mugabe who uh as has been pointed out brought their country to independence in 1980 among the suggestion is that amazon managua will serve out the remainder of robert mugabe's chum he is closely linked to robert mugabe very closely i mean in some ways he's a sort of junior carbon copy of robert mugabe twenty years his junior but he has been associated with periods of intense violence in zimbabwe both pre independence and paste independence and indeed in relation to muganga ryan.

zimbabwe priscilla misihairabwimushonga mary harper oscar managua president robert mugabe amazon managua i wadi clinton africa vice president julian twenty years 48hour
"zimbabwe" Discussed on Pantsuit Politics

Pantsuit Politics

02:17 min | 3 years ago

"zimbabwe" Discussed on Pantsuit Politics

"To which military leader said that's pretty divorced from reality in the minority party said then we're going to start impeachment proceedings so unclear what's going to happen the united states senate foreign relations committee is pretty uneasy about this here's a statement from that committee for nearly four decades zimbabweans have suffered under the authoritarian rule of president robert mugabe a dictator who has repressed his people and presided over the economic deterioration of his country while a change in leadership is long overdue we are concerned about the military's actions we urge the leaders of the zimbabwe defence forces to ensure the protection of all citizens in a transparent returned to civilian control as the country grapples with a new political reality symboblic leaders must adhere to democratic processes and establish a mechanism for the peaceful transfer of power that is consistent with zimbabwe's constitution in the will of its people which is a long way of saying we don't know what's going to happen here right end the think about this is that zimbabwe without mugabe hasn't really existed it's been a different thing but he's been there since the beginning of zimbabwe as its constituted today and as we know it so i think this is really fascinating in sarah what i love to get your reaction to you when i think about the idea of proxy wars in our sort of new world landscape the influence of china the if i'm vladimir putin how am i reacting to this news it seems to have some parallels with saudi arabia i i just think there's a lot here that we don't really understand yet i think that the world sees uh donald trump as giving up a lot of america's power and bargaining capacity and interest in exerting american influence in several events and so there's a vacuum and there's a destabilization sort of ripple effect as everybody's like well the united states is a pain attention so what can we do beat china saudi arabia or russia and i think that the destabilization or seen in places like the middle east and now africa and.

united states robert mugabe zimbabwe china vladimir putin donald trump america ripple effect saudi arabia russia senate president middle east africa four decades
"zimbabwe" Discussed on Pantsuit Politics

Pantsuit Politics

02:04 min | 3 years ago

"zimbabwe" Discussed on Pantsuit Politics

"Zimbabwe is landlocked in southern africa bordered by south africa botswana zambia and mozambique there are beautiful mountain ranges in zimbabwe and victoria falls one of the world's miss spectacular waterfalls and so there is quite a bit of tourism air it's a very diverse country there are sixteen official languages now imagine that in the state the state of montana rated sixteen official languages in race relations play an enormous role in zimbabwe's history it was a british colony called southern rhodesia until nineteen 65 when he conservative white minority government declared independence as rhodesia for the next fifteen years there was a guerrilla war between that whiteled government and black nationalist forces that culminated in a peace agreement in nineteen eighty they gave everyone the right to vote in made zimbabwe a symbolic a sovereign nation zimbabwe's now a member of the un as well as several other a consortium of african nations so the current president of zimbabwe is robert mugabe he was educated as a teacher and then became an activist as part of that struggle between the conservative white minority government and black nationalist and during the rhodesian period he was a political prisoner for eleven years he helped negotiate that agreement that ended the guerrilla war and in nineteen eighty he was elected prime minister and leader elected president susan bob way is technically a democracy but mugabe has a very long history of using force to smash political dissent there have been horrible human rights violations under his leadership beatings and imprisonment of political opponents according to heritage the economy of zimbabwe is quote characterized by instability and volatility both of which are hallmarks of excessive government interference and mismanagement massive corruption and disastrous economic pop policies have plunged the.

Zimbabwe zambia mozambique victoria montana rhodesia president robert mugabe prime minister africa south africa official susan bob human rights fifteen years eleven years
"zimbabwe" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

03:35 min | 3 years ago

"zimbabwe" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"And formulating a better future and if you care with and for future generations and those are some of the headlines this is democracy now democracy now dot org the warring peace report i'm amy goodman we begin today's show in zimbabwe where long time leader robert mugabe as refused to resign as president amidst growing political crisis in zimbabwe members of zimbabwe's ruling party are preparing to meet to discuss mugabe's impeachment after the deadline for him to resign came and went this morning on sunday mugabe gave a televised addressed acknowledging the country's problems but did not mention stepping down the paroles of the way they went about the rages sharing those concerns i as the president of zimbabwe and as commander in chief do a knowledge the issues they have drawn my attention to and do believe that these were raised during this spirit of honesty and out of deep and that treorchy concern for the stability of our nation of greater concern throughout komando has are the wellfounded fears that they lack of unity and commoners of purpose lean boss party and government was translating into perceptions all book he not tentativeness through the economy open public spurts between highranking officials in the party and government exacerbated by multiple conflicting messages from both the party and government made the criticisms levelled against us unis capable zimbabwe's ruling party signups vouch has expelled mugabe and mugabe from the party mugabe had been working to hand over power to his wife grace the impeachment proceedings against mugabe may now begin as soon as tuesday last week president mugabe was placed under house arrest after zimbabwe's military seized parliament courts government offices and the main airport in the capital harare the apparent coup came a week after president mugabe ousted his vice president emerson moonen gagua the military says it's appointed him as the interim president of zimbabwe on sunday after a week of relative calm residents in harari took to the streets to celebrate the expected announcement of mugabe's resignation only to be disappointed by his refusal to step down we're expecting to hear the presidency his listeners lee's swab snowdrifts to yet speech without any results cost the result is simple i am stepping down i am hitting over the country to someone else robert mugabe has held power since zimbabwe declared independence thirty seven years ago while for more we're joined by glenn them panni mason fellow at the kennedy school of government harvard university in cambridge.

amy goodman zimbabwe robert mugabe president komando house arrest interim president cambridge commander in chief harare vice president emerson moonen harari lee kennedy school of government h thirty seven years
"zimbabwe" Discussed on Business Daily

Business Daily

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"zimbabwe" Discussed on Business Daily

"Absolutely there are many lodge british companies american companies operating in the markets many international banks because there are of a seat huge opportunities in zimbabwe's extremely resource rich in terms of minerals very rich agricultural land as well as a relatively large consumer class actually by the standards the most african countries a does have a middle class and companies are eager to tap that demuth reasonably high levels of education with unusually high levels of education bias essay standard so even by the standards of neighboring south africa which is affiliated launched economy standards of literacy numeracy are a very high and there's actually been a big brain drain from zimbabwe with universityeducated zimbabwean seeking better opportunities either in south africa were brought here in the uk is what i mean that's one of the big stories here because there are millions of zimbabweans living overseas the majority in southern young somewhere around four million south africa zimbabwe wins by some estimates live in south africa as suppose that's why addressing the political crisis important for rejuvenation on the economic front because they obviously needs to be stability certainty for the skilled zimbabweans who have options to live elsewhere for them to want to return home so let's just don't then about the wider opportunities for the region because it isn't just one country in isolation you can imagine a more liberal uh economically liberal zimbabwe would have a transformative effect potentially on but a mozambique zambia et cetera when the neighbors all of whom deal in kind of crossborder trade in traffic here that would be liberalized hugely particularly with a tourist market opened up more in zimbabwe absolutely south african companies have been very concerned about some the import bans that is involved in government has implemented from time to time in response to there being a shortage of dollars to fund imports so south african companies be very concerned about those kinds of trade restrictions this kind of wider concern in the region about stability.

zimbabwe south africa uk africa mozambique zambia south african
"zimbabwe" Discussed on Global News Podcast

Global News Podcast

02:52 min | 3 years ago

"zimbabwe" Discussed on Global News Podcast

"This is the bbc cities complete range of programmes to bbcworldservicecom but slash podcast welcome to a special edition of global news on the fast moving events in zimbabwe recorded at ten thirty hours gmt on wednesday the 15th of november i'm sealey hatton the army in zimbabwe has seized control of the country but denies it is staged a coup there is no confirmation of mr mugabe's fate later we'll have an assessment from the bbc's africa editor frugal keen but first oh zimbabwe has been thrown into crisis the army has seized control of the country but denies it is staged a coup there's no confirmation of president robert mugabe's fate it was in the early hours of this morning at four a m local time that military officers took over the state broadcaster said b c they said they were not launching a coup but we're targetting criminals around the president this is major general sb moyal mountains following your bruce we may on thirty november the situation in our country has moved to another level we wish to assure the nation that's use excellency the president of the republic of zimbabwe and commander in chief of these about would forces cornered allergy mcgarvy and is sending are safe and sound in the vast security is gonna teach we are one of these debiting criminals are on our commenting crimes that are causing social and economic suffering in the country in order to bring them justice a representative of the governing zanu pf party here in london nicknamed wanna told the bbc that president mugabe is still in charge but the party which has been divided over who should succeed the 93 three leader was being realigned as a result of the army's action what my putter was is to call for a fair and transparent and clear process autism divorced from eta manipulation where the actual free will of the people is exercised with congress in its second week of december if people want to choose a different leader the process should be enough to allow should be a robust enough all people to do so so what is the situation like for those and harari at the moment i reporter on the ground.

zimbabwe army bbc president representative president mugabe congress africa editor commander in chief zanu london reporter ten thirty hours
"zimbabwe" Discussed on Business Daily

Business Daily

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"zimbabwe" Discussed on Business Daily

"And what is the situation in zimbabwe with comedy that much of a comedy see yeah uh so so we have lots of pop up kalmadi's uh clubs that happen lots of comics that are coming through the ranks the nice thing about what's happening with zimbabwe now is that the the line is sort of moved in terms of what we couldn't say in the past and that's to do with the fact that we tried to teach the the ministers and the politicians the context with which commandeered exists why it was important 4for4 zimbabwe to a tough comedy now they don't really agree with all with all methods but the date tended to be a lot more relaxed that over the years on like you don't get comics being locked up although we still get threatened but we don't get locked up we don't get beaten up and you know was sort of allowed public platforms in order to although in my case i'm not really allowed on television and zimbabwe so yeah is that a long that you can cross in zimbabwe to have a shade that his satirical and constantly sending up the government right so that's the reason why i actually had to leave zimbabwe's is that i started writing like a late night sort of a satirical showed that i wanted to teach the world about how africa works and so what's difficult about the research that have done jumping from african countries to african country i realize the selfcensorship and censorship issues are the same this this similar um they they wouldn't they wouldn't really allow for someone like me to perform year so zimbabwe's the most restrictive it but the other countries still had the same kind of issues.

zimbabwe kalmadi africa
"zimbabwe" Discussed on The Dave Portnoy Show

The Dave Portnoy Show

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"zimbabwe" Discussed on The Dave Portnoy Show

"Zaire with me i'll just like just come by he was gonna come and say hello anyway i was like just be ready because you never know how seriously it well i ask them like so what's up size like i dunno well i got i'm probably going back to the motherland unless some you know i go get a job here money motherland like zimbabwe zimbabwe barstool so you know those like barstool or buster like whatever whatever bust for assad appears to be bars to learn about birth will the village at the show it's the ship man i've wanted pressure and when you have to make a decision i gotta got like by the end of the hour of action first commercial real quick preside i brought you a gift from the motherland my man is schroll yachtswomen him bob wade has your money fitting for a mobile a hundred milliondollar million dollars of zimbabwe money fetig waiting for a mobile i heard have tightened his billion dollars million dollar not only does have been about what it literally says ten that it all is heading out million zimbabwe dollars guy was that somehow not outlet newtel's your broad fucking pay for kfc tuesday's occasion when my 10 millions of rahm way mile to xian there is a goal story reserve bank of zimbabwe page of the bear ondemand ten million dollars on or before june 30th two thousand eight only this guy bring in that i as coin money through so what is that equal to him arabisraelis expired or less than last time i left of which was when i left zimbabwe in 2010 that could not even get your loaf of bread wave fire exxon on the area it is it is for good hedlund nine has fired dollars and by the way i thought zimbabwe spoke hymns of zimbabwe east they'd right in english on the show it you guys are english blamed the british rauthat retake obama colonizers iraq and birth how about that though and while this is i'll money i know that's a little disappointed every picture now i take i forgot all this gone up on my instagram no i got a fucking patch on my fatah mike blocked at this time he gert good great souvenir though it is great souvenir our wish was real thank you saw it israel you up.

assad newtel kfc zimbabwe hedlund bob wade rahm obama iraq israel hundred milliondollar ten million dollars billion dollars million dollars million dollar