21 Burst results for "Zen Center"

"zen center" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

10% Happier with Dan Harris

06:22 min | 2 months ago

"zen center" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

"But to me, it's like that kind of attention is what's always possible. And I always think about that where the pandemic of loneliness and how do we learn how to step forward and actually care for people. So to me, it's paying attention. And I think that we often don't remember to pay attention. What is the difference between attention or mindfulness and the final entry in the eightfold path of right concentration? Yeah, so for me, right concentration is really about seated meditation. And I don't know if this is a traditional way of understanding it or not, but very often people start with meditation or I'll try that out, but for me, there's so much work to do before or during and after. But I think that see the meditation is the place of practice. So that's the place of concentration, but it's really hard to do if we have not looked at all of the weird shit in our back. If we haven't done the work of really unpacking some of the things that get in our way. And it's so interesting how this is at the end of the full path. It's like then you can settle down. It's kind of like back traditionally even the asanas of yoga were designed so you do all of that so that you can sit. So learning how to be connected to your whole self first and then sit down. I think about the last, however long I've been practicing, which is a period of time, but really it was my consistent work in all of the other a full path and also the first three truths of the four noble truths of really looking at my own suffering and really looking at how I'm causing my own suffering and really learning how to change. I think that all of them lead to what I've experienced in myself, I feel like the beauty of the hateful path is creating all the conditions and attending to the conditions that are going to allow your sitting your meditation to be very held in context. And I think that very often we want to kind of just jump into the sitting without doing the work that's needed. And so I think the Buddha is quite brilliant to put this here at the end, putting it literally at that, to really teach us that, oh, right, have to attend to this. And it's a double helix. It's a mutually reinforcing dynamic because you do all the work higher up on the list and that helps you sit, but then the sitting also helps you with the work. It's like the most awesome combo platter. The whole thing, yeah. To me, I've been doing all of it all at the same time. And I think that's what's so beautiful. The beauty of a life of practicing and not being good at it is you start to notice all these changes throughout your life and you start to see how life and you and practice changes. And people who say, like, I'll practice is boring or whatever that is. It's like, how is that even possible? It's so dynamic to see as you're saying how they flow into each other and inform each other that we're never done. So actually in my book, I added a 9th fold, which is mystery, because I wanted to get across what you were actually just saying, which is that we're never done. And that they all flow into each other. And so the eightfold path is also not linear. We always have the capacity to engage it on so many different levels. What's interesting to me and I think counterintuitively inspiring is knowing you as I do, you know, you're a zen monk, and you're a mess. I mean, in a good way. And you're embarrassed about lots of shit. Totally. In a healthy way. And so you're not trying to model some unattainable perfection. What you're trying to model is marginal improvement that compounds in a really powerful way over time. Yeah, to me, it's all about liveliness and service and love and vitality for the time that we have and connection. There's a chant that you and show off and lead. And at the end, the closing exhortation is don't squander your life. Yeah, perfection is not so important. I've never met a dying person who's like, I'm so glad I tried to control everything and was trying to post a perfect yet to meet someone like that. There was a song by this band, the band was called the silver Jews. David Berman, who himself was Jewish, no longer with us for tragic reasons, but very funny, sort of mordant humor. He was the lead singer. He had a line. It was something like in 1985, I was hospitalized for approaching perfection. It's really true. Yeah, it would be hard work. Well, it's just so sad, you know, because it's actually, if you look at the beauty of nature or you look at the beauty of anybody, it's not about a perfection. It's about what inspires us, at least it inspires me, is how someone walks into a room and just how they embody themselves and how they're open and curious and connected and courageous and loving and funny, gotta be funny. We agree on that. Before I let you go, can you please shamelessly plug your new book in any other stuff that you're putting out into the world that people might want to access? Yeah, so the new book is called untangled walking the 8 four path to clarity courage and compassion. And our zen center in New York zen center for contemplative care, twice a year, we have these 90 day commit to sit, so there's practice periods with all these teachers. And so it's a great opportunity to practice and that and many other things that we offered the world like our contemplative medicine fellowship are available at zen care dot org. Just

David Berman zen center New York
"zen center" Discussed on Game of Crimes

Game of Crimes

03:45 min | 4 months ago

"zen center" Discussed on Game of Crimes

"Filling out there listening to this podcast and you're wondering where your career path takes you. You to go. Anyway, this guy, he was such an anomaly for a DEA drug lord. You know, I mean, most DEA cases they have these flamboyant crack dealers or drug lords like Steve worked on. This guy was a marathon running vegetarian. Oh jeez. You know, he was endowed with a phenomenal chemical knowledge faculty. And he was very intelligent and polite. He's tall and thin. In some ways, he doesn't smoke. He doesn't drink alcohol or eat meat. He meditates and practices yoga, and he previously lived at the San Francisco zen center on page street. You know, he's really not your typical profile of a drug lord for DEA. All right, you need

DEA Steve San Francisco zen center
"zen center" Discussed on The One You Feed

The One You Feed

04:45 min | 7 months ago

"zen center" Discussed on The One You Feed

"Is because for people who need abstinence, I'm a little frightened by the moderation conversation to be honest because a little part of me wakes up and go see maybe it could be you. And so I think that's why it's difficult conversation. How do you feel about it on a personal level? Yeah, I had to write 300 pages before I got to a point where I was comfortable engaging with it. That was part of the arc of the book was trying to make sense of my felt sense that I am a person in recovery from addiction that there's something special about that that I have membership and that I qualify to be in this certain tribe or group of people. And at the same time, that there's no essential division between addiction and the rest of the population. So how do I make sense of that? And the moderation piece goes along with that question because if I'm not uniquely disordered in some way that crosses a very defined us them line, then there's no absolute law that says that I can or can't drink again. For me, I feel like it's enough. I've got enough data and I'm not a 100% sure. I'm not a 100% sure that I could never drink again safely. But it's not worth it to me. Yeah. It really isn't. What would I actually get from that experiment? What am I hoping to get out of it? And in fact, one of the gifts of recovery for me was that I got back to something. I had a real yearning for earlier in my life, but then addiction pushed me away from, which was Buddhist practice. Specifically, zen practice. And I could never commit to it because I would do a three week silent retreat. And then I would leave and go straight to the bar. Yeah. It's eradicate all of the progress I had made. I couldn't wake up on a Saturday morning to get to the zen center because I was too hungover or whatnot. As a totally separate system of spiritual practice, there are precepts about taking intoxicants and their precepts of caution people to be really attentive to the cause and effect of what happens when I take a intoxicants. And it's very similar to what happens when I engage in anger, very similar to what happens when I engage in gossip. You know, these are similar precepts. And that moral and ethical code. As I, again, I'm not a Buddhist teacher, but as I understand it, it's not to say thou shalt not. It's to say, pay attention and see what it's like when you do this when you do that. And it's about training the mind. So I'm in a place right now where I don't stress about it too much. I don't see much of an advantage to intoxication as a matter of fact. It takes me away from one of my main purposes of spiritual practice is as far as I understand it. And I share your fear that by talking about moderation, maybe somebody gets misled and they say, hey, some doctor said on some podcasts that some people can drink moderately and maybe I'll try it. And then they go out and they overdose because the supply is totally contaminated with fentanyl or whatnot. But we can't deny reality. The fact of the matter is back to the 1970s, we had these studies saying that some people, even with severe substance use problems, can return to moderation.

zen center
"zen center" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

10% Happier with Dan Harris

07:49 min | 1 year ago

"zen center" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

"We're in a religious context, like IMS or spirit rock or zen center. And we get a religious teacher or a religious figure. Certifying their religion by claiming science validates this. That is what I object to, because that's just I mean, that's a kind of philosophical confusion, something that's a kind of descriptive empirical investigation of the world can be relevant to a value system, but it never validates the value system. There's always a gap between values and facts. It takes work to connect them and you don't ever derive one from the other. So it's this idea that somehow the science now shows I mean, let me put it this way. When that kind of statement is made, science is being used to proselytize or to preach. And that I object to. For what it's worth and it might not be worth much. Having done a non trivial amount of retreats, but certainly not all of the retreats in the world. I never actually heard anybody say that. Nor do I think I've heard any of our hundreds of guests say that, but I could have missed it for sure because I missed a lot, but that's just the thought that's coming to mind right now. It's certainly not a proof of much. I mean, that's good. I'm glad to hear that that you haven't heard that because I've ordered a lot. I mean, it may be because I'm in context where that message is going to be presented more. The meditation retreats I've done. They tend to have a lot of scientists present and clinicians. A lot of times this is presented in a context where people do clinical psychological work or psychiatry and that message sometimes gets presented a lot in those contexts. But I mean, I'm happy to hear that you haven't heard that so much. Yeah, mostly, certainly the way I would discuss it with people who are clinicians, and I'm not a clinician. I'm not a scientist. So the way I would describe it as just a pretty close to a schmo is there's seems to be some interesting evidence that, again, is not dispositive, and it's intriguing. It's worth taking a look at. As you try to treat people who are in extremis. Anyway, I did interrupt you as you were endeavoring to make a separate point. So I want to give you a chance to make that point. All right, so that point the separate point or the second point was going to be that I definitely agree and think it's important that these practices, let's just call it mindfulness, help people deal with life crises and suffering. I mean, your descriptions in your books of your own experience are very moving. I mean, I've had similar experiences myself, where those kinds of practices have been very beneficial. I would never quarrel with anything that makes someone's life better in that sense. But I would say that because our culture is so consumerist and individualist that we often address problems that are social and structural by focusing exclusively, sometimes even obsessively on the individual. So this is in the world in which we're talking. This is what the word Mick mindfulness is used to designate is that we have a kind of commodification of aspects of meditation practice and mindfulness. And it's imported into systems or structures where people are suffering, where they're suffering is just not adequately addressed by doing mindfulness all by themselves in their office cubicle because there's a larger structural issue of inequity or injustice at play and that needs to be addressed. So yes, I mean, individuals should do what makes their lives better and makes them suffer less within of course an ethical framework of doing this. But let's not use that as a way of covering over or failing to see that there are often larger political systemic structural issues that aren't addressed by those things at an individual level. I mean, I know there can be a range of different political viewpoints about how to fix these things or which ones are the problems. That's of course a different kind of discussion. But I'm just signaling the fact that there are those kinds of structural issues. And they're kind of papered over when you just say, well, if you pay attention to your breath and practice mindfulness meditation every day for 20 minutes in the morning and 20 minutes in the evening or whatever, you're going to feel better. I mean, yeah, you might feel better, but some of your stress might not really be best to dress that way. There might be bigger things at play. Yeah, well, I think I agree with all of that. And let me respond and encourage you again to take pot shots at what I say, nitpick, whatever. Because if I'm wrong, I want to know it sooner, rather than later. My view on that is, you know, I've always described myself as a sort of a maximalist when it comes to human flourishing. I'm not a meditation fundamentalist. I think it's one tool among many psychotherapy medication, access to nature, friendship, meaningful work, exercise, healthy diet without being obsessive about it. These are all levers that we should be pulling as well as meditation if you're into it. So that's one thing as it pertains to the mic mindfulness beef that meditation is often sold, plays right into the western obsession with individualism. I think I kind of share that, which is why I'm a really increasingly vocal proponent of adding in a practice that was often taught right alongside mindfulness as far as I understand in traditional Buddhism, but is now I think in mindfulness craze, de emphasized to the detriment of the movement or whatever you want to call it. And certainly to the detriment of practitioners, I think, which is the Brahma viharas or loving kindness practice where you are boosting your capacity for warmth toward yourself and everybody else. And I think that, first of all, I mean, I'm gonna psych the science, which I know with you is dicey, but the science as early as it may be, seems to indicate in a very interesting way that love is not a factory setting. It's a skill that we can boost our capacity for warmth and being sort of an omnidirectional force that includes ourselves and the world. And I think that, in my experience, and my cursory understanding of the science seems to decay that we can nudge ourselves out of this solipsistic approach to the practice. And towards something I would call enlightened self interest, which is that your more engaged in the world and helping other people. And that, in fact, helps you and you get on this virtuous upward spiral, not in perpetuity, but you have greater access to that. So please, fire away at that. Yeah, so I mean, the Brahma viharas come from particular discourses of the Buddha or where the Buddha is presented as giving a discourse and there's kind of an interesting question about how they fit into other forms of Buddhist meditation practice over historical periods. I would say that the modern version that you encounter in the form of loving kindness meditation meta practice in the insight meditation communities, I think that's very much a Buddhist modernist practice. I think that's probably been crafted in I could stand corrected by historians of meditation on this. But I think that the way that we practice that today is very much a modern innovation. That's not a criticism. That's just a description. And of course, I have no quarrel with the claim that love, kindness, empathy, that these are skills. I think all ethical traditions in human thought view them as skills, secular and religious and the home base where you learn them is in the family or where that's where you're supposed to learn them anyways is in the family and then you kind of radiate them outwards. I have no quarrel with that. The modern meta practice I'm a bit more ambivalent about because often I find that feeds or plays into our cultural narcissism..

Mick mindfulness zen center confusion
"zen center" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

10% Happier with Dan Harris

02:32 min | 1 year ago

"zen center" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

"When you start to feel the responsibility to be a model for others, actually you're imperfections or the ways that you don't line up to your own ideals of mindful living, get highlighted. They get cast in relief. And that forces us to just get real about what it really looks like to be doing our best. And on some days, it all looks so good. And if we're striving towards an ideal, we can just beat ourselves up. And all that's going to do is keep us stuck in the same ruts. But eventually, if you are keeping it real and you ultimately have developed a sense of wanting to have your own back, you just start to get an honest look at yourself and say, hey, sometimes I need some forgiveness. I need to make some mistakes. I need some self compassion. I need a little patience for myself. And yeah, maybe you'll try something indulgent or aversive or avoidant. The first time the second time, the third time, but then that fourth time comes around and meditation is what you reach for. And it's something that we can be grateful. We've developed the habit to reach for at some point or other. Amen. And just on the burrito thing I mean, you know, I'm not a Buddhist scholar, but I understand in the Buddhist scriptures there is a carnitas exception to multitasking. It's like there's a specific codicil that you can burrito is totally fine. Totally, there's a classic story from the Soto zen tradition. There was a kind of well renowned meditation master his name was Suzuki roshi, who founded the San Francisco zen center. And he had a center there where he was living and he had some students who were living there as well. And his students knew him famously is giving the teaching that you should do one thing at a time. You give your full attention to mindfully and one morning, some students came downstairs and saw him eating breakfast and reading the newspaper. And later on, they worked up the courage to go challenge the master about his improper behavior, his what's the word I'm looking for his hypocritical behavior. And they said, roshi, we saw that you were simultaneously eating breakfast and reading the newspaper. And he famously responded with eating breakfast and reading the newspaper, just eat.

Suzuki roshi San Francisco zen center roshi
"zen center" Discussed on The Wisdom Podcast

The Wisdom Podcast

05:03 min | 1 year ago

"zen center" Discussed on The Wisdom Podcast

"I had this training group for a period of time, it was, you know, there was study that we did and we would talk about practice. But it was really just like a holding container for the growth maturation development of me as a practitioner and when that container broke, I didn't have a place. You know, I didn't have a way to hold this practice that I just was so I loved so much and was so devoted to. It was like no way to continue in a supported way. And you're back to these two types of lives. Right? You know what? Living in two worlds. Yep. Yeah, and I think the language I used in the book was something like, I felt like I kept banging on the door of the temple, you know, asking to be let in. And I didn't find a way. And I mean, maybe if I could have tried harder, but after trying very hard for a long time, I just gave up in a certain way. I just said, I can't keep doing this. And that was the point at which I shifted into inside meditation. What's that meditation? Okay. Yeah, so there's these two worlds and it seems that you were only allowed into one world for a certain time. And the hope that some people have is that they can make the entire world like the monastery. I think it's possible to do that. I mean, I've been living as a lay person for a long time now, but it takes it's not just we all need support. I mean, that's the beauty of living at a place like zen center where I was immersed in this community. And if you're out in the world as a layperson, you miss that sanga. Then there needs to be something some orientation again, some holding that allows one to remember that the whole world is the monastery, because the rest of the world isn't saying that, right? The rest of the world is saying, you know, be successful go make money, whatever. So it's like.

zen center
"zen center" Discussed on The Wisdom Podcast

The Wisdom Podcast

03:16 min | 1 year ago

"zen center" Discussed on The Wisdom Podcast

"So green gulch farm is another Dahmer community type situation. Yeah, so San Francisco zen center includes those three centers, the center in San Francisco, green gulch farm, which is a organic farm, Marin county, and then tassajara, which is the mountain monastery. Got it. And this is in the Soto zen tradition. That's right. So what makes this training so toes in? It's photos and because it came from a sort of end teacher who was shown to use Suzuki rashi, who founded Tasha and San Francisco zen center and he's the author of the book zen mind beginner's mind. It's how most people know him. And my understanding, there's basically two major schools of zen Soto and rinzai and sometimes it's described that rinsi is the warrior school that is much more often is co own based. So there's kind of a curriculum of learning and passing cons. And in Soto zen, which is comes out of dog and zenji, who is a Japanese scholar monk philosopher, smart guy. He has a beautiful piece of writing called the genjo coan. And gen Zhou Khan can be translated to basically it's the one koan. And it's basically translated to mean the koan of what's happening right now. What's a rising this moment? And that's much more the style of sodas in. It's kind of gentler in a certain way. It's not, it's not at all systematic. It's very loose in the way it's structured. That frustrated a certain part of me. You know, the good student part of me, but it was really very much what was needed to help me unwind, you know. From that striving, trying to get trying to fix place. So it was very. It was like being immersed and then being totally reoriented. I like that immersed and re oriented. Were you studying dogging at all at the monastery? Yeah. Yeah, yeah. I had this very much love affair with dogan, who if you've ever read dogen is very difficult. Yes. And what I loved about dugan and actually about sodas and in general was that, you know, I have a very fast mind and that had served me as a student, you know, and also as a worker to be in some ways. But it was troubled also. And what I loved about dogen was that my thinking mind was no match for him. Yes. Kept pointing to something else, and it was something I was so hungry for,.

San Francisco zen center green gulch farm mountain monastery Suzuki rashi zen Soto rinsi zenji gen Zhou Khan Marin county Tasha San Francisco dogan dogen dugan
"zen center" Discussed on The Wisdom Podcast

The Wisdom Podcast

05:10 min | 1 year ago

"zen center" Discussed on The Wisdom Podcast

"And that I can do. You mentioned real health, your starting getting a sense of what real health might be or real freedom. What did you understand that to be at this point? It's a good question and I'm not sure how much I understood anything at that point. But I do think that even then there was some degree of shift from looking outside to try to find something or fix myself or get a solution to beginning to pay attention to my own reactions and responses. And I, again, I don't know that I would have had the language for it at the time, but I started to change. I was less reactive. I was discovering in a very non verbal but visceral way, a kind of spaciousness in my experience from doing meditation. And I also was part of this community that made sense to me and somehow just not even the teachings, which I thought were beautiful, but the feeling and you're talking about feeling in this sense of watching yourself and your reactions and to things and as you're talking, it sounds like it feels like a healing, right? But on a different level than you know the way you were looking at it before you came, that there's this body that needs to be fixed. Exactly. Actually, the healing is happening in some other dimension in a way. Yes. Yes. Which is, I mean, it's a beautiful metaphor for how the Dharma works, most of the time. We come in looking for something and then the answer comes in the back door and we go, oh, I hadn't even been looking over there. Thinking about that. It's very much true to my experience. I have this funny memory that the roommate the same roommate who had given me the phone number for this Tibetan doctor. I remember when I started going to the zen center, especially in the mornings, I would go and I would sit and then we'd have temple cleaning soji and then I'd stay for breakfast..

zen center
"zen center" Discussed on The Wisdom Podcast

The Wisdom Podcast

05:03 min | 1 year ago

"zen center" Discussed on The Wisdom Podcast

"Work as an undergraduate on healthcare for the elderly, which was really about looking at chronic illness in the western healthcare system, which was a mess. Then, as now, in many ways. But this was in 1985. And then I was I was doing thesis work about the impact of science on our culture, but I was also always a history buff. And I had studied a lot of particularly Chinese history. And I had been a TA a teaching assistant for this beloved Chinese history teacher, and she arranged this new program so that I had a chance after I graduated to go to a university in China and study the healthcare system there. And then my Visa was turned down because I was diabetic. It was horrible, you know, crushing kind of disappointment at that point. So then I got a job. And I was working for a healthcare consulting firm. Kind of crunching numbers and doing interviews and writing reports and it's a story is also in the book, but it was a little bit soul crushing, you know? There's a scene where I describe my doing a report for my boss and her read any inking it and keeps telling me to do it over and over. And we were trying to prove that this physician group could sustain something like a cardiac catheterization lab or something. And the numbers weren't showing it. And she kept saying, run the numbers again. Why didn't the audience or the age or the geographic? And at some point, I remember I said to her, this is my, you know, just out of college, innocence. I said, don't you think it would be better if we just told them the truth? Yeah. And she said, literally, that's not what they're paying us for. Wow. Wow. And that was very much the pre pre before I went and knocked on the door of the insider. That was like, okay. There's something wrong here. And it wasn't, it wasn't feeding me at all. It was actually confusing me more. So those are some good stories about my stories and it shows how pervasive in your life. This search and around what health is. Yes. That's right. Yeah. You mentioned falling into the space of the zen center. Or into this presence. So it seemed like you went, did you go pretty hard at first, or did you tiptoe your way in?.

China zen center
"zen center" Discussed on Untangle

Untangle

01:57 min | 1 year ago

"zen center" Discussed on Untangle

"Connection to the world to everything that the world offer and an internet connection wasn't just by as observed that but i have merged myself i jumped into the water in the deep end and swim through so that was the place i started as how i ultimately got interested meditation and autos actually at age nineteen thought i would become a zen monk made a serious attempt back. Yeah he spent a few months at then san francisco center person there and why. I can't imagine what some of the older ten students for thinking about this young kid. Who is there. But i just needed to do that. You the next step for me. It sounds like you could have gone down this path of being a spiritual monastic or a philosopher. Had did you take what you were learning from. Meditation and from studying at the zen center and then decide to be a doctor. The subtitle of your book is medicine. Mindfulness and humanity. And i think that's so perfectly represents the essence of who you are as a human being but when did this and how did this all come together for you. As a child. I was interested in things medical and numbers even when we first got an encyclopedia paper encyclopedia. Nothing like phonics. And i look up. I interested in asthma as asthmatic and started reading about other aspects of human experience and that coupled with a fair degree of family. I wouldn't call it pressure. I guess some expectation or hope or aspiration that the family would somehow produce a doctor you at says in my grandmother..

zen center san francisco asthma
"zen center" Discussed on Gastropod

Gastropod

04:44 min | 1 year ago

"zen center" Discussed on Gastropod

"Didn't convince us aldi tofu but she ended up having a big influence on the growth of tofu in america because of a guy named bill shirtless is a stanford grad. He was one of the early peace corps volunteers who went to nigeria or what was called biafra to teach for a couple years. He came back he. He joined the san francisco zen center. He became a monk. Bill went to japan with a mission to found a zain's interview traveling americans but then the guy who sent him died. Bill was sort of stranded there and he was really poor and he was a vegetarian so he found himself eating a lot of tofu and write about then. He meets akiko ideology. Who is the young fashioned student. Who was Then designing a line of clothing for people with intellectual disabilities and the two bond over their shared mission to make the world better and as they're kind of getting to know each other he picks up a copy of diaper small planet. And it's like. Oh my god the tofu. Eating every day is this thing that could actually solve famine. Bill and akiko became tofu obsessive and the two of them spend two and a half years traveling. All over japan documenting traditional ways of making tofu and apprentices into tofu shop and then developing five hundred recipes. some of which are traditionally japanese. Some of which are like american in order to sell tofu to westerners in published this book in nineteen seventy five. It's called the book of tofu and they do bunch of recipes in it that are based on traditional japanese ones but also akiko spent a lotta time combing through that great american classic the joy of cooking and trying to replace all sorts of ingredients in it with tofu. We're talking about of ravioli..

san francisco zen center akiko Bill zain japan nigeria america
"zen center" Discussed on Everyday Buddhism: Making Everyday Better

Everyday Buddhism: Making Everyday Better

03:19 min | 1 year ago

"zen center" Discussed on Everyday Buddhism: Making Everyday Better

"New people in asia can be just going through the motions and not really digging into it. There's there's no escape as a human being. We've gotta do the work. But in the west the real problem seems to be faith that we don't you know we don't have a cultural support for it. happily. It's better now. Wants the dollar. Lama won the nobel peace prize. At least that helped people agree. Deal before that. I you know i came to dharma before that you know all sorts of personal crises. My father thought i had gone insane. I had a job interview. I'd spent ten years again before the dalai lama. it's been ten years and zen center And then cited have family in in needed a job so at a job interview in his tenure gap in my resume i went working at the smithsonian to do nothing for ten years and so they asked me. We'll redo and i said well you know. I was at a buddhist center. And i was interested in meditation and things like that and the guy looked at me and said. Oh yeah yeah. My wife was into witchcraft. As far as god so you have to have faith. It's the faith that keeps you going and actually the deeper faith even deeper than you know you have because you would not come across these buddhist teachings except for extremely positive karma. There's something deeper going on. That's true for everybody does deeper stop going on all the time. But we don't recognize it. The faith is the end of the divine discontent. That keeps you going despite yourself and you can have the experience where you're doing some practice. Just kind of like halfheartedly. Because it just happens to be going on the dharma center and the group that you're with us doing it or your girlfriend is doing whatever it is you can just do some half asked kind of involvement half with your mind somewhere else but he you can you know you can find yourself in a temple and suddenly be moved by looking at the buddha figure now who created that you know. It's your own mind but yet if it weren't for it's like throwing darts you know. We throw a ninety nine times before. He hit the bullseye it. But we're those ninety nine times wasted. No they weren't It said i think in In chinese pure land tradition you know people chanting tabas name in in having questions of doubt and feeling like well. What is this doing. I'm not experiencing anything like that. But the power of the moment of death it said that all of that positive intention and connection like all crystallizes in one moment. So there's great power when we drop this. This distraction that we've got going on all the time said the mind is nineteen times more powerful. I love these mathematical example. He had nine hundred times more powerful at the moment of death because the body drops away and and we. We don't have this obsession there. There's no object for this obsession anymore. So this is. The power of the mind is practices. We have the example twenty six hundred years you can see..

zen center dharma center Lama dalai lama asia
"zen center" Discussed on Everyday Buddhism: Making Everyday Better

Everyday Buddhism: Making Everyday Better

04:02 min | 1 year ago

"zen center" Discussed on Everyday Buddhism: Making Everyday Better

"I disappeared on you. Didn't i his been too long. Since i released an episode. I went on vacation in mid july Mid to late july then took more of the summer for a hiatus to recharging. Relax inn rethink the next steps for this podcast which just I hope to tease this. And i hope to promise something that I will keep the promise of and that is Being more regular on my podcast episode releases I have a target in mind. That would be twice a month. And hope i can make it but You know i'm human so Don't go nuts on me if i don't If they break that promise. So but i am ready to go again and i have a not so summer. Hiatus topic to share with you today and that topic is practice and specifically the topic is the thirty. Seven practices of body sat fas which is a practice. We in the everyday sanga are doing together so This episode is dedicated to my saga members. Thank you thank you for doing this practice with me but to help explain more about the thirty seven practices and the tradition from which it came. And how i found. It is my friend and teacher who i depend on for helping me with the wisdom of tibetan buddhism frank howard one of my first teacher said everyone is your teacher because everyone is a buddha now. That is true but there are some teachers who come into your life and have major influences on you and your practice and your perspective and the way you do life. Frank coward along with his wife gretchen. Howard were my first quote unquote in person mentors in buddhism and they enabled my initial buddhist refuge and teachings with lama droop on sonum. Jor pool ripa shake and teachings by many other wonderful teachers including his eminence. Cartoon rinpoche and campo sheer bodes or an on and on and on. If not for frank gretchen and the center they guide. I would not have had the experience of being in the presence of tibetan teachers who radiated the wisdom and compassion of buddha nature like the sun. I will offer a brief introduction to frank but i will have his full bio on my website. Frank is a local attorney in the director and teacher at the white lotus buddhist center. Rochester's tibetan buddhist temple I'll have a link to that website again on my My website In this in the episode section. He has studied in practice. Buddhism senses early twenties and began formal training at the rochester. Zen center in nineteen seventy one under the direction of roshii phillip koeppel but in january nineteen eighty one. He and his wife made a pilgrimage to buddhist holy sites in india and nepal and in one thousand nine hundred eighty five after nearly fifteen years of attending zen meditation retreats in practicing as a dedicated zen practitioner frank mediterr- betton lama coach coach yeltsin soon and has studied and practiced within the tradition since that time his letters and articles on tabet have been published in the wall street journal the atlantic monthly city.

frank howard Frank coward lama droop Cartoon rinpoche frank gretchen white lotus buddhist center ripa gretchen Howard roshii phillip koeppel Zen center Rochester frank Frank rochester frank mediterr betton lama coach yeltsin nepal india
"zen center" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

04:07 min | 1 year ago

"zen center" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Forest roots and the Tassajara Zen Center. Also ordered evacuated are all areas of Arroyo Seco Road west of Wood Tick Canyon. Including the Arroyo Seco campground, Rocky Creek Road as well. This is all things considered from NPR news. I'm Ari Shapiro and I'm Ailsa Chang, just a warning. This next conversation contains adult content, descriptions of sex acts and popular comic book characters. This may not be suitable for Children. In an interview with Variety. Last week, the creators of the HBO Max adult animated series, Harley Quinn revealed that a scene depicting Batman performing oral sex on Catwoman Was blocked by DC Entertainment. The rationale because quote heroes don't do that. Well. This prompted some heated conversations on social media about the censorship of female pleasure and sex in comics, even as the sexualization of female characters has become standard in most story lines. Glen Weldon of NPR's arts desk joins us now to talk about all this. Hey, Glen. Hey, It's great to be here. Thanks for having me good to have you, Okay? Said what do you make of the argument that heroes don't do that. Ha! I mean the whole notion that heroes don't do that. That's probably false. I'd argue that thinking of others and putting their needs above yours is pretty much the definition. I'll be hero, but Set that aside as you mentioned, we are getting the second hand right from the Harlequin creators who noted that D. C. Let them go nuts with villain characters, but we're very nervous, very protective of heroes like Batman. And unfortunately that tracks right. These characters are extremely valuable nuggets of intellectual property to these corporations, and it also, I got to say, seems sadly inevitable because superheroes are a uniquely American creation. It's jazz, baseball superheroes, and they embody our uniquely American hangups. Unfortunately, so they're all about violence. But when it comes to sex, they can't help but reflect our repressed and puritanical attitudes towards it totally, And we should know that we did reach out to D. C entertainment, which hasn't publicly common Posted on any of this. But what happened here with Batman and Catwoman is part of a broader cultural conversation about misogyny, Female pleasure and the aversion to sex, positivity and media. How do you think that larger conversation plays out when it comes to comic book culture, in particular, well as comic book and superhero fiction went from the kind of fringes of culture to become what it is today, the mainstream. There's just a lot more voices in the mix More women, more people of color. We're folk and they've got a fundamentally different and I would argue healthier attitude toward these characters because they use things like fan fiction to take these characters mix and match them up in a way that completely ignores the notion that DC, and Marvel owned them. And yes, Fan fiction has a rep. Sometimes they do it in a lot of sexual ways that make that Harley Quinn seems, seems like Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm. But there is something more important going on here, right? It's really about renegotiating that relationship between creators and audiences. It's now an ongoing dialogue and not just this unit. Directional corporate monologue. Exactly. So, I mean, with all of this outrage on the Internet boiling over last week, you know we saw Batman and Cat women's Sex lives Trending. Do you think the creators you know, I'm sure they've seen all of this discussion. Do you think that any of that will have an impact on what ends up on the screen? Well, as you mentioned, DC, hasn't commented, Imagine being the PR flack tapped to write that press release that be fun. But the reason you and I are talking about it is because this whole thing was a very fun, inescapable meme for a couple days last week on social media, with idiots like me weighing in on Which heroes do And don't do that. So, yes, they've heard. But are we going to get you know an official DC comic or official DC movie where the Justice League goes to a key party, and there's lots of hot hero on Hero action? No, But if it helps move the needle even a little bit so that these corporations and by extension these characters Get a little less uptight about sex. If that'll be healthy, right? And you think about it, they are already wearing the fetish gear. So take the next step. It's a small one. Great point. That was Glen Weldon from NPR's arts desk. Thank you, Glenn. Thank you. Mm hmm. When composer Julius Eastman died in a Buffalo, New York hospital.

Ari Shapiro Julius Eastman Glen Weldon Ailsa Chang Glenn Marvel Arroyo Seco Road Glen DC Rebecca Rocky Creek Road Harley Quinn Wood Tick Canyon DC Entertainment Last week Arroyo Seco Harlequin last week Justice League NPR
"zen center" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

07:23 min | 1 year ago

"zen center" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Attend the Olympic events. When the Games open next month. Julia wrote to us, she says she has a terror of the highway story. You were driving home from Park City to California. When another car clipped a deer. The deer spun out and landed on our car and exploded into a million pieces. The stench while waiting for the tow truck in the middle of the desert was horrendous. The Oregon whale story kept playing in my head over and over again, and then she sent pictures. Oh, no, no, no, don't you? Yes, that is blood on the windshield. Look at that. Salt, Dear bits, That is, Oh, gosh, That's just like the whale, uh, of the state's largest fire right now burning in Big Sur. It's called the Willow Fire. It started to believe that would be a Thursday Sunday evening. It was about 2400 Acres, zero containment. And it's way out in the Ventana wilderness northwest of Arroyo Seco rec area about three miles away from the If you're familiar with the Tassajara Zen center, sure, so that's where it is. It's up in that area. Well, it looks like the authorities in Orange County want the public's help to find out what this couple has been up to The couple that shot and killed Aiden Leo says he wrote to kindergarten in the back seat of his mom's car when he was hit by gunfire on the 55. Corbyn. Carson is joining us live now to talk more about this, and it looks like Corbyn Law Enforcement's trying to find any other incidents of road rage that these guys may have been involved with. Yeah, they put out a dedicated hotline for tips to get any more information on this. They basically want to know if Marcus eras, the alleged shooter, and when Lee, the alleged driver were involved in any other road rage incidents, the date range that they're looking at. Really focuses on between June 21st when the couple was arrested and December 2020 when prosecutors say the two met each other, But I spoke with Orange County D. A Todd Spitzer this morning and he told me really any incident or inside info. That can be uncovered about errors or leave from any time could help the process and prosecution of this case now. Spitzer flat out, refused to go into any details about the case. But he did point out the kind of the rationale here is that during the bail hearing on Friday, when Judge Larry Yellen said he was alarmed that there was another road rage incident that errors And Lee were involved in allegedly It took place days after Aiden Lagos was killed on that 55 Freeway. This was on May 21st. What we know on that incident from court records is that the couple was again driving on the 91 east to work and eras had, in their words brandished another weapon. At another driver that made him angry on the freeway. That driver and a blue Tesla told the couple he had called police, according to court records, and the couple have both admitted to this incident. And it could be that cops only found out about it through the defendants during interrogation because cops have not located the blue Tesla or that driver, So the hotline is a push to see if the blue Tesla Can be located as well as any other potential, infinite incidents that could help prosecute the case. And remember Gary Last time we talked about this, you pointed out how Teslas have some pretty fancy cameras on the car that could offer evidence. Of course, if they find the car, right, and that was the question that I had last week, But I think you just answered it as to where that information came from, If it wasn't if they were looking for the Tesla driver, the information didn't come from the test driver. It had to come from from this couple admitting that they've done something like this before. Right. And that was the kind of the impetus here is they don't Obviously they don't have a car or the driver. This is something that may have come up during interrogation. One talk and you know how they do you've seen enough cop shows where they got it, And they just go in the next room and ask the other one. Of course that supposition But what's interesting? As we can sort of read between the lines here on why there is an additional need for this hotline again. Spitzer wouldn't answer the question on on what this information could be used for, he said, presuming how other potential incidents would affect the case. Uh, they could affect the case bail or charges that would all be supposition. But again reading between those lines the timeline of this hotline and could be interesting because during court on Friday, the judge referred to this blue Tesla incident when ordering Air is beheld without bail, he said. Removing that to a million dollar bail that air is his lawyer lawyer had already said was unreasonable that now you know, basically, there's no bail for this guy. You know, the judge said Paris seems to be a complete danger to society. He said something to the effect of If a person was sorry, or remorseful for something they had just done pulling a gun and shooting a bullet into a car. Uh, he then he said any self reflection would cause that person to either stay away from guns, or at least not be so quick to wave a gun in traffic again. And then at that same hearing is the consideration for reducing lease $500,000 bail. She's again the alleged driver this week. The judge has ordered a complete background check into who she is. That's due Friday he wouldn't change the bill yet. But the judge indicated he is likely to keep some of that bill in place and maybe even reduce it from the $500,000 somewhat but keep in mind. Investigators say Lee has admitted to being the driver in both the shooting of of agent Leo's. An air is waving the gun at that blue Tesla. So that means she's doing the speeding up. She could potentially be doing this speeding up the cutting off and prosecutors brought it up. It was also her Volkswagen. Everybody was looking for and therefore she would have been at least consulted when it came to that in that period when they had hidden the car, And they also pointed out that Lee had been charged with having a loaded gun in the car. She would have known errors had just flipped out the week before and fired the shot. And even though the couple says they didn't know Leo's had been killed until a week after the shooting, she would have still known the gun was there and the shot was fired. So the idea is that this hotline could be intended to find that Blue Tesla and any other incidents. That could show a pattern that include Lee, and that could mean more charges for her and then a higher bail or some more restrictive conditions may come down the pipeline on Friday begin. That's all supposition. You're absolutely right. That's exactly what they want to show his pattern of behavior. We saw it with the murder trial. Phil Specter when he killed Lana Clarkson. Nobody was in that home to see him fire off the gun he was drunk and playing around with, but they put on a parade of woman after woman after woman on the stand that said, that's exactly what his M O was. You drink too much he'd whip The gun and he'd play around with it. And so that was enough. I mean, very powerful evidence to to convict him in that case as well. And you're absolutely right if they can show that this woman was along for more of these incidents That's a stronger aiding and abetting charge. I would assume Corvette absolute. Yeah, they They definitely put this just to put that hotline out there again. It's tips are it will be at 714. 834 7000. You can also email again. That's 714834 7000 tips can be emailed to tips at D A 70000.0 c gov dot com Again That's tips at D A 0.0.0 c gov dot com So they're looking again anything that can help with the prosecution of the case, and it'll be interesting to see if that then transcends into something stiffer. For Lee, as far as bail.

Phil Specter Aiden Leo Park City Julia California December 2020 Lana Clarkson Aiden Lagos June 21st Olympic Thursday Sunday evening Spitzer Friday May 21st Orange County Volkswagen Carson $500,000 Marcus 714. 834 7000
"zen center" Discussed on Everyday Zen Podcast

Everyday Zen Podcast

02:09 min | 1 year ago

"zen center" Discussed on Everyday Zen Podcast

"Is. And i know many of you know rob and she was down there. Tuskuhara evacuate the small crew of people. That were there. So i don't know how many times it's been. The tuskuhara was seriously threatened by fire. And here we are again so early in the season. Usually it's late summer fall so this morning i heard from wrenching months. Who sent me this report from the newspaper. Wins out of the west are pushing the fire toward todd. Sahara's zen center a monastery and retreat center in a remote mountain valley in the vendetta wilderness. Center provided an update on the fires status saturday today on its website and this is from the newspaper telling us what says on the center website. There was moderate fire activity last night and the fire has move closer. To tuskuhara accrue. Ten firefighters worked with the toss sahara fire crew yesterday and through the night helping with fire and cutting fire lines. Dharma rain was run until eleven pm. The area is damp and the water supply is good dharma. Rain is the system that they installed a few years ago to wet everything so that theoretically even if the fire is all around there everything is wet and so the fire won't won't spread there. We'll go somewhere where it's friendlier to the fire. So we have very good reason to hope that even though this you know very bad as it always is the tuskuhara will be spared but of course you never know so. There's always a reason to be concerned and.

yesterday last night eleven pm Sahara saturday today Ten firefighters this morning few years ago Tuskuhara late summer fall tuskuhara rob center sahara
"zen center" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

07:20 min | 1 year ago

"zen center" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Valleys and the Santa Cruz Mountains were triple digit temperatures were recorded today. Much cooler along the coast this afternoon. Tonight temperatures in the mid fifties across the region this weekend sunny and cooling down. National Forest Service is reporting an active fire burning in the Los Padres National Forest called the willow Fire. A mandatory evacuation is in place from Tassajara Road northwest of China Camp Campground, which includes the Tassajara Zen Center. This is 90.3 kz. You This is all things considered from NPR news. I'm Ari Shapiro and I'm Audie Cornish. The typical summer reading list is escapist. But given that there's been so much interest in books that embrace some of the most troubled parts of American history, we wanted to offer you some suggestions that don't shy away from those things. And our guide Key s a layman. His 2013 novel, Long division was a satire set and post Hurricane Katrina, Mississippi about teenagers time travel. And yes, race. It's been revised and reissued, and we asked him here to talk about that process and the books and authors he wants us to discover. Yes, A layman is here with us. Now. Welcome to the program. Thank you so much for having me audience so happy to be here with you. So we brought you here to talk about books that sort of have to do with social justice, which I feel like is fraud in this last year In what I call The Great Awakening trademark it up, but it means there are a lot of books that could sort of fit under this label. How do you think about it? I think that last year said the nation was obsessed with how to books and sort of like instructive books. You know, I think a lot of the nation lots of white people specifically or like I should have learned this in school. Can you teach me? I understand why instructive books were so popular, but as a writer, you know, I'm more interested in incisive and innovative books. And so I think some of most incisive, innovative books, um, have come out since June's last year, and I'm just excited to talk about some of them. You've brought us a really interesting mix, and I want to start with one, which is actually a memoir. It's by Marlon Peterson. And it's called Bird Uncaged. Hmm. What is it about this that struck you? And why does a memoir work for a sort of social justice conversation? Have burden cages. A special book to Me. I was an editor at Gawker. Maybe seven years ago, and I published this essay by Shin writer named Marlon Peterson about his time inside the prison and his relationships with the young people from his community who he met through letters. Seven years later, Marlin has turned this essay into a book that explores, among other things, like his experience coming here as a kid of a Trinidadian immigrants. And you know, he really throws the traditional karsa rally narrative on its head. And the thing that I really love about this book and all the other books I'm gonna talk to them about today are that the sentences are so beautiful, You know, Last year we kept talking a lot about like, what folks of color deserve what black folks deserve. And I think sometimes we don't necessarily like state. The black people deserve, among other things, like beautiful sentences and innovative art. Marlon Peterson uses beautiful sentences to explore something that on the surface is not so beautiful. But I think what he shows us is that the interior and if we use our interiors to like, really kind of etch around, what we x e and explore, have been told is inevitable. We can find something not just like socially just but something socially rebel tour. I want to talk about a novel that you've brought to this list as well. This is by Robert Jones Jr. It's called the profits and This is a book that does touch on slavery, right. It's sort of rooted in that history. How are you thinking about adding a book like this to this list? Because I know I'm one of those people that I get fatigued from drama. You know what I mean? I get exhausted from it. And sometimes that's not what I want to pick up for, like my summer reading, no doubt. And I think if we're gonna be honest, like not only do some of us get fatigued by trauma. I think some of us also get fatigued by watching people unsuccessfully, like deal with the trauma. But what Robert Jones is doing here is he is setting us in Mississippi, and we are in the loving relationship between Samuel and Isaiah to enslaved, Queer black men. The book does not slowly walk you into your relationship. Robert Jones places us in the throes of their love of their desire of their fear from chapter wine. But he also does this thing where he challenges us to understand our origin. Narratives in this world are black and queer. I'm not going to try to convince you I'm going to accept that. And I want you to accept that and then accepting that, like our origin, narratives are and our gods are and our understandings of catastrophe are necessarily not just black but also queer. He's saying that like our revolutions, our consequences are going to be different if we understand that. What it doesn't sound like is homework, which I appreciate. Because sometimes these lists feel like homework. You should read X because it is good for you. And it makes work around progressive issues. Sound like vegetables. Absolutely all of these books If you give yourself an opportunity will make you feel good. About the work we have to do, which which You can sign, actually ironic, but I think that's what these books do. We want to feel like we're being taken care of artistically. And I think these books do that One. Last selection you brought for us is actually a book of short stories. And it's called the Secret Life of Church. Ladies. I wasn't familiar with this author Dish. Ophelia. What can you tell us about her? Dish a failure. I read this book, Maybe over a year ago on my computer as a draft and I literally said out loud that whatever we call the new American short story, I think he should feel y'all should name it D Sha Rights through these black women's lives and their relationships to food and desire and church and secrets and secrets and secrets and all of this over a collection of what nine stories that are interconnected but are essentially short stories. Absolutely. It's a short story collection that again reads like an evocative novel, and one feels when they leave this book, as if they have been immersed and but the lives the secrets, the church and most importantly, the sort of intimacy the dish to fill you all right so beautifully. Your book Long Division. As we said, is being reissued with some revisions. I understand. Yes, indeed. Are these revisions that were happening in the last year or I'm wondering how both the pandemic and the racial reckoning and all these things have affected your creativity? What I think the pandemic and the awakening have done is they made me reconsider what narrative responsibility looks like from an author. So, Frances in Long Division, I had characters seen pejorative words that I don't say they were spelled out. Um and I don't know that the book did a good job of critiquing like the characters investments in like anti blackness or anti Semitism or misogyny like the characters were there, and I was trying to make the book critique that But in revision, I made sure that the characters are still lush, flawed kids who are you know all of those ISMs that we talk about, But the book is more.

Samuel Isaiah Marlon Peterson Ari Shapiro Robert Jones 2013 National Forest Service Tassajara Road Santa Cruz Mountains Last year Marlin Audie Cornish Hurricane Katrina Bird Uncaged seven years ago today Frances 90.3 kz nine stories Robert Jones Jr.
Toni Bernhard on Self-Compassion and the First Noble Truth

The Wisdom Podcast

04:38 min | 2 years ago

Toni Bernhard on Self-Compassion and the First Noble Truth

"Because it is so great to have you with us on the wisdom comcast. I'm really happy of asia. Thanks daniel think we might start off with you know so in about two thousand and one is when you you got sick. I believe in and seems. Then you've found inspiration in buddhist teachings and practices for learning how to be sick and we're gonna get into that in detail. But i wondering if you could tell us a little bit about how you initially came across these teachings and actresses okay. Well it was an about ten years before. I got sick so approaching thirty years. This may is nineteen year of my suffering from chronic ghana's so when i was in my early twenties i developed some interest in spiritual matters a lot of alan watts. I got my mantra from the maharishi. And then my husband. And i raised kids. All of that was put aside and when they Either late high school or had left home. When i had my wartime to myself. I started Looking back into spiritual practices and maybe only academic would do this. I bought like six copies of the dow teaching. Maybe five and i read the same verse in each one and then wrote my on verse based on my understanding of those translations and i have no idea were any of that is but it's relevant because one of the translations was by stephen mitchell and i found myself it was a great translation but i've found myself really interested in the footnotes because he can't there may have been some other people but he noted several times quoted this Somebody called master sung son. Who i subsequently learned was a korean zen master who when he first arrived in the states. I was fixing washing machines but then developed a Songa in providence rhode island and now is worldwide. His quantum school is in. And i just love the the quote senate came across one that that said no south. No problem i thought whoa. Whoa sounds no problem. I didn't know what it meant. But i also note was jam. He fascinated me so much. These footnotes that i went to the library at uc davis campus shields library and it went to the card catalogue and looked up sung sun and discovered that in the dr day basement of shields library were rows and rows of buddhist books and i found his dropping ashes on the buddha but i found a treasure trove and i started leading mostly tree traditions zen tibetan and tear baden. I couldn't get enough. Just taking him out piles and That's how i. I learned a lot about the buddhist teachings but i thought what am i supposed to do and so i wrote just stephen mitchell and i don't remember what i said but i remember what he wrote back to me. He said looking at an painting of an orange is not the same as eating orange. And then he recommended to possible dharma centers that i could go to from. I live in davis which is near sacramento so that central valley and they were both in marin county bay. Area was john. Toronto sonoma's zen center. I think and the other one was called spirit rock meditation center and he recommended jack cornfield and i don't remember why i chose that have no. I've just been thinking. How did i get there.

Stephen Mitchell Alan Watts Comcast Ghana Shields Library Daniel Asia Providence Rhode Island Uc Davis Senate Baden Marin County Bay Central Valley Spirit Rock Meditation Center Sacramento Davis
Interview With Dr. Ron Epstein

Untangle

05:27 min | 2 years ago

Interview With Dr. Ron Epstein

"Dr ron epstein. It is so great to have you on tangled. Thanks so much for being here real to be with you. I just want to read some of the quotes that are in the beginning of your book because they really struck me. John cabot zand says this book will be phenomenally useful to all of us who are desperately in need of true health. Care and caring. Dan siegel says the book is a beautiful synthesis of inner wisdom and hard earned impure cle findings and you start the book by saying that you believe the practice of medicine depends on deep understanding between clinicians and patients and that human understanding starts with the understanding of oneself. And i would just like to start with this question. where did you begin with understanding of oneself. It's probably in my james to some degree. Because i remember even as a young child being interested not only in the world outside but also the world inside pat. I was interested in what thought was and i was interested in breeding. I was has not as a child so badly. Learn how to briefing not cost kind of interested in how the body were town on a mind. Were tell ideas got into your mind. Things like that from a pretty young age. I guess it's the upside of being somewhat introverted at that dual view of the world just that interior human observers you. When did you first recognize that in yourself. will you ten years old. Did you have some influences. It sounds like you a seeker that you were asking a lot of questions. Her number certainly started before high school. I was really interested in reading. And i read things that were beyond the point where my world experience but allow me to truly understand and i was reading cavu when i was in junior high school. Obviously you can't really get what he's talking about. I mean i knew the words. But i kind of had the sense that he was really trying to understand the world and sewers. I am discovered hermann hesse fairly early on also that actually resonated with the because all of his novel is basically the same plot to people who start out life one becomes a contemporary live and spends there's lives on monastic search for wisdom and the other goes out in the world becomes longer and tries to understand universe through experiencing the world in a deeper way and i saw both of those in myself and quite a young age thought was drawn to that. I think it was sometime. In highschool that i learned about maslow's hierarchy of human vs botanist like survival and at the top was self actualization wanted the express train to sell That's where i wanna be. I can't say that there's wild ridden. It does the same thing from the. I discovered his poetry. We had to read some of his poetry like a junior high school or something that i really discovered it as a personal manifesto probably but i was like fourteen or fifteen history of connection to the world to everything that the world offer and an internet connection wasn't just observe that but i have merged myself in this i jumped into the water and the deep end and swim through it. So that was the place i started. And as how i ultimately got interested in meditation and autos actually at age nineteen thought i would become a monk. A serious attempt back. Yeah you spent a few months. At the zen saying cisco center person there. And why did i. I can't imagine what some of the older students were thinking about this young kid. Who is there that i just needed to do. That was the next step for me. It sounds like you could have gone down this path of being a spiritual monastic or a philosopher. How did you take what you were learning from. Meditation and from studying at the zen center and then decide to be a doctor. The subtitle of your book is medicine. Mindfulness and humanity. And i think that's so perfectly represents the essence of who you are as a human being but when did this and how did this all come together for you. As a child. I was interested in things medical and originally when we first got an encyclopedia paper encyclopedia. Nothing and i look up. I interested asthma. As as matic started reading about other illnesses aspects of human experience and that coupled with a fair degree of family. i wouldn't call it pressure. I guess some expectation or hope or aspiration that the family would somehow produce a doctor

Dr Ron Epstein John Cabot Zand Dan Siegel Hermann Hesse Maslow Cisco Zen Center Matic Asthma
In Celebration of Zen Mind Beginner's Mind

Everyday Zen Podcast

05:48 min | 2 years ago

In Celebration of Zen Mind Beginner's Mind

"I'm really happy to be here with you celebrating beginner's mind which is such a terrific book and so important for so many of us and i've read this book many many many times over many many years in the beginning i couldn't understand it at all. What is he talking about. And yet i was so intriguing that i was completely hooked. Right away suzuki row. She has a way of saying things that seem so true even though you can hardly know what he's talking about actually zen mind beginner's mind is not really suzuki. She's work if you actually look at his talks. The whole talk the raw transcription which you can actually find fairly easily online at san francisco zen center website or at david chadwick's wonderful crooked cucumber website. You'll see that's a superhero. She talks actually long rambling. Very hard to understand. It's like he's thinking out loud and a lot of the times. You really have no idea what he's talking about. Because he's in the process of trying to figure out how to speak english trying to figure out how to talk about dharma and english and trying to figure out how to talk about dharma to a bunch of young americans who have no idea at all about buddhism. so he's wandering a lot. he's experimenting with different ways of saying things very often. He laughs at his own jokes. And you have no idea what the joke is. His talks are kinda like that. And and and so that's why zinnemann beginner's mind is a really a co creation of suzuki row. She and mainly. I think trudy dixon who is credited with editing the talks. And i'm probably. I'm guessing although i'm not one hundred percent sure that richard baker who suzuki she's leading american disciple and my own ordination teacher. I'm guessing a big hand in a two. And no doubt there were many others whom i'm not aware of all these people love suzuki rosie a lot and i think we're really respectful of his words so i doubt that they changed anything to speak of. They probably cleaned up the english grammar a bit. But they did do a lot of cutting and shaping and framing and that's really what makes in my beginner's mind what it does. It is a labor of love and devotion. And i think you feel that in text and that's one of the reasons why it is such a marvelous text. My guess is that the young students listening to sapiro. She had him because he respected them and they loved them probably in a way that none of them had never been loved before he saw their beauty and he saw their confusion. And i think he loves them just as much for their confusion as for their beauty and i think that was a unique experience for the people who were in his presence as i said when i first read zen mind beginner's mind. I was intrigued. But i didn't understand and later readings. I was surprised at how seldom and lightly suzuki wrote. She mentions buddhist teachings improvising. but then still later. I marveled at exactly the opposite thing. How much everything that he says. Everything is a clear reflection of the classical and later classical early and the later on and doggone teachings yet he never sounds like. He's repeating teachings that he has studied and it never sounds like he's teaching you about buddhism. It sounds more like he's just talking about the way he sees and feels things and as he says. Many many times there are no teaching to stick to. there's just life and living life and then if you see life and live life truly and carefully. It's going to come out sounding a lot like the buddhist teachings instill later readings. I came to appreciate just being wishes. Lewke row she just hearing his voice. A voice of calmness and stability kindness but very very low key no fanfare. His dharma expression is very quiet and subtle. He really is not trying to impress or make a big deal out of anything in fact most of the time. He seems to be gently trying to disabuse his listeners. Of the big deal. They seem to have in their minds. About zen or spirituality. Or the powers of meditation. Just keep saying over and over again. Just just do it. Just do the practice just live. Just be sincere just constant

Suzuki David Chadwick Zinnemann Beginner Trudy Dixon Suzuki Rosie Sapiro Richard Baker Dharma Confusion San Francisco
A Poets Path To Awakening With Norman Fischer

The Wisdom Podcast

09:02 min | 3 years ago

A Poets Path To Awakening With Norman Fischer

"Zen priest. Norman is the author of many popular books including his most recent publication. The world could be otherwise imagination and the body Safa Path in his fascinating conversation. You'll he norman share stories from his own spiritual journey from aspiring young poet living in the woods of Northern California to meditation teacher and celebrated author. Norman talks about how early encounters with death predisposed him to religious and philosophical inquiry. And how reading? The existentialist would pave the way for a fascination with sin. You'll also hear Norman discuss the topic of doubt rather than providing faith certainty. Buddhism provides a pop a set of questions in which we discover what life is and who we are. Lastly Norman talks about what it means to be a teacher of the Dhamma as well as his own relationship to himself as a teacher of Buddhism. I so much enjoyed this conversation and I hope you do too. I did have the first question that came to me and it was when I was just sent yo bio and it said that you have a title Zo Kit Sue. I don't know if I'm pronouncing it correctly. That's new to me and I was just wondering what that means. And what does it represent? Well it's not a title it's just it's just my name. So so maybe you're aware that in Zan when you or dane either as a lay disciple or has a priest and a lot of people will I. Dane is a lay disciple and then later ordains a priest. That's fairly typical. Get your given a diamond name. And everybody has a person's personal name and the personal name usually has four characters. So there's and and and it's a two two character names so Zo Ketziot is to character Zo and Keto and those are the first two characters of my four character personal name and the characters translate as Elephant Cave. Zo Is an elephant. Like there's these Japanese water dispensers with like big long snouts on. I don't know if you've ever seen in those are called Zo shitty or something like that L. Elephant container so so as an elephant and catch you as a kind of a cave or grotto where people meditate so The they say that In Asia in ancient times when they were looking for caves to meditate in there would be caves where that elephants would be drawn to because the caves would have like some kind of. I don't know if this is true but somebody told me this. The cage have some kind of mineral in the walls of the cave that the elephants would like to lick on and eat for their digestion. So the elephants would go into these caves in search of this mineral and then they would over centuries. I rub their flanks against the Cave. Making the cave like really nice and smooth and pleasant and then later on meditators would go in these caves and they called him. Elephant caves for meditation so That's very unusual name. I've never there's a lot of names that are common in Japanese character names. You hear a lot of names. A lot of them are names that were given in the past that famous monks nuns. You know but this is a really unusual name. I don't know why I have this name. My teacher gave it to me and when I ask them like how come you gave you the name. He didn't seem to remember having done it. And that's because I think that he was a very busy person and he had a lot of students. I don't think he really particularly noticed me. So he just probably have random names assigned to people randomly so. I don't think there's any special reason why I have that many but it's so people yeah people often think it's title they think. Wow this is some very special title. I never heard this before but the thing is I don't like titles I I don't I don't ever like to use any titles Nobody calls me Rossier Censeo or anything like that. They just call me by my name and in fact hardly anybody calls me Zo Coetzer. They just call me by English name. I had that impression that you want to into title so then when I sold that bio and it intrigued me and I was like wow. Maybe he's I've never seen that title before. Maybe he's got the highest one I've ever seen before. And so he might be compelled to use it. No no no. It's not a title so Who was a teacher that gave you that name? Richard Baker Richard Baker. And and. How did you meet him? Well let's see. I was studying zen in the Berkeley Zen Center and but the Berkeley San Center did not have the opportunity for monastic practice. So the San Francisco Zen Center which is a much bigger organization. Had A monastery at that time just just opened a few years before call. Tuskuhara and I went there for visit and I really wanted to go and do monastic practice and so in order to do monastic practice. You had to be a student of the San Francisco Zen Center system so I started attending. Dharma talks by Richard Baker and And that's how I met him just by I. I didn't really I eventually. Of course got to know him personally and still know him personally now but in the beginning I attended his Dharma. Talks like a lot of other people and I was one of the many many Younger people who were drawn to the San Francisco Zen Center in the very early nineteen seventies. So he gave you the names. O Kit Sue and that was your deigned name is that is that right. Well I I got that name as a lay ordained disciple and then when I was dating later as a priest I retain the same name I'll k. And normally it's full syllables. Did you say yes? Yeah well Yeah the last. Usually you only go by to The last two syllables are a wrench. Oh so my second. My first name Elephant Cave and then Rancho can be translated in various ways it the character's mean something like to to to face something and to shine Saw My my route teacher from Berkeley Mel Weizman translates that second game as turning toward the light which is a really wonderful translation. So so my England in English. You could say my name is elephant cave turning toward the light. I love it. I don't know I'm fascinated by this. Fan is very elastic. The Japanese in fact I've given dominating so many many people over the years and it means a lot to people right because your teacher in my case. I don't think my teacher particularly no mayor new. You know why he was giving me that name as I said a minute ago but usually when I give names I know the people right so I give them some poetic name from the Dharma and they appreciate it right because it's like. Oh Yeah I have a new name now. This is sort of my new destiny my new sort of path in life and so it is a beautiful. It's a beautiful thing to have these Dharma names. People enjoy them and they take them seriously and the in charge them. Yes and you said when you're explaining it. You said that you grew teacher. Mel Wise Men gave you This had had a translation. What did you mean by route teachers interested in that as well? Well he's you know you can have as you know you can have a lot of A lot of teachers a lifetime. Most people will have more than one just one teacher. But there's one teacher who is closest in whom usually it's the teacher that you start with an imprint. Sue initially in Dharma and so Mel Who's still alive now. He's in his. He's ninety. He was my first teacher. And when I introduced me to the Dharma and later after my initial ordination when it was time for me to receive Dharma transmission and full ordination. He was my teacher for that process. Allow so he. He's been my my main really my main teacher and the person who's Dharma. I am following more than anybody else. And so that was at the Berkeley and center. Well well we. I studied with him at Berkeley senator about five years and then after that as I said I wanted to do. Monastic practice in the monastery for about five years and then after that. I remain with the San Francisco Zen Center for the next baby. Twenty some years and moved from the monastery to Green Gulch farm zen center where I lived for another fifteen or twenty years. You would be Abbott Co Abbot of San Francisco Zen Center eventually. Yeah Yeah

San Francisco Zen Center Elephant Cave Norman Berkeley And Center Berkeley Zen Center Kit Sue Zo Coetzer L. Elephant Zo Ketziot Richard Baker Richard Baker Berkeley San Center Richard Baker Berkeley Northern California Rossier Censeo ZAN ZO Mel Wise Green Gulch