21 Burst results for "Zen Center"

"zen center" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

07:23 min | Last month

"zen center" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Attend the Olympic events. When the Games open next month. Julia wrote to us, she says she has a terror of the highway story. You were driving home from Park City to California. When another car clipped a deer. The deer spun out and landed on our car and exploded into a million pieces. The stench while waiting for the tow truck in the middle of the desert was horrendous. The Oregon whale story kept playing in my head over and over again, and then she sent pictures. Oh, no, no, no, don't you? Yes, that is blood on the windshield. Look at that. Salt, Dear bits, That is, Oh, gosh, That's just like the whale, uh, of the state's largest fire right now burning in Big Sur. It's called the Willow Fire. It started to believe that would be a Thursday Sunday evening. It was about 2400 Acres, zero containment. And it's way out in the Ventana wilderness northwest of Arroyo Seco rec area about three miles away from the If you're familiar with the Tassajara Zen center, sure, so that's where it is. It's up in that area. Well, it looks like the authorities in Orange County want the public's help to find out what this couple has been up to The couple that shot and killed Aiden Leo says he wrote to kindergarten in the back seat of his mom's car when he was hit by gunfire on the 55. Corbyn. Carson is joining us live now to talk more about this, and it looks like Corbyn Law Enforcement's trying to find any other incidents of road rage that these guys may have been involved with. Yeah, they put out a dedicated hotline for tips to get any more information on this. They basically want to know if Marcus eras, the alleged shooter, and when Lee, the alleged driver were involved in any other road rage incidents, the date range that they're looking at. Really focuses on between June 21st when the couple was arrested and December 2020 when prosecutors say the two met each other, But I spoke with Orange County D. A Todd Spitzer this morning and he told me really any incident or inside info. That can be uncovered about errors or leave from any time could help the process and prosecution of this case now. Spitzer flat out, refused to go into any details about the case. But he did point out the kind of the rationale here is that during the bail hearing on Friday, when Judge Larry Yellen said he was alarmed that there was another road rage incident that errors And Lee were involved in allegedly It took place days after Aiden Lagos was killed on that 55 Freeway. This was on May 21st. What we know on that incident from court records is that the couple was again driving on the 91 east to work and eras had, in their words brandished another weapon. At another driver that made him angry on the freeway. That driver and a blue Tesla told the couple he had called police, according to court records, and the couple have both admitted to this incident. And it could be that cops only found out about it through the defendants during interrogation because cops have not located the blue Tesla or that driver, So the hotline is a push to see if the blue Tesla Can be located as well as any other potential, infinite incidents that could help prosecute the case. And remember Gary Last time we talked about this, you pointed out how Teslas have some pretty fancy cameras on the car that could offer evidence. Of course, if they find the car, right, and that was the question that I had last week, But I think you just answered it as to where that information came from, If it wasn't if they were looking for the Tesla driver, the information didn't come from the test driver. It had to come from from this couple admitting that they've done something like this before. Right. And that was the kind of the impetus here is they don't Obviously they don't have a car or the driver. This is something that may have come up during interrogation. One talk and you know how they do you've seen enough cop shows where they got it, And they just go in the next room and ask the other one. Of course that supposition But what's interesting? As we can sort of read between the lines here on why there is an additional need for this hotline again. Spitzer wouldn't answer the question on on what this information could be used for, he said, presuming how other potential incidents would affect the case. Uh, they could affect the case bail or charges that would all be supposition. But again reading between those lines the timeline of this hotline and could be interesting because during court on Friday, the judge referred to this blue Tesla incident when ordering Air is beheld without bail, he said. Removing that to a million dollar bail that air is his lawyer lawyer had already said was unreasonable that now you know, basically, there's no bail for this guy. You know, the judge said Paris seems to be a complete danger to society. He said something to the effect of If a person was sorry, or remorseful for something they had just done pulling a gun and shooting a bullet into a car. Uh, he then he said any self reflection would cause that person to either stay away from guns, or at least not be so quick to wave a gun in traffic again. And then at that same hearing is the consideration for reducing lease $500,000 bail. She's again the alleged driver this week. The judge has ordered a complete background check into who she is. That's due Friday he wouldn't change the bill yet. But the judge indicated he is likely to keep some of that bill in place and maybe even reduce it from the $500,000 somewhat but keep in mind. Investigators say Lee has admitted to being the driver in both the shooting of of agent Leo's. An air is waving the gun at that blue Tesla. So that means she's doing the speeding up. She could potentially be doing this speeding up the cutting off and prosecutors brought it up. It was also her Volkswagen. Everybody was looking for and therefore she would have been at least consulted when it came to that in that period when they had hidden the car, And they also pointed out that Lee had been charged with having a loaded gun in the car. She would have known errors had just flipped out the week before and fired the shot. And even though the couple says they didn't know Leo's had been killed until a week after the shooting, she would have still known the gun was there and the shot was fired. So the idea is that this hotline could be intended to find that Blue Tesla and any other incidents. That could show a pattern that include Lee, and that could mean more charges for her and then a higher bail or some more restrictive conditions may come down the pipeline on Friday begin. That's all supposition. You're absolutely right. That's exactly what they want to show his pattern of behavior. We saw it with the murder trial. Phil Specter when he killed Lana Clarkson. Nobody was in that home to see him fire off the gun he was drunk and playing around with, but they put on a parade of woman after woman after woman on the stand that said, that's exactly what his M O was. You drink too much he'd whip The gun and he'd play around with it. And so that was enough. I mean, very powerful evidence to to convict him in that case as well. And you're absolutely right if they can show that this woman was along for more of these incidents That's a stronger aiding and abetting charge. I would assume Corvette absolute. Yeah, they They definitely put this just to put that hotline out there again. It's tips are it will be at 714. 834 7000. You can also email again. That's 714834 7000 tips can be emailed to tips at D A 70000.0 c gov dot com Again That's tips at D A 0.0.0 c gov dot com So they're looking again anything that can help with the prosecution of the case, and it'll be interesting to see if that then transcends into something stiffer. For Lee, as far as bail.

Phil Specter Aiden Leo Park City Julia California December 2020 Lana Clarkson Aiden Lagos June 21st Olympic Thursday Sunday evening Spitzer Friday May 21st Orange County Volkswagen Carson $500,000 Marcus 714. 834 7000
Toni Bernhard on Self-Compassion and the First Noble Truth

The Wisdom Podcast

04:38 min | 8 months ago

Toni Bernhard on Self-Compassion and the First Noble Truth

"Because it is so great to have you with us on the wisdom comcast. I'm really happy of asia. Thanks daniel think we might start off with you know so in about two thousand and one is when you you got sick. I believe in and seems. Then you've found inspiration in buddhist teachings and practices for learning how to be sick and we're gonna get into that in detail. But i wondering if you could tell us a little bit about how you initially came across these teachings and actresses okay. Well it was an about ten years before. I got sick so approaching thirty years. This may is nineteen year of my suffering from chronic ghana's so when i was in my early twenties i developed some interest in spiritual matters a lot of alan watts. I got my mantra from the maharishi. And then my husband. And i raised kids. All of that was put aside and when they Either late high school or had left home. When i had my wartime to myself. I started Looking back into spiritual practices and maybe only academic would do this. I bought like six copies of the dow teaching. Maybe five and i read the same verse in each one and then wrote my on verse based on my understanding of those translations and i have no idea were any of that is but it's relevant because one of the translations was by stephen mitchell and i found myself it was a great translation but i've found myself really interested in the footnotes because he can't there may have been some other people but he noted several times quoted this Somebody called master sung son. Who i subsequently learned was a korean zen master who when he first arrived in the states. I was fixing washing machines but then developed a Songa in providence rhode island and now is worldwide. His quantum school is in. And i just love the the quote senate came across one that that said no south. No problem i thought whoa. Whoa sounds no problem. I didn't know what it meant. But i also note was jam. He fascinated me so much. These footnotes that i went to the library at uc davis campus shields library and it went to the card catalogue and looked up sung sun and discovered that in the dr day basement of shields library were rows and rows of buddhist books and i found his dropping ashes on the buddha but i found a treasure trove and i started leading mostly tree traditions zen tibetan and tear baden. I couldn't get enough. Just taking him out piles and That's how i. I learned a lot about the buddhist teachings but i thought what am i supposed to do and so i wrote just stephen mitchell and i don't remember what i said but i remember what he wrote back to me. He said looking at an painting of an orange is not the same as eating orange. And then he recommended to possible dharma centers that i could go to from. I live in davis which is near sacramento so that central valley and they were both in marin county bay. Area was john. Toronto sonoma's zen center. I think and the other one was called spirit rock meditation center and he recommended jack cornfield and i don't remember why i chose that have no. I've just been thinking. How did i get there.

Stephen Mitchell Alan Watts Comcast Ghana Shields Library Daniel Asia Providence Rhode Island Uc Davis Senate Baden Marin County Bay Central Valley Spirit Rock Meditation Center Sacramento Davis
Interview With Dr. Ron Epstein

Untangle

05:27 min | 8 months ago

Interview With Dr. Ron Epstein

"Dr ron epstein. It is so great to have you on tangled. Thanks so much for being here real to be with you. I just want to read some of the quotes that are in the beginning of your book because they really struck me. John cabot zand says this book will be phenomenally useful to all of us who are desperately in need of true health. Care and caring. Dan siegel says the book is a beautiful synthesis of inner wisdom and hard earned impure cle findings and you start the book by saying that you believe the practice of medicine depends on deep understanding between clinicians and patients and that human understanding starts with the understanding of oneself. And i would just like to start with this question. where did you begin with understanding of oneself. It's probably in my james to some degree. Because i remember even as a young child being interested not only in the world outside but also the world inside pat. I was interested in what thought was and i was interested in breeding. I was has not as a child so badly. Learn how to briefing not cost kind of interested in how the body were town on a mind. Were tell ideas got into your mind. Things like that from a pretty young age. I guess it's the upside of being somewhat introverted at that dual view of the world just that interior human observers you. When did you first recognize that in yourself. will you ten years old. Did you have some influences. It sounds like you a seeker that you were asking a lot of questions. Her number certainly started before high school. I was really interested in reading. And i read things that were beyond the point where my world experience but allow me to truly understand and i was reading cavu when i was in junior high school. Obviously you can't really get what he's talking about. I mean i knew the words. But i kind of had the sense that he was really trying to understand the world and sewers. I am discovered hermann hesse fairly early on also that actually resonated with the because all of his novel is basically the same plot to people who start out life one becomes a contemporary live and spends there's lives on monastic search for wisdom and the other goes out in the world becomes longer and tries to understand universe through experiencing the world in a deeper way and i saw both of those in myself and quite a young age thought was drawn to that. I think it was sometime. In highschool that i learned about maslow's hierarchy of human vs botanist like survival and at the top was self actualization wanted the express train to sell That's where i wanna be. I can't say that there's wild ridden. It does the same thing from the. I discovered his poetry. We had to read some of his poetry like a junior high school or something that i really discovered it as a personal manifesto probably but i was like fourteen or fifteen history of connection to the world to everything that the world offer and an internet connection wasn't just observe that but i have merged myself in this i jumped into the water and the deep end and swim through it. So that was the place i started. And as how i ultimately got interested in meditation and autos actually at age nineteen thought i would become a monk. A serious attempt back. Yeah you spent a few months. At the zen saying cisco center person there. And why did i. I can't imagine what some of the older students were thinking about this young kid. Who is there that i just needed to do. That was the next step for me. It sounds like you could have gone down this path of being a spiritual monastic or a philosopher. How did you take what you were learning from. Meditation and from studying at the zen center and then decide to be a doctor. The subtitle of your book is medicine. Mindfulness and humanity. And i think that's so perfectly represents the essence of who you are as a human being but when did this and how did this all come together for you. As a child. I was interested in things medical and originally when we first got an encyclopedia paper encyclopedia. Nothing and i look up. I interested asthma. As as matic started reading about other illnesses aspects of human experience and that coupled with a fair degree of family. i wouldn't call it pressure. I guess some expectation or hope or aspiration that the family would somehow produce a doctor

Dr Ron Epstein John Cabot Zand Dan Siegel Hermann Hesse Maslow Cisco Zen Center Matic Asthma
In Celebration of Zen Mind Beginner's Mind

Everyday Zen Podcast

05:48 min | 9 months ago

In Celebration of Zen Mind Beginner's Mind

"I'm really happy to be here with you celebrating beginner's mind which is such a terrific book and so important for so many of us and i've read this book many many many times over many many years in the beginning i couldn't understand it at all. What is he talking about. And yet i was so intriguing that i was completely hooked. Right away suzuki row. She has a way of saying things that seem so true even though you can hardly know what he's talking about actually zen mind beginner's mind is not really suzuki. She's work if you actually look at his talks. The whole talk the raw transcription which you can actually find fairly easily online at san francisco zen center website or at david chadwick's wonderful crooked cucumber website. You'll see that's a superhero. She talks actually long rambling. Very hard to understand. It's like he's thinking out loud and a lot of the times. You really have no idea what he's talking about. Because he's in the process of trying to figure out how to speak english trying to figure out how to talk about dharma and english and trying to figure out how to talk about dharma to a bunch of young americans who have no idea at all about buddhism. so he's wandering a lot. he's experimenting with different ways of saying things very often. He laughs at his own jokes. And you have no idea what the joke is. His talks are kinda like that. And and and so that's why zinnemann beginner's mind is a really a co creation of suzuki row. She and mainly. I think trudy dixon who is credited with editing the talks. And i'm probably. I'm guessing although i'm not one hundred percent sure that richard baker who suzuki she's leading american disciple and my own ordination teacher. I'm guessing a big hand in a two. And no doubt there were many others whom i'm not aware of all these people love suzuki rosie a lot and i think we're really respectful of his words so i doubt that they changed anything to speak of. They probably cleaned up the english grammar a bit. But they did do a lot of cutting and shaping and framing and that's really what makes in my beginner's mind what it does. It is a labor of love and devotion. And i think you feel that in text and that's one of the reasons why it is such a marvelous text. My guess is that the young students listening to sapiro. She had him because he respected them and they loved them probably in a way that none of them had never been loved before he saw their beauty and he saw their confusion. And i think he loves them just as much for their confusion as for their beauty and i think that was a unique experience for the people who were in his presence as i said when i first read zen mind beginner's mind. I was intrigued. But i didn't understand and later readings. I was surprised at how seldom and lightly suzuki wrote. She mentions buddhist teachings improvising. but then still later. I marveled at exactly the opposite thing. How much everything that he says. Everything is a clear reflection of the classical and later classical early and the later on and doggone teachings yet he never sounds like. He's repeating teachings that he has studied and it never sounds like he's teaching you about buddhism. It sounds more like he's just talking about the way he sees and feels things and as he says. Many many times there are no teaching to stick to. there's just life and living life and then if you see life and live life truly and carefully. It's going to come out sounding a lot like the buddhist teachings instill later readings. I came to appreciate just being wishes. Lewke row she just hearing his voice. A voice of calmness and stability kindness but very very low key no fanfare. His dharma expression is very quiet and subtle. He really is not trying to impress or make a big deal out of anything in fact most of the time. He seems to be gently trying to disabuse his listeners. Of the big deal. They seem to have in their minds. About zen or spirituality. Or the powers of meditation. Just keep saying over and over again. Just just do it. Just do the practice just live. Just be sincere just constant

Suzuki David Chadwick Zinnemann Beginner Trudy Dixon Suzuki Rosie Sapiro Richard Baker Dharma Confusion San Francisco
"zen center" Discussed on Everyday Zen Podcast

Everyday Zen Podcast

02:21 min | 10 months ago

"zen center" Discussed on Everyday Zen Podcast

"I'm sorry that I so long and didn't allow much time for dialogue. Was a wonderful talk here a loved. The SPICING OUR HEART SUTRA? Baghdad's period with I could actually have a question If anybody else has a quick question, they can also raise their hand. Russia Joan often says I think you're quoting you that lighten is being selfish. was wondering if that was. From and say something about that you've been talking about that for an hour but. You say a little. I don't know if I said that probably. But certainly in the literal way, right enlightenment is being literally unselfish. We think of selfishness as a moral failing. But. It's also a failing vision, right? It's a separate I'm I'm separate and I can be. Grab, what I want or defend myself that selfishness right. But if I see that all diamonds are empty and all beings are Buddha's and it's only US Buddha's mixing in and out of one another than what's there to be selfish about. Myself is the world and the world is myself so. You could say that's selfishness with a capital S.. or You could save. The ultimate in unselfishness, one way or the other. Yeah. It's literally true. Last questions and comments wedding one the. Loss of area ninety watching on. Exhibiting. More Levi. House. Or prejudice. Much go ahead with before bounds. Ahead. Visions are exhaustible..

Buddha Baghdad Russia Levi Joan
"zen center" Discussed on Everyday Zen Podcast

Everyday Zen Podcast

08:34 min | 10 months ago

"zen center" Discussed on Everyday Zen Podcast

"To Achieve Nirvana. He didn't. Think. That's what Zen was. Dog and understood Zas an absolutely in accord. With the teachings of the Lotus Sutra. That all beings are originally. Buddha. They don't need to make themselves into Buddhist by whipping themselves in the shape with Zan. They're already Buddhist. And all they need to do. Is appreciate that. So. That's why. We do. Not to get enlightenment. But because we know. Enlightenment is already our birthright as human beings. And Zan. Is the activity. I've been lightened. Buddhism. So that's why we do it. We're imitating. Buddha and imitating our own true nature to sit ins. Oddsson. We're not sitting in. To get to be other than. What we truly are. Now people have a hard time believing this. You know when they first come to zen practice usually they're predisposed. To think they're lacking something and needed they need to get something that somehow to practice will give them. which is. Normal I think and probably necessary. But after you do the practice for ten or twenty years. You Begin to get the hang of it. And then you begin to appreciate. How Great Zen is And you really want to continue to do it. Without striving too much. You know to get something you think you don't have. You strive just enough. To remember. Your Buddhist self. So you know you sit up straight. Put on your robe. Sitting up with full dignity regulating you're breathing. In full identity with all beings who are equally. With you? In that very moment of your breathing. Are Equally But So. Billions in. He's very much a Lotta Sutra version. Of Sin. So the Lotus Sutra opens with an amazing miracle. The scene is set the buddha is presiding over a huge assembly. That includes historical disciples and their named men as well as well as women disciples. But in addition to those historical disciples, there's all kinds of celestial body sought fas and Gods and demons, and all kinds of. Beings from other realms. And with this great assembly surrounding him, he preaches a Sutra called innumerable meanings. Sutra in that Sutra he says. Although you might have thought teaching of the Buddha was this or that actually there's no end to the teaching of the Buddha. The teachings and meanings are absolutely innumerable an infinite. Meaning goes beyond meeting. There's no way to contain the meeting. All meanings are the meaning. Of the Sutra. After he preaches this Sutra, he sits down and Samadi. And spontaneously a beam of light shoots out from the tuft of hair between his eyebrows zoo in an easterly direction and it eliminates eighteen thousand. Worlds. To the east and in each one of those world, you see a Buddha and a retinue in preaching and hall world you can see they could all see that. And they did not know. What this was all about. They had never seen anything like this and so. They ask Muensri the Buddy Safa of wisdom and buddy south of Wisdom Montana three says, yes don't worry. I know just what this is about because I've seen it many times before and then he launches into stories about how he's seen it before and he says anyway when you see this Tuft of light shooting beam like that this means that the Buddha is just about to preach the ultimate Sutra. So, sit tight. It's going to happen any minute. So they're all. Well, they can't wait. This is amazing. So loaded Sutra is is really mostly famous for its many parables. A lot of famous parables in a Lotta suit little little tails you know about Buddhism in the form of. Parables not so different actually from one room I read in the Bible. However. If you think about it and you analyze the teaching of the Lotus Sutra carefully. It appears. that. In the Lotus Sutra. The Buddha never preaches the Lotus Sutra. Didn't never happens this moment. He talks about the Lotus Sutra mostly about how great it is. And All the parables are about why the Lotus Sutra Great and why it's important and how it fits in with other countries. But you you know you're reading hundreds and hundreds of pages, and finally it dawns anew we'll wait he never. Preach the Lotus Sutra. It never happened. So. This is I think a great thing you know. Of course, you never preaches the lowest Sutra. How could you preach the load of Sutras beyond that? The Greatest Sutra never taught. The greatest truth. Never told. Maybe, when you hear that it's somehow reminds you of doggone. If you've study. Doug. HOW WEIRD EXPERIENCE That can be. Frustrating. In a way because. Dolgen is very hard to pin down. He doesn't seem to WANNA say. This Or that. You feel like you're spinning around at first it might feel like, wow, this is really Slippery Or maybe the translation is bad or something. Maybe maybe it's a trick maybe doug and trick us like they used to say Zan. The Cohen's are just trying to trick you somehow. But I don't think it's a trick at all. The Buddha. Way. is about. Radical. Freedom. In this world. and. Radical love. In this world. which is so resistant. To Freedom. and. Love. To, hold onto a fixed truth. is to limit. This love and this world and to be bound by that truce. There is truce. But. You can't define it or grasp it. But you can live. And you can love the truth. Even if you can't know it. and. You know what? Else? It's really hard to be arrogant. When you don't know any more than anyone else. And everyone without exception. Is Expressing the truth..

Lotus Sutra Buddha Doug Zas Samadi Montana Muensri Dolgen Cohen
"zen center" Discussed on Everyday Zen Podcast

Everyday Zen Podcast

10:13 min | 10 months ago

"zen center" Discussed on Everyday Zen Podcast

"Better known everybody. Really happy to. Be Able to talk to you in the middle of your practice period. Thanks a lot for me. And I'm quite aware of your practice period because as you know. Cathy. My wife Kathy is one of the CO leaders, and so she's Co leading right in the middle of our household. So I'm hearing all about you and what's going on. In fact. Our little house is a beehive of practice period activity because. Every. Day is also in the middle of practice period. In fact it wasn't planned that way, but we both started on the same day. I think. So it's practice period from top to bottom at our house. And I know that you guys are studying the Heart Sutra And that's really good because the heart Sutra is foundational to. Our practice and foundational all of my on a Buddhism. There's a reason why we chanted every day. It's really. are fundamental basis. So as you know Mahane, Buddhism. Includes his ends and as a my on a school and. Tibetan Buddhism, they call advisory on it and has on in it, but also Mayan it's basically I on Buddhism. and. So Zen, and Tibetan Buddhism. Practice that's the basis of it. Practice. For the benefit of others with love for others with compassion. Concern for all sentient beings. That's sort of foundational. To our practice. And you can't have boogie sought practice without the emptiness teachings. Because the emptiness teachings open up the space. And clear the ground. For Body sought for love. This might not be apparent. You know when you hear the heart Sutra and you hear. Form is emptiness. Emptiness is form though is no ears? No nose no tongue no body. No. Tastes no touch. No attainment. No four noble trues. When you hear all that it doesn't sound that much like love and compassion. But really it is the basis for buddy sought for love and compassion. As Cathy explained. In her talk. That things are empty. Doesn't mean. That things don't exist. Doesn't mean that things are somehow. Fading out or Pale. Somber emotionless. What it means is as your local translation courtesy of cause and Roshii Joan Habit. Things are boundless there there are no boundaries to them. There are no independently real things to push and bunch up against each other. So there's no real source of. Of Conflict, and problem. Since, all, Dharma's are empty. You. Are Empty of you and I am empty of me. The only thing there is unimpeded flow. Loving kindness. That's really what Emptiness amounts to. So, boaty office. Don't have to pull and hall. To help others. Because they know they are others. And others are them so buddy sought for helping. Is Natural Joyful. An easy going just like love itself just flows. You know it's not it's not a pressure it's not a problem. Path is imaginative and expansive because the realization of emptiness. And the true. Marcus. Mark. Of Existence. Makes it that way. So I guess you guys all know. That the earliest iteration the teachings of the Buddha as we find them in the Pali Canon. Are More or less straightforward instructions. For how to practice. Though Ceuta's, and there are lots of them are on the whole pretty short. And although they do contain every now and then a few miracles or some gods and demons floating around. By and large. They're mostly rational and psychological. And that's why they're so important and so useful, and that's why they're sort of the basis of the. Mindfulness Movement. which is anything but you know supernatural. On the other hand the Maya texts. Are. Long and extravagant. Actually, they called them. Viper Puria. Sutras lie. Pouliot meaning. Extended so way way longer than any of the. Texts in Nepali cannon. Now, the heart Sutra is, of course, the exception. That proves the rule. The heart sutras one page because there are hundreds and hundreds and thousands and thousands of pages of emptiness sutras and the heart surgeries a one page basically notes. On that vast. Literature. A Lot. Of Western Dharma students. ESPECIALLY THOSE WHO Value the teachings for their practical application don't really much like the my on a sutras. Because of this because there are so outrageous. So cosmic and so full of supernatural elements. And they're totally impractical. You know there's very little. Instructions that you could seemingly us. So a lot of people read a few pages and they say what? I. This is this Buddhism. So you could I mean this is a very broad brush thing here, but you could say there's two kinds of my on sutras. They're the ones that. Insist on. Practically even harp on. The emptiness teachings, a lot of those. But then there's All the others that don't harp on the emptiness teachings that put forth all kinds of other sorts of teachings without much. Mentioning emptiness if at all. But it's pretty clear when you consider. The totality of the mindful of the. Sutras that they all depend on and they all accept. The emptiness teaching some of them as I'm saying emphasize it some of them don't emphasize they just assume it and then they go on from there. I'm telling you all this because I want to. Say something today about the Lotus Sutra, which is what our everyday practice period is studying. This is one of the ones that's not about emptiness. But it is like the some of the earliest emptiness sutras a very early taxed. And just as a little background, it is the most important Sutra. Probably, it's not an exaggeration to say it's the most important Sutra for all of Far East, Asian Buddhism in other words all the Buddhism's. That have been primarily influenced by China and Chinese culture. And the Sutra was less important in India and therefore not that important Tibet, which is you know gets its Buddhism largely from India. There are even some scholars who think that maybe. The Lotus Sutra originated in China because the earliest Chinese. Version is actually earlier than the. Oldest existing. Sanskrit version. That's possible that it was back translated into Sanskrit from. Chinese. But I I sort of could believe it because to me it has more of a Chinese flavor than the other my on a text it's more down to Earth. It's parables and there are many of them are famous parables are pretty simple. and. It just sounds more like China to me, but it's still it's very, very cosmic and very. Supernatural. I know that in her talk Kathy, told you the truly amazing story of. COOMER Jeeva. The Fourth Century Central Asian monk. Who ended up running a huge translation bureau in China? which produced many many hundreds of Chinese translations. Of Indian my on texts. That were flooding China at that time. And you can imagine this caused a revolution in understanding. But it became a little confusing..

China Cathy Kathy India Pali Canon COOMER Jeeva Dharma Marcus Mark Ceuta Tibet
"zen center" Discussed on Everyday Zen Podcast

Everyday Zen Podcast

02:00 min | 1 year ago

"zen center" Discussed on Everyday Zen Podcast

"Thought would begin my talk this afternoon. Or this evening? With some Shabbat, teachings from the Great Rabbi. Suzuki. You who founded the San Francisco Zen Center. These are some words from his Book called not always so. which was Compiled from his many years posthumously from his Dharma talks. From a section call be kind with yourself. Our aim is to have complete experience or full feeling in each moment of practice. What we teach is that enlightenment and practice. Are. The same. But my practice when I was young. was what I call step ladder practice. In other words I understand it's much much now. And next year, I'll understand a little bit more and a little bit more a little bit more. But that kind of practice doesn't make much sense and it never satisfied me. If you try step ladder practice. Maybe you too will realize that it's a mistake. If. We do not have some warm big satisfaction in our practice. Then, it's not true practice. Even though you sit. Trying to have the right posture and counting your breath. It may still be lifeless sitting. Because you're just following instructions. Kind enough with yourself. You think that if you follow the instructions given by some teacher, then you will have good sitting practice but the purpose of the instruction. is to encourage you to be kind with yourself..

San Francisco Zen Center Suzuki
A Poets Path To Awakening With Norman Fischer

The Wisdom Podcast

09:02 min | 1 year ago

A Poets Path To Awakening With Norman Fischer

"Zen priest. Norman is the author of many popular books including his most recent publication. The world could be otherwise imagination and the body Safa Path in his fascinating conversation. You'll he norman share stories from his own spiritual journey from aspiring young poet living in the woods of Northern California to meditation teacher and celebrated author. Norman talks about how early encounters with death predisposed him to religious and philosophical inquiry. And how reading? The existentialist would pave the way for a fascination with sin. You'll also hear Norman discuss the topic of doubt rather than providing faith certainty. Buddhism provides a pop a set of questions in which we discover what life is and who we are. Lastly Norman talks about what it means to be a teacher of the Dhamma as well as his own relationship to himself as a teacher of Buddhism. I so much enjoyed this conversation and I hope you do too. I did have the first question that came to me and it was when I was just sent yo bio and it said that you have a title Zo Kit Sue. I don't know if I'm pronouncing it correctly. That's new to me and I was just wondering what that means. And what does it represent? Well it's not a title it's just it's just my name. So so maybe you're aware that in Zan when you or dane either as a lay disciple or has a priest and a lot of people will I. Dane is a lay disciple and then later ordains a priest. That's fairly typical. Get your given a diamond name. And everybody has a person's personal name and the personal name usually has four characters. So there's and and and it's a two two character names so Zo Ketziot is to character Zo and Keto and those are the first two characters of my four character personal name and the characters translate as Elephant Cave. Zo Is an elephant. Like there's these Japanese water dispensers with like big long snouts on. I don't know if you've ever seen in those are called Zo shitty or something like that L. Elephant container so so as an elephant and catch you as a kind of a cave or grotto where people meditate so The they say that In Asia in ancient times when they were looking for caves to meditate in there would be caves where that elephants would be drawn to because the caves would have like some kind of. I don't know if this is true but somebody told me this. The cage have some kind of mineral in the walls of the cave that the elephants would like to lick on and eat for their digestion. So the elephants would go into these caves in search of this mineral and then they would over centuries. I rub their flanks against the Cave. Making the cave like really nice and smooth and pleasant and then later on meditators would go in these caves and they called him. Elephant caves for meditation so That's very unusual name. I've never there's a lot of names that are common in Japanese character names. You hear a lot of names. A lot of them are names that were given in the past that famous monks nuns. You know but this is a really unusual name. I don't know why I have this name. My teacher gave it to me and when I ask them like how come you gave you the name. He didn't seem to remember having done it. And that's because I think that he was a very busy person and he had a lot of students. I don't think he really particularly noticed me. So he just probably have random names assigned to people randomly so. I don't think there's any special reason why I have that many but it's so people yeah people often think it's title they think. Wow this is some very special title. I never heard this before but the thing is I don't like titles I I don't I don't ever like to use any titles Nobody calls me Rossier Censeo or anything like that. They just call me by my name and in fact hardly anybody calls me Zo Coetzer. They just call me by English name. I had that impression that you want to into title so then when I sold that bio and it intrigued me and I was like wow. Maybe he's I've never seen that title before. Maybe he's got the highest one I've ever seen before. And so he might be compelled to use it. No no no. It's not a title so Who was a teacher that gave you that name? Richard Baker Richard Baker. And and. How did you meet him? Well let's see. I was studying zen in the Berkeley Zen Center and but the Berkeley San Center did not have the opportunity for monastic practice. So the San Francisco Zen Center which is a much bigger organization. Had A monastery at that time just just opened a few years before call. Tuskuhara and I went there for visit and I really wanted to go and do monastic practice and so in order to do monastic practice. You had to be a student of the San Francisco Zen Center system so I started attending. Dharma talks by Richard Baker and And that's how I met him just by I. I didn't really I eventually. Of course got to know him personally and still know him personally now but in the beginning I attended his Dharma. Talks like a lot of other people and I was one of the many many Younger people who were drawn to the San Francisco Zen Center in the very early nineteen seventies. So he gave you the names. O Kit Sue and that was your deigned name is that is that right. Well I I got that name as a lay ordained disciple and then when I was dating later as a priest I retain the same name I'll k. And normally it's full syllables. Did you say yes? Yeah well Yeah the last. Usually you only go by to The last two syllables are a wrench. Oh so my second. My first name Elephant Cave and then Rancho can be translated in various ways it the character's mean something like to to to face something and to shine Saw My my route teacher from Berkeley Mel Weizman translates that second game as turning toward the light which is a really wonderful translation. So so my England in English. You could say my name is elephant cave turning toward the light. I love it. I don't know I'm fascinated by this. Fan is very elastic. The Japanese in fact I've given dominating so many many people over the years and it means a lot to people right because your teacher in my case. I don't think my teacher particularly no mayor new. You know why he was giving me that name as I said a minute ago but usually when I give names I know the people right so I give them some poetic name from the Dharma and they appreciate it right because it's like. Oh Yeah I have a new name now. This is sort of my new destiny my new sort of path in life and so it is a beautiful. It's a beautiful thing to have these Dharma names. People enjoy them and they take them seriously and the in charge them. Yes and you said when you're explaining it. You said that you grew teacher. Mel Wise Men gave you This had had a translation. What did you mean by route teachers interested in that as well? Well he's you know you can have as you know you can have a lot of A lot of teachers a lifetime. Most people will have more than one just one teacher. But there's one teacher who is closest in whom usually it's the teacher that you start with an imprint. Sue initially in Dharma and so Mel Who's still alive now. He's in his. He's ninety. He was my first teacher. And when I introduced me to the Dharma and later after my initial ordination when it was time for me to receive Dharma transmission and full ordination. He was my teacher for that process. Allow so he. He's been my my main really my main teacher and the person who's Dharma. I am following more than anybody else. And so that was at the Berkeley and center. Well well we. I studied with him at Berkeley senator about five years and then after that as I said I wanted to do. Monastic practice in the monastery for about five years and then after that. I remain with the San Francisco Zen Center for the next baby. Twenty some years and moved from the monastery to Green Gulch farm zen center where I lived for another fifteen or twenty years. You would be Abbott Co Abbot of San Francisco Zen Center eventually. Yeah Yeah

San Francisco Zen Center Elephant Cave Norman Berkeley And Center Berkeley Zen Center Kit Sue Zo Coetzer L. Elephant Zo Ketziot Richard Baker Richard Baker Berkeley San Center Richard Baker Berkeley Northern California Rossier Censeo ZAN ZO Mel Wise Green Gulch
"zen center" Discussed on Everyday Zen Podcast

Everyday Zen Podcast

02:12 min | 1 year ago

"zen center" Discussed on Everyday Zen Podcast

"That. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> The host has <Speech_Male> muted all participants. <Speech_Male> I heard a certain <Silence> amount of <Speech_Male> cacophony <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> so now <Speech_Male> I guess we'll end right <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> is that <Speech_Male> is that right. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> The <Speech_Male> refugees <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> but <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> I'm the <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> MOM <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Serrano. <Speech_Music_Male> God <Speech_Male> Char <Music> <Speech_Male> New <Speech_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> Song <Music> <Speech_Male> I Dunno <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> in God <hes> <Music> <Music> <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> but <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> I don't know <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> God shaw <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> a <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> dion. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Tom <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> I don't know <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Tian <Speech_Male> <hes> <Speech_Male> is on Kong's <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> I don't know <Speech_Music_Male> <Music> God <Music> <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Tie <Speech_Male> tm he <Music> <Music> but <hes> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> God Shaw <Speech_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> a <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> titanium <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> I Dunno <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> charge <Music> <hes> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> You <Speech_Male> taught <Speech_Male> him <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> is on <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> I don't know <Music> <Music> God <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Music> The <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> thank you <Speech_Male> good night everybody.

Shaw Kong
"zen center" Discussed on Everyday Zen Podcast

Everyday Zen Podcast

06:45 min | 1 year ago

"zen center" Discussed on Everyday Zen Podcast

"So he he's referring to the modern self and and are you talking about your take on the modern self or my take on the modern self. I didn't catch that so that's wonderful. If I got this right you said you wondered if the modern selves condos are the same as the ancient or premodern selfs. Condon's is that what you said. Yeah Yeah isn't that a great question only All the Great Buddhist would ask that question. That's a great question. I of course though you think when That it must be true right they must be. There must be something wile the modern self. The ancient of are very different. In some very important ways they also must be same in some very important ways to write and maybe this would be a way of defining. How the ancient self in the modern self are just being human in the same way. Would you say that I'm missing? I'm missing almost all that. I'm sorry we may. We may have to. We may have to leave it at that way. Because I think it's hard for people to it's hard. We're not hearing much so anyway. Thank you very much for being here. And it's wonderful to hear your voice and practice together for a moment. Thank you bye bipolar. I see Terry raising his hand. Maybe I can use tear your now a muted. Thank you I can hear you terry. Okay and see you too okay. Great so I was wondering you talked about the world somehow. There's one part that they didn't understand you talked about the world creating our internal sales. Yeah I think I think I said that it was sort of like a half a joke and half true when I said that when we this enchanted the world and tamed the world to suit our needs maybe for revenge. The world stuck our sub conscious into our psyches as a form of revenge. That was a kind of joke but at the same time. Maybe it's true. You know. Maybe maybe you know like when we were We were like Joanna. Macy has the this great idea that all has lover you know when maybe when the world was our lover and we were the lover of the world. We didn't have so many psychological issues problems. And maybe now that we don't have the world anymore a lover now that we're like in peril of trashing the world we have a lot more inter- problems a lot more despair and a lot more craziness and confusion something like that and maybe those two things somehow go together something like that is what. I was indicating. I think I'm I'm getting a thank you. Thank you all result. Yes separating ourselves from the we get further and further. We're not so happy with our internal lives right. You have a lot of problems with our internal lives many of us do. Yeah many of us do well. I think that Jochen is telling me that. It's probably time to stop. What time is it. It's about an on together for about an hour so yeah I think it's time to stop a my right for one more. Belkin all right. I'm okay with that one more question. Okay you're a muted now. Okay can you hear me Norman again? That's not how are you coming to see you to hear Your Voice? Thank you so much for having all of us here for speaking with US tonight. I don't WanNa put you on the spot. I was wondering that's always a bad introduction. I don't WanNa put you on the spot but but okay go ahead. Since it's you okay. We might be able or you might be able to chant the refuges holly for us to lows tonight. Oh sure here. I'd be happy to do that. It would be a huge mass for all of us to commute and do that together. Jochen would make that call. Probably but maybe just but even if we didn't even if everybody chanted at home we could chant together in that way even if you couldn't hear it all we could do that and so let's concur with that right. Yes maybe before Let's let's have the chanting be close so just Just want to thank Norman. Thank you so much I I I loved how you said. Oh you'll find a few words for tonight. You know from from some old talk clearly. You have a wonderful your remarks and thank you. Everyone for joining US said up. Come a checkout zen centers. Were not doing a early morning online sits and Wednesday evening at Saturday. Lectures and Susan I are cooking up a three day session. That's great next Thursday Friday to open up. That's great that's good yes. I think. Zen Center is doing a great job of this and other centers around the country are doing this. So that People from everywhere I think can participate in practice. Since there's nothing else to do might as well right good idea. So thanks for doing.

Jochen US Norman Terry Condon Macy Belkin Zen Center Joanna Susan I
"zen center" Discussed on Everyday Zen Podcast

Everyday Zen Podcast

02:16 min | 1 year ago

"zen center" Discussed on Everyday Zen Podcast

"To do that. Well I'm not going to tell the story again. You know the story in any way. Some of the other people that read the book. And if if if they didn't I don't want to tell the story you can read it in the book But the thing about that story is that here's a person in a dire situation who will not who refuses to let the conceptual framework of that situation rule his heart he uses his imagination to live in another world then the world that's presented to him and because of that he's able to affect the kind of miracle so. I think that's what we're talking about now just the same. We are also now living in a very dark objectively. Our situation is very dark. Not only with the virus but beyond the virus we have many many real bad human problems. I think we will have other viruses. You know we need a world in which we know how to be handled this better than we've had at this time as well as other problems so we need to have imagination that goes beyond the arrangements. We think are the only possible arrangements to see new arrangements and new ways of being together new ways of living together. We really need that much daring. That much vision in that much imagination and what I said tonight at Mytalk is that I think that through our spiritual practice that we can share together and and there's lots of ways I'm not saying everybody has to do is there's lots of ways of accessing the same aspect of the human heart. That's part of what we need. Because that's what's going to give us the imagination and the and the love and these go together right Levin Imagination to get through and I think we will. We will so. Maybe that's a way of connecting those. Thank you thanks for being here. Nice to see you. I can see the the other people for some reason. I didn't get a picture of them but I can see you. Thanks when Paul that Highway Nepal it. I'll talk to you next.

Levin Mytalk Paul
"zen center" Discussed on Everyday Zen Podcast

Everyday Zen Podcast

04:34 min | 1 year ago

"zen center" Discussed on Everyday Zen Podcast

"AND I. I guess I've been thinking a lot about the fact that this little viruses showing us. How connected we all are across this entire world that we within the very same moment that we're in in this intense way game shown how interconnected we are also being asked to physically distance ourselves from each other and I just was wondering what that if you have anything to say about that. Yes it is. I hadn't thought about that exactly but isn't that wonderful. Yeah well Right so isn't there an old saying love. Absence makes the heart grow fonder. Isn't there something like that. That makes sense right. When you don't see somebody you realize how much you you miss them. And how much you need them. So yeah. Maybe our so-called social distancing will make us realise how much we need one another. I think already things are happening like what we're doing tonight. Ways that we're we are reaching out to each other and staying in contact with each other. I've been telling friends that our our sons who usually are so busy with their families in their in their lives that we can never get their attention are now calling My wife Kathy and I every day every day. We're talking to our sons because they yeah. We're we're Kathy and I are older. We're at risk so They've been calling us and urging us to be very careful and not do anything. And then they're not gushing about how much they love US but probably they're calling us every day because this makes us realise how much we care about each other and also in our case they live three thousand miles away and we were not far away because we knew we were only an airplane right away but at the moment there's no airplanes and who knows whether there will be our planes. There shouldn't really be airplanes. You know we shouldn't be seeing our families who live three thousand miles away. It's ridiculous but now that we can't see them They're reaching out to us. More thinking about is more I guess and so I think we're all doing that collectively you know What's interesting is what's going on right now is of course unsustainable and it can't last forever or even probably for very long and maybe when it's over we all just you know shrug our shoulders and go on with life as if it never happened but then never is like that right. Everything changes us so this is going to change us. And and perhaps it'll change us in important ways because I've been quite upset actually about how we keep pumping more carbon into the atmosphere and even as we sail. That's bad that's bad. We shouldn't do that. We've been continuing to do it at a great rate. Well now. We're not pumping so much. Carbon into the atmosphere. I think carbon emissions have gone way down in the last couple of weeks so who knows but what this event however long it lasts with all sorts of inner and outer implications for us going forward. So yeah it's really something isn't it but I miss my friends at Donna Seminar. You know I miss seeing everybody every week. And I'm glad that we have thanks to the Center for having the wherewithal and the personnel to make this happen so we can still be in touch. But I can't see everybody right. I wish I could see all of you. I wish I could feel your presence in the room. Margot Frank you raise your hand so I call a new next. Thank you Norman. I you know I was so taken by the story. You told the beginning of your book the world could be otherwise. I repeated many many times some stories. Yeah and so. I'm wondering if there's anything you might say tonight to tie that peace with this moment that we're in now because I feel the way I could be held by that story and also the way. It's hard.

Kathy US Margot Frank Donna Seminar Norman
"zen center" Discussed on Everyday Zen Podcast

Everyday Zen Podcast

03:16 min | 1 year ago

"zen center" Discussed on Everyday Zen Podcast

"Scrub Jay pokes for food and grass. Purple finch bobs and weaves on Bush like a boxer whose orange face does the steeple Jack see in the mirror of destiny. All hardly matters. God arrives striped and singing loose. According to Pirouettes and panjandrums a little virus eludes them. So mighty in. It's simple strength There's no end to his mercy. We were out walking on pavement and on dirt landscape. Hillside brush pieces of persons by prearrangement. Otherwise predicted this. Is You because of sky? A tiny virus anyone's lover peaceful and simple good as gold night is falling all around us like a hat. We're so quiet. We can die in peace. Tall tree separates one. From the one. On the other side of the innocent virus we schedule holidays hushed within the sacred forests of time this silent poem barely speaks at night in a lonely home at the top of lamps but the desert sky is dark and full of tweeting stars. The hearts beat and care about the others. They are oneself as far as substance provides food for the invalids and preachers. Who visit for sucker. Highly people nurse one another now in tempted times for a little eager. Virus knows its lightness. Follows threads of fragrant hair and lips and teeth. It's duty veils across the avenues tonight. No one levels the streets but breathing understands.

Jay Bush
"zen center" Discussed on Everyday Zen Podcast

Everyday Zen Podcast

02:50 min | 1 year ago

"zen center" Discussed on Everyday Zen Podcast

"Others loving yourself and everyone else. This is clear so we're GONNA be alright. No matter what happens we are ready for whatever will come and we can act with all our heart and with all our might for the good and that's what we have to do as best as we can understand it so now at the end of my talk. I A my corona virus poems which Agai in Wuhan China emailed me the other day and said I'm doing an anthology of corona virus palms. Would you send some virus poem so I wrote some Corona Virus Poems? So I'm offering them to you as kind of bedtime story here at the end of my talk yesterday this disconcerting monologue bearing weight in each direction hearing words heaving heaving would aloft fill the air force quiet quiet spaces a little virus. That is an isn't goes improper. Sharing puts the people in their places charts graphs numbers. We're singing on porches applause for people singing on Porches. Their joy gathering airports in the rain. The elderly must rest in place. See Pictures of places that are not those places as much as anyone would want to know for the modern self. There are large numbers such harm as we could project to care to withhold embraces. The man with an ink washed mountain high up Chinese Air. Little farmer in four-grand pulls little ox who does not want to go are the children near. Are The children ready? Big SPACES NO INK..

Agai Wuhan China
"zen center" Discussed on Everyday Zen Podcast

Everyday Zen Podcast

15:18 min | 1 year ago

"zen center" Discussed on Everyday Zen Podcast

"Profound teaching that takes a lifetime to appreciate ancient China. I don't think the average person expected life to be worthwhile or fulfilling. Life was a veil of tears. Life was a struggle an unfortunate slog that you had to go through to get. You hoped to a better rebirth. Maybe one day far into an imagined future. That wasn't a future in the world. We now take to be real sometime. Maybe you'd be born as what he Safa and you could meet a Buddha. Maybe that was what was important this life not so much ordinary life was not something you clung to are celebrated. It was just a trial in took strength to endure it. A third assumption of the modern self is that we live in nature and that nature is something sacred and benign and profound. It's a source of inspiration abundance of material support assumption. We make before before this. I think everyone understood. That nature is is rough and brutal violent. I think to be feared and used when you could use it and I think the Chinese thought that way to despite the impression you might get from Chinese nature poetry the production of WHO's ink sticks before the China many many centuries ago in the West it was their matic's and transcendental Ists who changed nature for us a few centuries ago who made nature into the inspiration for their modern selves in Revolt Against Industrial Maternity. When there was the first machine there was the first person complaining about the First Machine. So this view of nature you can feel goes along with our inward nece as we swell inside and we get bigger we project an outside. That is not us. We're inside in nature which is separate from us is outside so are other people outside. They are not us and we are not them so our unconscious gives us a strong inner power in enormous self regard but also a strong built in sense of alien nation and Asian. You Know is a twentieth century. Where the everybody in the twentieth century was thinking only about alienated and how alienating contemporary life had. We don't use that word so much anymore. But that was the word then another assumption of the modern self which also seems so obvious. We would never question. It is that knowledge is possible. We can investigate and we can know something for sure in other words science. Which when you think about it is inevitable outcome of the third assumption. The otherness of nature and other people and the inward -ness of me gives me an object outside myself that I can study because object of knowledge requires objects and objects are there when their subjects. The subject is studying the object and the subject knows the object. So scientific knowledge requires our separation from nature and from one another so we modern people. Of course we can know things we think we can understand things and this is why we feel superior to the ancients who God love them. They understood things but their understanding was almost like a child so crude and so silly by the standards of what we know now so i. I'm sure all of you know the old saying not knowing most intimate we love not knowing. Zan Praise not knowing in the dialogue I mentioned earlier between nonchalant and Joshua says if the way is everyday mind he just heard from nonchalant ways everyday mind if the ways everyday mind how can I know it and nonchalant replies. Everyday mind has nothing to do with knowing and not knowing. The not knowing mine isn't ignorant it doesn't deny scientific or any other kind of knowing but it does recognize that knowledge is not ultimately true. It does know that knowledge separates and alienates in other words to see that every day mind is the way is to see that knowledge including maybe especially including knowledge of oneself is not ultimate knowledge. And that you tear the fabric of reality when you unthinkingly believe that it is so when we think about the world we live in now with the feelings we have right now of dread or fear or maybe we have hope or lack of hope about the future. We have to realize that our feelings are not based on something necessarily accurate or true but on a host of unexamined assumptions that go along with are being conditioned as modern selves. I'm not saying that the information we have about the world is not good information. And I'm not saying that there's something wrong with our being the way we are because of course we have the assumptions. We have everything that's happened before has led us to this place. How could we be other than as we are? And how could we stop knowing the things that we know so? I'm not saying that what I'm trying to say is that it would make a very big difference if we were not blind to our assumptions in our viewpoints and to know that of course we are blinded by such things and we appreciate this we will feel things differently and we will act differently in the world and here is to me. Wise is it is so great why. I'm so relieved and so happy that I consider every day and go a lot of sessions. Nowadays there's a lot of meditation being discussed and practiced and taught and I'm glad I'm sure all of it is really good and Zaza is just basic garden variety meditation. There's nothing fancy or profound about zen meditation but the way we understand is and the way we feel about dozen the way. Togan Suzuki row she understands is on this. I think is really great and this I think is what heals US why. It's so important for us now because when we sit. Ins is in. We're sitting in the middle of our human selves and all our human assumptions. We're not as we're usually are standing on the ground of ourself and are many assumptions about reality looking out and reaching out from that ground. No we're doing. We're sitting down in the middle of our assumptions. Were sitting down in the middle of the persons that we are as I said we cannot be otherwise than as we are but we can understand ourselves as we are without being blinded by ourselves and spun around and around and around by ourselves in a million ways when we sit INS on. We are marinating in our feelings and thoughts and unexamined assumptions and just by virtue of our sitting we are surrounding them with space and with silence allowing these things rather than believing them feeling our way through them rather than grasping them and maybe maybe for a moment seeing through them completely and feeling a moment of liberation and this is why sitting practice can be such a tremendous relief from our anxiety. I don't think it's that we come down. I don't take that. We have insights that help us find solutions to our problems inside or out but when we're truly sitting we will be in a process that is going to make us feel our human problems differently. We are going to be grounded in our human problems in a very very different way. So my excuse is that I've spent my whole adult life in full-time practice which excuses me to say that. I'm absolutely convinced that our human future depends on our authentic and committed spiritual practice. Of course I would say this. You can count on me to say this but also by the way I really believe it's true because I think our contemporary human problems really have come from the arrogance of our modern selves. It's not a good thing and it's not sustainable thing to have torn ourselves apart from nature and the world around us and from one another we have to find our way back when I was a young man. I was just thinking about this the other day with disbelief that I was the same person than I am now. I'm not sure actually it's true. But when I was young man I was I was a Marxist because I was convinced that collective action collective identity was the only way but I'm not a Marxist anymore because practicing. Zen showed me that it's not enough to believe in love and connection to think about love and connection even to work for love and connection. You have to feel it. You have to be immersed in it at the bottom of who you are in your very presence in your skin and your flesh and blood and marrow in your heart in every word and gesture. I don't mean that sittings is going to save the world. The world is not going to be saved or another way of saying the same thing. The world saves itself and we are human beings. And we're here for a reason you're here for a reason. I'm here for a reason. We have to do our best to practice. Generosity ethical conduct forbearance joyful effort. Meditation and the wisdom that sees beyond desire and attachment and notions. To the truth of housing's are who knows what the future will bring could bad things happen. Oh yeah really bad things could happen. Could good things happen? Yes good things could happen and will happen. In fact I think we bet on this bad things and good things will happen and maybe bad things caused the good things. Good things. 'cause the bad things I don't know round and round and round the world turns who knows who knows even if the future is anything more than a quirk of our human minds trick that has been built into us for some unknown reason. Not Knowing is most intimate. What a great teaching practice it is. You can whenever you think about the future about. What's going on today about yourself about your friends about the world thinking. Of course you can't help but think it but don't believe it entirely take a breath and remember that everyday mind has nothing to do with knowing or not knowing things just are they come and go.

China First Machine INS Safa US Zan Praise Togan Suzuki Zaza Wise Joshua
"zen center" Discussed on Everyday Zen Podcast

Everyday Zen Podcast

15:06 min | 1 year ago

"zen center" Discussed on Everyday Zen Podcast

"So I hope everybody is okay here in California we are sheltering in place as the term of art. Not going anywhere not shopping. Not doing anything staying at home. Kathy and higher okay here at the beach in for us as long as we manage not to get sick and die. We're okay we're doing pretty well in fact We can appreciate life slowing down trips being cancelled not getting in the car. It's not bad but at the same time we're thinking every day about people for whom this restriction is not so easy and especially about those who have the virus now or we'll get it and maybe quite ill and maybe die. We're also thinking about the workers in the healthcare system who are already working really hard very hard Dealing with the pandemic and face. Who knows what kind of catastrophe if this gets out of control so we're going to hope and imagine that with everything that everybody's doing it gets better than worse and I'm actually hoping and praying that that's going to be so so nobody can think about anything but this pandemic and the uncertainty of the Near and far future on many levels this affects us but before we were thinking about this. We had a lot of other things to think about that. Made Life trying in our times. Though these other things did not stop us in our tracks this one has though maybe they should have stopped us in our tracks long ago. Climate Change for one is something that really worries me and an economic system. That is hard for everyone. But the rich and the increasingly anti-democratic politics all over the world and the speeding up and stressing out of our lives due to accelerate technologies and other pressures. So we have a lot of ongoing serious long-term problems others that I haven't mentioned of course lots of them and altogether. They make us wonder. I think whether we're approaching some sort of human limit that makes the future for human beings uncertain in dark. The future is the future. Nobody ever knows what's going to happen in the future and the future is not the president as we always say but Dharma and yet in the present we have a feeling about the future and that feeling that we have about the future conditions how we live and how we feel in the present so we really canNot Dismiss. All this or philosophize it away and it's not the first time human beings have felt like this. When I was a boy in elementary school we hid under our desks in simulated air raids. Waiting for the Russian atom bombs to drop by the nineteen eighty s with thousands of events nuclear warheads in the Cold War. It's maximum. We felt sure that nuclear holocaust was inevitable and there was a big movement against nuclear weapons. Today there are still a huge number of nuclear weapons around the world and countries. That have them now. That didn't have then but we don't think about this at all because we have so many other crises to worry about and I can only imagine but my parents and grandparents felt about the human future in the time of Hitler when you were Jewish you were either being killed or your family members are being killed somewhere and even if you weren't a junior one way or the other involved in a world war effort really scary with an unsure outcome and then long before that during the black plague in Europe it's unbelievable but actually like every third person maybe more but at least every third person died and nobody knew why other than that it was the wrath of God displeased with us so there have been many many times in the past when people had a strong feeling of dread about the future. So I'm not saying. Of course then. Our contemporary problems are not really serious or even unprecedented. I'm just saying that the human feeling of dread for the future is not new in fact it seems to go with the territory of being a human being because we have the idea of the future and we care about the future we identify with people in the future so will uniquely have this kind of dread so I want to ask a stupid question about this which is zan question who is feeling this. Dread we were brought up to expect something else. Some bright future with a wealth of possibilities we are. After all modern people we have science technology. It was not supposed to be this way so I really think a lot of what we're feeling right now. In addition to our fear about this virus is a tremendous sense of shock and disappointment. We've been cheated out of a bright future we had expected and we're mad about it. Were scared and we WANNA know. Who Do we blame? We can blame the government or the wealth. Probably that's good probably. They are to blame. They could be doing better for all of us but maybe we don't blame them. Maybe we blame them and also blame ourselves blame humanity but the thought that humanity is somehow unworthy or incompetent or maybe some kind of blight on the planet thought that has crossed my mind more than once. That's a terrible thought to have if you're human because then you hate yourself and it's really hard to live with that kind of hatred so interested in the modern self the persons that we all have been conditioned to be in our particular historical period. What is a person after all? We take it for granted that everybody knows what a person is a person. A person that being a person has always been more or less the same thing. But I don't think that's right at all. I think that in the tongue or song dynasties in China when our ancestors practiced together and produced the stories and legends. We still studied today. There were no persons there were no selves in anything like the way that we ourselves. Now so what are the hidden assumptions? That underlie the modern self. These things that we take for granted but actually their assumptions people may not have assumed these things in the past for one we have inner lives right inner lives. Freud gave us the idea that there's an unconscious a dark subterranean pool full of passions and confusions that conceal the truth of who we are but not entirely the analyst can help us discover are hidden depths. I don't think Freud thought that he invented the unconscious I think. He thought that he discovered it. But this doesn't mean it was always there. I wonder whether Jesus or Buddha or Jouko had an unconscious I bet they did not maybe. In order to grow and unconscious we had to tame and disenchant the world and maybe the world inserted the unconscious into our psyches as a form of revenge. If you don't have an unconscious then there's no need to be someone special. There's no need to appease your ed or Superego. No need to justify your life as worthwhile in the face of your deep seated. Fear that it's not no need to make your way in the world make your mark. Nothing eats at you. Nothing drives you on probably people in ancient times were just born. They knew who son or daughter they were. They knew what they had to do. Had No choice Israeli or visions or big hopes for the future. Probably they didn't even have an idea of the future that would be different from the president or the past. Maybe they had children or not. They worked hard. They worshipped according to their community norms. And then they died and went onto another life. Maybe if they were in the Christian West they went to Heaven Hell if they were in Asia. Maybe they went onto another lifetime. Maybe better lifetime. It's always amazed me that all over the world ancient peoples who very likely had no contact with one another all produced the thought that the world was both a wonderful in a fearful place that might cease at any moment. You could count on being there every day. In order to ensure that the world continue human beings have to acknowledge the gods who empowered it everywhere in the world? In ancient times people spontaneously understood the necessity of sacrificing to the gods something that would absolutely never occur to a modern self. That thinks it's in charge of and knowledgeable about a rational world at operates according to knowable scientific laws the idea of sacrifice too sensible invisible powers beyond ourselves never occur to us because to us. There's nothing really beyond ourselves. So I've always been as I said so amazed by and really impressed by this insight that sacrifice to the gods is a human necessity even though as a modern person. Of course I can't begin to understand it so I'm saying being a modern self is first of all having an inner life unconscious having the sort of inner life and high self regard that people before the modern period probably did not have a second unexamined assumption of the modern self again so pervasive. We don't even notice. It is the validation and assumed value of everyday life that it's worthwhile that it has meaning just life living working loving having family having some fun having some self realization. We think that all this is really good and that everyone is entitled to it. This is an assumption of the modern self. We're nonchalant told Josh that everyday mind is the way I don't think he was referring to everyday life as we understand it. Now I think you meant the radical present moment as it is with all its limitation and tragedy. The difficulty of living that people may have wanted to escape. He was saying no. This difficult life is the way is the path the escape is no escape.

president Freud California Kathy China zan Europe Josh Jouko Dharma Asia analyst
"zen center" Discussed on Dreamland

Dreamland

03:39 min | 2 years ago

"zen center" Discussed on Dreamland

"We just couldn't do it. You know? And so we had to shut the business down after that. I began to work more in media because for me what this came down to. I was living in zen center. It was a it was it was a lay center. So I could actually live there and work outside even though I never left because we were decentralized naked just remote viewed their run the run the business. I was I was meditating all the time. And I was remote viewing. And it really increases the ability finances the mind tremendously meditation almost any kind of meditation, unless it's, you know, full music in incense hopping around or whatever his going to intensify all every type of psychic activity at all levels. And there's an nerve Vondle between the two parts of the brain called the caught eight in the Putin and. And that nerve bundle grows if you're meditating and that nirvana is critical to that. Those two parts working together are are the intuitive area of the brain. So, you know, the if you're I if if you do that, you you build your power, and that's exactly what you were doing living in zen center. Yeah. You know, for me, it actually became this huge struggle of, you know, devoting my life to being monastic versus working in the world, and in the sort of black and white either or sort of thing, and and I was struggling with that. Because you know, I thought I should just dump remote viewing and just live the monastic life to know, the south completely no the self. And and it was this one moment where the teacher of zen center said to me John in order to be the best remote viewer, you can possibly be. You've got to let go of every shred of yourself. And it was that moment that I realized where these two worlds completely came together. And and all I was doing was letting go because in order to get remote viewing data you have to constantly like like layers of an onion peel off your ideas about it. And it's the same thing when you are practicing sitting on the cushion. To seek the south to know what this moment is. No, you are right. And that it was at that point that it just it really came together for me as one complete holistic thing, and I didn't have to go anywhere do anything. And I do what I want to do you became? Yeah. Kim world Booker, right? Yeah. That's what I am. I'm a World War Two. A person who lives who lives in in in the monastery but worked walks in the world. And I my case the monasteries right here in my little apartment. Exactly. Yeah. You're probably is too. At this point. Yep. Very you are exactly you're running stir. It goes with you folks, take another little break in when we get back. We're gonna completely shift gears because we're going after skinny Bob, we'll tell you the whole story of skinny, Bob, and what remote viewing that has been done recently about skinny Bob revealed. What's so fascinating about the fact that skinny Bob knew at the time that this remote viewing was taking place. Now, even though that was back in the forties. We'll be right back. Whitley Strieber.

zen center Bob Putin Whitley Strieber Kim world Booker John
"zen center" Discussed on The Upgrade by Lifehacker

The Upgrade by Lifehacker

04:44 min | 2 years ago

"zen center" Discussed on The Upgrade by Lifehacker

"Tell us something. We don't know we get smart people to make us smarter today. Smart guest is cushioned paleo, then Kochan is Buddhist monk and the co founder of the New York zen center for competitive care. He's the co author of awake at the bedside contemporary of teachings on palliative and end of life care and the forthcoming book. Wholehearted slowdown help out wakeup which comes out in June. Kochan is going to tell us something. We don't know about death. Welcome koshen. Thank you for being here comes pushed. So you're zen monk. And when we think of monks in sort of the popular imagination, we think of them cloistered away in monasteries. What does being among look like in the middle of New York City? Well, is end the ideal in some ways is thought to be the small retreat is often the mountains so cloistered away as you talk about as which we do many times during the year, we go on retreat and bought the great retreat is disappearing in the capital. So really learning how to participate end serve and help out with what is happening where suffering is as opposed to just staying in place of in some ways, comfortable and internal process in learning. How to say will however you and how are you? And how do we engage each other in thoughtful way, tell us about the New York's enter for contempt of care. So the New York sun center for contemporary cares, educational nonprofit organization. Dedicated to transforming the culture of care through wisdom, compassion and addressing old age sickness in death. And we do that work through our zen practice daily practice and our educational programs. Whether it's master's program or are training, local folks just to how to care for people and bring their meditative practice into their relationship and we've trained people from all over the country. And so to me it's like the beautiful manifestation of your earlier question of like what is among do? We stay with people through the changes, and realizing that life is full of change in some of his heart wrenching, and some of it is extraordinarily beautiful. What is contemporary of care versus just regular end of life care? So contempt of care is done by someone who has a meditation practice and sees how pay practice their meditation as how pay attention to being in relationship and for us. It's really move away from the expression that we have in our culture, which I so far find deeply depleting. These two words called care giver and care provider. And when I'm the care giver than I'm actually I'm the one who's going to give you care or the care providers. Same in. So for contempt of care, we really think about partnership so being a caring partnership with someone. So where there is true equality in equanimity, realizing you. You also know what you need, and I wanna be so curious about you and be open to what is happening. So that I can serve you. And so for me. The other day they knows with sitting with a person who had just lost their tiled. She walked into the center and sat down and was just way, Bing, and weeping. And we. And it was so extraordinary. And so beautiful, and heart wrenching and just like to be the helplessness with her and to not move away from it for me was the way of contempt of care wreck really staying in my breath, an realized with her at the same time, she cried and she wailed for good, forty minutes. And then when she was done she was done, and she looked up man said that was unbelievable..

Kochan New York City New York zen center Bing co founder forty minutes
"zen center" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

10% Happier with Dan Harris

03:23 min | 3 years ago

"zen center" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

"And so you know, this is this is a faith that really there's a high high level of orthodoxy. If you're in the Mormon church, you know, you don't find a lot of casual Mormons from what I can tell. And so I was so interested when I heard that there was kind of thrive. Having Buddhist meditation group in Salt Lake City founded by a guy who calls himself a Mormon and populated by many people who are active practicing believing Mormons. So I, I wanted to know how does this work and what? What was the founder story? And so finally, Thomas McCarthy who, as we said, lives in Salt Lake City found himself in New York City, and I got him into the studio, and here's what he had to say. First of all, thank you for coming on. We've been trying to set up for a while. Totally. How did you get interested in meditation? I was eighteen years old. I'd had a pretty big falling out and the Mormon church. I was raised, Mormon and Salt Lake City, Utah. Mecca where there's still to this day, huge concentration of latter day saints, Mormons and I had a falling out with my family with my church, my community. I mean, when you fall out of the church in that concentrated an environment, it's not just, you know, you don't see people while they're churches. Sundays. It affects twenty four hours of your day. Seven days a week. Week, and I went through a kind of rowdy adolescence just, you know, trying to sort it out. But by eighteen I realized there was a really intense hunger and I needed something to channel. My devotion towards that was the environment I was in. Mormonism wasn't going to work for me, and I happened to stumble across a zen center and downtown Salt Lake. So such As such, thing. the absolute there was cans. Eons on center was the name of that particular center. And it was the biggest order of Buddhism outside of Japan and the whole world at the time. So it was in its heyday and there were Buddhist masters hanging out, you know, just a few blocks up from the Mormon temple and downtown Salt Lake. And I was really fortunate to find some support from them and you know, plant my feet on the path she has, they say, gee, ju- did you start practicing with them there? Did you go over seas or wh- or what? I did both. Eventually, I started practicing and downtown Salt Lake just that the center there and I really took to the practice. I needed needed something to really, you know, settle down and I was, I felt so committed to Buddhism after short time that I just decided to move to China. Like, you know, let's let's return to the the fountainhead of the wisdom strain. So I, I spent a few years mainland China's well, skipping college. I ended up studying Mandarin there and transferring credits, so it didn't totally derail my life most Mormons if not all practising. Mormons do missionary year abroad, many two years. It's a truly emission. And I, like I said, I, I've been out of the tradition for quite some time, so you didn't do that? I didn't do a mission, but it it made sense for me to get really far away from Utah, because even though I was studying Buddhism and was really finding myself in it, it was still really painful place to be. What was the reaction of your folks, your family to studying designs enter, and then going to China to study more, oh, all sorts of edgy. I'm in and this is back. I mean, this was before the two thousand..

Salt Lake City Salt Lake Mormon church China Utah Thomas McCarthy Mormon temple New York City founder Mecca ju Japan twenty four hours eighteen years Seven days two years
"zen center" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

02:12 min | 4 years ago

"zen center" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"Sphere adds soltani a very central quotation now i'm working on a book the title of which is love across difference um and central to the thinking in that book is that love depends on a recognition of something in common and the value wing of a different right you don't want someone just like yourself you want someone and now fly yourself so that you can learn new things from right right you know i would like to talk to you about religion i i mean it's it's very interesting your your parents had you know as we discuss complicated lives and philosophies and and complicated relationships with religion i mean you describe your father's studied english atheism but across his life span he was investigating conscious purpose and the san francisco zen center was an important place for him in the eastland institute and you read him passages that he loved from the book of job while he was dying and your mother he now you you quote this m there's this love these lines of kipling that is so taken with kipling's description of heaven which your mother loved heaven as a place of tireless creativity but each for the joy of working and each and has some separate star will pay paint the thing as he sees it for the god of things as they are isn't that a wonderful lined the god of israel wonderful i love it and it seems to me that across your life you you were more overtly curious end.

san francisco zen center eastland institute kipling israel