6 Burst results for "Zarqa Jordan"

"zarqa jordan" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

08:16 min | 5 months ago

"zarqa jordan" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"Drive show whose placement Joe gonna selectors his running mate names that are being bandied about include centers or any clubs your lover Minnesota Catherine Cortez Masto of Nevada Florida congressman where the hell's rounders Val Demings because they need Florida she represents your Orlando mission governor Gretchen Whitmer thicker stock has fallen of late based on the says she's is ideologically she says that she's exactly the same former national security adviser Susan rice singing well you better wait till of germs down on that one Georgia Democrat Stacey Abrams I'm such a standard would well but that would be a good thing for you know for the present and the others include of course Elizabeth Warren Zarqa Jordan while also but number one rising to the top of the ticket according to politico and friends circuits in campaigns have is lower than Campbell Harris Sean Joe Bryan people ask me who pick as my running mate well as I go stir crazy in my basement suffering from a quarantine and choose to there's only one reasonable way to answer that question she'll join my crew it's she is a woman of color to all of you hello the he he has you know he has is we want a binder moment here at all yeah he says it's like a beauty contest choosing who he wants next to him in this is us I wrote I mean that's that's that's a quote there is also like the almost any changes gender no they are Mr September and Mr January instructor over I'm thinking really I hate to be the one to say this but you wonder which one of the women are going to pass the smell test we just got married just so you said it not me what it is yeah I've heard very precious mother isn't exactly nothing to sniff notice of we'll have to nose around see we can come up with I know who knows nostrils almost enough of those a lot of time on the what are the yeah I just went home and watched billions so don't tell me you have to use your by one when you find out he's a Russian spy thrillers I'm sorry yeah all right CBS reporter Lesley Zhang here there's a big to do about this this is the question she asked of the president yesterday now she happens to be Asian she happens to be a Chinese heritage but this is the question she asked and this is the answer he gave her frankly this is the answer he has given a number of times in a number of different circumstances many times that the U. S. is doing far better than any other country when it comes to testing yes why does that matter why is this a global competition to you if every day Americans are still losing their lives and we're still seeing more cases every day well they're losing their lives everywhere in the world and maybe that's a question you should ask China yeah don't ask me has a China that question okay when you ask them that question you may get a very unusual answer yes behind you so that was that was the first half of it and again he has said exactly this and a number of other circumstances of that you could tell that does China is a Burr under this guy's settle he is not pleased with how they handle the entire thing he he thinks they've been deceptive that once they knew there was a real problem the Chinese one around cornering the market on P. P. ease and masks and ventilators so that they can then resell at a higher price to everybody else you know he he has some real issues with the Chinese however if you're really feeling aggrieved and you think you should be recognized as being an aggrieved minority this is how you respond why are you saying that to me specifically specifically to anybody I'm saying if anybody or ask a nasty question please go ahead okay anybody else please go ahead the back place I have two cars okay I have two questions the cemex cement exporters you called on me I did and you didn't respond and I'm calling on so I just laid in the back please let my colleague okay the cast ladies and gentlemen thank you very much yeah that's it that's it we're done the camp behavior you can't show rural decorum as the president United States if you can't by by the rules you know he's going to shut it down that's what he did but the downside is you know the Jiang the Asian American reporter from CBS she pulled her mask them before Jessica Chinese person right beside her again which I think is almost sold for chlorine victim while you're singling me out as I go I was trying to yeah would you say the same offers a Swedish reporter well you know if an applied yeah the guys pretty blunt about this kind of stuff and again as I noted from jump street here he has said exactly this and a number of different forms of since this all began to come to light that clearly China has been deceptive her and her question frankly is a stupid question well you know you keep you keep saying we're doing really well better than everybody else why does that matter well it matters because his job because they provide for American citizens they have spent months criticizing marking the president on the lack of ventilators lack of mass swarms it's the federal government's job to provide testing testing testing their policy insurers say it one more time it's it it is going to drive me nuts and that's the reason why he feels the need to get out there every day and give them an update on protective PPVs protective equipment so it's so it's damage to do damage or don't now that he can say or generally look we're looking at three hundred thousand tests that day this is a phenomenal number of that we have available in this country that means in ten days we go through three million people if necessary and that's it this is a huge deal yeah and now the the criticisms all why did you have to make this sort of competition one of my answer is there any other further this is not but in the end we are in a competition that they were competing against the hidden enemy we're competing against the will flow that's were trying to be here we're trying to defeat this virus and make it go away it's not a competition among countries it is a competition against this invisible enemy if you wanna play choose your fake news we got her tickets and he arrived in cinema this any film when they re open locations will beltway plaza sun valley plaza Marty station falls to just to name a few imports could be good to get back to the movies again they'll be coming in phase three if we ever get the phase one here in Maryland which may come as early as Friday but maybe as late as next week or the week after or maybe after Memorial Day week or not quite short usually locked already looks to Andrew Cuomo for his spiritual guidance and so we'll see what happens avocado because right now for ten W. C. B. M. six eighty one eight hundred W. CV on six eighty the you get a chance to match wits with C. with and with the Mister Bruce you have see what because I miss her and we have no idea how much half brother and half with the cause and deal with that's right the only works at night hello okay story sometime about the workers but I can't what about those people trying to get through their day were also thank you so bringing us together brought to you as a service the motive six oh one back river neck road.

Joe Catherine Cortez Masto congressman Val Demings Florida Gretchen Whitmer Minnesota Nevada Florida Orlando
"zarqa jordan" Discussed on Kickass News

Kickass News

12:56 min | 5 months ago

"zarqa jordan" Discussed on Kickass News

"I WANNA talk about a couple of more of these leaders that you profile in the book You include not just military leaders but also people like Walt Disney Leonard Bernstein. Albert Einstein even Coco Chanel. How much knowledge did you have about? Coco Chanel coming into this. This is a great admission. I didn't know she was a person. I thought Chanel was just brand. Name the brand Chanel number five and yet when you studier. It's amazing here is an incredible fashion designer but even more she's a branding and marketing genius. Whose an orphan at a young age work sure way up takes an opportunity to about the time of the first World War Two revolutionize fashion not just in France but around the world and then she builds an empire on that to include the fragrance number five by being both a good business person but then also being the brand herself. When people bought Chanel products they were buying Coco Chanel because she dressed a certain way she actor certainly shed a lifestyle and she invited you to be like cocoa and the best way to do it is where her clothes use her perfume embrace her lifestyle and it worked beautifully as a leader. She was a tough person. She was tough to work for. Yeah got no people loved to work for because she was special have embraced the Chanel lifestyle. That far probably the figure in this book with whom Americans are least familiar is a Chinese name. Jong who is pretty well unknown over here but in China he's revered as this great hero and today even become a symbol of China's emergence as a super power. What does young her say about. China's global ambition in the Twenty First Century. Well he says a lot. He was a fifteenth century. Figure theoretically seven feet tall with a waste five feet around he'd been castrated at age ten but then remained loyal to the to the Ming Dynasty. Which had actually killed his father and castrated him but but he led this big spoilt seven. Different voices of treasure ships out around the world and China now has pulled his memory most people in the West and didn't know who he was pulled his memory up to show that they're a global power to show that they have always be international. Most of us think of China's the last two hundred years when the Middle Middle Kingdom was very insular and to a great degree backward now Shizhong paying with the one belt one road strategy is saying. That was a very temporary thing. What you saw in. The last two hundred years isn't us? We actually were global nation. We have always been that way and here here's proof and so who a nation pulls up and makes their heroes says an awful lot about what that nation wants to communicate and I know that you're probably more often asked to comment on Iraq or Afghanistan. But is the rise of China and the state of play in the South China Sea. Something that you give a lot of thought to these days. Well I do I'm not in government but anyone who doesn't give a lot of thought isn't thinking economically or diplomatically or potentially militarily because China which again had two hundred years of I describe it as a bad weekend They are back in a big way. And what we've gotTa do is re look how we fit in the world. Most Americans have a post World War Two view in right after World War. Two America was forty six percent of the world's global domestic product which is an aberration and not sustainable. Now that we've got the rise of kingdoms like China and other parts of the world. I think we need to understand that. Our role will be interacting not necessarily opposition. But it's going to be complex and we're going to have to deal with in real not in a in a way of denying the reality but in a realistic approach you actually include of all people to many people's surprise al Qaeda and Iraq leader Abu Musab Al Sarkawi among the biographies of leaders in this book. Now this is the man that you hunted and eventually killed What can you learn about leadership from your enemy in combat? But it's it's interesting to step back. We took thirteen leaders for this book. To include Coco Chanel. Harriet Tubman Margaret Thatcher Albert Einstein. Leonard Bernstein Sweden a wide range. Because they're not just military leaders or political. But someone I had to put in there was Abba sabotage conway because I fought him as part of my task force for two and a half years and we ultimately killed him and in June of two thousand six but I came to respect him. I didn't come to like him. I didn't come to agree with him and I did more when he died. But I came to respect leader and the thing that was interesting about him and we pair him with Maximilien Robespierre the French Revolution Zarqa. We was poorly educated. Came up over the tough background and industrial town. In Jordan he became very committed to Eslam the fundamental view of Islam and believed very heavily in Jihad or holy war and wanted to be a Mujuhedeen holy fighter. And what worked for him was he became a zealot. He became someone so pious. So personally self-disciplined so obviously committed to his cause that burn like a hot flame and almost. Moths are attracted to that. We're all attracted to people who are very confident very committed and very zealot like in their leadership style as people did with ropes peer. Now the other thing about our colleagues because he was so committed he got many other people to follow him who didn't share the same level but they were willing to follow him because his obvious commitment to it and then he was also he was a good leader. He was charismatic. He did good things. Get around to to talk to his people basics and so I could disagree with his. 'cause I could disagree. He was a psychopath in terms of a murder. But I had to respect the effectiveness. He had as a leader and to be honest head to learn from it. I suppose it's easy to dismiss him as a psychopath in a monster which he probably was. But it's not a useful way to go about trying to actually defeat and kill your enemy. Sounds like you must have dedicated. A good amount of thought to getting in the mind of your enemy. Was that a pretty dark place. And what did you come to understand about him? Well it is a dark place to do that. Think what we do in war we try to dehumanize the enemy do. What right army's always do we call the Germans the Huns we tal- The Japanese? The Nips we saw Vietnamese the Kooks and that's so that they're not human so it's easier to kill him. You're not frightened of them and you. You don't feel the same empathy when actually fight against someone for a while that changes because particularly when they turn out to be very good fo you have to respect and so in the case of any enemy but particularly czar cowie. I started with this thing. He beheaded a young American nick. Berg in two thousand four hundred founded and my whole force was just emotionally furious over. We committed ourselves to kill him but over time. A few things happen. I who's very good at what he did. And then the second is you come to the realization that his perspective is his perspective and he believes it deeply. I may believe my side. I may be committed to it. But what makes me right in him wrong? And what if I'd been born in Zarqa Jordan instead of where I was what I believe? Is He did? And what if he's as right as I am just on different sides and so you start to get a grudging? I respect for the effectiveness of your photo and then you have to have a certain respect that they might just be as right as we are. The beheadings were sort of a morbid media strategy but somehow it seemed that it was effective with his own people in If you will establishing his bran or the brand of al-Qaeda and talk a little about that and how that was received within his circle sure we think that the beheadings were to scare the West and they do a little bit of that but what they really did is. They signaled to his potential followers. That he is so committed to the cause that he's willing to do things that he knows are horrific. Isis made an art form of this. They committed to people that we are after a righteous cause but our causes so righteous that we're willing to do evil to achieve it. We go back to rogue spear and the French Revolution. Here's a guy who believed writing things. He believed in the writings of Russo. But he became committed that you needed to use terror to achieve virtue. Now there's a contradiction there but there's sort of a An interesting seductive idea. I'm willing to behead nine hundred Frenchmen in five weeks in the center of Paris to build a virtuous society on the surface it looks laughable but many French believed that here. We are finally committed to making a change. We're committed to doing whatever it takes to get virtue and very similar with our Collie it just has a power to it. And Rebecca took more of a distanced approach to terror He kind of delegated that His subordinates and in some cases he probably wasn't even aware of all the people who were beheaded in his name. Call me on the other hand personally. Beheaded many people. How do you assess that? I really can't make a distinction. Because on the one hand robespierres hands were clean. Reportedly the only the first execution ever attended was his and so he kept himself slightly at arm's length but he was in fact. Part of the driving force behind it Zarqa trademark was up close. His hands were dirty. He was involved. He was doing beheadings. He wore combat. Close so to me. There's not a big distinction. Both on the positive side shared a very genuine commitment to their costs. So you really can't doubt that they were real about it at the same time. Both did some pretty horrific thing so it's hard to to judge them positively. There are no statues to rub spear around. Now you go. You won't find them with the proliferation of attacks in Iraq and colleagues ability to just elude capture time and time again. In fact you talk about. How oftentimes he traveled completely alone went through checkpoints in disguise. It's understandable that he sort of took on almost a supernatural mystique in Iraq and even among the troops. I imagined trying to defeat him from a morale standpoint for you as military leader. Did you find yourself having to fight against this ghost like persona and bring him back down to Earth in the eyes of your men sometimes absolutely because he became almost a symbol of our inability to get him and so a little like Francis? Marion the swamp Fox are mostly from the civil war. Just the fact he's able to operate is impressive. To people it makes him a little bit more powerful and it underwrites or underlines our inability to do that now as you studied leaders for this book did you find parallels to your own experience and maybe even as you read about some of their flaws and mistakes. Think to yourself Yup. That sounds familiar. I recognize that I can look back. I just countlessly almost every leader here. The one that sort of jumped out at me. That surprised Walt Disney because he had a lot of traits. You much more talented than I'll ever be. But he was a good animator and then he creates this amazing full length animated picture. Snow White and the seven dwarfs and he desert over three years by mortgaging his company mortgaging the intellectual property to Mickey Mouse and then pushing his team to create this magnificent full first full length animated movie and at the time it.

Coco Chanel China Iraq Chanel West Walt Disney Leonard Bernstein Albert Einstein South China Sea France Harriet Tubman Margaret Thatch Walt Disney Ming Dynasty Abu Musab Al Sarkawi Twenty First Century Leonard Bernstein Sweden America Maximilien Robespierre al-Qaeda
"zarqa jordan" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

07:30 min | 6 months ago

"zarqa jordan" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"You see something say something all that is catchy and if you see something say something with Donna Anstey see something say something in fact about Beastie Boys I was probably like ten years old we were driving a West Virginia was my mother in this lovely woman her dear friend ever Donna who everyone calls Graham so Graham tent linger since my mom and grandparents and I'm in the back of the van on the couch you because one of those big like caravans having them play brass monkey over in in over a year yes she was playing brass monkey for me over and over and over again well that phone okay mom okay I mean it like at ten or eleven there's not a better song that could be created and Graham Taylor was the only time that she like ever sniff dimensions like Steve we have to stop playing that song it was I'd like probably the nine I thought your mom and her friends were buying it and you know and I was no I was into the beast even though they were playing at my request god yeah okay for BC boys to murder Hornets we told you about these earlier this week murder Hornets they have made their way from Asia to the United States for the first time they are scary Hornets that are two inches in length they are a real terror to honey bees they decapitate them can destroy a hive in no time and they can even kill a human if they repeat sting you even if you're not allergic so everybody feeling good now great here's the upside let's take a note from Japan Japan were more murder Hornets kill up to fifty people a year they eat murder Hornets there even considered a delicacy turns out murder Hornets are pretty high in protein protein what now murder Hornets are pretty high in protein you can't find chicken a cosco girl you might wanna get yourself some murder Hornets since they're two inches long they are easy to pan fry and serve as secure what is the matter with them that is messed up more than thirty fancy restaurants in Japan Japan have them on the menu I don't know if we should be eating weird things in nature right now especially considering what's going on in the world we don't know where stuff the region eight a guy in New York City what it is who runs a company that's entirely dedicated to edible insects says quote people have compared it to a popcorn flavor without the butter mmhm yeah mansion how about this let's look into the dystopian future okay it's one year from now it's kind of feeling that way right now I'm movie theaters are open the game and you sit down to watch a movie about the pandemic can US conquering it and you get yourself a box of boo boos and chocolate covered murder Hornets yes hi I'm gonna pass on that well step right up to the escalated and not doesn't because right this you'll end up fifteen feet high they do all that a woman named Andrea called and said that her mother used to work at Donaldson's department store in Minneapolis in the thirties and when they've been in install the first elevator there and she just always tell stories about probably very excited oh my gosh could you imagine there's something right now that we must be we must have experienced in the last you know five or ten years that was really like whoa you know it was smart phones we were like they were life elevator we rely for the smartphone when you realized I'm connecting to the internet or I can do these video yeah for stations I remember the first time I saw a video on a computer and I was like what the future is here because it was so clear and so what I am futuristic anyway I hear you you know they do a little bit of that by the way back to upload the new show on Amazon okay do some fun things they play with the future you know and so they're just messing around trying to show you technologies that might be available in the future as we always do this in scifi movies one thing is since it's at about fifteen or twenty years in the future somebody walks past a in Oprah and Oprah come Molla twenty twenty four sign maybe that's a prediction for a future president well United States you never know and then also someone do you have a dial in the afterlife in this up loaded reality you have a dial so he opens its doors and it's this beautiful autumn scene and he looks at the dial in turns it to the snow flake setting and suddenly the mountains or snow covered that's cool and I thought now that would be a real if you could just decide what you want yeah state of your outdoor world to look like I did a minute a minute that would be awesome anyway okay thank you upload on Amazon prime FYI can I tell you something that I saw okay did you guys see this Ilan musk kid's name yeah so I mean it won't get off it's X. eight D. A. minus twelve Ozark and then he is setting the record straight on his son's name because his girlfriend who is that singer Grimes yeah she tried offering this detailed explanation and then he corrected her at one point of her message it has something to do with like X. as the unknown variable S. H. E. my elven spelling of a I love it and your artificial intelligence a minus twelve is the precursor to S. R. seventeen his favorite aircraft no weapons no defenses just speed great in battle but nonviolent it doesn't sound like I'm just saying gibberish and then a equals archangel my favorite song X. metal rat there is some somebody went through and said that it has to be exam here so I thought ash ash arc angel and then someone else said no actually exists I would like to go for a B. ash Michael since Michael is the ark angel think we'll find out soon but it sure is interesting should there be a council that has veto power on baby names yes okay in ninety nine percent will will go through I'm sure the council from time to time will recommend a a spelling change but other than that most will go through but for times like this because we're all looking out for Zarqa Jordan we don't want I thank him to have to go through this whole he'll probably be home schooled so version one.

West Virginia Donna Anstey
"zarqa jordan" Discussed on Covert

Covert

09:48 min | 1 year ago

"zarqa jordan" Discussed on Covert

"Of camera you have not just technical but also esthetic stuff like where do you put the horizon or how do you frame a photograph. It's really pretty amazing so I want to give you a special offer and I want you to go there and do this right away. Okay start learning with the great courses plus today and I've worked out a fantastic offer for my listeners a full free month of unlimited access. That's all of the courses you don't or have to just take one special introductory course. It's all of their material free for a month but you gotta sign up using my exclusive. Url Okay so sign up up at the great courses plus dot com slash covert. That's the great courses plus dot com slash covert super important slash covert vert don't forget the great courses plus dot com slash covert to understand how Al-Zour Cali rose rose to become one of the most feared terrorists on the planet. We must look to the town of Zarqa Jordan. Five hundred miles to the west of Baghdad or Al-Zour Cowie was was born in one thousand nine hundred sixty six author of insurgent Iraq. I'll ZERKALO WE IN THE NEW GENERATION Loretta Napoleonic other cow is a working class individual. It does not belong to an elitist family in that is very very different from the majority of the lead there some of the Jihadist Movement and arcade them his his background is he was a criminal. You know he spent time in Jordanian prison for sexual assault salt he was a drug dealer. He was a petty criminal Jordan. Well there is a there's a narrative which you find in the lives of of quite a lot the people who got involved without Kaieda and I suppose you could say that there's a period in their lives which you might call the sinful years crazy years as I mean you saw it with some of the nine eleven hijackers that there was a period of their life when they've been drinking heavily and doing lots of things which clearly Islam would consider very very very Harare unplayed Zaccaria was one of those people I mean accounts differ as to whether he was actually hard boozing villa in his hometown now it's certainly true that he was involved in some forms of crime and that he probably had some kind of a piff unie some kind of moments when he realized that he he's life was going the wrong way and the Islam was the answer for him and of course many of those people who had kind of experience often in jail became the most militant jihadist because they felt they had redeemed their lives and discovered purpose in one thousand nine hundred nine. All ZACCARIA traveled to Afghanistan to become a freedom MM fighter against the Soviet occupation it was there he met his mentor and Inspiration Osama bin Laden at the beginning of two thousand finally finally Auxerre car. We met Osama bin Laden. It was a very interesting meeting with the leader of al-Qaeda a very very powerful man in Afghanistan. Also cow was a novelty. It was the leader of this small group of individuals who did not even have a name that did not not have base and the reason why are the Cowie met is because he was looking for a sponsor he was looking for money. He wanted to set up a little camp where he could look after his followers. Osama bin Laden offer Cowie to become part of Al.. Okay dumb former White House counterterrorism adviser Fran Townsend Sir Kelly really came to at least my attention I think many in the counterterrorism community me during the millennium the ninety nine to two thousand period there had been a series of raids in Jordan and there was a threat in inside Jordan there was tremendous cooperation between the FBI the CIA and our Jordanian counterparts during in fact we deployed a number of FBI agents. It's over to Jordan to work with the CIA and the Jordanians and during the course of that investigation it became clear the leader of the cell was an individual by the name of Zarcal. We we knew he was an important terrorists figure. We knew he was an important operational leader. I don't think anyone at that point in time. Imagine you you know more than a decade later we would be chasing him inside. Iraq where he would become an even more influential figure in Al Qaeda in the wake of September eleventh much of the Al Qaeda leadership went into hiding in the tribal belt between Afghanistan and Pakistan the United States had begun its invasion of Afghanistan Afghanistan Zorka we and other al-Qaeda fighters meanwhile had crossed over to Iran and then into the northern Iraq region known as Kurdistan now now that move is very much the beginning of the making with made because the Americans were informed of the existence of outsor- Cowie at the end of two thousand and one by the Kurdish secret service the Kurdish secret service alerted Americans the odds are Cowan was the link between between Al Qaeda and Saddam Hussein it was clear as we were in Iraq the increasing importance of czar calloway inside al-Qaeda circles he had come up during the course of the war in Afghanistan people understood his importance as an operational leader and he was clearly trusted by bin Laden Auden and Al Qaeda senior leadership and so when he was deployed if you will from the federal administrative tribal aries into Iraq we understood as the the American counterterrorism community that this was a significant event this was he was well liked by soldiers and al Qaeda. He was well respected by leadership. He was incredibly capable he was experienced and so he had that unique combination of skills that would allow him to be a real force on for al Qaeda against US inside Iraq in two thousand three the US and other coalition forces entered Iraq and the Saddam Hussein regime quickly collapsed but it created a major power vacuum houser Collie who was hiding in the shadows kick started a campaign of violence. He stirred up the hatred between Iraq's two main religious groups the majority Shia Muslims and the minority Sunnis he then created a militant group with the aim of killing as many many Shias as possible and sparking a brutal cycle of violence across the nation and it was drawing the attention of the United States especially Secretary Three of State Colin Powell on the fifth of February two thousand and three calling power when to Security Council and in front of the words presented also Cowie as link between Qaidam and Saddam Hussein nobody at art of Our cowie before that day I mean everybody in the community of terrorists expert and never heard his name interestingly pressingly enough from that moment onwards also cowie became the men masterminded immaturity of the terrorist various attack which had taken place after nine eleven also Conway's group was named by intelligence officials al Qaeda in Iraq or for short short a Q. I when you look at Al.. Qaeda's mission in Iraq is our couch mission. We mistakenly look at these organizations as terrorist groups. This is too narrow. These are revolutionary organizations that want to spread an idea they can return to what they call a caliphate of fourteen centuries old old concept that there's a pure way to live according to the Koran Prophet Muhammad targets included bombing the offices of the United Nations and the Red Cross regular attacks tax on the basis of US military coalition forces but in an effort to maximize casualties the terrorist group shifted its attention to targeting public markets. It's police stations mosques and with it media coverage and in the eyes of our Collie this was attention on his movement and an important recruitment Krugman tool former interrogator and author of how to break a terrorist Matthew Alexander. There's a large influx of foreign fighters into Iraq after the Abu Abu Ghraib scandal which was essentially al-Qaeda's number one recruiting tool for convincing young Muslims from all across from everywhere from North Africa all across the Middle East to come to Iraq and fight in what they termed Jihad in these foreign fighters were extremely potent because they were the ones who made most of the suicide bombers so they're the ones that essentially we're also the most brutal I think the largely the ax you see like beheadings happen because of these foreign fighters and not so much because of Iraqis Al-Zour collie orchestrated numerous suicide bombings a devastating series of attacks in March two thousand four killed close to two hundred people at she a holy sites czar Cowie was is at the top of the target list inside Iraq one because of the bloodshed he was causing and not just of Iraqis. I mean this. This terrorist leader became a primary source of injuries and killings of our own soldiers and coalition forces and so absolutely he became prominent on the scope of the president in terms of briefings and targets then on May eleventh.

Iraq Inspiration Osama bin Laden Cowie Afghanistan al-Qaeda Al-Zour Cowie Al Qaeda Saddam Hussein outsor- Cowie Zarqa Jordan United States Baghdad bin Laden Auden assault Loretta Napoleonic
"zarqa jordan" Discussed on Kickass News

Kickass News

04:09 min | 2 years ago

"zarqa jordan" Discussed on Kickass News

"To respect him. I didn't come to like him. I didn't come to agree with him. And I did mourn when he died, but I came to respect to leader. And the thing that was interesting about him. When we pair him with Maximilian Robespierre, the French revolution. Zarqa we was poorly educated came up of the tough background and industrial town in Jordan. He became very committed to Iselin, the fundamental view of Islam and believed very heavily engine hot or holy war and wanted to be mujahedeen or holy fighter. And what worked for him, which he became a zealot he became someone so pious te so personally self-disciplined so obviously committed to his cause that burn like hot flame, and almost like moths are attracted to that. We're all attracted to people who are very confident very committed very zealot like in their leadership style as people did with ropes peer. Now, the other thing about Sarkar weaves because he was so committed he got many other people to follow him who didn't share the same level. But they were. Willing to follow him because his obvious commitment to it. And then he was also he was a good leader. He was charismatic. He did good things get around to to talk to his people basics. And so I could disagree with his 'cause I disagree. He was a psychopath in terms of murder, but but I had to respect the effectiveness. He had us a leader. And to be honest, head to learn from it, I suppose it's easy to dismiss him as a psychopath in a monster, which he probably was, but it's not a useful way to go about trying to actually defeat and kill your enemy. I it sounds like you must have dedicated a good amount of thought to getting in the mind of your enemy was that a pretty dark place. And would you come to understand about him? Well, it is a dark place to do that. Thank what we do in war. We try to dehumanize the enemy do what? Right. Army's always do we call? The Germans the Huns. We tal- they Japanese the nips twelve Vietnamese the googles and. That's so that they're not human show. It's easier to kill him. You're not frightened of them. And you you don't feel the same empathy when you actually fight against someone for a while that changes because particularly when they turn out to be very good fo-, you have to respect them. And so in the case of any enemy, but particularly Cowie I started with this thing. He he beheaded a young American Nick Berg in two thousand four filmed it, and my whole force was just emotionally furious over and we committed ourselves to kill him. But over time a few things happen. I who's very good at what he did. And then the second is you come to the realization that his perspective is his perspective. And he believes it deeply, I may believe my side. I may be committed to it. But what makes me right in him wrong? And what if I'd been born in Zarqa Jordan instead of where I was what I believe is. He did and. And what if he's is right as I am just on different sides. And so you start to get a grudging I respect for the effectiveness of your foe. And then you have to have a certain respect that they might just be as right as we are the beheadings were sort of a morbid media strategy. But somehow, it seemed that it was affected with his own people in if you will establish his brand or the brand of al-qaeda and Iraq talk a little about that. And how that was received within his circle. Sure, we think that the beheadings were to scare the west, and they do a little bit of that. But what they really did is they signaled to his potential followers that he is so committed to the cause that he's willing to do things that he knows are horrific. Isis made an art form of this. They committed to people that we are after a righteous cause, but our causes so righteous that we're willing to do evil to achieve it..

googles Nick Berg Maximilian Robespierre Zarqa Iraq al-qaeda Zarqa Jordan Sarkar murder Jordan Iselin Isis Cowie Army
"zarqa jordan" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

10:08 min | 2 years ago

"zarqa jordan" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

"Jason man, gone leaders myth and reality you can't put it down. You cannot put down leader general mcchrystal. Welcome back. Always a pleasure to talk. It, sir. You it's my honor. Thank you. I gotta tell you. This is it's hump for me because I've spent hundreds of hours with Plutarch, I help Richard Nixon write the book leaders in Winston Churchill's, great contemporaries is one of my favorites. So when I saw that Stanley mcchrystal had done Plutarch for the new millennium six pairs of leaders compared plus one stand on. I thought I cannot wait to see the thirteen are. But I didn't allow myself to go through the table of contents. I wanted to be surprised are you still boy might surprise? Are you still surprised by the leaders you and Eggers and Mangone chose to profile Hugh, actually? Am I thought we were going to come out with sort of a more expected political leader or even business leader group, but we tried to get diversity and what they did and their sexes and their backgrounds and whatnot. And I feel really good about it. Well, you said we lack I'm quoting you. Now, we lack the leadership equivalent of a general theory of relativity. So you sit out to outline and underscore the complexities. And I finished the book, and I thought to myself, I don't have a formula. And I don't think he wanted me to have a formula. That's exactly right. You know, we we were writing this book and partway through we came out with a realization that leadership isn't what we think it is and studying history, we realize it never has been. And so as we went back to deconstruct, what leadership actually constitutes we learn it's not something that leaders possessed that they aim at followers, and they make things happen is really like an interaction between contextual factors, followers and lead. Irs, and it's always changing and therefore endlessly complex. So now, I want to warn the audience, I'm gonna talk about some specifics from leaders myth and reality. So if you wanna be surprised as I was you can just turn this off and go to the book and Amazon dot com. Leaders myth and reality by Stanley mcchrystal Jagger's, Jason Mangone. But if you don't mind getting a little bit of a spoiler, let let me just say the biggest surprise for me is defined find Pierre ends are Cowie at the middle of your book. But boy does it make sense when you're done with reading about these two villains. They were villainous leaders of extraordinary ability and effectiveness. That's exactly right. And we call them zealots because their strength came from sort of the purity of their conviction, and the fact that they wouldn't waiver from what they believed even though we might think what they believed was completely wrong. It gave them a magnetism for followers. I also picked up general that names mean a great deal, zealots and other leaders. End up with different sets of names Robespierre became the incorruptible Sarkhouhi took on many different names for him. And so this renaming process is part of our myth building. And to get back to the core person. You always went back to their childhood as grant recommended we do if you want to know the man find the child that's exactly right because I don't think people stray too far from what initially forms them. We talk about this tough upbringing in Zarqa, Jordan industrial town. He gets tattoos. He's kind of a bully. He gets in fights. She does these things and show the rest of his life is both a journey to move away from that come leader to become an ideologically pure Islamist. But also he can't step away from the fact in many ways she's a thug and when he personally beheads people he's not far from his youth. That's it and to bring out the full. Portrait of the evil and the zealotry in to do it in thirty pages. Mazing there's lots of disgust Coco Chanel. A wonder Walt Disney is far more complex than I'd imagine. And I gotta confess to you. I've never even heard. I hope I pronounce it correctly. John who I had never even heard of him. I'll be talking about him. And now president is using him with the secretary of state in a few minutes. How when did you? Discover am I saying correctly showing you young hey jungle, I hadn't either he when we were studying this. We wanted to find somebody from Asia, China, preferably and Dante. Attention. We had on John had a lot of what he's he's known for you know, being seven feet tall. Five foot waste being made a unique at age ten and then yet, but coming a very famous Admiral all of those things don't seem believable. And of course, many of the may not be accurate. But the reality is he has become a symbol for modern China. And so he's symbolizes that China's past was international. And so that the Bill road initiative that Xi Jinping is pushing he can go back and point to somebody looks Jong. Hey and go look this isn't new for us. This is legitimate. Because we've been doing it for hundreds of years the astonishing success of the treasure fleet. Again, I'm admitting my historical ignorance, I didn't know about the treasurer. I did not know that China had ventured as far as they did on the seas. And then when you bring up the president Xi is using it in the road and belt rhetoric and they're building this blue water navy ship afloat than we have right now. General mcchrystal, it's a great warning people to read leaders, well, names better. So call me stand you. But no, that's exactly right. You leaders get leveraged. And when I say leaders get leveraged in their lifetime. They can get leverage. But their legacy gets leveraged. It has a purpose and value mean Coco Chanel is still a brand. That sells things Joan. Hey is a symbol row. Speier in some ways is a symbol for somebody. Who's also a cautionary tale for others. How somebody who's a lawyer by training who comes in his beliefs. So fanatical that he essentially leads the reign of terror. We look at that. And we say even somebody trying to achieve something as arguably admirable as virtue and a new French Republic can get so horribly off track. Now, I wanted to save the last three minutes of our very brief introduction to leaders, and it's an every bookstore Amazon right now, and I'm going to try and get general mcchrystal over to the studio to do a long conversation about this the marble man, Robert E Lee coming up is Mike Pompeo, another other West Point, man. You're no us point, man. But the sort of archetypal West Point man is Robert de Leon. I didn't know that I'm reading from page twenty five other generals. Like Eisenhower MacArthur in patent were depicted in statues at West Point held up for sunny, but for Lee was reserved the special honor of emulation, I along with many other young leaders venerated him for his unwavering dignity stoic commitment and courageous leadership. I gotta compliment you Stanley mcchrystal because you came to grips with the other side of the late. He was cruel to the people. Enslaved and he broke out to the United States. And so while he had what you call. The extraordinary ability for war the deeply mixed record. That's exactly right. I mean, I grew up literally, wishing I could be Robert E Lee, but never thinking that I could achieve that level of performance or excellent. But yet she really at two things first he lost. Now. People can make excuses. You didn't have as many soldiers, logistics. But he lost the CEO, you judge that way, but much more importantly, he chose to betray the same oath that I made and secretary pale made in the plane at West Point tried to destroy the United States of America, which his role model. George Washington it helps create and then did it in defense of slavery. And they almost no way to square that. And I won't tell people about the portrait and your personal story because that's where that grabs you and people need to read about it. But I wanna know since he had no demerits how many demerits did Stanley mcchrystal rack up at West Point. Oh, never fair question. Zero. Let me let me close by talking with you about not Einstein in Bernstein. That's fascinating Harriet Tubman now, I know about Harriet Tubman since being a small child, but boy did she have guts. I don't know that many people in America know that today. I think when we think of various ten, and we think of this small African American former slave she went back into Slade control territory thirteen times, if she'd been captured on one of them, he would have she would have been reintroduced or probably executed to bring out fellow slaves, and so for personal courage, her personal dedication, and yet she wanted nothing for herself. And show is a consequence. She lived to old age still very modest her lifestyle very modest except in for symbolism. She became for African Americans and for females proof that you can do things that matter, and that's symbolic became incredibly important. And I would argue still is today and then finally the the unusual pairing. You're calling the Plutarch Tarquin method here. Boss tweed, and Margaret Thatcher is the most unusual. Of the two, but it works. I mean, are you surprised that it works? Yeah. We we really sort of wrestled with that one because they're very different. But, but if you think about it, Margaret Thatcher has this conviction of a set of beliefs, and she's very effective through a sort of normal arc of a career. And then of course, she's Blakely assassinated when people get tired of her that helps too many leaders boss tweed, he manipulates the system he hall. It's spraying is brilliant. And they're both at the center of very complex rule sets. And they make them work bringing about the orange riots in the fall of tweet. I didn't know about the leader's is such a great book general Stanley mcchrystal. Let's get a date set. Come over to along a.

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