35 Burst results for "Zambia"

New CDC reports warn variants could lead to rapid rise in Covid-19 cases

News and Perspective with Tom Hutyler

00:38 sec | 3 months ago

New CDC reports warn variants could lead to rapid rise in Covid-19 cases

"The new covert 19 variants that are spreading across the U. S CDs. He says those new variants could easily lead to a rapid rise in covert 19 cases refreshing its calls for people to postpone travel and continue wearing masks and social distancing. UK and South African variants are thought to be more transmissible. The CDC cited a study of cases in Zambia, which shares a lot of commerce and travel with South Africa, and says within a month the number of variant cases there grew 16 fold. CDC says the UK variant is spreading rapidly here in the U. S, and could be the dominant strain sometime next month. Marco Malard ABC News Talk

U. CDC UK Zambia South Africa Marco Malard Abc News
"zambia" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

The Economist: The Intelligence

05:55 min | 5 months ago

"zambia" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

"Charlotte. He.

"zambia" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

The Economist: The Intelligence

07:27 min | 5 months ago

"zambia" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

"Don been doing into the lead comes in. The central zambian town of kabwe has been called the most toxic place on the planet. It was developed around a lead mine built by a british colonial firm in the early nineteen hundreds although the mine shut its doors in one thousand nine hundred four. it's toxic. Dust continues to plague the town. Some residents try to protect themselves like joy. Bouza who tells her young brothers not to play outside of just in before i went to now a class action lawsuit against anglo american south africa which was affiliated with the mind for fifty years is seeking compensation for more than one hundred thousand women and children. Wade tend to defend positions as. We don't believe that. Anglo american is responsible for the current situation. I obviously understand that. That doesn't help. The people of kabwe. And i realized that and of course we have every sympathy so they applaud whatever the outcome of the case. There will still be a need to deal with the lead that permeates the town's soil and it inhabitants bodies. The most atrocious cliche for any africa correspondent is to refer to replace as hot and dusty but in case the fact that cowboys hot and dusty really matters because it's the dust off the former lead mine. The has blown all of time john. Mcdermott is the economists. Chief africa respondent. He recently visited kabwe. Much of kabwe is a normal. Mid sized. african settee has a bustling market. And it's a hive of activity but there are about half a dozen townships that lie close to the former smelter and they in particular are kind of coated in this fine dust which contains the lead metal. And when i was there a few weeks ago. I went to see a man called. Assail timbo. hello good morning how you move you. Who was a minor for almost two decades and we sat in his front yard. What kind of tree is this smuggle underneath a mango tree while chickens were pecking around his feet and i heard her story of the mind. Gross today it will be became. I think they demo- plus mr tembo worked at the mine after it was nationalized in nine thousand nine hundred seventy until it closed in one thousand nine hundred four and he says he was never really told about the dangers of lead while he was there but that today continues to give him health problems. He says he's got bad eyesight sore head droopy limbs. He can't be sure but he suspects the all of those elements have something to do with the fact that worked at the lead. The hoi issue has come to everybody in this study after the miami has been and presumably if this dust is all around that mr tembo story isn't isn't unique. That's right anyone you speak to in cowboy has some knowledge of the risks of lead and more recently that wellness has grown especially when it comes to the dangers faced by children. Local ngos are hosting radio shows and running courses in schools to educate people. Someone please tell me about what is lead. Leave is a subset benefits as you. Live is very poisonous. Substance that finding the so. That's gonna alert of course. Potentially toxic metal can be poisonous really low levels in the bloodstream. And because children's bodies are smaller they're developing and because kids more likely inhale and ingest the toxic dust there at greater risk and their effects can be profound. We're talking about behavioral problems learning disabilities and ultimately low iq if you have prolonged exposure to the metal and what efforts have been made down the years to to protect the residents from from the the the mines lead. There'd been a few efforts a couple funded by the world bank including one that's going but environmental scientists and experts in this field are convinced that none of them have been or will be sufficient to fully decontaminate the town. I saw this. When i went to the house of a man called cornelius katiti. They went to kidneys. Closed this one at that point. And then they put some blocks so that their wits through this one he has a canal right on the back of his garden which was dredged in the two thousands by a world bank funded project but even today as a matter has grown into it. Every rainy season water builds up and the comes over the of canal into his garden adding to the toxic contents of yard. And that just symbolized for me. How while there's been these piecemeal efforts day in day out to the people in cowboy still face with the poisonous environs and about the court case that that is tackling this problem. Why why is it happening now. After all these years of of half hearted efforts lawyers have been looking at the case for the better part of two decades but they feel they finally got in the necessarily archive over research. Done to bring the case against anglo and the also feel that legal changes in south africa to do with the ease of making a class action suit mean that now is the time to try and seek redress for their clients. And what do you think will happen. The only thing. I know for sure is that the case is gonna take many years to play out the lawyers for the applicants need to first prove that the case can be heard in south africa. That's before it even gets to trial and if it were to get to trial there's no the anglo will vigorously contest the charges so i don't think there'll be a resolution anytime soon and in the meantime the residents of kabwe will will continue to inhale to live around all of this toxic dirt. Subtly that's the case in the absence of any clear plan to remediate the time people living in. Kobe are trying their best to protect themselves. But ultimately many residents are simply too poor to leave and others do not want to go because whatever its perils cowboys their home like cornelius katiti. But you hope that your children your grandchildren will be to play and safety some point. Yes john thank you very much for your time. Thank you jason.

kabwe mr tembo Bouza Assail timbo cornelius katiti south africa africa Mcdermott Wade cowboys john miami anglo Kobe jason nets
Get the lead out: Zambias toxic mine

The Economist: The Intelligence

07:27 min | 5 months ago

Get the lead out: Zambias toxic mine

"Don been doing into the lead comes in. The central zambian town of kabwe has been called the most toxic place on the planet. It was developed around a lead mine built by a british colonial firm in the early nineteen hundreds although the mine shut its doors in one thousand nine hundred four. it's toxic. Dust continues to plague the town. Some residents try to protect themselves like joy. Bouza who tells her young brothers not to play outside of just in before i went to now a class action lawsuit against anglo american south africa which was affiliated with the mind for fifty years is seeking compensation for more than one hundred thousand women and children. Wade tend to defend positions as. We don't believe that. Anglo american is responsible for the current situation. I obviously understand that. That doesn't help. The people of kabwe. And i realized that and of course we have every sympathy so they applaud whatever the outcome of the case. There will still be a need to deal with the lead that permeates the town's soil and it inhabitants bodies. The most atrocious cliche for any africa correspondent is to refer to replace as hot and dusty but in case the fact that cowboys hot and dusty really matters because it's the dust off the former lead mine. The has blown all of time john. Mcdermott is the economists. Chief africa respondent. He recently visited kabwe. Much of kabwe is a normal. Mid sized. african settee has a bustling market. And it's a hive of activity but there are about half a dozen townships that lie close to the former smelter and they in particular are kind of coated in this fine dust which contains the lead metal. And when i was there a few weeks ago. I went to see a man called. Assail timbo. hello good morning how you move you. Who was a minor for almost two decades and we sat in his front yard. What kind of tree is this smuggle underneath a mango tree while chickens were pecking around his feet and i heard her story of the mind. Gross today it will be became. I think they demo- plus mr tembo worked at the mine after it was nationalized in nine thousand nine hundred seventy until it closed in one thousand nine hundred four and he says he was never really told about the dangers of lead while he was there but that today continues to give him health problems. He says he's got bad eyesight sore head droopy limbs. He can't be sure but he suspects the all of those elements have something to do with the fact that worked at the lead. The hoi issue has come to everybody in this study after the miami has been and presumably if this dust is all around that mr tembo story isn't isn't unique. That's right anyone you speak to in cowboy has some knowledge of the risks of lead and more recently that wellness has grown especially when it comes to the dangers faced by children. Local ngos are hosting radio shows and running courses in schools to educate people. Someone please tell me about what is lead. Leave is a subset benefits as you. Live is very poisonous. Substance that finding the so. That's gonna alert of course. Potentially toxic metal can be poisonous really low levels in the bloodstream. And because children's bodies are smaller they're developing and because kids more likely inhale and ingest the toxic dust there at greater risk and their effects can be profound. We're talking about behavioral problems learning disabilities and ultimately low iq if you have prolonged exposure to the metal and what efforts have been made down the years to to protect the residents from from the the the mines lead. There'd been a few efforts a couple funded by the world bank including one that's going but environmental scientists and experts in this field are convinced that none of them have been or will be sufficient to fully decontaminate the town. I saw this. When i went to the house of a man called cornelius katiti. They went to kidneys. Closed this one at that point. And then they put some blocks so that their wits through this one he has a canal right on the back of his garden which was dredged in the two thousands by a world bank funded project but even today as a matter has grown into it. Every rainy season water builds up and the comes over the of canal into his garden adding to the toxic contents of yard. And that just symbolized for me. How while there's been these piecemeal efforts day in day out to the people in cowboy still face with the poisonous environs and about the court case that that is tackling this problem. Why why is it happening now. After all these years of of half hearted efforts lawyers have been looking at the case for the better part of two decades but they feel they finally got in the necessarily archive over research. Done to bring the case against anglo and the also feel that legal changes in south africa to do with the ease of making a class action suit mean that now is the time to try and seek redress for their clients. And what do you think will happen. The only thing. I know for sure is that the case is gonna take many years to play out the lawyers for the applicants need to first prove that the case can be heard in south africa. That's before it even gets to trial and if it were to get to trial there's no the anglo will vigorously contest the charges so i don't think there'll be a resolution anytime soon and in the meantime the residents of kabwe will will continue to inhale to live around all of this toxic dirt. Subtly that's the case in the absence of any clear plan to remediate the time people living in. Kobe are trying their best to protect themselves. But ultimately many residents are simply too poor to leave and others do not want to go because whatever its perils cowboys their home like cornelius katiti. But you hope that your children your grandchildren will be to play and safety some point. Yes john thank you very much for your time. Thank you jason.

Kabwe Mr Tembo Bouza Assail Timbo Africa South Africa Mcdermott Wade Cornelius Katiti DON Cowboys John Miami Anglo Kobe Jason
As Tanzania Votes, Many See Democracy Itself on the Ballot

Monocle 24: The Globalist

08:18 min | 7 months ago

As Tanzania Votes, Many See Democracy Itself on the Ballot

"Tons Anita went to the polls yesterday to vote in an election overshadowed by opposition complaints of irregularities such as ballot box, stuffing President John Maga. Fully who is accused of stifling democracy seeks a second term in office alongside fourteen other candidates talk to Dan. Padgett is electoral politics at the university. Of Aberdeen, he specializes in political communication through mass rallies and populist and nationalist ideologies in Tanzania and joins me on the line. Now Don Tanzania's long been thought of in the West is a a haven of stability within east Africa but I mean this isn't necessarily the case and I. I wonder if you could sketch out the political dynamic there, the ruling party's been in power since nineteen sixty one. Yes that's right. It's is the longest ruling party in sub. Saharan Africa. The political dynamic in Tanzania has been one of the ruling Kanzi, CCM's decline over the last fifteen years. Reaching a low point in two thousand fifteen where it where the margin of victory was. The fittest is ever been. Since then President Michel, Foodie, it came to kyle and that's election has led Tanzania. Very shot an increasingly extreme offered Harry. Intern. And we weren't sure how just how? Radical that authoritarian agenda would be and the election this we're just getting results from now suggests that it is as bad as any of us feared as so the opposition allegations of vote rigging, etc do stand up. Well. So. Of course, normally I would turn to international election observers. Attorney to arbitrate these claims to decide which to give credence in which not to give credence. Unfortunately, we can't almost no international election observers. Were invited and those that were invited were. Invited at our so Given that and given the advantage of the opportunity that this creates the ruling party the elections it's hard not to give at least prima facie credence to these opposition claims especially given the the wide range of anecdote to. Video and photographic evidence that I've seen an which which I've been collecting these last twenty four hours, and of course, zipping a social media crackdown various restrictions on the press. Has Been, a crackdown all over and and for the last five years. So in many ways, the the rigging receipt which we've been seeing apparently seeing of the next twenty four hours. Is. Really just the icing on the authoritarian cake. There's extreme. Media Censorship rallies have been banned and consider route the rally. The most important means of communication tends to emotional time about seventy percent of people attend local meetings on a regular basis and attend election campaign rallies they were they were abandoned twenty sixteen and indeed the opposition at large have. Hottest. Struggle underneath. Almost constance. Of States and extra state harassment in includes trumped up court cases but also extrajudicial. So extra state attacks. Unknown assailants that have arrested some abductors killed. And in fact, one of the main challenges has recently returned to the country after recovering from gunshot wounds. That's right. So tenderly series is. Presidential. Candidate is the largest opposition party in Tanzania. and. So that's Experience of being of surviving attempted assassination attempt has has given. US already in very impressive political figure a sort of a sparkle. Some people referred to him as a living miracle. But of course, we don't know the results. Yes. But we all seeing violence particularly in Zanzibar. Zanzibar the autonomous. ARCHEPELAGO's Zanzibar, which is a federally devote area of 'em. Into UK. Has has often seen electoral violence. We saw it in ninety five and two, thousand and thirteen, thousand, five and twenty fifteen and actions by varying degrees. So in in some ways, this is a return to form It's not. The recurrence of violence is is. Seems to be because the opposition has probably one in sensabaugh almost every time. But they've never officially one out one means or another has always been used to not in the that's the that's the the scholarly consensus on. Politics what's different? This time I think is that there's violence on the mainland as well. So this is no longer an issue of contained physical violence in Zanzibar. There have been a series of incidents including. What appears to be an attempt to a to attack the chairman of the leading opposition party on the eve of the elections. So that's one difference the other is considered. No money there is. A. Sporadic protests violence and in return state brutality, police army heavy-handedness in putting down those protests that the protests have often been. Constrained and sporadic because they have not been condoned led. By, by the leaders of the opposition there, there are indications that this could be different this time one of the reasons for that is. The, the rhetoric is different. The leader of the opposition in Zanzibar say amount has been say had has been saying that in the past he's held his supporters back. He's been of restraint, and at this time he he won't urge restraint to newly sue has said that he will. Bring people out onto the streets and consider the state of the opposition behind because it seems like this might be the last stand in a sense that vikings they can make, and so they they don't have that say incentive to hold back this time and say the keep up how to drive the next time. Just finally before we go, do you think that this is part of something that we're seeing across parts of Africa there is a younger demographic. They were all born after independence that not prepared to accept authoritarian rule the just coming to the age where they are protesting we're seeing it in Nigeria within saws and in various other places could this be the the Africans spring. My sense is if there is African spring to come, it will come off and an Wiki will extend. Mexico an authoritarian winter. The trend on that strikes me is that a number of leaders are emerging in an intense Aena in Zambia. In other parts of the consonant, which bear a striking resemblance to this sort of authoritarian. Developmental. Nationalists of is so The there's a young population I are angry. But in fact, I think the trend seems to go the other way. And results. When can we expect those? So the first also are already dripping in and they show. That a series of opposition strongholds, there's places that you would never expect or or at least likely. To expect to go to a to the ruling party are being won by then by margins of three to one, which suggests that the the the rigging. Being worried about maybe taking place typically a Tanzanian election result takes three or four days that was related end and announced especially with the presidential elections but. So far. This is actually has been crisis already.

Tanzania Zanzibar Don Tanzania Saharan Africa East Africa Padgett DAN Aberdeen Anita President Trump John Maga Africa Aena President Michel United States Intern Harry
TikTok's owner applies for Chinese license to close US deal

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | 8 months ago

TikTok's owner applies for Chinese license to close US deal

"Tick tocks owner says he has a plan for Chinese technology exports license as it tries to complete a deal with oracle and Walmart to keep the popular video up operating in the U. S. Beijing tightened control over technology exports last month in an effort to gain leverage over Washington's attempts to force an outright sale of tech talk to U. S. owners the White House says the video service is a security risk because the personal information of its millions of U. S. users could be handed over to Chinese authorities president Donald Trump said this week he would approve a proposed deal in which oracle and Walmart could initially owned a combined twenty percent often use U. S. entity tick tock global I'm in Zambia Shockley

Oracle Walmart U. S. Beijing Washington White House Donald Trump U. S. President Trump Zambia
Recording police brutality: how technology is driving the new civil rights movement

The Vergecast

31:46 min | 9 months ago

Recording police brutality: how technology is driving the new civil rights movement

"Hey everybody seemingly from the verge cast really special interview episode this week yesterday the verge published feature package where calling capturing the police which was a months-long effort for almost everybody at the site to really interrogate the role of technology in the movement against police violence. The heart of the package is a feature where we talk to. People who had filmed the somewhat viral videos of police violence asking him why they did it. What happened next how they felt in the moment whether they would do it again, really contextualising these that we've seen over and over and over again we estimate videos. One is about a specific incidents with a specific set of men in Baytown Texas who filmed police violence and what happened next another one from the science team is about body cameras and police body cameras, and how they affect your perception. What's going on in some academic research that's come out about that. So I asked verge reporter, Steven and verge video producer, my calf, the two leaders of the site wide project To come on, say talk to me about the project what they learned in. Really I, keep thinking about this, the role that our phones are playing in changing our relationship to the and the government. I don't think any product manager or designer at a smartphone company ever thought that their products will be used in this way or create this moment. This is the direct intersection of technology and culture, which is something the virtuous. Investigate. So this is a really great conversation with John and Maria and a really big project. We're very proud of it that'd be read. Watch it here are John and Maria. Maria Abdul. John Steven Welcome to the virtuous easy doing well I. I'm doing great another beautiful day in. Quarantine Mario. How are you? I'm good. I'm very relieved that this really big thing that we have produced is out there. So now I get to. Take back and reflect de. So Youtube or the editorial leaders have big projects that four I would say two months we just called the police project I. Hope Everybody can see it on site. We're very proud of it in scope it looks at how people have been using technology to record the police record police behavior protests use technology and the tools to organizers protests to organize. The movement around police brutality, and then a lot of how those cameras in particular affect our relationship with the police. So it was a huge project and it looks like one big feature, a bunch of. Additional reports around that feature in two videos that my help produce. Let's start with where it came from. How did this project begin in? How did it take the shape that it ended up being on the site? That is very, very good question because. It was sort of such a big undertaking. We it started in a very different direction than it ended as I think a lot of large projects generally tend to. So it started with an idea, a sort of idea in the staff, one of our executive editor was like we should do something to capture the moment then it sort of fell on me to shape that idea. Which is, which is interesting sort of problem because I was very interested in. Working with the initial iteration of the of the project, but getting a chance to shape it meant that I had to think critically about sort of what what would fit the moment and what would capture the moment. Well, I would say so that's how we came came up with the idea of focusing on the people filming videos of police brutality because it felt like there was a section missing to the narrative that was Benjamin. Circulating around social media, which is to say, we don't really hear from those people like we hear a lot from from victims we hear from police officers, but we don't really hear from people who like the everyday people who are sort of in the line of fire and decide to make the very brave decision to pick up their phones and record and sh like shine light like shed light. On on this type of violence that really sort of goes undocumented because one of the things we police finances, it never really shows up police reports. Yeah. One thing that caught me is I say this a lot but this is a new way of using phones that fundamentally what's happening with with all of these if you look at our feature, we started at very intentionally with Rodney King. George holiday that the person who shot the Rodney King beating in the nineties using gigantic Sony eight millimeter cassette handicap which basically no one had those like some families WanNa had those. But the the that camera was present at that moment in time at one am on that corner to witness that thing was astoundingly improbable and as we've come to now, the presence of cameras is actually more likely than not in just the way people live their lives and so the decision to record seems at once. Easy simple. Everyone has a camera. It seems likely that everything will be recorded, but it also turns out to have dramatic consequences. Yeah. Yeah. I think one of the main threads which will I'm sure get into later is a lot of these people felt afraid of retaliation from the police because they posted on social media they sort of were indentifying themselves as targets, Samara and you pretty. Videos here how how did you pick the two together the verge video team did want in the verge science team did one how do we land in those two? So. At the first video and Ben Evita's. I initially saw the video on this very large like database of other videos, police brutality that had been collected, and that was being shared on twitter that we were using that we were looking through for this project, and when I first saw the video I serve noted it as something worthy. But because it had, it didn't happen at a protest. It wasn't the the video that I thought I was going to focus on but after just Justin Callum did the interview with Isaiah for the peace reporters feature in. Told me after he published the video, there had been an increased police surveillance in his life and that he was feeling a lot of anxiety and a Lotta paranoia since he published video. It just really struck me that he still even with all of the sphere and all this anxiety and what was happening he still wanted to talk to us because he had told Justin that he was interested in being part of the video project and so as soon as she told me that I spoke to him and as we sort of spoke, it was just. So clear that he understood the magnitude of recording and he understood the consequences that comes with it and yet still wanted to bring awareness to not only this moment but also what happens when you record the police? So that's how we landed on that video. So our second video on the role of body cams and capturing police brutality fell imperative that we would cover. It in that way given that it's not only bystander footage that is coming out of these recent protests. It's also a lot of body CAM footage in. So we thought it was important and imperative, and that verge science team thought it was imperative to also cover the role of camps and capturing police brutality, but also how they might actually influence how we perceive police. Violence. So it just added a different layer and a different impact to this larger piece. One thing that caught me about that and Addie has report that just is really stuck with me as we went through the project about how all these videos of protests and police violence are becoming a genre film, and as I read that and I watched the body cam video. It just occurred to me that we actually have to use of the formal language of film to describe what's happening here that the body cam is telling the story because it's one kind of camera it shows you one kind of it has a gaze and all these other cameras have another kind of perspective in it. I. Don't think we ever think about that as these videos is having maybe like that formal connection between what the cameras are doing and what you is the viewer perceived and that to me has been a very powerful through line of this whole project. Actually cameras are active participants in these stories and they shape the narrative. The same way that we we know this in every other situation where there's cameras camera shape the narrative, and they leave things out in a enhance other things and that to me I think there's going to be a big long cultural reckoning over the role of cameras in these moments because we don't really understand how that affects our blazing to the culture to the police to the state, and it's changing because the. Cameras Right now I mean it is ironic a little bit that this genre films started in Los Angeles. Well, that's the most cameras right and it's I mean like you know if you think about it that way it's like it makes sense that like Rodney, King beating was filmed by a person in Los Angeles and maybe not elsewhere but also I, think I think it's interesting that you bring up peace because i. I do think filmmakers understand this. And it is also I mean to to get not conspiratorial but to go a little bit off the rails which I still think it's in line but. The US government spends a not insignificant amount of money advising film makers were making films about the police and the military, and they do get some of these editorial. Editorial. Control some of the stuff. and. I think that perspective does shape the way that we see some of these institutions. Which is why I think it's very powerful that. People on the ground filming and they're making their own narratives about these institutions in real time. So let's start there. That's the that's the big feature. That's the piece reporters. It's eleven interviews with people who film police violence. I want to just immediately atop credit or creative director William troll and the engineer from the box media team Adler who built this thing it is beautiful is quite an experience to go through it. But the stories are actually of course, the most powerful thing. John, tell me about one thing you said to me at the very beginning of this project was this is the same story over and over again? Yes. And there's something about the volume of it that I think really brings it home feature came together and tell me hey, came to that realization and tell us what that story actually is. Yeah. So we interviewed a lot of people that was that was the hard part. One of the hardest parts of the projects was finding people who actually wanted to talk to us but I think we were using Greg sets list on twitter to find some of these people Shasta Greg I did actually interview him for. The you know that's a separate thing but yeah, I think I mean I. Think it's very it's interesting right because through these videos like they all have the same, the same beginning middle and end and. It's once you've see enough of them. It's very it's becomes predictable where the rising action in the falling action isn't purely film criticism terms I. Think the reason that we decided to go this route was because it adds context experience police violence like it's one of the things that like it really gives depth to what's going on and it's stuff that you don't normally see and the idea was to bring that sort of reality. Home to people reading, which is why the reason it's the same story every time and the reason that it's sort of like it was distracting actually at the beginning because I was like, okay, this is a different place. This is a different time. These are different people, but like chronicling the experience effective people in the same way, and that's why it was the same story every time because it's not every day that you see. Somebody who is like an officer? Who's who has sworn an oath to protect the public, just beating the shit out of. A peaceful protester and I think it's one of those things it sort of jars you out of complacency and I think for a lot of the people that we spoke to the interviews it seemed like these people were very sort of Shell. Shocked. They sort of knew the extent of the problem but a lot of them were just normal people who happen to be a protest and happened to be filming when stuff went down and so it was very strange reading these these. Reports from the ground like these eleven fourteen over and over again because. One of the reasons I think that it's important that we have the dateline like when it happened where it happened and like you know how many shares or whatever it, the the videos got was because it, it gave back some necessary context because again, if you're if you're reading this stuff in a vacuum if you're just reading reports. From. People who filmed the stuff it really does get eerily similar in for whatever it's worth videos are almost all at night. If they're usually chaotic and they all feel like are happening same place. Yeah. It's really strange and maybe they are I mean at least psychically speaking right like it's it is the same sort of mental place I think yeah and that was one of the notes as we were putting the thing together that we got from our editors was this we have to return some sense of place to it. So we we added that back in as you were kind of editing each of these individual vignettes. was there a theme that that really came out from each of the people? Was it? What what strikes me as as I watch all these videos there's just everyone has a phone out. Right like all the time it just seems like this instinct to have your phone out that to me is new. That's yeah. That's not how people thought ten years ago or twenty years ago I really do think that's in large part because of the power of social media because again, like the thing about social media, people dismiss it out of hand as like a bad and toxic place which a lot of the time it is like don't get me wrong. However, it is one of the only avenues for social change for people who are marginalized like it's a place where you can go to be heard. By by the institutions who would normally just have the power to ignore you and I think like police violence is one of those things where it is like it is sort of an abuse of power, right? It's one of these. It's like something that it won't show up on an incident report somebody like a cop like using their baton on a protester but if somebody films that and films like the circumstances where it where it happened how it happened like you you you you get a sense of whether or not this was justified and I think. A lot of the Times it's not and a lot of the Times that goes on reported and I think. People have seen that you can actually like get some measure of justice from these otherwise unaccountable institutions by sharing the stuff on social media because public pressure is still a thing and it's interesting that to go back to Isaiah Ben Evita's. He has video that officer fired like his him posting the video actually made a change at the very local level. In his town and I think I think that's a really important thing and I, that's that's sort of what's driving this stuff because again, institutions like the police were previously entirely unaccountable to the public. Mario I mean you, you are yourself filmmaker you talked to Isaiah how do you? How do you take that? That everyone is just instinctively pulling out their phone because they think it will lead to some some change down the road. I think what's interesting about Isiah specifically is that this video doesn't take place at a protest it. He was filming outside of a convenience store they were coming from a barbecue. They hadn't gone to protests recently, they were the at that moment they weren't planning necessarily planning on going to protest later that week however. In as the video begins, you hear him say I've got to get out and record this. You also hear his friends in the car say we've got a record this and yet when we interviewed them, it was the first time any of them had ever recorded police had ever been with other people who recording the police and I think that is largely part to seeing these videos. On twitter and on facebook of police violence being captured by by citizens being captured by civilians, and so they wanted to hold this police officer accountable and they also started recording him preemptively. They didn't start recording him the moment he started you know approaching them they started recording the minute they were pulling over in. So I think that really signifies to us at least to me that. Even. If you've never participated in a protest or never participated in filming the police, you now know that's an option for you. That's an option for you and that's an option for your community. It is I do think the third part that is going on said here. Is that like it is a protective thing too. You have evidence that maybe you weren't doing anything wrong even like, okay like you get pulled over by the cops and they sight probable cause like you're sitting there peacefully. You get to tell your story, view the camera to I think. These videos, I. Am sure are showing up in courts of law across the country. One thing that's really interesting about this. Again, I come back to that the piece from addy come back to the the body cam video from the science team. I was filming someone else he was at a remove right? It was his friend who is in in the encounter at the police. Most of the powerful videos we see the lead to change our are removed. They're not from the participants. How do you? How do you think that plays out in this larger? There's a lot of change in this country. Now, there's a lot of conflict actually WANNA talk we we published the piece yesterday there's been some criticism I wanNA talk about that. But right now we're we're seeing one sort of very clear perspective from a remove. How do you think that's that's playing I. think a big part of when you hear Isaiah speak about filming he talks about the fact that he constantly to remind himself to take a step back because he knew the moment that he engaged directly with these officer, the officer could come out for could come for him. You know he had he very much understood the power dynamics at play. Even, as him as the filmer, so he kept as the officer kept getting closer he kept moving back and he would ask you can hear in the learned the full twelve minute video this incident you continuously hear him ask the other officer in the video hayes it. Okay. If I'm standing here, is it okay if I'm standing here, he's very conscientious of his body and his proximity to the violence to the violence has been that's being enacted against his friends and when we interviewed him the reason that he did take a step back was because he knew that if they took him if he got arrested along with his friends that that video. Might, not like not not got published right? Like he might not get his phone back. These things might happen and he knew the power of that video and the power of what he was holding his hands and he wanted to share it with the world so that meant taking a step back so he do that and it doesn't mean that it didn't traumatize him every time he sees the video he gets. Traumatized by seeing his friends violated in this way however, he understood that the consequences would not have been possible. Had he not taken a step back and capture according? I also think. Just. Generally speaking like we tend to trust videos that come from outside sources or people who are around but not exactly involved. It adds another like an extra veneer of credibility. I think which is. Another reason that like some of the biggest videos that we see are not like it's not the body cam it's not the person on the ground being choked to death. At, somebody else. Who has has has had the same realization as as but. I think you know just subjectively with trust trust those perspectives more because they feel more objective. CVT camera just happened to capture the incident on on film. I would say with this specific incident like the group that was arrested. In Zambia. The was interested but his friends, Skyler Gilmore Phillips were they were all taking part in questioning this officer across the parking lot. So I don't think they were necessarily objective I. Don't I. Don't think they were I think they saw there being pulled over, they recognize the police officer there friend had just been with them at this barbecue and I think the fact that he was able to get the video out there in the fact that you can see the whole incident play out right? Like in our video we don't show the whole twelve minute video, but it's like five minutes. Of Not, much going on until the officer sort of approaches them. So I think the added quote unquote like credibility is that you see the beginning middle and end of that incident Isaiah did not stop recording until the police left Isaiah began filming before the police had even had even gotten out of their cars. So I think with this specific video, it's less about the eject objectively and more about the fact that he was able to capture all. How do you think that ties into one thing that we write about a lot surveillance where all being surveilled all the time you mentioned TV cameras. A on a different day in a different moment. The way our talks about like extremely prevalent C. T. V. Cameras is crap ring put a camera everywhere. Now we're being surveilled in the cops have access to this footage, right? At the same time what we've been talking about a lot is the presence of this camera at a remove actually serves a purpose is Asia. Taking that video from that remove sort of purpose. How should we think about this balance because I I personally right? Like you catch me in a different minute. I'm over here. I'm over there. Actually surveillance is good. No, I think the difference is it really depends on like the the institution that has the footage and what they want to do it. Right like the cops when they get ring footage and what I mean like it's not it's like the cops are using footage to incriminate and I think generally this is very generally speaking in very, very general terms like it's evidence, right? And you know when it's coming from people on the ground protests were filming. It's documentation it's like the same footage, but it can be used in very different ways depending on who's doing the asking. For, the footage like and where it's going I think I think that context is actually super important right? Because like in England, for example, there are cameras everywhere. There's just like municipal cameras run by the fucking. Like in London, for example, there's there's cameras run by the Metropolitan Police Department, and that's just that's just a fact of life. And I think it's interesting because like they I think they have like controls on how you can use that stuff whereas with ring networks here it's like sort of ad hoc private companies turning it over to the police whenever they feel like it. I don't know I guess I'm going on a little tangent here. I really do think that like it depends on who's asking for the footage and what they intend to do with it. I think you know people taking footage is as it's intended to sort of exonerate his friends and that they weren't doing anything wrong and this sort of an unjustified thing. And I think the intent really matters. So I think that it's not just about the presence of cameras and footage, but it's also about who has those cameras and this of act of pulling out your phone to question authority to question police officers is actually referred to as surveillance by scholars. It is the opposite of surveillance. Right surveillance is often reserved for those in power. It doesn't necessarily mean it's always the state surveilled someone but the moment that you begin to surveilled them, you were taking a bit away a bit of their agency away from them. You're taking a bit of their privacy away from them but soon, valence is this idea of challenging. Authority by trying to sort of disrupt this power dynamic by filming your oppressor by filming specifically in marginalized communities, the police, and so with surveillance, it is the idea of this is what we're talking about right like it's not mentioned one time in the videos nor is it mentioned in any of these pieces but all of this is what scholars refer to sue balance, which was coined by Steve Man, and it's all about looking from below. So you're not looking from below you're not the person who is above and the position of power. You are the person who's often surveilled right like with Isaiah and friends like they were they knew this officer they. They had never recorded this officer, but they not only knew of him. They had previously had seen incidences of him, and so I think by pulling out their phone, what they're doing is trying to challenge this authority figure to them that had represented sort of. Head oppressed in had sort of harassed or had allegedly harassed and targeted African Americans in their community. So they see this officer, they see their black friend being pulled over they understand this officer had allegedly been targeting and harassing African Americans they pull out their phone to begin to try to create a counter narrative, and before any of these things I think Bijon spoke about this earlier like when you start recording early on, you can sort of see the maybe there wasn't any probable cause and what you hear them saying the first few minutes of the video is, what's the probable cause? What's probable cause like why did you over in the officer officers aren't engaging right? and. So I think the role of that video in that moment is about who has it right? Like you can hear them. Surveillance video from above that's muted that can be distorted. It's about the person who got out of the car who started filming. Once they start one saw him started getting attacked the person who filmed at the very beginning and surveillance often doesn't involve you filming. Once you see the police officers sort of attacking someone but you film when you see a police officer because you want to challenge there are over you. Yeah. The when I say we're GONNA face a long period of cultural reckoning over this I don't think that we the surveillance scholarship is that it's very early stages right and it's not builds out. It's not complete. We're learning how it works and that to me is one of. You know when when the smartphone cameras invented I don't think people thought the people who invented the ship in the back of every smartphone thought we're going to have to have a conversation about surveillance when this is all said and done and that to me is. Right and that I think about that, all of the time like there are engineers and product managers and designers who make these products. and. Sometimes they have a guest of how they'll be used but this to me is one of the most surprising revolutionary uses of the technology right just fundamentally and I think this conversation about what does it mean for everyone to record the state? What does it mean for the state? Maybe record your back with a body camera or something else it's going to change the nature of our relationship with the people in power. It is interesting like one of the things that fascinates me about taking video protest specifically is like I think, a lot of police officers on the ground seat is violence when somebody holds a camera to them because it like it does challenger Authority, but it also like like it is a a thing creating a record in real time that they cannot control in a situation and I think it's just very strange because. Yeah I mean, the perspective really matters who's who's taking the video really really really matters. Let's talk about that for a minute in this conversation. In the feature, we have very intentionally chosen to highlight one perspective people filming the videos. We have almost no perspective from the police in return know perspective from the state in return as we are making this project I, you know the editor in chief ultimately I'm for everything I knew we were making that decision I felt comfortable with it. We do hear a lot from the police, but that notion that the camera is impeding the the police officers job that the police are themselves scared of violence they need to be protected that there are people with guns in the street Often fear for their lives how do you think that I mean the piece is almost yesterday right for many people liked it. Some people were critical of it. We appreciate the criticism and makes us better. But how do you how were you prepared for that criticism that there was no perspective from the police as after pieces published how did he react and where are you at now? That's a really I mean that's a really really good question I haven't seen much of that criticism. Charts to my filters I. Guess My. But it's I mean I think the larger question of like what police think is really interesting to me new I. Don't know if you know there's been a few years ago. I actually spent a year in Ohio reporting a story on cops there and like. Like this, this very, it was Liverpool East Liverpool Ohio, which is a very small town between it's like West Virginia Pennsylvania and Ohio. It's right on the border of those places and it was the site at one point of the like it had the worst heroin. Like heroin outbreak people were dying of overdoses every single day like the average was like one a day and the police department was like it largely fell on them to take care of the people and it was really interesting because I what I did was like I just spent like my time going on right alongside like. Suit up get my notebook get in the car and we drive around like I would smoke black and milds with this cop, and we would like He. He would pick people up and so I went to the county jail and like I saw the mechanisms of the state like from the passenger seat, which was very interesting because like the more time you spend with police officers, the more you understand that like. Seeing people seeing people's worst every day does something very bad to your brain. It puts you on extremely high alert. And it makes ordinary situation seem incredibly terrifying and I think. One of the things that goes unexplored is the trauma police officers sort of feel, and they just don't talk about it like all of these. There were seven people department all of them were very, very, very clearly traumatized. In a way that was not obvious to them, but very obvious to me is like an outside observer. And it was interesting because like the other thing that they did most of the time, it was just like social work they were just they knew all the people that were talking to they were involved in the community. Everybody knew them like I remember. The COP I was with like picked up this woman because she like had drugs on her. And he was like, why? Why? Like what happened like we talked about this I let you go last time because like you said, you were working on your raptor what happened to that and it was like one of these things where I was like Oh this guy actually really doesn't understand like where these people are coming from we ended up having to take her to the county. Jail because she didn't have money for bail is like one hundred bucks and he was like on the on the hour long ride back. He was fuming that she would have to spend this long in jail just because she didn't have hundred dollars and so it's one of these things I think like you know there are good cops. The police is fundamentally like disordered. I will say it's like. And I think both of those things are in conversation with each other because like again, there are days that are incredibly bad like this cop was telling me like the worst day of his life I ask offhandedly by the way never ask cop with the worst day of their life is. He Was Not prepared for the answer which was like he was like Oh. Yes. So I had to respond to a call this. This guy had kids who you know his his kids were friends with he locked them in the House and burn the house down because his wife was cheating on him and so this cop had to respond to the call and then go tell kids afterward what happened and it was I was just like that is just like outside. So outside of the scope of a normal person's life. That it's like did it requires examination right and I think that's the kind of trauma that these people are like seeing like one of those one of those events can scarred for life I don't necessarily think being police officer is as dangerous to save a firefighter like statistically speaking. But again, like these horrific incidents of violence really do change your perspective and I think a lot of this kind of trauma is invisible and goes unexamined and it's difficult because a protests which is a very ordinary event. There is A. There is some potential for stuff to go wrong and I think if you're on the lookout for that, like it makes it skews your perspective and you can't see what is happening objectively, which is I think why it's very important that people also film the police at these events because there is another record that is being created in real time.

Officer Isaiah Ben Evita Twitter John Steven Rodney King Texas Metropolitan Police Department Youtube Product Manager Maria Abdul Reporter United States Los Angeles Engineer Heroin Isiah Justin Callum Producer
Science briefs from around the world

60-Second Science

01:55 min | 9 months ago

Science briefs from around the world

"Hi, I'm scientific American Assistant News Editor Sarah Frazier, and here's a short piece from the August. Twenty twenty issue of the magazine in the section called it. He dispatches from the frontiers of science technology and medicine. The article is titled Quick Hits And it's a rundown of some non corona virus stories from around the globe. From Canada a new study models how gigantic morphing Blob of liquid iron in Earth's outer core underneath the Canadian Arctic is losing its grip on the north magnetic pole a second intensifying. Blah below Siberia is pulling the poll away. From Scotland, a geologic dating efforts suggests the fossil of millipedes creature found on the island of Cara formed four hundred, twenty, five, million years ago making it possibly the oldest known fossilized land animal older land animals have been spotted indirectly through preserve tracks. From Tanzania researchers discovered Africa's largest ever collection a fossilized human footprints left in volcanic mud about ten thousand years ago. Many of them came from a group of Seventeen people mostly women all walking in the same direction. From Norway archaeologists excavating a twenty meter. Viking ship buried below farmers field to stop a would eating fungus from destroying it. Ground penetrating radar had found the ship in two thousand eighteen and a new woods sample analysis revealed that could not be preserved underground. From Zambia in Mongolia. Spring satellite tagged Kuku completed an epic twelve thousand kilometer journey from one country to the other. It had originally been tagged in Mongolia in two thousand nineteen and traverse sixteen countries in his round trip migration. From Antarctica, scientists found that King Penguin excrement releases nitrous oxide also known as laughing gas. It forms a soil bacteria eat the droppings nitrogen rich compounds.

Twenty Twenty Mongolia Sarah Frazier Nitrous Oxide News Editor Tanzania Siberia Norway Canada Cara Scotland Africa Antarctica Zambia Kuku
Members Of The Class Of 2020 Face A Brutal Job Market

NPR's Business Story of the Day

03:21 min | 10 months ago

Members Of The Class Of 2020 Face A Brutal Job Market

"Just. A few months ago college seniors could reasonably expect to graduate into one of the best job markets in history. Now, because of the pandemic, they've graduated into one of the worst generations when members of the class of twenty twenty half landed jobs, the experience is odd NPR's Berlin reports. Twenty twenty was shaping up to be a great year for Golden. DACA, he be the first member of his family to graduate from college not only that he was the Valedictorian of his school. Morehouse College. ATLANTA. But in March, campus emptied and classes went online and then the moment he'd been waiting for commencement it was postponed I wanted to give that huge speech onstage with my family friends and loved ones who made it very possible for me to go to it came to an abrupt end been expecting rites of passage and celebration. Instead he landed in the pandemic, it's been a really difficult transition you know and it's been one that's a mocking allies with. A lot of uncertainty. A lot of self doubt. Worst of all, his grandmother who was supposed to come see him graduate passed away in their native. Zambia. Despite everything, there has been a bright spot dako landed a paid fellowship with the governor of Illinois after four rounds of remote interviews. So I'm more on the fortunate side and a lot of my classmates in other individuals across the nation are is a very challenging time to be a new college graduate through pollock is a Labor economist with the job sites Ziprecruiter. So compared with fee labor market in February before covert hit, we have seen job postings for the entry level positions most popular among new college graduates fall by seventy three percent. But even though postings have plummeted, people are still landing jobs. So even in a crisis, there are companies hiring eighteen million jobs have been posted. On ziprecruiter since covert struck, what has changed dramatically is how those new workers get hired interviews or evolving from those zoom skype calls and now to virtual video platforms where you record yourself answering the questions and then send that video in yourself. So you have no interaction with a person that all the lack of face to face human interaction that's been one constant for Danielle Kaplan she graduated this spring from the University of Iowa, and moved in with her mom it's been fine. But with a lot of activity around the house, it was tricky for her to find a quiet place for job interviews. So I, feel like my interviewer singing a different background, every single time with them. You know this is a very difficult, but as it turned out, backgrounds didn't matter. So I will be heading to Kansas City to work at a startup in. So I'm really excited about it. Kaplan's excitement is accompanied by trepidation because so much of the last few months felt unreal even disembodied. This is a huge major life transition that I'm about to undergo and it doesn't feel that way. I've been virtually meeting people. Virtually getting an apartment. So nothing feels like tangible to me all that is about to change this weekend. Kaplan will load up a rental truck and moved to a new hometown. Kansas. City. There won't be anything virtual about it. Berliner NPR news.

Danielle Kaplan Morehouse College Kansas City Twenty Twenty NPR Zambia Berlin Berliner Npr Atlanta Labor Economist Illinois Kansas Pollock University Of Iowa
What Bungee Jumping Taught Me About Visualization

Optimal Living Daily

03:48 min | 11 months ago

What Bungee Jumping Taught Me About Visualization

"What Bungee Jumping Tommy about visualization by mascot of free to pursue DOT COM. It's one thirty in the afternoon. The weather's perfect. The crew at Victoria Falls Bungee have just wrapped me in. They've done all the necessary safety checks to ensure good to go there now helping me move to the edge of the platform, because my ankles are secured with tight straps around too thick layers of folded towels to protect my legs from jarring. They're about to receive. My toes are over the edge I. Look out over the Embassy River, and then I hear it three to one bungee. Jump off the platform with a grin on my face and start screaming, Hoo. I take it all in my initial weightlessness, my rate of acceleration, the of the cliffside, the rushing water below, and finally the deceleration has the Bungee saves me from a much shorter life than I would like. I bounce up and down another half dozen times before the experience comes to an end is the best one hundred fifty seven dollars. I've ever spent the not just because of the Bungee jump was even more valuable. Was the lesson I learned in preparing for this experience? One day earlier. On the morning of August twenty, second might travel Buddy Michelle inform me that due to a tight travel schedule, I'd be jumping on August twenty third, not August twenty fourth, as at initially prepared for I didn't say anything at the time, but it didn't sit well with me at all. Up to that point I'd been confidence. I played out the day in my mind for weeks and I felt in control this change tip. The scale and fears favor the reality now. Is that Bungee jumping? If it were still on, the table was to happen number one a day earlier than expected number two after a morning flight on a four seater Bush plane. Those are always eventful number three shortly after we arrived at our lodge, rob our bags, check in and take a shell to the bridge and number four with no. Way To get oriented or settle in. Let's just say that I wouldn't be in my happy place. Later that evening my friends started speaking enthusiastically about the jump, and stopped her dead in her tracks, and informed her that the change made a significant difference to me the sense we were rushing to get in and the fact that I felt I lost some control of the situation changed my jump status from green to amber with a tinge of red. She struggled to understand and I struggled to explain. Processing the change. I've told many crazy stunts over the years. Bucket list does not lie. Bungy was far from the toughest, but of needed to feel that I was in control of the variables surrounding the experience, which both insured I felt safe, and that I can enjoy the moment if anything didn't feel right at all is giving myself permission to walk away Guilt Free I. Guess You could say that I needed to feel that I was free to participate in the experience, not bullied into getting it done by people or circumstances. That night I thought long and hard about what could happen. The next day I worked through all the variables, old and new and processed what the day might look like. I thought about the transportation to the new lodge, but close I would wear the bus ride to the bridge getting a bridge pass at customs to Zimba's a natural border between Zimbabwe and Zambia paying for the jump and finally. Finally getting the gear on and everything involved in the jump itself the sights, the smells feel the wind on my skin, feeling the harness, my heart rate that thought process took the better part of an hour before falling asleep, and in our lying in bed, the following morning that mental preparation made the difference the calmness about me that morning, and thankfully Michelle did not bring up the jump. Indeed. Our understanding of my need to decide on my own terms may have made the difference.

Bungee Michelle Victoria Falls Embassy River Zimba Zimbabwe Bush Zambia
"zambia" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

05:33 min | 1 year ago

"zambia" Discussed on KCRW

"Connie Connie was a part of the workshop we did in Zambia in southern Africa there was red which was founded in two thousand six by activist Bobby Shriver and musician Bondo to fight aids the women in the workshop you from all over Zambia and each of them have been affected by HIV and aids K. tellers from the moss led the workshop we worked with them for several days to help craft their stories on the final day we did a showcase of stories and a club in downtown Los aka Zambia for some of the challenges of doing this retelling workshops so far away in a very different world well there was the challenge that these were people that were unfamiliar with the moss and not only that that come from a different culture of storytelling and they were also telling the story of the thing that had excluded them and made them the most and ties in their entire life so that was a challenge in the beginning because they need to understand why they were doing this but what was amazing to me was that in the first day as we went around the table and people started to share their stories and that thing that was the thing that isolated them the most in the world suddenly became the currency in the room Sir taught me that Connie so Connie was one of our storytellers Connie was I would say like the feisty this woman in the room she was kind of the camp counselor of all of the other women so here's confident that live at the mall the new soccer Zambia working as a peer educator and counseling people that HIV positive was actually very easy for me because apart from the training that I underwent the prison that is living with HIV and I didn't have any problems we need to cut it came to share my experience with them but when I encountered women that's where expecting women that's where pregnant women that's where waiting to get their results for their children to find out if they're HIV positive or not it was something that I will talk very lightly because I depended mostly on statistics I would just simply say look the last last month maybe we tested a hundred women and then maybe or from the hundred women ninety five of those women with high children that are negative and that was fine because it was a statistic he didn't really touch me so much I had no experience with that and the way women that would come and do woods lamented because they could not get their results sometime in October I would tell them that look if the system saves you have to wait then you need to wait there's nothing that I can do if they say you need to have your child retested you need to have your child retested there's nothing that I can do until I had that experience I took my daughter to be tested which was six weeks old and they pretend to hear of the foot and I was told that I will get the results after two weeks when I went back to the clinic after two weeks the results we know to trade and then I was given another two weeks so in total that was a month of waiting anxiously not knowing whether my child was negative or positive I was very sure that somebody was keeping those results for me because my child was positive and it really scared the hell out of me so when I when back when my child when when it was a month and they told me that the results were not yet ready and I was supposed to take my child back so that they can pre cut again I just said no you're not going to pick my child but those are not the exact words that I used there are ways that I use that I cannot actually repeat here but I just told them you're not going to pick my child you get the results for me today and they couldn't find the results in the clinic but I was very lucky because I had gone to a clinic where even the central lab was located so I volunteered I said I'm going to go to the lab and find the results myself which I did and I went to the lab in St I'm not going to leave this place until you give me my daughter's results fortunately they were able to look at the results so you know what happens when you just deliver here in Zambia you're given three months maternity leave you're supposed to be a toll so I got those results and then almost since procedure was after I get them from the lab I had to take them to the clinic so that they are recorded in their statistics book but somehow somehow how I don't know I bypassed the clinic and instead of being home I found myself at the office I wasn't supposed to be working but I found myself there so does this with you you can try to imagine this crazy woman running into a building with a piece of paper in her hand weeping I was crying and then I just budgeting to allied medical director's office and then when she saw me with a piece of paper in my hand she didn't ask she also started crying so these two women are crying we're not saying anything we just crying weeping and then after some time she started telling me that everything is okay these medication your child is going to be okay in the process she takes the paper looks at it and suddenly she realized but the result was negative.

Connie Connie Zambia Africa
Houston Fire Department makes changes to protect firefighters during coronavirus pandemic after 19 test positive

Coast to Coast AM with George Noory

00:31 sec | 1 year ago

Houston Fire Department makes changes to protect firefighters during coronavirus pandemic after 19 test positive

"The city of Houston reports twenty eight municipal workers nineteen firefighters and twenty four police officers of all tested positive for co in nineteen ninety Zambia yesterday expanded is pandemic protocols for his firefighters the next step in our protocol is to require firefighters to wear the surgical masks throughout the day at the fire stations another four hundred cases of covert nineteen have been confirmed within the city of Houston but officials say that's due to a backlog of testing kids at the lab a total of ten city residents have died from the virus

Zambia Houston
Climate change has brought parts of Zambia to the brink of famine

Bloomberg Daybreak: Europe

00:18 sec | 1 year ago

Climate change has brought parts of Zambia to the brink of famine

"Zambia is on the brink of famine Jew to climate change according to experts the country's wrestling with a devastating drought because when changing weather patterns the U. N. is calling for urgent action is temperatures in parts of southern Africa are expected to rise by twice the global average as a result of climate

Zambia Africa
We’ve officially annihilated a second strain of polio. Only one remains.

Radio From Hell

01:43 min | 1 year ago

We’ve officially annihilated a second strain of polio. Only one remains.

"Well two strains of polio gone in another milestone on the long and expensive and sometimes discouraging road to wipe out polio global health officials announced Wednesday that two of the three strains of wild polio virus at all wild poll you have officially been eliminated although that brings the world another step closer to Iran a caving polio altogether the effort has taken far longer than was ever anticipated when the campaign began back in nineteen eighty eight most public health officials and donors expected the battle to be over by two thousand but two major obstacles emerge first millions of families around the world not let their children have the drops because of persistent false rumors that the vaccine is a western plot to sterilize Muslim girl second in some countries virus is used in the oral vaccine itself have mutated into a form that can be passed on in diapers and sewage and can paralyze unvaccinated children this is contributed the fear of the oral vaccine even though all vaccination is the only protection against these mutant viruses just in the last two months cases a paralysis caused by mutant vaccine viruses have been reported in the Philippines Zambia Togo and Chad because paralysis person only about one in every two hundred cases of polio experts assume that more children have been affecting don't factor but they but it hasn't they've been infected but it hasn't caused them serious problems so they they have the virus but it's it's dormant oracle not not make it's certainly not

Iran Togo Polio Philippines Chad Two Months
News in Brief 21 June 2019

UN News

03:55 min | 2 years ago

News in Brief 21 June 2019

"This is the news in brief from the United Nations, there will program or WFP confirmed on Friday that it has started a partial suspension of aid to areas of Yemen, controlled by Hootie opposition. Forces spokesperson Irv Eva, who SEL told journalists in Geneva that the agency took the decision after efforts failed to prevent food aid being diverted from those who need it most, as in many areas, some individual seeks to fit from paying on divinity Habil and diverting food away from where it is most needed debris has been seeking the support of the Sanaa-based authorities to introduce biometric 'cause she's stationed system that will prevent diversion and protect the many families we serve, and storing food, which those who need it most. Unfortunately, we are yet to reach agreement. They development means that aid will be cut to the capital Saana, which is. Told by hoochies affecting eight hundred fifty thousand people although missed of a hustle insisted that the agency will maintain nutrition programs for malnourished children pregnant, and nursing mothers in total WFP estimates that nine out of twelve million food, insecure people in Yemen, are in areas controlled by who tease who have been fighting a coalition of international forces backing the government of president at Brabham Mansour Hady for more than four years. According to latest UN figures nearly ten million people are severely food, insecure and do not know whether next meal will come from to the Central African Republic now where WFP has called for help from the international community to stave off severe and acute food shortages after years of ongoing conflict, and mass displacement nearly half the country's people. More than one point eight million are unsure how they are going to feed themselves of that number more than four hundred sixty thousand are expected to face. Emergency food insecurity during the lean season which lasts from may until August among the areas? Worst affected are those hosting hundreds of thousands of people displaced by violence and insecurity. These include Kaga, Bandra, oboe and Zambia, along with three prefecture's and Bomo haute Kotto and oat Emba MU where security conditions remain volatile despite a peace agreement signed in February amid reports of regular attacks by armed groups who did not sign the deal on major supply routes and around major cities. WFP says it needs more than thirty three million dollars to help eight hundred thousand people every month until the end of the year. And finally to DPRK or North Korea where you n appointed independent rights expert, Thomas, or here container has appealed to the state to ease people suffering, speaking at the end of a five day mission, to Seoul in South Korea mister Kintana expressed regret that he did not see any sign of improvement. In the human rights situation of people in DPRK before urging profound legal and institutional reforms citing various sources in new report, the expert spoke of public executions carried out by gunfire after trials between twenty thirteen and twenty seventeen victims faced charges, including murder, and drug dealing. He said in his report while also noting that people continue to live in fear of being sent to political prison camps for watching South Korean soap operas in a statement to the press, Mr Clinton, urged the government of the DPRK to be open about the political camps, which called Quanli. So at the same time, he called on the government of China not to repatriate North Korean escapees asking them to give the primary consideration to what will happen to the escapees if repatriated to North Korea. Daniel Johnson, UN news.

WFP United Nations Dprk Yemen North Korea Irv Eva Mr Clinton Geneva Brabham Mansour Hady South Korea Saana Daniel Johnson Bomo Haute Kotto Zambia Hoochies China
"zambia" Discussed on The World Nomads Podcast

The World Nomads Podcast

03:03 min | 2 years ago

"zambia" Discussed on The World Nomads Podcast

"Was that overland train from Zambia to ten ten AM dot was quite the experience so are received by the time. I took that train. I'd been in in Livingston and an Africa for about a move by the time, I t about trains, it was my first real solo trouble experience. And I think we will late and depart in. Rickety trade. I mean, it was it was great. You know, so many people taking the train. It was just amazing just to sit there looking out the window. So many people around the tracks and the train quite slow and a lot of places and we'd stop in towns and the feet people outside the trade, you know, selling all kinds of stove, you know, sin cards and fruits, lots of different types of things. So you could you could get off the train and interact with people which I did a long stretch my legs and things like that. I am in between stop moving again, you'd have to kind of like runnin concert, which was great. And it was amazing everything we we did break down a couple of times. I think I think one time we stopped in the middle of the night. And I've no idea. Why are we stop for so long ahead? A rumor that we'd run out fueled. But that's true. So house up with either yet, it was amazing experience. But we ended up actually arrive in. Twenty four hours late into Dar-es-Salaam? So, you know, it's just very typical. You know, an amazing way I seem to sell off my true solo travels in Africa a leaked to Helen sides. Again, we'll be shy nights at sow bible, really isn't. If you enjoyed this episode on Zambia and would like to hear of another great African distance and given Helen mentioned it, and we mentioned it how about episode on Tanzania lots of the national bar spending where you're going and where you're of another great African distance and given Helen mentioned it, and we mentioned it how about episode on Tanzania lots of the national bar spending where you're going and where you're saying they will have public campsites. So there's some very basic facilities provided like a blockhouse so showers and toilets, maybe like a little kitchen or dining room eating area under that these are unfenced campsite. So a lot of the tented camps and lodges across various parks in Africa are also totally unfenced regardless of your accommodation. The animals are can be passing through your camp. And you know, they don't necessarily care what you're in. You can find the light. It's hip aside through all of your popular podcast EPs implies. But the easiest way to listen is just go to wilda meds. Don't come forward slash podcasts. And if you could. Anything you want to sideways or any suggestion? You can Email us at podcast at will. Call me, if he knows someone who loves travel as much as you do and way to please tell them about us. We appreciate any likes shares and social love you would care to give us place next week on another amazing nomad. Book Royal boundaries.

Helen Zambia Africa Tanzania Livingston Twenty four hours
"zambia" Discussed on The World Nomads Podcast

The World Nomads Podcast

03:02 min | 2 years ago

"zambia" Discussed on The World Nomads Podcast

"Fit said that because they don't have a long life. Yeah. On I imagine they just Rupa Jesus. I got. Yeah. Fascinating still rolling Dragonfly mall. Well, speaking of survival Christie Ayton is a travel writer to she says, she's caught and China she stood down bison in South Dakota and was lost in Samoa all for the story. But I really don't think anything could have prepared her for what would happen in Zambia. So I was selected to be the fistula foundation's inaugural writer in residence, and it was a program for journalists to be able to see their what they do up close and personal. And so I went there for three weeks in October of twenty eighteen and what happened? Well, she had a great time. I mean, I would work very hard. I wrote about fifteen stories of I got the see the programs close in got the see their outreach efforts in meet women in learn their stories. So is all very powerful the last few days there. I started to think that may be I had food poisoning or I just thought my stomach wasn't adopting to the food. Very well, I've traveled extensively in. I just felt a little off but not like horrible. I just wasn't really sure I ended up I didn't leave early or anything. I completed my time there and came back to the US and a couple of days later, I still wasn't dealing better. So I ended up going to the doctor and. Explain the situation in the ended up testing me for malaria, and they called me back later that afternoon and said I had it. There's a couple of strains of it. And I had the most severe strain of Cousy. Did he? I ended up being hospitalized three times in it affected like walk and kind of just function. So I had a couple of blood transfusions 'cause it impacted my blood in my red blood cell count. Yeah. Like, I said it affected my ability to walk. And so this is all November that I was hospitalized about three times. And then in December. I went to physical therapy in relearned kind of how to walk and work out again because I'm a big exerciser. I would say it's been like the last month or so that I I'm like really back to where I was. But it was very scary time, and we both sitting he open mouth. I mean, it's syphilis. That's really see. Yeah. I was on. I was intimated. And there's a couple of days that like, I don't even remember did, you know, when you've been bitten did you at least get the little? Bugah? That's the thing..

Christie Ayton writer Dragonfly mall malaria Zambia Cousy South Dakota Samoa US China three weeks
"zambia" Discussed on The World Nomads Podcast

The World Nomads Podcast

02:08 min | 2 years ago

"zambia" Discussed on The World Nomads Podcast

"It's also got all the big five animals, if you think you've taken safari and some pretty amazing, national parks and all of the national parks, by the way, and lots of the accommodation near as as well as unfenced so elephants and lines nine to wonder around some of the town. So you can really take a wolf on the wall side feeling like there's a bit of a difference between an elephant and a lion. Wandering into town. An elephant ally walk into a bar. Everybody else lays exactly there's also heaps of cool hidden things that a nomad would like to soak up pun intended, like hot springs alongside of right forest trial caves with prehistoric rock art, and you can sign on the biggest edible mushroom in the world coupla affects the capital is Lusaka. They speak English and Swahili at we've got some. We'll meds fries books that you can download and we've got one abets one. He swale Healy's. He can get some Swahili prizes. I'll put a link to that in the China freshly updated too, but let's stop the episode with Kathryn Marshall, she began her career as a hod noise. Journalists reporting on news Phil and that was in south nice eve of south South Africa, twenty lady she's in Sydney writing travel articles, one of the articles that she's written really caught our attention is about one of nature's greatest spectacles, and it's the can soccer bat migration. In zambia. Now, why we reached out to her is because often we share stories of taking a safari in Africa or even saying as an example, the voter base migration in Tanzania, but bats that's different McCain tonight, just how many bets talking well with the with the number two million. Sorry, twelve million twelve million surprise you that must just about blood at the sun. Although it's not so the moon. Well, the sun is just going on as they merged. So I'm it took me blocks out the twilight and win they return in the morning. The sun is starting to rise. So they once again blotter the door..

Phil swale Healy Kathryn Marshall South Africa McCain zambia Africa China Tanzania soccer Sydney
China's Xi touts more than $64 billion in Belt and Road deals

Chris Douridas

00:52 sec | 2 years ago

China's Xi touts more than $64 billion in Belt and Road deals

"The Chinese government says it signing new deals worth more than sixty four billion dollars reach during a summit with forty world leaders this week and pure Shanna van Zandt reports as part of aging belt and road initiative to connect China with the world. China's president Xi Jinping says the deals will deliver sustainable growth, but critics say the projects are leaving some developing countries with unsustainable debt in Zambia journalist, Eric wallo, says China is investing massively in the country. Most of the government officials Fagan's see the d'etre the money as comes in like, investing, enrolls and infrastructure. But in the long term, I don't know how they tends to get up to Dick's China says it's now setting up a framework to resolve debt risk in developing

China Shanna Van Zandt Chinese Government Eric Wallo Xi Jinping Fagan Zambia President Trump Dick Sixty Four Billion Dollars
Deadly Tropical Cyclone Idai Barrels Towards Mozambique

UN News

01:38 min | 2 years ago

Deadly Tropical Cyclone Idai Barrels Towards Mozambique

"A major aid operation is underway. Way in Mozambique and Malawi to help victims of tropical cyclone it die which has reached the densely populated Mozambican port of better after registering. Maximum wind speeds of nearly two hundred kilometers per hour exceptional rainfall before the cyclone hit has already affected a total of one point five million people in both South African countries and claimed more than one hundred twenty lives. In addition tens of thousands of people have been displaced and homes, roads bridges and crops have been washed away weld food program or WFP spokesperson ever hersal told journalists in Geneva topical areas made landfall and they'd overly populated laws on beacon port city of Beira, which is his compound this took the flooding that radio cured as far inland assault on Malawi and eastern Zimbabwe. We know all the that some people sadly died in the past week in probably doing tonight. We don't have any numerous to communicate for the moment as that number. Is changing constantly the UN agency has already begun to assess the extent of the flood damage and prioritize needs among the most vulnerable. He added satellite imagery shows that Malawi's cheek w-we district has been particularly badly affected by flooding while Mozambique Zambia and teddy provinces have also seen tens of thousands of people displaced and more than one hundred and sixty eight thousand hectares of crops reportedly affected in addition to helicopters already sent by the South African government WFP is sending at least one transport helicopter to conduct emergency era perations in Mozambique.

Malawi WFP Mozambique UN Beira Zambia Geneva Assault Zimbabwe Two Hundred Kilometers Per Hou Sixty Eight Thousand Hectares
News in Brief 27 February 2019

UN News

03:33 min | 2 years ago

News in Brief 27 February 2019

"This is the news in brief from the United Nations. The first assessment of a major you and eight storage facility in war-torn Yemen has taken place since it was cut off by fighting last September, according to the World Food Program or WFP a team that reached the Red Sea mills near the key port of data on Tuesday. W F is appealing for sustained access to the site which contains enough week to feed three point seven million people for a month his spokesperson over who SEL Tuesday. Visit was a great first step renewed. No sustain access every day as much as possible for WFP's stuff. But also later for the mills stuff to access the facilities, and that will be necessary before we can start again milling delete some of the grain have been sent for testing to check whether it is still edible. If so the fifty one thousand tons of wheat can be processed at the facility where equipment is largely untouched and the generators appear to be. In good condition. WFP says the positive development is dependent on continued access being granted by the warring. Parties who signed a UN led partial ceasefire agreement in December and follows a UN led appeal for more than four billion dollars from international donors this year to save millions in Yemen. From starvation at the pledging conference in Geneva on Tuesday, UN secretary General Antonio Gutierrez won't of an overwhelming humanitarian calamity as a result of almost four years of fighting between supporters of Yemeni President abd Robbie Maso. Howdy and Hootie opposition groups. Millions of people have escaped statelessness in west Africa in recent years after states committed to ensuring that everyone has access to a nationality by twenty twenty four the UN refugee agency said on Wednesday, according to UNHCR thirty seven thousand two hundred and fifty persons who are at risk of statelessness received birth certificates in Burkina Faso last year in Guinea-Bissau, meanwhile, seven thousand four refugees, many of whom fled their countries of origin without identification papers are being granted citizenship and initia- several million people also benefited from late birth registration and had their marriages registered as a result of special procedures for your charge. The UN agency said highlighting a pledge to end statelessness for years ago by echo S, the economic community of west African states in a statement UNHCR said that civil and birth registration. We're key to providing protection and ensuring that citizens can access education, healthcare, and work writes that most of us take for granted. And finally a life saving. Airlift operation is underway in the Central African Republic. C A R to deliver food supplies to eighteen thousand people in remote and insecure location one thousand kilometers, east of the capital Bangui, the arrival of thirty six tonnes of assistance by air comes amid increased violence in Zambia. According to the World Food Programme WFP. It says that thousands of people have been unable to go to markets or their farms because of the, insecurity and that food reserves. There are exhausted SIA has faced fighting between the mostly Christian anti lacquer and the mainly opposition Muslim Celica militia since twenty twelve a peace agreement was reached in January twenty thirteen but rebels seized the capitals that March forcing then president Francois disease to flee in January this year, government and armed groups. Agreed to hold peace talks up to two point one billion people in Sierra authored insecure WFP says while severe acute malnutrition exceeds. The two percent emergency threshold in ten prefecture's out of sixteen. Daniel Johnson UN news.

WFP United Nations Yemen President Trump Unhcr Red Sea Malnutrition Geneva Secretary General Antonio Guti Guinea-Bissau Daniel Johnson SIA Robbie Maso Burkina Faso Zambia Sierra Bangui West Africa
Oil prices jump as Gulf of Mexico rigs evacuated

Morning News with Manda Factor and Gregg Hersholt

05:18 min | 2 years ago

Oil prices jump as Gulf of Mexico rigs evacuated

"Morning confirmation hearings for supreme court nominee. Brett Cavanaugh will be getting underway this morning, and let's check in right now with ABC news political analyst, Alex custody, honest. Good morning, Alex. Good morning, Greg. What do you sense is going to happen here? Obviously, the Republicans seem to have the votes don't they Republicans have the votes, they have fifty one Republican votes, and they probably have two three or maybe even four democrat votes from democratic senators who are running for reelection this year in Trump states, like West Virginia. So. It looks like Kevin is going to be confirmed. But what we're really going to see is that the most dangerous place to be in Washington is between US Senator and a TV camera. This is going to be a bunch of grandstanding today. But it's not going to ultimately change the votes. Let me ask you this from your perspective. You've for many years have worked for Republican campaigns are the Republicans playing by a different set of rules when it comes to the way, they're handling this nomination. But that I refer to the fact that tens of thousands of pages of documents about judge Cavanaugh have just now been released the day that the hearings are opening and I'm just wondering if the Republicans are playing by a different set of rules. Well, they're playing by a different set of rules than both Democrats and Republicans used to play by. But Democrats have been doing that too. You know, it used to be that this was an unpoliticized area that you judge supreme court justices on whether they could do the job, whether they understood the constitution and respected it, but now like everything else. The supreme court has become politicized. It's especially when we look at what the supreme court has been doing. Which is it hasn't been telling us what the law is. It's been making the laws it's been acting as a legislative branch. So sure enough when they start making laws they become part of the political game. So I'd say that yes, Republicans are playing by a different set of rules. But Democrats have been doing the same thing ever since Robert Bork and didn't the Democrats. I'd rather didn't the Republicans would change the rules when in not even giving a hearing to Merrick garland. They didn't give it a hearing to Merrick garland. And and of course, that the end of the day they were successful there process arguments about when you're going to give someone a hearing or a we haven't seen enough paperwork. They never really impact voters and therefore senators substantive issues does is this candidate pro-life or pro-choice. How he going to affect my life? Those are the real issues that could derail this nomination. But Democrats don't seem to be able to make those arguments. So they're going to process. Oh, you didn't let us look at the papers long enough. You think we'll ever get back to the days when a supreme court nominee one say with ninety votes in the Senate. Oh, gosh. That's so hard everything is you know, we we used to play football in football stadiums. Now, we play politics two. Now, we play politics in everything even in picking a supreme court Justice. I don't see that happening anytime soon. All right. Alex, thanks for your input this morning. ABC news political analyst, Alex custody. Honest hearings are expected to last for three or four days and judge Kavanagh's is not expected to speak until the safter noon. Because members of the Senate are getting about ten minutes of comment time in opening statement time each KOMO news time five twenty. Type of the propel insurance money update. There's a storm looming and it's lifting US oil prices. Tropical storm, Gordon is building to hurricane strength. And that's forcing oil rigs in the Gulf of Mexico to evacuate the price of crude up twenty five cents a barrel. The west Texas intermediate is now over seventy dollars a barrel. International benchmark Brent crude is off about eight cents. How stressed is the city where you live wallethub says these other five most in need of a little Zambia five is Toledo Ohio number four is Birmingham. Alabama. Then Cleveland, Ohio at three Newark, New Jersey at two and Detroit. Michigan number one. John Kiernan's has high unemployment put the motor city at the top of this dubious lists since money's the number one stressor for Americans, according to American psychological association that really kind of push it to the top of this list. The nation's least stress city, Fremont, California. Daria Albinger, ABC news. Apple is cracking down on. Apps. The don't have a privacy policy starting up about a month. From now, apple says all apps, including those in the testing phase will have to communicate to the users. How their information is used and secured and shared the new policy will be required for all absent app. Updates across the board. Apple previously required apps. It offered subscriptions or interacted with Apple Pay to have privacy policies and that requirement now is going to apply to everything in the app store. Looks like we could slip a little at the opening bell on Wall Street this morning. The Dow futures are down about eighty one points. That's about a third of a percent. And we'll check traffic and weather next. Komo news time five twenty one. After the game. Komo news. Traffic team will get.

Republicans Democrats Alex Custody Komo Apple Brett Cavanaugh ABC Political Analyst Merrick Garland United States Senate Greg West Virginia Kevin Judge Kavanagh Donald Trump Robert Bork Ohio Mexico
Zambia, Kerala and Seoul discussed on BBC Minute

BBC Minute

00:10 sec | 2 years ago

Zambia, Kerala and Seoul discussed on BBC Minute

"Hashtag Star Wars resistance still trending in the US. Lots of excited BB eight fans out there. It's after the company tweeted the trailers to the new animated series that premieres on the Disney channel on

Zambia Kerala Seoul BBC Disney South Korea United States Africa Dombi
Zimbabwe opposition leader detained after asylum bid fails

The World

00:42 sec | 3 years ago

Zimbabwe opposition leader detained after asylum bid fails

"Imbaba and opposition politician Tendai BT has been denied asylum in Zambia some foreign ministers at the. Grounds for Mr. betes claim were too weak however Mr. his lawyer and Kobe Zita Melillo said they had not heard from the ambient authorities he told the BBC. Mr. BT faced peril in Zimbabwe Your life is Because of the political conventions they. Have with him Request for political asylum They are not giving Macedo impacted giving Mr. Has, been accused of instigating violence following Zimbabwe's elections

Canada Israel Russia Kobe Zita Melillo United States Tendai Bt Justin Trudeau Stefan Brandon BBC Zimbabwe Gaza Bank Of Bolivia Rotavirus Writer Gaza Strip Heather Nauert Ukraine Cannabis
"zambia" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"zambia" Discussed on KGO 810

"From this jeremy from coast to coast and worldwide on the internet this is coast to coast am now here's your guest host richard seront and this is something relatively new from a band that's been around a very long time over fifty years you may recognize some zambia's and this is moving on which came out in two thousand fifteen of still got that hunger album they are still around and they still sound great i took my my twin boys get they were ten at the time ten years old and we had a great time watching the sambas all right hey the uk royal society for the prevention of cruelty to animals has recently received a number of calls about apparently intoxicated seagulls officers say they have fielded over a dozen calls recently with reports of the birds staggering about and perhaps even flying drunk when brought into the are spca facility they appeared disoriented and confused and struggled to stand says veterinarian david cooper in a video released by the organization one of the birds appears to have been in a fight and stumbles around the assila drunk tank it's theorized the sloshed avian have somehow either developed a taste for the alcohol infused waste from area breweries or aren't aware of the consequences left unsaid is the.

richard seront zambia uk royal society david cooper fifty years ten years
"zambia" Discussed on We Hate Movies

We Hate Movies

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"zambia" Discussed on We Hate Movies

"Just talking about because it is silly i know he doesn't know that he doesn't know that he's coming that's the character being a character how is that a problem that was choice they also made it wasn't just like like drac oh and then he's gone that's part and that's was saying it's kinda like in zambia movies where like the time it takes you to turn from being varies depending upon how big of a character you are because he's the only one that gets a speech everybody else just disintegrates for the most mike will is a little bit got something when he's going like feeling pain like and cute roots say goodbye that's kind of it's a war movie and a lot of ways and that's he's low jimmy shelia cabin that had characters don't know what is happening to them the fact that you were like mad that these characters are like fuck it be ripe no no that's not what i'm pissed off it's the treatment of its sentimental as hell benny hill theme song playing very interesting choice when it you'd be sitting there like what was that about by the way the battle kanda totally fucking useless didn't need to be in the movie at any dec mutant dogs and then like vano says henchmen like coming down ill defined only gary cooed wasted when when aliens come to earth for stones or otherwise i would love if they had spears and axes to fight with.

vano zambia jimmy shelia gary
"zambia" Discussed on The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"zambia" Discussed on The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

"'cause it's gonna to get my revenge right right in my going to do it because it's a protected from people and you know if people died that's understandable or like you said m i it because actually looking for revenge heavy is the head was the crowd that's what you statement and then firmly carol and tobin have a heart to heart and he says if he knew getting stat with get her teaching then he would have done it sooner no is that he went on on instagram was like damn girl of i know stabbing you but it got his soon out of been stab south yeah i just i'm not a fan of tova and it's because it like this yeah like soon as he started talking to carol facility this nigga said he would he if he knew if staff will get her to calm talk to him he would against apps come on and i said i cannot wait for the zambia virus to do his work on your eyes zombie vars do you think he asked her if their relationship was real care was like i didn't want it to be real is pretending i was trying to live a lie he was like well let me down easy why don't you she was like look man i loved because i couldn't keep faking it right i basically left before it turned real right because i think it was going to turn real sea like i i wanna be homemaker care.

carol instagram tobin zambia
"zambia" Discussed on Food 4 Thot

Food 4 Thot

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"zambia" Discussed on Food 4 Thot

"To as an adult that kind of had a little bit more of a a discerning i when it came to film and that's zambia dawn's movies in the islamic law filmmaker and a particular he has to him a male which is like i killed my mother sloga and i got my favorite of all time one of my favorite movies of all time as heartbeats which is a really poor translation of ali's amoah imaginaire which is about a love triangle between this like a more fiercely sexual kind of like straight beautiful man and then like a gay and of a woman best friends in the movie is just like so funny and it let queen this is such a component of it but not it's like it is it's a queer movie in that the queen is suggests everywhere in the movie it does not like a heartbroken coming out so it's just like queen misses the movie and there's a really good sexy in which most game movies can't say they have what are you we're still trying to come up in that part when it comes to showing gay intimacy physically like trying to accomplish that sometimes i think so for me i sort of out of similar upbringing to joe in that way like i really like a lot of this movie that you're talking about too long fu a cousin well the birdcage 'cause i didn't watch the french version i didn't even learn of these movies existence until i was in college um i just i don't have a family that super big on film like robot books but i i just wasn't exposed to them and so for me one of my earliest gay movies was actually a movie that came out in either two thousand through two thousand four and it's called camp interestingly enough.

ali zambia joe
"zambia" Discussed on Wash FM 97.1

Wash FM 97.1

02:07 min | 3 years ago

"zambia" Discussed on Wash FM 97.1

"Middle of winter but this year the prices are unbelievably all good a mm law because ocean city's hotels are offering thousands of rooms at no unheardof save yeah now play later rates just go to host the ocean dot com and book right now as his soon to lock in a as great price on we hotel murray you'll love then you can spend whoa the next few anne months just dreaming of all the fun you'll have this summer like swimming at king bogey boarding gobbling and up fries and the fall cake on the board walk playing mini golf answer relaxing on the beach shopping dining i know out it's early dancing but don't change or it a just joint yet because free we got events free stuff like for fireworks you next i and aw movies give forget on the beach not been checking with our in special ninety hotel seven rates point one you'll wash have a smile fm toby on your face until chile in even the morning before hello you arrive in ocean oh city so the reserve dr your place in the fun go osceola shen gary dot com and click v on save now play later for three a couple of sleepless list of hotel deals of the journey but hurry because while the two fun never ends in ocean city without maryland knowing these with special saw rates won't last zambia two juliana in his name sao paulo mayor in a dream aww no reliable me no my door opened up by that's fine round the doorway aw no no no boy all this massive no oh lord owen two oh in five view o'clock in the capital city of the free world thank you for letting i toby in chile in the morning see how you start your day with ninety seven point one wash fm and i love when the headline is sunshine return yes indeed so after being the state of washington in seattle for the last five days or so the sun will be back today enjoy at while it lasts though and normally would elect a road out all the stats because god knows you could that on your phone or you ask alexa we're gonna get to fifty seven today clouds and hello 38 tonight it's 29 now enjoy it though because we've got today and tomorrow and then seattle returns for.

toby ocean city maryland zambia chile washington seattle alexa sao paulo five days
"zambia" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

01:45 min | 3 years ago

"zambia" Discussed on KGO 810

"I consider zambia crazy right winger remember that did you ever see the original men in black or were you two years old when that um i did see it it's been awhile but i did go yet are for rvo turns into one of these like space insects in his head liens barschak ta with their mile ads sanaa what are the liberals good at it well so cone cabinet is trying to do something about it and has put his money where his mouth is he's donated proceeds from his thousand jersey sales he's done all these donations million dollar pledge program so he's put his money where his mouth is that we should we would shut up about that he's actually doing something on like all the talking heads who complain about violence in the day i yeah we'll call kabir next doing something about it what are you doing about it and steph curry stepped up it is doing something about it to money is only one piece of the puzzle by the way want you to get involved next colin i don't know about that i mean i i know it's tough because your big figure and too little harder sometimes to do that but that's what i look for next from colin cabinet casey hey democratic prima northbound eighty every month boulevard an accident definitely has at least one lane block but still digging up those the tape ills that jam up his solid now and it's pushing back to dixon landing road castro valley construction it's stroke bridges causing heavy traffic in both directions of five eighty eastbound side jamming up almost back to the nimitz on south at to thirty eight in fact westbound direction is staffing up back to grove way belmont northbound 101 ralston you got to start off it was still in that slow lane lance update traffic is slowing now back to whipple avenue in redwood city ali graham kgon this is.

steph curry colin nimitz ali graham kgon zambia sanaa kabir castro valley million dollar two years
"zambia" Discussed on Wash FM 97.1

Wash FM 97.1

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"zambia" Discussed on Wash FM 97.1

"And and government shutdown so for some people emme congratulations on your holiday that you didn't know you're going to get eagles and patriots in the super bowl sarcastically annan by the way and just as each monday this in the nation's capital is the man of with ferrying toby in chile in the morning here on ninety seven point one wash fm and by the way dick the good irvin news is if you have the day off you we'll be able to enjoy most of the day there might be some sprinkles this morning this otherwise cloudy enjoy the heatwave sunshine will be to about sixty five we tonight than our winter shows up tomorrow evening at the drops down to thirty two hopefully they'll have government narain by and then wednesday to highs only fortyfive so yet back to seasonal oh temperatures bides god locally with that zambia will park service seems says that the logical parks are accessible they're just aren't going to be any park rangers or any of the concessions open so two you could still walk the grounds so to speak no so way now on the other side i'm sure welcome alisa bayden will agree that the traffic volume is certainly eric going to be impacted dill by now on the other two side i'm sure ali sabeyton will agree that the traffic volume is two certainly going to be impacted by the government being closed um i'm guessing that that is two the case that's what i'm guess yeah roads still me too early to tell you this point but in a couple of hours we'll know for sure sure yeah though anyway we don't want those kind of problems no the bilski come in with the other mortgage is going to be do regardless of whether or not congress mm decides to get something done or not but anyway well i'll tell you what's happening right now the man and that's nothing it's beautiful and beltway traffic 95 between dcm baltimore nothing to report between richmond and springfield along way 95 then add some overnight road work on the beltway near connecticut avenue but the last barrel unsigned was put to bed so everything's open you will and waiting for you be which toby and chile in the morning i'm.

super bowl chile zambia alisa bayden toby irvin fortyfive ali sabeyton richmond springfield
"zambia" Discussed on Disruption

Disruption

02:09 min | 3 years ago

"zambia" Discussed on Disruption

"And coming of zambia apocalypse that's really what it is bler actually typing out things yeah and also a number of odd of trump a decent amount of traffic that seemed to source from russian servers so you know there was a lot of discussion of before this that the vote should be delayed but why would we let a little bit of fraud in a little bit of uncertainty stop taking will take you only money from a normal leedle type 2 million quest people oh yeah yeah they ambient super sarcastic korean that have been found to be either impersonated or using people that have passed away well i take the really important thing is i i want people to understand like if you go to mexico right now ally people don't watch youtube videos on their phones there because it's so prohibitively expensive under the plan so what this is essentially going to do is create create two tiers of internet one for the very very rich and one for the very very poor and this is very very concerning we don't have a free society when we can't all access information so you could i mean you could see them doing things like blocking access to sites it may have views contrary to at t n comcast you could see them like blocking traffic and having one very slow internet for the poor and one faster internet for the rich uk expect to not be able to access net flex or youtube or a lot of these other you know like things and i also want to stress this isn't just on your mobile device they can do this for everything so this is this is a really big wakeup call for democracy here and the thing that like we got itaca is you know the fcc chairman aajit pie he is so smarmy intellectually dishonest through every single bit of this.

fraud mobile device zambia mexico youtube fcc chairman
"zambia" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

02:16 min | 3 years ago

"zambia" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"In zambia and zimbabwe was overturned my friends we cannot permit this this is a venal paid to play wayne pacelle president and chief executive of the humane society told the washington post said as it is a venal and the ferry us pay to slay arrangement that zimbabwe has set up with the trophy hunting industry now zimbabwe is a criminal gangster state run by mugabe a mass murderer in addition to murdering his own people in stealing land from the farmers when he took it over used to be called rhodesia he said he would help the blacks of as in bob way need i remind you what happened when whites were farmers in zimbabwe they were exporting food to the world when mugabe the mass murderer took over zimbabwe ex rhodesia and turn the land over to his native peoples what happened they couldn't farm the land properly they became a basket case and they've been begging for food on the world stage ever since so now that they've destroyed themselves they want to destroy their all their elephants what kind of message does it send donald trump to the world that you would reverse a thing like this i have given time and money to the elephant projects for years and to me this is far more important than groping to be honest with you this a sickening it turns my stomach and remember what i'm saying to you mr president it's in your hands you have the power to reverse this you can send a lesson to those working for you that you will not tolerate the destruction and the killing of innocent animal's remember what i said to you mr president you have the power this does not justify the hunting and killing of them remember mr president we are the elephant i am the elephant you are the elephant and when we lose our compassion for the world's most noble creatures who was next will we start culling the human heard saying this overpopulation as well many believe we are doing that just now we are desensitizing ourselves to the taking of life whether is through the abortion of the unborn in this country or the.

zambia chief executive washington post zimbabwe mugabe rhodesia donald trump president wayne pacelle bob
"zambia" Discussed on Wash FM 97.1

Wash FM 97.1

02:23 min | 3 years ago

"zambia" Discussed on Wash FM 97.1

"If you want to take a look at it but starbucks is keeping their halloween plans a secret for now but he put a beleaguered if we're talking well yeah but they're not get like an eye confirming any of this but anyway if you're curious now you have an idea of what the zambia frap will look and potentially tastes like green apple flavored green caramel apple okay i now do fall for that i'm sorry label were into oil i gotta get the like i say no because the sugar is pretty intense the amount of sugar and there so i sort of stay away from that sort of beverage with that much sugar in it but if you don't care or then you'll be one of the first ones to try it don't get spooked out are you five twelve here at ninety seven point one who wash ahead of lisa are you or your coffee drinker or not i liked decaf if we're talking about well yeah but they're not get like they're not confirming any others but anyway if you're curious now you have an idea of that was actually a good thing guys you got her attention and now turn your attention to her to find out how the roads are looking right now well nothing sugary in mary fall for that stuff i'm sorry i mean people are into oil i gotta get the late i say no because the sugar is pretty intense the amount of sugar and there so i sort of stay away from that sort of beverage but that much sugar in it but if you don't care or then you'll be one of the first ones to try it yeah don't get spooked out are five twelve here at ninety seven point one who wash have a lisa are you are you a coffee drinker or not i like decaf i don't know that there's a dekalb i don't even know if there's caffeine in this to quite honestly but yeah but when you settle a of sugar i thought well maybe i will try it here that was actually a good thing you got her attention and now turn your attention to her to find out how the roads are looking right now well nothing sugary in maryland i three accidents in maryland v the eastbound if you're heading from the beltway toward annapolis but they're moving that out of the way now and boy on now route two north of two sixty one if you're dry through down.

apple lisa caffeine maryland annapolis starbucks halloween zambia
"zambia" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

01:46 min | 4 years ago

"zambia" Discussed on PRI's The World

"Zambia's everywhere thanks george as of the world i'm mark were woman george romero's godfather of the samba movie is dead at the age of seventy seven but its creation just keeps coming back all over the globe wailing as on the metaphor as can ivic vic rightflank is laziness also gathering scientific data can be dangerous work but not nearly as dangerous as ignoring the data entirely hit his very disturbing says sank the things that scientists do may very well be completely disregarded plus venezuelan opposition organizes a referendum and millions voted symbolically is a massive deals feet to reach the full the government who six she's holding its own vote those stories ahead today on the world market were men in your with the world thank you for being here on this monday there are many ways to measure a societies wellbeing had pretty important one is whether there's enough food available for everyone at affordable prices in a moment will take you to a supermarket in caracas venezuela where the only affordable items on the shelves are vinegar and sardines we begin though with the latest in the political dysfunction that's largely responsible for venezuela's economic meltdown this weekend more than seven million people voted in a referendum organized by the venezuelan opposition and which was considered illegal by the government of embattled president nicolas maduro garish gupta's a reporter for reuters base in caracas so garrisons votes had no legal standing more of a symbolic way i guess to reject madouas plan to rewrite the constitution so what was the opposition hoping to accomplish.

Zambia george romero vic rightflank caracas venezuela economic meltdown gupta reporter president nicolas maduro reuters