35 Burst results for "Zambia"

U.S. Has World’s Highest Rate of Children Living in Single-Parent Households

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:08 min | 8 months ago

U.S. Has World’s Highest Rate of Children Living in Single-Parent Households

"United States has world's highest rate of children living in single parent households. And there's no way it's gotten better by the way, since the virus. Almost a quarter of U.S. children live in single parent homes more than any other country on the planet. Let me say that again. More than any other country on the planet, and so the obvious explanation as to why this is, is wealth. Is in poor countries you just don't have the money or the luxury or the ability to break up a family you need a nuclear family to stay alive in Zambia. Even if you don't like your husband or don't like your wife, what keeps you together is survival. When America because of our abundance of garbage we've imported from China, and our instantaneous science scientific and technological economy that's rigged towards instant gratification, like I don't like my spouse, I'm just gonna leave. And in a perverse way, wealth has made our moral fabric weaker. When you think about that now, a libertarian one agree with that a staunch libertarian person who just defends, abstractions all day long. They say, no, no, no. It's what you do with it. That's the silliest argument I've ever heard, okay? There are externalities to conditions. Economics teaches you that. So 23% of U.S. children live in single parent homes. The next highest on the planet is the United Kingdom, 21%. That's a wealthy country. Russia, 18%, not as wealthy, but definitely previously war torn. We have a we have more children living without parents than countries that are known for orphans without two parents. Kenya, 16%. Japan only 7% India, which is one of the poorest countries on the planet 5%.

America Zambia China United Kingdom Russia Kenya Japan India
"zambia" Discussed on ARTICULATE with Steve McJones

ARTICULATE with Steve McJones

04:32 min | 9 months ago

"zambia" Discussed on ARTICULATE with Steve McJones

"He after after max. Finally though that's what it just went everything skyrocket. Let's go live. Let's let's see what we can do. Yeah and the weight started like melting away. 'cause i was like intermittent fasting and Working out and then the gym's closed in december. So i was picking up starting get strong. I felt like it was What i need it in a way. Because i started running. And that's a whole new part of my life. That i never thought whatever be a thing in running. My idea started the flow. I never i. I remember thinking to myself. The first time. Iran was. I'd have a runner's high runners overdose at that was just because it was. I was dying like my lungs. Were not there. But now i'm trading for the a half marathon. So it's like that's crazy. Yeah i slam trading for five a. I'm gonna do it at some point but it's going to be either really bad. Yeah it's happening november thirteen. There's not around so there is something to be said about like how running is sort of running in the morning at least because it. It doesn't allow you to set in that pool of thoughts that you typically like just the end up on. Yeah every meal to end up in your phone or just even if you don't like even you get up to get some food in and you just don't have the same when you go out especially in the city in the morning golfer. Run you're gonna see maybe a few people walking around like you have to imagine what their life is going to be at a right now or the sun is coming up. Like it's that's nice day zambia To start thinking about like all right well then what's funny about the you know. Let's run If you do this or not. But like i'll get these doubts of like if i'm listening to music and i'm running alternative music off than start like same room thankful for. That's like a cool gratitude yet. Like i i. Because i realized where i was in the runs like i was when i first started. You're frustrated because like nanos making all this headway. Then.

Iran zambia
"zambia" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

04:24 min | 10 months ago

"zambia" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

"He making the kind of enemies that might come back after him in the future whether or not his taking a risk. I may not explicitly state. But what i can when you do. Is that zambia. Almost always has changed the entire leadership of the service. Chips the zambia. National service zambia ami zambia. If it was zambia police zambia correction services. When we changed government boeing donning history. Go to nineteen ninety. One win from the beneath government into the em-empty government. The same happened in twenty eleven moving from the md of meant into the patriotic front government. The same happened but one of the things that the president spoke of when he made this decision was the fact that the past seven years have been some of the most difficult for zambia of all human rights and so what he wants to achieve is to ensure that for example the please he wants service to become professional to guarantee the safety of before the human rights. he made a very interesting remark. When you're swearing in the new spec general police told them do not arrest anyone before conducting investigations do not detect anyone beyond the stipulated forgave dollars. All in the name of vixen them because they i political opening of somebody and those are the things that wants to at you so the hope of many zambians is that. This decision does not backfire. Let's have a think about how he intends to govern. And i guess what the early months and years of his term could look like. We know a bit about his paucity. Is this serial presidential contender and also this extremely wealthy self made businessman but as a politician does it strike you that there are any parallels disea- have any. Inspirations any idols. Any other leaders anywhere else in the world that he wants to be a bit like looking at fifteen years that she has spent in the opposition and the kind of things that was said about him claims about him being the one. That's sort of the zambian assets during the privatization era in the late nineties..

zambia patriotic front government boeing
"zambia" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

05:58 min | 10 months ago

"zambia" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

"You're listening to the foreign desk on monocle. Twenty four joining me now from kitwe. Is michael kaluga a news. Reporter at phoenix. 'em zambia michael. Let's begin with the reason we're doing this program which is zambia's new president and what he hopes to accomplish if you were to introduce our listeners to president hawkeye day hitch dilemma. How would you describe him. I describe a highgate. H as steal his own words of boy that grew up. In the rural at zambia when through the steam at buzzer from governments to end himself is education if gatien's a businessman but his opponent descended timely man. And finally the president better public zambia. It's not his first. go round this. If i've countered right. This is the sixth time. He's run for president after failing to make it five times. What's your sense of. Why zambians voted for him this time when they didn't all the other times this one. If you conduct an assessment on the ground is pretty much. Zambian people voting the previous regime out less than it is about them. Voting for president had engaged in mental office. The bus five or six times. There hasn't been really much that has changed from his campaign strategies except maybe for one or two aspects that could have played a bigger role which include his presence on social media and his ability now to connect to the zambian people better than he has done in the past five campaigns. Is it clear which parts of the zambian people. He wants connecting with woolsey especially popular with any particular age demographics or any particular regions. Who are his people. Initially presidents each lama had restriction. I think it goes one of the things that against if you had so much popularity in southern province as well as a wisden and northwestern provinces web. he's people are his tribes men. But i think over the past five years. He rebranded himself. And that did connecting more to people from other parts of the country and also the biggest score that the president had prior to the election was his connection with a you. Look at the population of zambia. The institute over seventy percent of the population and so it give him an h. The moment he had that connection with the us you mentioned earlier his use of social media which obviously has become a bigger part of electoral processes all over the world. Was that an important part of that connection with youth in particular. And if so how did he do it. What was he social media strategy purposely. Going through as seven years. Had i h lim. Has i all manner of intimidation from the states..

zambia kitwe michael kaluga gatien phoenix michael woolsey lama us
"zambia" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

04:27 min | 10 months ago

"zambia" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

"To the foreign desk. I'm andrew mullah. Zombie became independent in nineteen sixty four though the reputation it has since established as a to or relative order in southern africa is merited. The journey has not been an altogether smooth. One will joining me now from. Lusaka is visit j perry professor of history. At the university of zambia professor. Let's go back to the point at which zombie starts to emerge from british rule and become a country in. Its own right before that. What kind of rule were the british running over. What was then known as northern rhodesia when the country was known as northern rhodesia as the country was colonized about eighteen. Ninety at that time there were two northern rhodesian those north eastern rhodesia another some rhodesia which were amalgamated in nineteen eleven as northern rhodesia and then a part of that period was under the british south africa company then in nineteen twenty four. The british colonial of his took over on the begun manage the country as a war as northern rhodesia. Under the corneal. Office bez in london and that went on until nineteen sixty three wendo elections at time the that had been formed among which was the african national congress on the united national independence. Party unit on the ufp. It was for white people in the election that took president in sixty three none of the three parties only election but the african national congress under him on under unique under kennedy. The gold from the collision and president kaunda became the prime minister until the next elections in nineteen sixty four. When you nip won the elections on unique perform the fisted government out independence on four th october nineteen sixty four at the time when the african national congress among blah underneath where competing in nineteen sixty four elections. The idea was to form a government. Which was the win to unify the seventy three ethnic groups in zambia. At that time so you need make as winner of those elections because it had an ideology which was sold to the people at the time so it made us the winner but the african national congress was not different either because both capacities where fighting to image from the colonel government however there was a feeling among the national is that the hormone cobra was much more sympathetic to the colonial government so that kind of gave him less people supporting his unique. Imagine because you nip was considered the as mom only patchy was most charged to fight for independence so because of that that's what different is the two capacities. It's always an interesting question at a key. Moment of history. How much difference one person makes. But kenneth kaunda who of course only died quite recently does emerge as the absolutely crucial figure of zambia's post independence. History he stays president for twenty seven years. How different does this time line potentially look if he's not there is. The country built entirely in his image. Well there's almost as ready pointed out. Prison kaunda ruled zambia for print. Seven years but in those twenty seven years to a two core systems and which he roads road in what was referred to as the first republic which was nineteen sixty four to nineteen seventy-three which was motivated demarcus where the african national congress parts was the opposition but but ninety seven to three. The country moved from multiple democracy. Who what was referred to as the one participatory. Democracy is the idea of the one participant. Democracy was to try and the united people because multiple democracy was the pfister public. They used to be a lot of conflicts between the different supporters of unique on the african national congress so as aware of lessening conflict during elections. That's how they want to participate..

rhodesia african national congress northern rhodesia andrew mullah j perry university of zambia kaunda united national independence ufp Lusaka southern africa zambia colonel government kenneth kaunda south africa kennedy london demarcus united people because multiple
"zambia" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

01:58 min | 10 months ago

"zambia" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

"Became independent in nineteen sixty four though the reputation it has since established as a to or relative order in southern africa is merited. The journey has not been an altogether smooth. One will joining me now from. Lusaka is visit j perry professor of history. At the university of zambia professor. Let's go back to the point at which zombie starts to emerge from british rule and become a country in. Its own right before that. What kind of rule were the british running over. What was then known as northern rhodesia when the country was known as northern rhodesia as the country was colonized about eighteen. Ninety at that time there were two northern rhodesian those north eastern rhodesia another some rhodesia which were amalgamated in nineteen eleven as northern rhodesia and then a part of that period was under the british south africa company then in nineteen twenty four. The british colonial of his took over on the begun manage the country as a war as northern rhodesia. Under the corneal. Office bez in london and that went on until nineteen sixty three wendo elections at time the that had been formed among which was the african national congress on the united national independence. Party unit on the ufp. It was for white people in the election that took president in sixty three none of the three parties only election but the african national congress under him on under unique under kennedy. The gold from the collision and president kaunda became the prime minister until the next elections in nineteen sixty four. When you nip won the elections on unique perform the fisted government out independence on four th october nineteen sixty four

zambia amy hobby hockey treasury Lima Laima africa
A New Dawn for Zambia?

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

01:58 min | 10 months ago

A New Dawn for Zambia?

"Became independent in nineteen sixty four though the reputation it has since established as a to or relative order in southern africa is merited. The journey has not been an altogether smooth. One will joining me now from. Lusaka is visit j perry professor of history. At the university of zambia professor. Let's go back to the point at which zombie starts to emerge from british rule and become a country in. Its own right before that. What kind of rule were the british running over. What was then known as northern rhodesia when the country was known as northern rhodesia as the country was colonized about eighteen. Ninety at that time there were two northern rhodesian those north eastern rhodesia another some rhodesia which were amalgamated in nineteen eleven as northern rhodesia and then a part of that period was under the british south africa company then in nineteen twenty four. The british colonial of his took over on the begun manage the country as a war as northern rhodesia. Under the corneal. Office bez in london and that went on until nineteen sixty three wendo elections at time the that had been formed among which was the african national congress on the united national independence. Party unit on the ufp. It was for white people in the election that took president in sixty three none of the three parties only election but the african national congress under him on under unique under kennedy. The gold from the collision and president kaunda became the prime minister until the next elections in nineteen sixty four. When you nip won the elections on unique perform the fisted government out independence on four th october nineteen sixty four

Rhodesia J Perry University Of Zambia Northern Rhodesia Lusaka Southern Africa African National Congress United National Independence UFP South Africa Kaunda London Kennedy
Nigeria Beat Liberia in World Cup Qualifiers

BBC Assignment

00:55 sec | 10 months ago

Nigeria Beat Liberia in World Cup Qualifiers

"News down African qualifying for the 2022 World Cup where the Leicester City striker Colecchia Natural scored twice for Nigeria, who kicked off their Group C campaign with a comfortable two nil victory of a Liberia well, Nigeria will be with that natural and other top players for their next game, however. As Cape Verde drew 11 with the Central African Republic is on the UK government's covid red list. It means that anyone entering such a country would need to quarantine for 10 days upon their return to their English Premier League club. The two time African champions Every coast were held to a goalless draw in Mozambique, sides kicking off their in Group D Cameroon had a decisive two nil win over Malawi. Also on Friday, Tunisia went top of Group B, They beat Equatorial Guinea three nil. Zambia defeated Mauritania and in the group G Open in South Africa were held nail nail in Zimbabwe, Ghana beat Ethiopia one

Colecchia Natural Nigeria Cape Verde Drew Leicester City English Premier League Club Liberia World Cup Central African Republic UK Mozambique Cameroon Malawi Tunisia Equatorial Guinea Zambia Mauritania South Africa Zimbabwe Ghana Ethiopia
"zambia" Discussed on NPR News Now

NPR News Now

03:25 min | 11 months ago

"zambia" Discussed on NPR News Now

"Trudeau said of monday. More than eight hundred. Afghans have been evacuated from afghanistan with about five hundred having already arrived in canada. To also said his government is working with the us britain and other allies and international aid organizations on his pledge to bring twenty thousand afghans to canada trudeau said the canadian military including aircraft has been deployed to the region. It's estimated there are about one thousand interpreters who helped the canadian military still in kabul many rush to the airport on sunday hoping to escape others believed to be in hiding ottawa closed. Its embassy in kabul over the weekend. Further complicating the plight of the interpreters for npr news. I'm dan carpenter. In toronto. the justice department is urging congress to update the voting rights act. Npr's carrie johnson reports. The move follows the supreme court's ruling that limited the federal government's power assistant attorney general. Kristen clark says the justice department ability to protect the right to vote has been eroded. I am here today to sound an alarm. Clark is asking congress to restore the heart of the landmark nineteen sixty five voting rights act including a measure that allowed the federal government to pre approve election. Changes in places with a history of discrimination until then. Doj is bringing individual cases in places like georgia which can take years to move through the courts house speaker. Nancy pelosi says democrats will consider voting legislation next week but republicans are casting the bills as unnecessary power grabs. That would take power away from the states. Carrie johnson npr news. Washington start at the trading week on wall street as investors shifts. Some money in the lower risk categories after recent run up in stocks. The dow gained a hundred and ten. Points the nasdaq was down. Twenty nine points. The s&p rose eleven points. This is npr. German discount supermarket chain aldy is putting up. The help wanted sign company announcing these looking to hire twenty thousand new workers in the us will also be increasing its average starting wages restoring warehouse workers from fifteen dollars to nineteen dollars an hour. All he says it intends to hold a hiring week in september. We'll be looking to fill a variety of positions including cashier stockers and associates for more than twenty one hundred stores and twenty-five warehouses across the us. In the southern african nation of zambia. The country's longtime opposition leader has become the country's president elect npr's or peralta reports after questioning the election result. Zambia's incumbent president has conceded for decades. Now zambia has been seen as a bastion of democracy instability in southern africa but over the past few years president edgar lube has been accused of eroding democratic norms by curbing freedom of speech and at one point even jailing his opponent last week. Zambians voted overwhelmingly for his opposition. Giving each limb up a victory fellow citizens it is indeed. And your day in zambia. It's a new beginning for all of us. He promises a return tweet. democratic zambia. Were all voices are respected after an election cycle marked by clashes between political groups. He called on zambians to unite a npr news. Capetown amid concerns of a global pandemic related shutdown and slowing the economy crude oil futures. Prices lost ground today oil down one point seven percent i'm jack speer npr news..

npr news carrie johnson justice department kabul dan carpenter Kristen clark Trudeau canada federal government trudeau congress zambia aldy afghanistan Npr ottawa britain npr us
"zambia" Discussed on NPR News Now

NPR News Now

03:58 min | 11 months ago

"zambia" Discussed on NPR News Now

"A seven point two magnitude earthquake hit southwestern haiti saturday officials say entire towns were destroyed and at least three hundred. Four people died. Marcello vis car is the director of world vision a humanitarian organization that helps people in poverty. He says he plans to charter. Planes to reach the area because the roadways aren't safe is very go there Round competition because gang activity a ripe bonito between or a friend in the south. The epicenter of the earthquake was about seventy eight miles west of the capital port-au-prince president biden has ordered another thousand. Us troops to kabul to help in the partial evacuation of the us embassy in the afghan capital. This will include some afghan citizens would help the us. During the twenty year war taliban militants have swept through the country in recent weeks as us led forces withdrew more than two hundred thousand. People gathered across france saturday in a fifth round of demonstrations against the so-called health past law as rebecca rosman reports. The law took effect earlier. This week led by the far-right patriot. Party leader throwing city though. Demonstrators and perish shouted mccone. We don't want your pass while carrying signs. That said liberate us and corona madness francis. Health pass requires people to show proof of vaccination or a recent negative code nine hundred ninety s to enter bars restaurants cafes or aboard a train or plane but recent polls show that despite the vocal opposition the majority of francis seventy six million people support the health pass government data shows nearly two thirds of the eligible population is now fully vaccinated and the government says it expects to reach its target vaccinating fifty million people by the end of august for npr news. I'm rebecca rosman in paris. Hot dry conditions in the pacific northwest are hampering efforts to put out. Wildfires fire crews are tracking a dozen uncontained large fires across oregon alone christian foden fenzl of oregon public broadcasting reports full told roughly half a million acres of land boon so far in the state an excessive heat and low humidity over the last few days of cold several years to grow. Mike's turley with the northwest interagency. Coordination center says they've just enough resources to fight these fires but not much more than that. Crude and resources are harder to come by experiencing fire in california and montana wyoming all throughout the west. The wildfire season in the pacific northwest. Started early this year. But it won't be clear until full how it compared to previous seasons. Meanwhile an excessive heat advisory remains in place for npr news. I'm christian foton vessel. This is npr. News in zambia. Roughly half the results from an election on thursday show the leading opposition presidential candidate ahead ishmael fund equal reports necessity update zambia's electoral commission puts challenge a hacker individually ahead of incumbent edgar lou offer to announce the consolidated resents for sixty two out of one hundred fifty six to and says so far receive long. Got five hundred sixty two thousand five hundred hundred three. Upn one million twenty four thousand two hundred twelve day. The president's office alleged violence by the opposition that it says renders the elections. Neither free nor fair. These has prompted fears. That leung could be the first zambian president to cling to power after losing an election. They electoral commission will resume updates on sunday for npr news. I am ish. Muff wendy inari. But after continues to rise a.

rebecca rosman Marcello vis prince president biden npr news earthquake mccone us francis foden fenzl kabul haiti Coordination center au taliban oregon france pacific northwest turley zambia
"zambia" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

The Economist: The Intelligence

06:46 min | 11 months ago

"zambia" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

"Today voters in zambia. Go to the polls for a decade one party has ruled the country the patriotic front or pf its leader. president edgar lou has been on the campaign trail. But i want you to know that you're good right to vote and use it wisely and so has opposition leader hockey in the hit. You laima who stood for the presidency five times before twice already. Mr liu has defeated him narrowly and it looks to be close again. Mr hitching up seems to be gaining ground in key urban areas including the capital lusaka but civil society groups accused president lingers patriotic front of using the power of the state to bully voters or to buy them off. Things are pretty grim in zappia. John mcdermott is the economists chief. Africa correspondent and twenty fifteen. The current president at google ascended to office. His tenure has been associated with a stagnation in the economy widespread corruption and a ryan's in human rights abuses and while there are some external factors going on here. Sam bear is africa's second largest copper producer and until recently the copper prices in low plus. We've had cove it. The main reason has been his terrible running of the country so zambians are feeling frustrated and the feeling angry at the impoverishment. That's happened on dimissed. Lingo. and so what alternative do they have that. Who is who is standing against the incumbent. The main opposition candidate is a man called have hit ulama otherwise known as h. h fellow citizens of august. Twenty one is a very important day in our. His is a day when we decide whether we continue with the poverty. The unemployment all we do as an economist by training these businessman he basically has to a physician via the first is to restore some sanity economic policymaking and the second is to retire to the corruption. The has blossomed under mr lingo. This is almost certainly his best chance at the top job in the past his minority tonga ethnicity and the sense in which he is quite close to western business interests have meant that he treated quite wehrley among some zambians but he has done a good job in presenting himself as a more unifying force this time around and he also benefits from the widespread frustration about deteriorating living standards. And as far as we can tell even though. There isn't a lot of polling zambia. If this were a fair fight h h would win narrowly. You say if it were a fair fight as if to say that it's not going to be no it's not going to be. There's a reason why. The vast majority of incumbent presidents in africa win reelection. And that's because they often marshal the resources of the state to ensure they stay in power and mr lingers done the same he has used state law jest to buy off swing voters that has been widespread intimidation of opposition figures buying so-called cadrez linked to english ponte. The patriotic front state media is systematically biased against any opposition party. The extensively independent election commission is looking increasingly biased. And on and on and on we go well in a sense this this feels like a familiar story african strongmen leaders using the power of the state to make sure that they remain strong leaders. It is but zambia is different in some important ways in one thousand nine hundred eighty one. It was one of the first african countries to move from one party rule to hosting multiparty elections. Its founding president who died earlier this year. A man called candidates konda he resisted the move to democracy but ultimately he did the country huge favor by going quietly and peacefully. And that wasn't the only time zambians have told the rest of the continent a lesson in democracy in twenty eleven there was another case of a peaceful transfer of power so for much in its history while hasn't attracted huge amounts of international attention. It has not sleeping something of a trailblazer african democracy which is why the restrictions on civil liberties and the authoritarian slide on the missile is depressing as well as wearing and so what does that decline in in democratic norms. Look like on. The campaign trail is is h h being given a fair shake. No not really. The government has used covert related restrictions to justify not allowing a change to travel allowing helicopters his policy to visit rural areas and somehow these covert related restrictions of not applied to the president. This also been some more disturbing moments. H h is convoy was shot when he was trying to get to church while the has been some violence allegedly linked to cadrez from the main opposition party monitoring group suggests that the vast majority of the violence is being perpetrated by groups linked to the ruling party. And frankly kenny you emphasise say it's fair democracy when one side can campaign freely with all the largest of the state and the other side's can barely get the words so given all those obstacles do. Do you think there's a chance that mr liu could be unseated in this election. There's a chance the election is very much in the balance. I think though it's unlikely that will get clean result either way that could well be legal challenges that could be demonstrations on the streets and given the amount of guns the disposal of the zambian security forces. There's also a risk of violence. As so i think it's important for the international community to start preparing for the worst even as they hope for the best when i spoke to him. H h called this the most important election in zambia's history and i think frankly it's hard to disagree. Thanks.

president edgar lou zambia laima Mr liu zappia Sam bear cadrez mr lingo John mcdermott mr lingers lusaka africa konda hockey tonga Mr ryan Africa election commission google
"zambia" Discussed on Break The Rules

Break The Rules

01:33 min | 11 months ago

"zambia" Discussed on Break The Rules

"Dude is part up here. And i am been so Really means included just not demonizing sued and not Ritualized either around timing in or even the types of foods that you eat she admissions having peace with carbs and for her body. Doing some carb cycling. Even checking program are really great. Way to your towing the water or intermittent fasting to learn more about it. How it works. How to make it practical doable for your life and really customize it for and you don't find that all that information events in the low dot com links Just so enjoyed having zambia on the show and she is a woman not is not about getting all caught up in the dogwoods fasting. Which tends you be very reinvent right now. In dr google era and really helping again individuals onto and become more intuitive with their body through the process. In that is something that you are on trying and and just thank. You saw the app. Come on in. We will be keeping up with her. Work and community breaks some roles and health and slump a..

zambia google
More Than 110M COVID Vaccines Sent to 60 Countries, US Says

AP News Radio

00:45 sec | 11 months ago

More Than 110M COVID Vaccines Sent to 60 Countries, US Says

"The by the administration is touting more progress and helping vaccinate the world against covert nineteen the White House says it has shipped more than one hundred ten million vaccine doses to more than sixty countries from Afghanistan to Zambia it's a notable number but still just a fraction of the shots needed worldwide the donated doses come from the nation's surplus stock as domestic vaccinations slow amid widespread vaccine hesitancy there are still about ninety million eligible Americans who are unvaccinated White House virus response coordinator Jeff science says the good news is about three million people have gotten their first shot over the past week the highest total in a month Sager mag ani Washington

White House Zambia Afghanistan Jeff Science Ani Washington
Third Time's the Harm: Africa's Crippling COVID-19 Wave

The Economist: The Intelligence

01:45 min | 1 year ago

Third Time's the Harm: Africa's Crippling COVID-19 Wave

"Night. South africa's president cyril ramaphosa announced new restrictions for the next two weeks after the country recorded nearly fifteen thousand new covid. Nineteen cases on saturday will be in place from nine pm to four. Am and all non essential establishment needs to close by eighteen. South africa isn't alone. The whole continent is suffering from a devastating resurgence of covid nineteen. The world's organization is warning africa not to get complacent in the fight against covid with in the last three weeks. The number of new daily cases in uganda has increased dramatically the africa. Cdc is concerned about the cases being reported in kenya. if you're and sudan at least nineteen other countries are in the middle of a third wave and their health systems are overwhelmed in countries. Such as namibia. Uganda and zambia. Oxygen is running out. Hospital beds are full and with vaccines in short supply. There's no easy way out. In early months of the pandemic it was common to hear. The africa somehow been spared the worst of covid nineteen. John mcdermott is the economists chief. Africa correspondent and is based in south africa. People speculated about whether that might be due to the consumer demographics its history of dealing with this infectious disease or something else entirely such as underlying immunity however. The premise was always shaky. We always knew fought in little about what was really going on on the continent and it looks increasingly shaky now that africa is in the middle of a particularly grim third wave.

Cyril Ramaphosa South Africa Africa Uganda CDC Sudan Kenya Namibia Zambia John Mcdermott
New CDC reports warn variants could lead to rapid rise in Covid-19 cases

News and Perspective with Tom Hutyler

00:38 sec | 1 year ago

New CDC reports warn variants could lead to rapid rise in Covid-19 cases

"The new covert 19 variants that are spreading across the U. S CDs. He says those new variants could easily lead to a rapid rise in covert 19 cases refreshing its calls for people to postpone travel and continue wearing masks and social distancing. UK and South African variants are thought to be more transmissible. The CDC cited a study of cases in Zambia, which shares a lot of commerce and travel with South Africa, and says within a month the number of variant cases there grew 16 fold. CDC says the UK variant is spreading rapidly here in the U. S, and could be the dominant strain sometime next month. Marco Malard ABC News Talk

U. CDC UK Zambia South Africa Marco Malard Abc News
"zambia" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

The Economist: The Intelligence

07:27 min | 1 year ago

"zambia" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

"Don been doing into the lead comes in. The central zambian town of kabwe has been called the most toxic place on the planet. It was developed around a lead mine built by a british colonial firm in the early nineteen hundreds although the mine shut its doors in one thousand nine hundred four. it's toxic. Dust continues to plague the town. Some residents try to protect themselves like joy. Bouza who tells her young brothers not to play outside of just in before i went to now a class action lawsuit against anglo american south africa which was affiliated with the mind for fifty years is seeking compensation for more than one hundred thousand women and children. Wade tend to defend positions as. We don't believe that. Anglo american is responsible for the current situation. I obviously understand that. That doesn't help. The people of kabwe. And i realized that and of course we have every sympathy so they applaud whatever the outcome of the case. There will still be a need to deal with the lead that permeates the town's soil and it inhabitants bodies. The most atrocious cliche for any africa correspondent is to refer to replace as hot and dusty but in case the fact that cowboys hot and dusty really matters because it's the dust off the former lead mine. The has blown all of time john. Mcdermott is the economists. Chief africa respondent. He recently visited kabwe. Much of kabwe is a normal. Mid sized. african settee has a bustling market. And it's a hive of activity but there are about half a dozen townships that lie close to the former smelter and they in particular are kind of coated in this fine dust which contains the lead metal. And when i was there a few weeks ago. I went to see a man called. Assail timbo. hello good morning how you move you. Who was a minor for almost two decades and we sat in his front yard. What kind of tree is this smuggle underneath a mango tree while chickens were pecking around his feet and i heard her story of the mind. Gross today it will be became. I think they demo- plus mr tembo worked at the mine after it was nationalized in nine thousand nine hundred seventy until it closed in one thousand nine hundred four and he says he was never really told about the dangers of lead while he was there but that today continues to give him health problems. He says he's got bad eyesight sore head droopy limbs. He can't be sure but he suspects the all of those elements have something to do with the fact that worked at the lead. The hoi issue has come to everybody in this study after the miami has been and presumably if this dust is all around that mr tembo story isn't isn't unique. That's right anyone you speak to in cowboy has some knowledge of the risks of lead and more recently that wellness has grown especially when it comes to the dangers faced by children. Local ngos are hosting radio shows and running courses in schools to educate people. Someone please tell me about what is lead. Leave is a subset benefits as you. Live is very poisonous. Substance that finding the so. That's gonna alert of course. Potentially toxic metal can be poisonous really low levels in the bloodstream. And because children's bodies are smaller they're developing and because kids more likely inhale and ingest the toxic dust there at greater risk and their effects can be profound. We're talking about behavioral problems learning disabilities and ultimately low iq if you have prolonged exposure to the metal and what efforts have been made down the years to to protect the residents from from the the the mines lead. There'd been a few efforts a couple funded by the world bank including one that's going but environmental scientists and experts in this field are convinced that none of them have been or will be sufficient to fully decontaminate the town. I saw this. When i went to the house of a man called cornelius katiti. They went to kidneys. Closed this one at that point. And then they put some blocks so that their wits through this one he has a canal right on the back of his garden which was dredged in the two thousands by a world bank funded project but even today as a matter has grown into it. Every rainy season water builds up and the comes over the of canal into his garden adding to the toxic contents of yard. And that just symbolized for me. How while there's been these piecemeal efforts day in day out to the people in cowboy still face with the poisonous environs and about the court case that that is tackling this problem. Why why is it happening now. After all these years of of half hearted efforts lawyers have been looking at the case for the better part of two decades but they feel they finally got in the necessarily archive over research. Done to bring the case against anglo and the also feel that legal changes in south africa to do with the ease of making a class action suit mean that now is the time to try and seek redress for their clients. And what do you think will happen. The only thing. I know for sure is that the case is gonna take many years to play out the lawyers for the applicants need to first prove that the case can be heard in south africa. That's before it even gets to trial and if it were to get to trial there's no the anglo will vigorously contest the charges so i don't think there'll be a resolution anytime soon and in the meantime the residents of kabwe will will continue to inhale to live around all of this toxic dirt. Subtly that's the case in the absence of any clear plan to remediate the time people living in. Kobe are trying their best to protect themselves. But ultimately many residents are simply too poor to leave and others do not want to go because whatever its perils cowboys their home like cornelius katiti. But you hope that your children your grandchildren will be to play and safety some point. Yes john thank you very much for your time. Thank you jason.

kabwe mr tembo Bouza Assail timbo cornelius katiti south africa africa Mcdermott Wade cowboys john miami anglo Kobe jason nets
Get the lead out: Zambias toxic mine

The Economist: The Intelligence

07:27 min | 1 year ago

Get the lead out: Zambias toxic mine

"Don been doing into the lead comes in. The central zambian town of kabwe has been called the most toxic place on the planet. It was developed around a lead mine built by a british colonial firm in the early nineteen hundreds although the mine shut its doors in one thousand nine hundred four. it's toxic. Dust continues to plague the town. Some residents try to protect themselves like joy. Bouza who tells her young brothers not to play outside of just in before i went to now a class action lawsuit against anglo american south africa which was affiliated with the mind for fifty years is seeking compensation for more than one hundred thousand women and children. Wade tend to defend positions as. We don't believe that. Anglo american is responsible for the current situation. I obviously understand that. That doesn't help. The people of kabwe. And i realized that and of course we have every sympathy so they applaud whatever the outcome of the case. There will still be a need to deal with the lead that permeates the town's soil and it inhabitants bodies. The most atrocious cliche for any africa correspondent is to refer to replace as hot and dusty but in case the fact that cowboys hot and dusty really matters because it's the dust off the former lead mine. The has blown all of time john. Mcdermott is the economists. Chief africa respondent. He recently visited kabwe. Much of kabwe is a normal. Mid sized. african settee has a bustling market. And it's a hive of activity but there are about half a dozen townships that lie close to the former smelter and they in particular are kind of coated in this fine dust which contains the lead metal. And when i was there a few weeks ago. I went to see a man called. Assail timbo. hello good morning how you move you. Who was a minor for almost two decades and we sat in his front yard. What kind of tree is this smuggle underneath a mango tree while chickens were pecking around his feet and i heard her story of the mind. Gross today it will be became. I think they demo- plus mr tembo worked at the mine after it was nationalized in nine thousand nine hundred seventy until it closed in one thousand nine hundred four and he says he was never really told about the dangers of lead while he was there but that today continues to give him health problems. He says he's got bad eyesight sore head droopy limbs. He can't be sure but he suspects the all of those elements have something to do with the fact that worked at the lead. The hoi issue has come to everybody in this study after the miami has been and presumably if this dust is all around that mr tembo story isn't isn't unique. That's right anyone you speak to in cowboy has some knowledge of the risks of lead and more recently that wellness has grown especially when it comes to the dangers faced by children. Local ngos are hosting radio shows and running courses in schools to educate people. Someone please tell me about what is lead. Leave is a subset benefits as you. Live is very poisonous. Substance that finding the so. That's gonna alert of course. Potentially toxic metal can be poisonous really low levels in the bloodstream. And because children's bodies are smaller they're developing and because kids more likely inhale and ingest the toxic dust there at greater risk and their effects can be profound. We're talking about behavioral problems learning disabilities and ultimately low iq if you have prolonged exposure to the metal and what efforts have been made down the years to to protect the residents from from the the the mines lead. There'd been a few efforts a couple funded by the world bank including one that's going but environmental scientists and experts in this field are convinced that none of them have been or will be sufficient to fully decontaminate the town. I saw this. When i went to the house of a man called cornelius katiti. They went to kidneys. Closed this one at that point. And then they put some blocks so that their wits through this one he has a canal right on the back of his garden which was dredged in the two thousands by a world bank funded project but even today as a matter has grown into it. Every rainy season water builds up and the comes over the of canal into his garden adding to the toxic contents of yard. And that just symbolized for me. How while there's been these piecemeal efforts day in day out to the people in cowboy still face with the poisonous environs and about the court case that that is tackling this problem. Why why is it happening now. After all these years of of half hearted efforts lawyers have been looking at the case for the better part of two decades but they feel they finally got in the necessarily archive over research. Done to bring the case against anglo and the also feel that legal changes in south africa to do with the ease of making a class action suit mean that now is the time to try and seek redress for their clients. And what do you think will happen. The only thing. I know for sure is that the case is gonna take many years to play out the lawyers for the applicants need to first prove that the case can be heard in south africa. That's before it even gets to trial and if it were to get to trial there's no the anglo will vigorously contest the charges so i don't think there'll be a resolution anytime soon and in the meantime the residents of kabwe will will continue to inhale to live around all of this toxic dirt. Subtly that's the case in the absence of any clear plan to remediate the time people living in. Kobe are trying their best to protect themselves. But ultimately many residents are simply too poor to leave and others do not want to go because whatever its perils cowboys their home like cornelius katiti. But you hope that your children your grandchildren will be to play and safety some point. Yes john thank you very much for your time. Thank you jason.

Kabwe Mr Tembo Bouza Assail Timbo Africa South Africa Mcdermott Wade Cornelius Katiti DON Cowboys John Miami Anglo Kobe Jason
As Tanzania Votes, Many See Democracy Itself on the Ballot

Monocle 24: The Globalist

08:18 min | 1 year ago

As Tanzania Votes, Many See Democracy Itself on the Ballot

"Tons Anita went to the polls yesterday to vote in an election overshadowed by opposition complaints of irregularities such as ballot box, stuffing President John Maga. Fully who is accused of stifling democracy seeks a second term in office alongside fourteen other candidates talk to Dan. Padgett is electoral politics at the university. Of Aberdeen, he specializes in political communication through mass rallies and populist and nationalist ideologies in Tanzania and joins me on the line. Now Don Tanzania's long been thought of in the West is a a haven of stability within east Africa but I mean this isn't necessarily the case and I. I wonder if you could sketch out the political dynamic there, the ruling party's been in power since nineteen sixty one. Yes that's right. It's is the longest ruling party in sub. Saharan Africa. The political dynamic in Tanzania has been one of the ruling Kanzi, CCM's decline over the last fifteen years. Reaching a low point in two thousand fifteen where it where the margin of victory was. The fittest is ever been. Since then President Michel, Foodie, it came to kyle and that's election has led Tanzania. Very shot an increasingly extreme offered Harry. Intern. And we weren't sure how just how? Radical that authoritarian agenda would be and the election this we're just getting results from now suggests that it is as bad as any of us feared as so the opposition allegations of vote rigging, etc do stand up. Well. So. Of course, normally I would turn to international election observers. Attorney to arbitrate these claims to decide which to give credence in which not to give credence. Unfortunately, we can't almost no international election observers. Were invited and those that were invited were. Invited at our so Given that and given the advantage of the opportunity that this creates the ruling party the elections it's hard not to give at least prima facie credence to these opposition claims especially given the the wide range of anecdote to. Video and photographic evidence that I've seen an which which I've been collecting these last twenty four hours, and of course, zipping a social media crackdown various restrictions on the press. Has Been, a crackdown all over and and for the last five years. So in many ways, the the rigging receipt which we've been seeing apparently seeing of the next twenty four hours. Is. Really just the icing on the authoritarian cake. There's extreme. Media Censorship rallies have been banned and consider route the rally. The most important means of communication tends to emotional time about seventy percent of people attend local meetings on a regular basis and attend election campaign rallies they were they were abandoned twenty sixteen and indeed the opposition at large have. Hottest. Struggle underneath. Almost constance. Of States and extra state harassment in includes trumped up court cases but also extrajudicial. So extra state attacks. Unknown assailants that have arrested some abductors killed. And in fact, one of the main challenges has recently returned to the country after recovering from gunshot wounds. That's right. So tenderly series is. Presidential. Candidate is the largest opposition party in Tanzania. and. So that's Experience of being of surviving attempted assassination attempt has has given. US already in very impressive political figure a sort of a sparkle. Some people referred to him as a living miracle. But of course, we don't know the results. Yes. But we all seeing violence particularly in Zanzibar. Zanzibar the autonomous. ARCHEPELAGO's Zanzibar, which is a federally devote area of 'em. Into UK. Has has often seen electoral violence. We saw it in ninety five and two, thousand and thirteen, thousand, five and twenty fifteen and actions by varying degrees. So in in some ways, this is a return to form It's not. The recurrence of violence is is. Seems to be because the opposition has probably one in sensabaugh almost every time. But they've never officially one out one means or another has always been used to not in the that's the that's the the scholarly consensus on. Politics what's different? This time I think is that there's violence on the mainland as well. So this is no longer an issue of contained physical violence in Zanzibar. There have been a series of incidents including. What appears to be an attempt to a to attack the chairman of the leading opposition party on the eve of the elections. So that's one difference the other is considered. No money there is. A. Sporadic protests violence and in return state brutality, police army heavy-handedness in putting down those protests that the protests have often been. Constrained and sporadic because they have not been condoned led. By, by the leaders of the opposition there, there are indications that this could be different this time one of the reasons for that is. The, the rhetoric is different. The leader of the opposition in Zanzibar say amount has been say had has been saying that in the past he's held his supporters back. He's been of restraint, and at this time he he won't urge restraint to newly sue has said that he will. Bring people out onto the streets and consider the state of the opposition behind because it seems like this might be the last stand in a sense that vikings they can make, and so they they don't have that say incentive to hold back this time and say the keep up how to drive the next time. Just finally before we go, do you think that this is part of something that we're seeing across parts of Africa there is a younger demographic. They were all born after independence that not prepared to accept authoritarian rule the just coming to the age where they are protesting we're seeing it in Nigeria within saws and in various other places could this be the the Africans spring. My sense is if there is African spring to come, it will come off and an Wiki will extend. Mexico an authoritarian winter. The trend on that strikes me is that a number of leaders are emerging in an intense Aena in Zambia. In other parts of the consonant, which bear a striking resemblance to this sort of authoritarian. Developmental. Nationalists of is so The there's a young population I are angry. But in fact, I think the trend seems to go the other way. And results. When can we expect those? So the first also are already dripping in and they show. That a series of opposition strongholds, there's places that you would never expect or or at least likely. To expect to go to a to the ruling party are being won by then by margins of three to one, which suggests that the the the rigging. Being worried about maybe taking place typically a Tanzanian election result takes three or four days that was related end and announced especially with the presidential elections but. So far. This is actually has been crisis already.

Tanzania Zanzibar Don Tanzania Saharan Africa East Africa Padgett DAN Aberdeen Anita President Trump John Maga Africa Aena President Michel United States Intern Harry
TikTok's owner applies for Chinese license to close US deal

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | 1 year ago

TikTok's owner applies for Chinese license to close US deal

"Tick tocks owner says he has a plan for Chinese technology exports license as it tries to complete a deal with oracle and Walmart to keep the popular video up operating in the U. S. Beijing tightened control over technology exports last month in an effort to gain leverage over Washington's attempts to force an outright sale of tech talk to U. S. owners the White House says the video service is a security risk because the personal information of its millions of U. S. users could be handed over to Chinese authorities president Donald Trump said this week he would approve a proposed deal in which oracle and Walmart could initially owned a combined twenty percent often use U. S. entity tick tock global I'm in Zambia Shockley

Oracle Walmart U. S. Beijing Washington White House Donald Trump U. S. President Trump Zambia
Recording police brutality: how technology is driving the new civil rights movement

The Vergecast

31:46 min | 1 year ago

Recording police brutality: how technology is driving the new civil rights movement

"Hey everybody seemingly from the verge cast really special interview episode this week yesterday the verge published feature package where calling capturing the police which was a months-long effort for almost everybody at the site to really interrogate the role of technology in the movement against police violence. The heart of the package is a feature where we talk to. People who had filmed the somewhat viral videos of police violence asking him why they did it. What happened next how they felt in the moment whether they would do it again, really contextualising these that we've seen over and over and over again we estimate videos. One is about a specific incidents with a specific set of men in Baytown Texas who filmed police violence and what happened next another one from the science team is about body cameras and police body cameras, and how they affect your perception. What's going on in some academic research that's come out about that. So I asked verge reporter, Steven and verge video producer, my calf, the two leaders of the site wide project To come on, say talk to me about the project what they learned in. Really I, keep thinking about this, the role that our phones are playing in changing our relationship to the and the government. I don't think any product manager or designer at a smartphone company ever thought that their products will be used in this way or create this moment. This is the direct intersection of technology and culture, which is something the virtuous. Investigate. So this is a really great conversation with John and Maria and a really big project. We're very proud of it that'd be read. Watch it here are John and Maria. Maria Abdul. John Steven Welcome to the virtuous easy doing well I. I'm doing great another beautiful day in. Quarantine Mario. How are you? I'm good. I'm very relieved that this really big thing that we have produced is out there. So now I get to. Take back and reflect de. So Youtube or the editorial leaders have big projects that four I would say two months we just called the police project I. Hope Everybody can see it on site. We're very proud of it in scope it looks at how people have been using technology to record the police record police behavior protests use technology and the tools to organizers protests to organize. The movement around police brutality, and then a lot of how those cameras in particular affect our relationship with the police. So it was a huge project and it looks like one big feature, a bunch of. Additional reports around that feature in two videos that my help produce. Let's start with where it came from. How did this project begin in? How did it take the shape that it ended up being on the site? That is very, very good question because. It was sort of such a big undertaking. We it started in a very different direction than it ended as I think a lot of large projects generally tend to. So it started with an idea, a sort of idea in the staff, one of our executive editor was like we should do something to capture the moment then it sort of fell on me to shape that idea. Which is, which is interesting sort of problem because I was very interested in. Working with the initial iteration of the of the project, but getting a chance to shape it meant that I had to think critically about sort of what what would fit the moment and what would capture the moment. Well, I would say so that's how we came came up with the idea of focusing on the people filming videos of police brutality because it felt like there was a section missing to the narrative that was Benjamin. Circulating around social media, which is to say, we don't really hear from those people like we hear a lot from from victims we hear from police officers, but we don't really hear from people who like the everyday people who are sort of in the line of fire and decide to make the very brave decision to pick up their phones and record and sh like shine light like shed light. On on this type of violence that really sort of goes undocumented because one of the things we police finances, it never really shows up police reports. Yeah. One thing that caught me is I say this a lot but this is a new way of using phones that fundamentally what's happening with with all of these if you look at our feature, we started at very intentionally with Rodney King. George holiday that the person who shot the Rodney King beating in the nineties using gigantic Sony eight millimeter cassette handicap which basically no one had those like some families WanNa had those. But the the that camera was present at that moment in time at one am on that corner to witness that thing was astoundingly improbable and as we've come to now, the presence of cameras is actually more likely than not in just the way people live their lives and so the decision to record seems at once. Easy simple. Everyone has a camera. It seems likely that everything will be recorded, but it also turns out to have dramatic consequences. Yeah. Yeah. I think one of the main threads which will I'm sure get into later is a lot of these people felt afraid of retaliation from the police because they posted on social media they sort of were indentifying themselves as targets, Samara and you pretty. Videos here how how did you pick the two together the verge video team did want in the verge science team did one how do we land in those two? So. At the first video and Ben Evita's. I initially saw the video on this very large like database of other videos, police brutality that had been collected, and that was being shared on twitter that we were using that we were looking through for this project, and when I first saw the video I serve noted it as something worthy. But because it had, it didn't happen at a protest. It wasn't the the video that I thought I was going to focus on but after just Justin Callum did the interview with Isaiah for the peace reporters feature in. Told me after he published the video, there had been an increased police surveillance in his life and that he was feeling a lot of anxiety and a Lotta paranoia since he published video. It just really struck me that he still even with all of the sphere and all this anxiety and what was happening he still wanted to talk to us because he had told Justin that he was interested in being part of the video project and so as soon as she told me that I spoke to him and as we sort of spoke, it was just. So clear that he understood the magnitude of recording and he understood the consequences that comes with it and yet still wanted to bring awareness to not only this moment but also what happens when you record the police? So that's how we landed on that video. So our second video on the role of body cams and capturing police brutality fell imperative that we would cover. It in that way given that it's not only bystander footage that is coming out of these recent protests. It's also a lot of body CAM footage in. So we thought it was important and imperative, and that verge science team thought it was imperative to also cover the role of camps and capturing police brutality, but also how they might actually influence how we perceive police. Violence. So it just added a different layer and a different impact to this larger piece. One thing that caught me about that and Addie has report that just is really stuck with me as we went through the project about how all these videos of protests and police violence are becoming a genre film, and as I read that and I watched the body cam video. It just occurred to me that we actually have to use of the formal language of film to describe what's happening here that the body cam is telling the story because it's one kind of camera it shows you one kind of it has a gaze and all these other cameras have another kind of perspective in it. I. Don't think we ever think about that as these videos is having maybe like that formal connection between what the cameras are doing and what you is the viewer perceived and that to me has been a very powerful through line of this whole project. Actually cameras are active participants in these stories and they shape the narrative. The same way that we we know this in every other situation where there's cameras camera shape the narrative, and they leave things out in a enhance other things and that to me I think there's going to be a big long cultural reckoning over the role of cameras in these moments because we don't really understand how that affects our blazing to the culture to the police to the state, and it's changing because the. Cameras Right now I mean it is ironic a little bit that this genre films started in Los Angeles. Well, that's the most cameras right and it's I mean like you know if you think about it that way it's like it makes sense that like Rodney, King beating was filmed by a person in Los Angeles and maybe not elsewhere but also I, think I think it's interesting that you bring up peace because i. I do think filmmakers understand this. And it is also I mean to to get not conspiratorial but to go a little bit off the rails which I still think it's in line but. The US government spends a not insignificant amount of money advising film makers were making films about the police and the military, and they do get some of these editorial. Editorial. Control some of the stuff. and. I think that perspective does shape the way that we see some of these institutions. Which is why I think it's very powerful that. People on the ground filming and they're making their own narratives about these institutions in real time. So let's start there. That's the that's the big feature. That's the piece reporters. It's eleven interviews with people who film police violence. I want to just immediately atop credit or creative director William troll and the engineer from the box media team Adler who built this thing it is beautiful is quite an experience to go through it. But the stories are actually of course, the most powerful thing. John, tell me about one thing you said to me at the very beginning of this project was this is the same story over and over again? Yes. And there's something about the volume of it that I think really brings it home feature came together and tell me hey, came to that realization and tell us what that story actually is. Yeah. So we interviewed a lot of people that was that was the hard part. One of the hardest parts of the projects was finding people who actually wanted to talk to us but I think we were using Greg sets list on twitter to find some of these people Shasta Greg I did actually interview him for. The you know that's a separate thing but yeah, I think I mean I. Think it's very it's interesting right because through these videos like they all have the same, the same beginning middle and end and. It's once you've see enough of them. It's very it's becomes predictable where the rising action in the falling action isn't purely film criticism terms I. Think the reason that we decided to go this route was because it adds context experience police violence like it's one of the things that like it really gives depth to what's going on and it's stuff that you don't normally see and the idea was to bring that sort of reality. Home to people reading, which is why the reason it's the same story every time and the reason that it's sort of like it was distracting actually at the beginning because I was like, okay, this is a different place. This is a different time. These are different people, but like chronicling the experience effective people in the same way, and that's why it was the same story every time because it's not every day that you see. Somebody who is like an officer? Who's who has sworn an oath to protect the public, just beating the shit out of. A peaceful protester and I think it's one of those things it sort of jars you out of complacency and I think for a lot of the people that we spoke to the interviews it seemed like these people were very sort of Shell. Shocked. They sort of knew the extent of the problem but a lot of them were just normal people who happen to be a protest and happened to be filming when stuff went down and so it was very strange reading these these. Reports from the ground like these eleven fourteen over and over again because. One of the reasons I think that it's important that we have the dateline like when it happened where it happened and like you know how many shares or whatever it, the the videos got was because it, it gave back some necessary context because again, if you're if you're reading this stuff in a vacuum if you're just reading reports. From. People who filmed the stuff it really does get eerily similar in for whatever it's worth videos are almost all at night. If they're usually chaotic and they all feel like are happening same place. Yeah. It's really strange and maybe they are I mean at least psychically speaking right like it's it is the same sort of mental place I think yeah and that was one of the notes as we were putting the thing together that we got from our editors was this we have to return some sense of place to it. So we we added that back in as you were kind of editing each of these individual vignettes. was there a theme that that really came out from each of the people? Was it? What what strikes me as as I watch all these videos there's just everyone has a phone out. Right like all the time it just seems like this instinct to have your phone out that to me is new. That's yeah. That's not how people thought ten years ago or twenty years ago I really do think that's in large part because of the power of social media because again, like the thing about social media, people dismiss it out of hand as like a bad and toxic place which a lot of the time it is like don't get me wrong. However, it is one of the only avenues for social change for people who are marginalized like it's a place where you can go to be heard. By by the institutions who would normally just have the power to ignore you and I think like police violence is one of those things where it is like it is sort of an abuse of power, right? It's one of these. It's like something that it won't show up on an incident report somebody like a cop like using their baton on a protester but if somebody films that and films like the circumstances where it where it happened how it happened like you you you you get a sense of whether or not this was justified and I think. A lot of the Times it's not and a lot of the Times that goes on reported and I think. People have seen that you can actually like get some measure of justice from these otherwise unaccountable institutions by sharing the stuff on social media because public pressure is still a thing and it's interesting that to go back to Isaiah Ben Evita's. He has video that officer fired like his him posting the video actually made a change at the very local level. In his town and I think I think that's a really important thing and I, that's that's sort of what's driving this stuff because again, institutions like the police were previously entirely unaccountable to the public. Mario I mean you, you are yourself filmmaker you talked to Isaiah how do you? How do you take that? That everyone is just instinctively pulling out their phone because they think it will lead to some some change down the road. I think what's interesting about Isiah specifically is that this video doesn't take place at a protest it. He was filming outside of a convenience store they were coming from a barbecue. They hadn't gone to protests recently, they were the at that moment they weren't planning necessarily planning on going to protest later that week however. In as the video begins, you hear him say I've got to get out and record this. You also hear his friends in the car say we've got a record this and yet when we interviewed them, it was the first time any of them had ever recorded police had ever been with other people who recording the police and I think that is largely part to seeing these videos. On twitter and on facebook of police violence being captured by by citizens being captured by civilians, and so they wanted to hold this police officer accountable and they also started recording him preemptively. They didn't start recording him the moment he started you know approaching them they started recording the minute they were pulling over in. So I think that really signifies to us at least to me that. Even. If you've never participated in a protest or never participated in filming the police, you now know that's an option for you. That's an option for you and that's an option for your community. It is I do think the third part that is going on said here. Is that like it is a protective thing too. You have evidence that maybe you weren't doing anything wrong even like, okay like you get pulled over by the cops and they sight probable cause like you're sitting there peacefully. You get to tell your story, view the camera to I think. These videos, I. Am sure are showing up in courts of law across the country. One thing that's really interesting about this. Again, I come back to that the piece from addy come back to the the body cam video from the science team. I was filming someone else he was at a remove right? It was his friend who is in in the encounter at the police. Most of the powerful videos we see the lead to change our are removed. They're not from the participants. How do you? How do you think that plays out in this larger? There's a lot of change in this country. Now, there's a lot of conflict actually WANNA talk we we published the piece yesterday there's been some criticism I wanNA talk about that. But right now we're we're seeing one sort of very clear perspective from a remove. How do you think that's that's playing I. think a big part of when you hear Isaiah speak about filming he talks about the fact that he constantly to remind himself to take a step back because he knew the moment that he engaged directly with these officer, the officer could come out for could come for him. You know he had he very much understood the power dynamics at play. Even, as him as the filmer, so he kept as the officer kept getting closer he kept moving back and he would ask you can hear in the learned the full twelve minute video this incident you continuously hear him ask the other officer in the video hayes it. Okay. If I'm standing here, is it okay if I'm standing here, he's very conscientious of his body and his proximity to the violence to the violence has been that's being enacted against his friends and when we interviewed him the reason that he did take a step back was because he knew that if they took him if he got arrested along with his friends that that video. Might, not like not not got published right? Like he might not get his phone back. These things might happen and he knew the power of that video and the power of what he was holding his hands and he wanted to share it with the world so that meant taking a step back so he do that and it doesn't mean that it didn't traumatize him every time he sees the video he gets. Traumatized by seeing his friends violated in this way however, he understood that the consequences would not have been possible. Had he not taken a step back and capture according? I also think. Just. Generally speaking like we tend to trust videos that come from outside sources or people who are around but not exactly involved. It adds another like an extra veneer of credibility. I think which is. Another reason that like some of the biggest videos that we see are not like it's not the body cam it's not the person on the ground being choked to death. At, somebody else. Who has has has had the same realization as as but. I think you know just subjectively with trust trust those perspectives more because they feel more objective. CVT camera just happened to capture the incident on on film. I would say with this specific incident like the group that was arrested. In Zambia. The was interested but his friends, Skyler Gilmore Phillips were they were all taking part in questioning this officer across the parking lot. So I don't think they were necessarily objective I. Don't I. Don't think they were I think they saw there being pulled over, they recognize the police officer there friend had just been with them at this barbecue and I think the fact that he was able to get the video out there in the fact that you can see the whole incident play out right? Like in our video we don't show the whole twelve minute video, but it's like five minutes. Of Not, much going on until the officer sort of approaches them. So I think the added quote unquote like credibility is that you see the beginning middle and end of that incident Isaiah did not stop recording until the police left Isaiah began filming before the police had even had even gotten out of their cars. So I think with this specific video, it's less about the eject objectively and more about the fact that he was able to capture all. How do you think that ties into one thing that we write about a lot surveillance where all being surveilled all the time you mentioned TV cameras. A on a different day in a different moment. The way our talks about like extremely prevalent C. T. V. Cameras is crap ring put a camera everywhere. Now we're being surveilled in the cops have access to this footage, right? At the same time what we've been talking about a lot is the presence of this camera at a remove actually serves a purpose is Asia. Taking that video from that remove sort of purpose. How should we think about this balance because I I personally right? Like you catch me in a different minute. I'm over here. I'm over there. Actually surveillance is good. No, I think the difference is it really depends on like the the institution that has the footage and what they want to do it. Right like the cops when they get ring footage and what I mean like it's not it's like the cops are using footage to incriminate and I think generally this is very generally speaking in very, very general terms like it's evidence, right? And you know when it's coming from people on the ground protests were filming. It's documentation it's like the same footage, but it can be used in very different ways depending on who's doing the asking. For, the footage like and where it's going I think I think that context is actually super important right? Because like in England, for example, there are cameras everywhere. There's just like municipal cameras run by the fucking. Like in London, for example, there's there's cameras run by the Metropolitan Police Department, and that's just that's just a fact of life. And I think it's interesting because like they I think they have like controls on how you can use that stuff whereas with ring networks here it's like sort of ad hoc private companies turning it over to the police whenever they feel like it. I don't know I guess I'm going on a little tangent here. I really do think that like it depends on who's asking for the footage and what they intend to do with it. I think you know people taking footage is as it's intended to sort of exonerate his friends and that they weren't doing anything wrong and this sort of an unjustified thing. And I think the intent really matters. So I think that it's not just about the presence of cameras and footage, but it's also about who has those cameras and this of act of pulling out your phone to question authority to question police officers is actually referred to as surveillance by scholars. It is the opposite of surveillance. Right surveillance is often reserved for those in power. It doesn't necessarily mean it's always the state surveilled someone but the moment that you begin to surveilled them, you were taking a bit away a bit of their agency away from them. You're taking a bit of their privacy away from them but soon, valence is this idea of challenging. Authority by trying to sort of disrupt this power dynamic by filming your oppressor by filming specifically in marginalized communities, the police, and so with surveillance, it is the idea of this is what we're talking about right like it's not mentioned one time in the videos nor is it mentioned in any of these pieces but all of this is what scholars refer to sue balance, which was coined by Steve Man, and it's all about looking from below. So you're not looking from below you're not the person who is above and the position of power. You are the person who's often surveilled right like with Isaiah and friends like they were they knew this officer they. They had never recorded this officer, but they not only knew of him. They had previously had seen incidences of him, and so I think by pulling out their phone, what they're doing is trying to challenge this authority figure to them that had represented sort of. Head oppressed in had sort of harassed or had allegedly harassed and targeted African Americans in their community. So they see this officer, they see their black friend being pulled over they understand this officer had allegedly been targeting and harassing African Americans they pull out their phone to begin to try to create a counter narrative, and before any of these things I think Bijon spoke about this earlier like when you start recording early on, you can sort of see the maybe there wasn't any probable cause and what you hear them saying the first few minutes of the video is, what's the probable cause? What's probable cause like why did you over in the officer officers aren't engaging right? and. So I think the role of that video in that moment is about who has it right? Like you can hear them. Surveillance video from above that's muted that can be distorted. It's about the person who got out of the car who started filming. Once they start one saw him started getting attacked the person who filmed at the very beginning and surveillance often doesn't involve you filming. Once you see the police officers sort of attacking someone but you film when you see a police officer because you want to challenge there are over you. Yeah. The when I say we're GONNA face a long period of cultural reckoning over this I don't think that we the surveillance scholarship is that it's very early stages right and it's not builds out. It's not complete. We're learning how it works and that to me is one of. You know when when the smartphone cameras invented I don't think people thought the people who invented the ship in the back of every smartphone thought we're going to have to have a conversation about surveillance when this is all said and done and that to me is. Right and that I think about that, all of the time like there are engineers and product managers and designers who make these products. and. Sometimes they have a guest of how they'll be used but this to me is one of the most surprising revolutionary uses of the technology right just fundamentally and I think this conversation about what does it mean for everyone to record the state? What does it mean for the state? Maybe record your back with a body camera or something else it's going to change the nature of our relationship with the people in power. It is interesting like one of the things that fascinates me about taking video protest specifically is like I think, a lot of police officers on the ground seat is violence when somebody holds a camera to them because it like it does challenger Authority, but it also like like it is a a thing creating a record in real time that they cannot control in a situation and I think it's just very strange because. Yeah I mean, the perspective really matters who's who's taking the video really really really matters. Let's talk about that for a minute in this conversation. In the feature, we have very intentionally chosen to highlight one perspective people filming the videos. We have almost no perspective from the police in return know perspective from the state in return as we are making this project I, you know the editor in chief ultimately I'm for everything I knew we were making that decision I felt comfortable with it. We do hear a lot from the police, but that notion that the camera is impeding the the police officers job that the police are themselves scared of violence they need to be protected that there are people with guns in the street Often fear for their lives how do you think that I mean the piece is almost yesterday right for many people liked it. Some people were critical of it. We appreciate the criticism and makes us better. But how do you how were you prepared for that criticism that there was no perspective from the police as after pieces published how did he react and where are you at now? That's a really I mean that's a really really good question I haven't seen much of that criticism. Charts to my filters I. Guess My. But it's I mean I think the larger question of like what police think is really interesting to me new I. Don't know if you know there's been a few years ago. I actually spent a year in Ohio reporting a story on cops there and like. Like this, this very, it was Liverpool East Liverpool Ohio, which is a very small town between it's like West Virginia Pennsylvania and Ohio. It's right on the border of those places and it was the site at one point of the like it had the worst heroin. Like heroin outbreak people were dying of overdoses every single day like the average was like one a day and the police department was like it largely fell on them to take care of the people and it was really interesting because I what I did was like I just spent like my time going on right alongside like. Suit up get my notebook get in the car and we drive around like I would smoke black and milds with this cop, and we would like He. He would pick people up and so I went to the county jail and like I saw the mechanisms of the state like from the passenger seat, which was very interesting because like the more time you spend with police officers, the more you understand that like. Seeing people seeing people's worst every day does something very bad to your brain. It puts you on extremely high alert. And it makes ordinary situation seem incredibly terrifying and I think. One of the things that goes unexplored is the trauma police officers sort of feel, and they just don't talk about it like all of these. There were seven people department all of them were very, very, very clearly traumatized. In a way that was not obvious to them, but very obvious to me is like an outside observer. And it was interesting because like the other thing that they did most of the time, it was just like social work they were just they knew all the people that were talking to they were involved in the community. Everybody knew them like I remember. The COP I was with like picked up this woman because she like had drugs on her. And he was like, why? Why? Like what happened like we talked about this I let you go last time because like you said, you were working on your raptor what happened to that and it was like one of these things where I was like Oh this guy actually really doesn't understand like where these people are coming from we ended up having to take her to the county. Jail because she didn't have money for bail is like one hundred bucks and he was like on the on the hour long ride back. He was fuming that she would have to spend this long in jail just because she didn't have hundred dollars and so it's one of these things I think like you know there are good cops. The police is fundamentally like disordered. I will say it's like. And I think both of those things are in conversation with each other because like again, there are days that are incredibly bad like this cop was telling me like the worst day of his life I ask offhandedly by the way never ask cop with the worst day of their life is. He Was Not prepared for the answer which was like he was like Oh. Yes. So I had to respond to a call this. This guy had kids who you know his his kids were friends with he locked them in the House and burn the house down because his wife was cheating on him and so this cop had to respond to the call and then go tell kids afterward what happened and it was I was just like that is just like outside. So outside of the scope of a normal person's life. That it's like did it requires examination right and I think that's the kind of trauma that these people are like seeing like one of those one of those events can scarred for life I don't necessarily think being police officer is as dangerous to save a firefighter like statistically speaking. But again, like these horrific incidents of violence really do change your perspective and I think a lot of this kind of trauma is invisible and goes unexamined and it's difficult because a protests which is a very ordinary event. There is A. There is some potential for stuff to go wrong and I think if you're on the lookout for that, like it makes it skews your perspective and you can't see what is happening objectively, which is I think why it's very important that people also film the police at these events because there is another record that is being created in real time.

Officer Isaiah Ben Evita Twitter John Steven Rodney King Texas Metropolitan Police Department Youtube Product Manager Maria Abdul Reporter United States Los Angeles Engineer Heroin Isiah Justin Callum Producer
Science briefs from around the world

60-Second Science

01:55 min | 1 year ago

Science briefs from around the world

"Hi, I'm scientific American Assistant News Editor Sarah Frazier, and here's a short piece from the August. Twenty twenty issue of the magazine in the section called it. He dispatches from the frontiers of science technology and medicine. The article is titled Quick Hits And it's a rundown of some non corona virus stories from around the globe. From Canada a new study models how gigantic morphing Blob of liquid iron in Earth's outer core underneath the Canadian Arctic is losing its grip on the north magnetic pole a second intensifying. Blah below Siberia is pulling the poll away. From Scotland, a geologic dating efforts suggests the fossil of millipedes creature found on the island of Cara formed four hundred, twenty, five, million years ago making it possibly the oldest known fossilized land animal older land animals have been spotted indirectly through preserve tracks. From Tanzania researchers discovered Africa's largest ever collection a fossilized human footprints left in volcanic mud about ten thousand years ago. Many of them came from a group of Seventeen people mostly women all walking in the same direction. From Norway archaeologists excavating a twenty meter. Viking ship buried below farmers field to stop a would eating fungus from destroying it. Ground penetrating radar had found the ship in two thousand eighteen and a new woods sample analysis revealed that could not be preserved underground. From Zambia in Mongolia. Spring satellite tagged Kuku completed an epic twelve thousand kilometer journey from one country to the other. It had originally been tagged in Mongolia in two thousand nineteen and traverse sixteen countries in his round trip migration. From Antarctica, scientists found that King Penguin excrement releases nitrous oxide also known as laughing gas. It forms a soil bacteria eat the droppings nitrogen rich compounds.

Twenty Twenty Mongolia Sarah Frazier Nitrous Oxide News Editor Tanzania Siberia Norway Canada Cara Scotland Africa Antarctica Zambia Kuku
Members Of The Class Of 2020 Face A Brutal Job Market

NPR's Business Story of the Day

03:21 min | 2 years ago

Members Of The Class Of 2020 Face A Brutal Job Market

"Just. A few months ago college seniors could reasonably expect to graduate into one of the best job markets in history. Now, because of the pandemic, they've graduated into one of the worst generations when members of the class of twenty twenty half landed jobs, the experience is odd NPR's Berlin reports. Twenty twenty was shaping up to be a great year for Golden. DACA, he be the first member of his family to graduate from college not only that he was the Valedictorian of his school. Morehouse College. ATLANTA. But in March, campus emptied and classes went online and then the moment he'd been waiting for commencement it was postponed I wanted to give that huge speech onstage with my family friends and loved ones who made it very possible for me to go to it came to an abrupt end been expecting rites of passage and celebration. Instead he landed in the pandemic, it's been a really difficult transition you know and it's been one that's a mocking allies with. A lot of uncertainty. A lot of self doubt. Worst of all, his grandmother who was supposed to come see him graduate passed away in their native. Zambia. Despite everything, there has been a bright spot dako landed a paid fellowship with the governor of Illinois after four rounds of remote interviews. So I'm more on the fortunate side and a lot of my classmates in other individuals across the nation are is a very challenging time to be a new college graduate through pollock is a Labor economist with the job sites Ziprecruiter. So compared with fee labor market in February before covert hit, we have seen job postings for the entry level positions most popular among new college graduates fall by seventy three percent. But even though postings have plummeted, people are still landing jobs. So even in a crisis, there are companies hiring eighteen million jobs have been posted. On ziprecruiter since covert struck, what has changed dramatically is how those new workers get hired interviews or evolving from those zoom skype calls and now to virtual video platforms where you record yourself answering the questions and then send that video in yourself. So you have no interaction with a person that all the lack of face to face human interaction that's been one constant for Danielle Kaplan she graduated this spring from the University of Iowa, and moved in with her mom it's been fine. But with a lot of activity around the house, it was tricky for her to find a quiet place for job interviews. So I, feel like my interviewer singing a different background, every single time with them. You know this is a very difficult, but as it turned out, backgrounds didn't matter. So I will be heading to Kansas City to work at a startup in. So I'm really excited about it. Kaplan's excitement is accompanied by trepidation because so much of the last few months felt unreal even disembodied. This is a huge major life transition that I'm about to undergo and it doesn't feel that way. I've been virtually meeting people. Virtually getting an apartment. So nothing feels like tangible to me all that is about to change this weekend. Kaplan will load up a rental truck and moved to a new hometown. Kansas. City. There won't be anything virtual about it. Berliner NPR news.

Danielle Kaplan Morehouse College Kansas City Twenty Twenty NPR Zambia Berlin Berliner Npr Atlanta Labor Economist Illinois Kansas Pollock University Of Iowa
"zambia" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

01:46 min | 2 years ago

"zambia" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"My thing I. Want you to comment on risk. Because you got. I think yet. My thought is that this is. This is a an old playbook that hasn't been taught in a long time. Like I told you that origins of totalitarianism. They started chipping away at the kids twenty years ago. Well, those kids are now in their twenties and thirties, and they know nothing about history. You know nothing about reality. They know nothing about money. All they know is what they were told because they stopped teaching children with things and started teaching them to repeat and what's going on now that I believe the issue is these. Really common core. Totally a bed. I was in Hollywood for fifteen years. I couldn't take it anymore. Barely I know in a believe me. It was more you were there when you were ten. No a lot older than you. But I'LL BET CREAM You need. But I? Just got Italian. Anyway know that your this. They've created a bunch of zombies. Zambia's are stuck will know everywhere. They turn I. Mean I it's it's devastating. When I speak to people that I think are educated and talked to them, and not only do they hate trump? They have no real reason why. You orange man bad. But it's also like look at what he's done. Which of these these policies? A wrong or bad? The conversation that doesn't matter. Does it matter what? And repeat no longer. Books, in My, story. Doubt you know we give out thinking about. Once you because all the. Way New York is the. The break be.

Zambia Hollywood New York
What Bungee Jumping Taught Me About Visualization

Optimal Living Daily

03:48 min | 2 years ago

What Bungee Jumping Taught Me About Visualization

"What Bungee Jumping Tommy about visualization by mascot of free to pursue DOT COM. It's one thirty in the afternoon. The weather's perfect. The crew at Victoria Falls Bungee have just wrapped me in. They've done all the necessary safety checks to ensure good to go there now helping me move to the edge of the platform, because my ankles are secured with tight straps around too thick layers of folded towels to protect my legs from jarring. They're about to receive. My toes are over the edge I. Look out over the Embassy River, and then I hear it three to one bungee. Jump off the platform with a grin on my face and start screaming, Hoo. I take it all in my initial weightlessness, my rate of acceleration, the of the cliffside, the rushing water below, and finally the deceleration has the Bungee saves me from a much shorter life than I would like. I bounce up and down another half dozen times before the experience comes to an end is the best one hundred fifty seven dollars. I've ever spent the not just because of the Bungee jump was even more valuable. Was the lesson I learned in preparing for this experience? One day earlier. On the morning of August twenty, second might travel Buddy Michelle inform me that due to a tight travel schedule, I'd be jumping on August twenty third, not August twenty fourth, as at initially prepared for I didn't say anything at the time, but it didn't sit well with me at all. Up to that point I'd been confidence. I played out the day in my mind for weeks and I felt in control this change tip. The scale and fears favor the reality now. Is that Bungee jumping? If it were still on, the table was to happen number one a day earlier than expected number two after a morning flight on a four seater Bush plane. Those are always eventful number three shortly after we arrived at our lodge, rob our bags, check in and take a shell to the bridge and number four with no. Way To get oriented or settle in. Let's just say that I wouldn't be in my happy place. Later that evening my friends started speaking enthusiastically about the jump, and stopped her dead in her tracks, and informed her that the change made a significant difference to me the sense we were rushing to get in and the fact that I felt I lost some control of the situation changed my jump status from green to amber with a tinge of red. She struggled to understand and I struggled to explain. Processing the change. I've told many crazy stunts over the years. Bucket list does not lie. Bungy was far from the toughest, but of needed to feel that I was in control of the variables surrounding the experience, which both insured I felt safe, and that I can enjoy the moment if anything didn't feel right at all is giving myself permission to walk away Guilt Free I. Guess You could say that I needed to feel that I was free to participate in the experience, not bullied into getting it done by people or circumstances. That night I thought long and hard about what could happen. The next day I worked through all the variables, old and new and processed what the day might look like. I thought about the transportation to the new lodge, but close I would wear the bus ride to the bridge getting a bridge pass at customs to Zimba's a natural border between Zimbabwe and Zambia paying for the jump and finally. Finally getting the gear on and everything involved in the jump itself the sights, the smells feel the wind on my skin, feeling the harness, my heart rate that thought process took the better part of an hour before falling asleep, and in our lying in bed, the following morning that mental preparation made the difference the calmness about me that morning, and thankfully Michelle did not bring up the jump. Indeed. Our understanding of my need to decide on my own terms may have made the difference.

Bungee Michelle Victoria Falls Embassy River Zimba Zimbabwe Bush Zambia
"zambia" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

05:33 min | 2 years ago

"zambia" Discussed on KCRW

"Connie Connie was a part of the workshop we did in Zambia in southern Africa there was red which was founded in two thousand six by activist Bobby Shriver and musician Bondo to fight aids the women in the workshop you from all over Zambia and each of them have been affected by HIV and aids K. tellers from the moss led the workshop we worked with them for several days to help craft their stories on the final day we did a showcase of stories and a club in downtown Los aka Zambia for some of the challenges of doing this retelling workshops so far away in a very different world well there was the challenge that these were people that were unfamiliar with the moss and not only that that come from a different culture of storytelling and they were also telling the story of the thing that had excluded them and made them the most and ties in their entire life so that was a challenge in the beginning because they need to understand why they were doing this but what was amazing to me was that in the first day as we went around the table and people started to share their stories and that thing that was the thing that isolated them the most in the world suddenly became the currency in the room Sir taught me that Connie so Connie was one of our storytellers Connie was I would say like the feisty this woman in the room she was kind of the camp counselor of all of the other women so here's confident that live at the mall the new soccer Zambia working as a peer educator and counseling people that HIV positive was actually very easy for me because apart from the training that I underwent the prison that is living with HIV and I didn't have any problems we need to cut it came to share my experience with them but when I encountered women that's where expecting women that's where pregnant women that's where waiting to get their results for their children to find out if they're HIV positive or not it was something that I will talk very lightly because I depended mostly on statistics I would just simply say look the last last month maybe we tested a hundred women and then maybe or from the hundred women ninety five of those women with high children that are negative and that was fine because it was a statistic he didn't really touch me so much I had no experience with that and the way women that would come and do woods lamented because they could not get their results sometime in October I would tell them that look if the system saves you have to wait then you need to wait there's nothing that I can do if they say you need to have your child retested you need to have your child retested there's nothing that I can do until I had that experience I took my daughter to be tested which was six weeks old and they pretend to hear of the foot and I was told that I will get the results after two weeks when I went back to the clinic after two weeks the results we know to trade and then I was given another two weeks so in total that was a month of waiting anxiously not knowing whether my child was negative or positive I was very sure that somebody was keeping those results for me because my child was positive and it really scared the hell out of me so when I when back when my child when when it was a month and they told me that the results were not yet ready and I was supposed to take my child back so that they can pre cut again I just said no you're not going to pick my child but those are not the exact words that I used there are ways that I use that I cannot actually repeat here but I just told them you're not going to pick my child you get the results for me today and they couldn't find the results in the clinic but I was very lucky because I had gone to a clinic where even the central lab was located so I volunteered I said I'm going to go to the lab and find the results myself which I did and I went to the lab in St I'm not going to leave this place until you give me my daughter's results fortunately they were able to look at the results so you know what happens when you just deliver here in Zambia you're given three months maternity leave you're supposed to be a toll so I got those results and then almost since procedure was after I get them from the lab I had to take them to the clinic so that they are recorded in their statistics book but somehow somehow how I don't know I bypassed the clinic and instead of being home I found myself at the office I wasn't supposed to be working but I found myself there so does this with you you can try to imagine this crazy woman running into a building with a piece of paper in her hand weeping I was crying and then I just budgeting to allied medical director's office and then when she saw me with a piece of paper in my hand she didn't ask she also started crying so these two women are crying we're not saying anything we just crying weeping and then after some time she started telling me that everything is okay these medication your child is going to be okay in the process she takes the paper looks at it and suddenly she realized but the result was negative.

Connie Connie Zambia Africa
"zambia" Discussed on Horror Vein

Horror Vein

05:18 min | 2 years ago

"zambia" Discussed on Horror Vein

"Yeah. And that's and that was one of the things that got me. It was like okay. How many times have you seen this before you know? Someone's getting chased by either a killer Zombie but what's surprising about the film is like okay. The she gets to the house and you're like okay. She stuck there, and then you find out that there's people downstairs. And and it really answers new dimension to the whole films because these people downstairs, and this is where the film gets really interesting. and. I mean. Yeah. I mean there's the characters are so right are so thought out. it really takes a simple story and really makes it interesting. And it's and it's not about, and then you have the Zambia's on top of it and and then you find out that the film's not really about. The monsters outside of his Arby's I mean they have something to do with it. But you find out that the real monsters are inside our. And and it's a typical situation that anyone could find themselves in in a life and debts situation. and. That's what's interesting about I. Think all of George. Romero's films is that he kinda. Tackles that in different ways. I don't think other filmmakers ever. Attempted that it was always about okay, there's a monster. And Station you and that's it either get killed or you survive and there was nothing more to it. and that's why I think it was so in a film that was really inspiring to. filmmakers and into the audiences, and that's why they love it so much because of that. Yeah..

Romero Zambia George
Houston Fire Department makes changes to protect firefighters during coronavirus pandemic after 19 test positive

Coast to Coast AM with George Noory

00:31 sec | 2 years ago

Houston Fire Department makes changes to protect firefighters during coronavirus pandemic after 19 test positive

"The city of Houston reports twenty eight municipal workers nineteen firefighters and twenty four police officers of all tested positive for co in nineteen ninety Zambia yesterday expanded is pandemic protocols for his firefighters the next step in our protocol is to require firefighters to wear the surgical masks throughout the day at the fire stations another four hundred cases of covert nineteen have been confirmed within the city of Houston but officials say that's due to a backlog of testing kids at the lab a total of ten city residents have died from the virus

Zambia Houston
"zambia" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"zambia" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"Welcome back looking forward to chatting with you on the phones it'll come up soon in the next half hour headline experts comma trump's advisers doubt White House is two hundred forty thousand corona virus deaths estimate well that's all fine and dandy but look what we've now based everything on so they put out this number from their models starts at two point two million and that was never going to be an active number because that was based on if we did nothing that number should never be mentioned but it will continue to be mentioned as the high mark because it'll be able to then be you'll see how great a job we did it wasn't your point two million it was whatever the death toll in Zambia then they scared us one hundred thousand two hundred thousand two hundred forty thousand are all leading disease forecasters hu's research the White House used to conclude that a hundred thousand to two hundred and forty thousand people will die nationwide from the corona virus were mystified when they saw the administration's projection this what why the administration simply relying on this modeling data so why were the modelers why were the disease forecasting forecasters mystified when they saw the administration used the number the experts said they didn't challenge they don't challenge the numbers validity but they don't know how the White House arrived at the do you see what's happening here folks they give the administration these numbers from the models in ministration uses among all the models come back in the snow what someone else doing with that we don't think these.

White House Zambia
Climate change has brought parts of Zambia to the brink of famine

Bloomberg Daybreak: Europe

00:18 sec | 2 years ago

Climate change has brought parts of Zambia to the brink of famine

"Zambia is on the brink of famine Jew to climate change according to experts the country's wrestling with a devastating drought because when changing weather patterns the U. N. is calling for urgent action is temperatures in parts of southern Africa are expected to rise by twice the global average as a result of climate

Zambia Africa
We’ve officially annihilated a second strain of polio. Only one remains.

Radio From Hell

01:43 min | 2 years ago

We’ve officially annihilated a second strain of polio. Only one remains.

"Well two strains of polio gone in another milestone on the long and expensive and sometimes discouraging road to wipe out polio global health officials announced Wednesday that two of the three strains of wild polio virus at all wild poll you have officially been eliminated although that brings the world another step closer to Iran a caving polio altogether the effort has taken far longer than was ever anticipated when the campaign began back in nineteen eighty eight most public health officials and donors expected the battle to be over by two thousand but two major obstacles emerge first millions of families around the world not let their children have the drops because of persistent false rumors that the vaccine is a western plot to sterilize Muslim girl second in some countries virus is used in the oral vaccine itself have mutated into a form that can be passed on in diapers and sewage and can paralyze unvaccinated children this is contributed the fear of the oral vaccine even though all vaccination is the only protection against these mutant viruses just in the last two months cases a paralysis caused by mutant vaccine viruses have been reported in the Philippines Zambia Togo and Chad because paralysis person only about one in every two hundred cases of polio experts assume that more children have been affecting don't factor but they but it hasn't they've been infected but it hasn't caused them serious problems so they they have the virus but it's it's dormant oracle not not make it's certainly not

Iran Togo Polio Philippines Chad Two Months
News in Brief 21 June 2019

UN News

03:55 min | 3 years ago

News in Brief 21 June 2019

"This is the news in brief from the United Nations, there will program or WFP confirmed on Friday that it has started a partial suspension of aid to areas of Yemen, controlled by Hootie opposition. Forces spokesperson Irv Eva, who SEL told journalists in Geneva that the agency took the decision after efforts failed to prevent food aid being diverted from those who need it most, as in many areas, some individual seeks to fit from paying on divinity Habil and diverting food away from where it is most needed debris has been seeking the support of the Sanaa-based authorities to introduce biometric 'cause she's stationed system that will prevent diversion and protect the many families we serve, and storing food, which those who need it most. Unfortunately, we are yet to reach agreement. They development means that aid will be cut to the capital Saana, which is. Told by hoochies affecting eight hundred fifty thousand people although missed of a hustle insisted that the agency will maintain nutrition programs for malnourished children pregnant, and nursing mothers in total WFP estimates that nine out of twelve million food, insecure people in Yemen, are in areas controlled by who tease who have been fighting a coalition of international forces backing the government of president at Brabham Mansour Hady for more than four years. According to latest UN figures nearly ten million people are severely food, insecure and do not know whether next meal will come from to the Central African Republic now where WFP has called for help from the international community to stave off severe and acute food shortages after years of ongoing conflict, and mass displacement nearly half the country's people. More than one point eight million are unsure how they are going to feed themselves of that number more than four hundred sixty thousand are expected to face. Emergency food insecurity during the lean season which lasts from may until August among the areas? Worst affected are those hosting hundreds of thousands of people displaced by violence and insecurity. These include Kaga, Bandra, oboe and Zambia, along with three prefecture's and Bomo haute Kotto and oat Emba MU where security conditions remain volatile despite a peace agreement signed in February amid reports of regular attacks by armed groups who did not sign the deal on major supply routes and around major cities. WFP says it needs more than thirty three million dollars to help eight hundred thousand people every month until the end of the year. And finally to DPRK or North Korea where you n appointed independent rights expert, Thomas, or here container has appealed to the state to ease people suffering, speaking at the end of a five day mission, to Seoul in South Korea mister Kintana expressed regret that he did not see any sign of improvement. In the human rights situation of people in DPRK before urging profound legal and institutional reforms citing various sources in new report, the expert spoke of public executions carried out by gunfire after trials between twenty thirteen and twenty seventeen victims faced charges, including murder, and drug dealing. He said in his report while also noting that people continue to live in fear of being sent to political prison camps for watching South Korean soap operas in a statement to the press, Mr Clinton, urged the government of the DPRK to be open about the political camps, which called Quanli. So at the same time, he called on the government of China not to repatriate North Korean escapees asking them to give the primary consideration to what will happen to the escapees if repatriated to North Korea. Daniel Johnson, UN news.

WFP United Nations Dprk Yemen North Korea Irv Eva Mr Clinton Geneva Brabham Mansour Hady South Korea Saana Daniel Johnson Bomo Haute Kotto Zambia Hoochies China
China's Xi touts more than $64 billion in Belt and Road deals

Chris Douridas

00:52 sec | 3 years ago

China's Xi touts more than $64 billion in Belt and Road deals

"The Chinese government says it signing new deals worth more than sixty four billion dollars reach during a summit with forty world leaders this week and pure Shanna van Zandt reports as part of aging belt and road initiative to connect China with the world. China's president Xi Jinping says the deals will deliver sustainable growth, but critics say the projects are leaving some developing countries with unsustainable debt in Zambia journalist, Eric wallo, says China is investing massively in the country. Most of the government officials Fagan's see the d'etre the money as comes in like, investing, enrolls and infrastructure. But in the long term, I don't know how they tends to get up to Dick's China says it's now setting up a framework to resolve debt risk in developing

China Shanna Van Zandt Chinese Government Eric Wallo Xi Jinping Fagan Zambia President Trump Dick Sixty Four Billion Dollars
"zambia" Discussed on Mornings with Keyshawn, Jorge & LZ

Mornings with Keyshawn, Jorge & LZ

03:09 min | 3 years ago

"zambia" Discussed on Mornings with Keyshawn, Jorge & LZ

"You certainly would we don't want that. It's not very efficient. I'm not saying that you want them saying that you're gonna get we're going to get. So if we're going to get that why why would we? Pay him that type of money for four innings. Hold up. Knock you don't get to do actively. You were the one that was saying paint a man, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah. Now, all of a sudden. But I didn't know he was no us for eating trying to see all off season. Four in the minors, though. You guys unbelievable for Waco. Hold on a second. It was for the minor. He'd through thirty some pitches, then I'd be like going. Okay. Well, he hasn't thrown a long time. So they wanted to chip the rest away. It's not the the numbers at the end of the day aren't really what I care about the number that they're hey, he was hitting ninety miles an hour on the gun. Okay. But that's not where he lives in breeze. He's not a guy that pitches at ninety miles an hour. This is not Tom glavin whose painting corners ninety. This is a guy didn't seem ninety was pretty much. What Kershaw has always been. No he was in the mid nineties. Yes. It's drops. It's dropped significant. And when they say nineties that means it's peak. They're probably eighty eight right that he's probably pitching consistently somewhere in the high. It used to be his changeup doggy, they need to just come to a and I think that look the dodgers. I don't think are under any disillusion of what it's going to be the dodgers know exactly what what's it gonna be now that they see? But they certainly didn't think it was going to be this. Oh, I think they decided extending be could keep the the writing was on the wall the Clayton Kershaw splits Zambia pitch drop down to the mid eighties by the time the middle of the season comes. That's right. This is what did you say? Well, you may. The talk by the time. He starts destroying innings. Rob was talking about you. If in the past is throwing in the mid ninety or no he's doing ninety right now. Right. Yeah. So that means by the middle of the year all star breaking on another stuff he might be in the mid eighties. And you know, why you want to pay him all that money? The money's gone money. Spent the money is spent, but my point was the dodgers the guys that run. The dodgers are pretty smart guys. The they've done a really good job on player acquisition on identifying guys that they want. They're they're really what they do. They're dialed in. They knew that this was coming. They gave him that extra year thirty three million as a gold watch. Basically. Thank you for everything. They go hall of fame player did that. That's the hall of fame equivalent of a gold watch thirty million now, but you're gonna this is what he's going to be. He's going to be a guy that's going to give you five or six innings pitched you into a situation where you're gonna win most nights. But the guy that lights it up every fifth day is it's in the rear view. Mary. He's not that guy anymore. Just found an old Laker stuff in my bag. Why are you going through your bag right now? Trying to charge my phone. All right. You know, he's he's like a Hobo. Do all sorts of medicines and everything and. Hobo got a can of beans in an old boot. And they're just like a bomb. It's so bad dang thing. And get ready to snap the stream credential..

dodgers Clayton Kershaw Rob Tom glavin Hobo Zambia Waco
"zambia" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

KLIF 570 AM

01:50 min | 3 years ago

"zambia" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

"Welcome back. Zambia's moving on. We spent a large portion of this broadcast talking about artificial intelligence. I with Lieutenant Colonel Bob mcginnis. And that conversation has sort of seeped into the open line segment. We'll continue to talk about AI, no doubt as we head into the second and final hour of open lines. I don't know about you. But what I think of artificial intelligence, and I guess my own my only my main experience with it is. My encounters with those automated, the self-checkout set the Home Depot where the value martyr, WalMart, or what have you? And I don't know how effective those are. Because ultimately, I see most people getting frustrated with them. They can't navigate their way through those checkouts and ended up having to buzz and attendant for help. So given that I mean how much traction does artificial intelligence having our life. I suppose that's not strictly a that's just me ranting about technology an old guy being real grumpy. All right. I wanna tell you about George Noory, and what he's up to these days. He's heading back to Columbus, Ohio and the the beautiful Lincoln theatre, and that's happening on may the eleventh that's mother's day weekend. I believe and he's invading again, Columbus Ohio for a jam packed night of fun and conversation with special guests ghost whisper Marianne when Cousy certified hypnotist in paranormal mystery researcher, Rosemary Ellen. Golly. And the father of Ufology Stanton Friedman, plus a special mother's day tribute, it'll be a live band, audience participation.

Lieutenant Colonel Bob mcginni George Noory Zambia Stanton Friedman Columbus Ohio WalMart Columbus Home Depot Rosemary Ellen Ohio researcher Cousy Marianne
"zambia" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"zambia" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

"Hey, Larry, just wanted to leave your message and just. Immoral to build the wall. But yet her party. Morally, okay. Ahead and have have abortions in the third trimester. So to think. My goodness. What kind of morality? Eight nine seven one S eight triple eight one seven two four three Larry elder. Relieffactor dot com duty we're talking about whether the president's going to sign this deal to continue to allow the government to remain open to avert a shutdown any attends to according to Mitch McConnell declare a national emergency for get the funds to build the wall. We're also talking about the growing problem within the Democratic Party of antisemitism at one time Jews and the Labor Department in the UK overwhelmingly support at that party. Now, it's down to about twelve percent. Because of the antisemitic comments made by people in that liberal labour party similar comments made by liberals in the Democratic Party. Here you have Alon Omar referring to Israel as an apartheid state. Sumi or Zambia Cossio Cortez belongs to the Democratic Socialist Party that chant from the river to the sea, which means no Israel Rashida delay pass a map in her office without a picture without an Israel on the map. These are the women that have joined the Democratic Party have made blatant statements, anti semitic, even Chuck Schumer referred to the boycott divest sanction movement as antisemitic. Unfairness springs from.

Democratic Party Democratic Socialist Party labour party Larry elder Israel Chuck Schumer Mitch McConnell Israel Rashida Cossio Cortez Alon Omar Sumi Zambia president Labor Department UK twelve percent