18 Burst results for "ZHU"

"zhu" Discussed on Strength to Strength

Strength to Strength

03:57 min | 11 months ago

"zhu" Discussed on Strength to Strength

"A couple of weeks a couple base and the because of some small things at op so on the sunday on that sunday at on that day i did ended not going to visit in a church Home at a one to downtown boston without Bring my phone with me one. My wife can back and he was so while raid and anxious he thought i came back to china because we because of the fight. But i want to downtown. And he was so yeah he she yesler. She tries to find me anywhere aware around more than area and he gave a call to the marlin. And he's darla to look for me by the fund me from any witter modern and they said maybe i wanted to airport so they want they want to go to the airport to the find me. Yeah also eight. It was a reading a and almost eleven in the evening. So i can back. My wife talked to me about this thing and they're trying to find the and at the time at heart was stable heart as i don't care yeah why are you looking for me. I don't care. I was to do angry at that time. My my wife didn't talk to march and wanted to bed the next morning round marlin. Give me a call awesome. I'll do unto corrupt breakfast with me so as okay can grab a like a breakfast together. And their He's darla gave him my love. Sonya call come all burried. Have a like a coffee. Time wife wanted to her house. Yeah and we spent almost four hours to talk about the like a busting at the berea. the bridge the life in america. We didn't talk about anything about our five. After four or five hours and we went back to the breach and at that time my heart was solved yet. If in the beginning asked me yet was was what was happening with your relationship. Why did you have a fide yet. I was the i will see is none of your business because my heart was still hard but after four five hours conversation my heart was salt and the he studied Asking the question. Why do you have a i was happening. Your relation shay. Yeah at that time. Yeah my heartless saw. I was crying and he was crying into with me to together. Because this is something in our alive. Yeah i don't send his fide and the have a question about our relationship and he freed phony and he awesome do one to reconsolidated with each other. Yes i yes. I long so yeah sorry. Later on. we went back to his house ahead. A really good conversation with Alive and also four hundred Cray and share harse with each other. We cried together a game and yeah my heart. It was so moved at the moment and the best evening. So i started. Have a conversation with the my wife We coming by from his house for our home. Our boom yeah table. Meet night to all three in the morning way. Talk about why they..

darla boston marlin Sonya berea china america Cray
"zhu" Discussed on Strength to Strength

Strength to Strength

04:58 min | 11 months ago

"zhu" Discussed on Strength to Strength

"Talk about the creation of the world. I think the for me. It is very make sense because why look at the world a perfect world. I can leave and come into some other of planet i think. Yeah the earth has to be created by a her so at that time. I didn't have any of those about got. But i still have daza. Alisa is jesus a real person. Is he a gov all some one lake up. Yeah sorry started the doing some research and reading some books and watching some Documentary i still remember the doc documentary. We watch to guide their way the curricula and He invented aas to watch the documentary. A name as the star of bethlehem. So it talked about like the star of bethlehem in matthew. So there's a documentary from the senate perspective to located and another one is The case for christ. Yeah i ride. That vulcan also watched a movie. Yeah have is a person from the eighth to become a christian and the third book. I read as the head laymen talking to brother. He's chinese and yeah he's amazing amazing journey they'll see god and serve god and also i had a some other resources and then after doing some research a had no doubt about jesus Row person and dowd. He'd died under resurrect and detailed to the last point holy spirit. At that time we did a study with a brother Grynbaum news. And i believe i believe god exists and jesus died under resurrect at that time i think as iran may two thousand eighteen and we talk about the law and the seen in my life which I didn't really understand I can now feel. I cannot feel of at that moment. And i didn't know the scenes in my life Talking about up internal law. I still remember a one of teaching from rather finney mentioned about. He experienced la from He was in high. School can of like electricity going through his body. Why heard of that. I was so yeah. I was so i want that but i can feel the love from and also talk about a scene if at at the moment when i think about my scene i think oh these these wrong. A day that thing wrong like a lie or Maybe diesel bay my parents. Yeah but i didn't like idol. But i didn't think i i'm so simple a like a. I didn't kill a person at in there. Rob a bank like that. I can feel my scene at that time. And also i didn't view i have a really close personal relationship with god because i've been i've thought god is so big we are so small. Got don't even like to baylor relationship with us small ten decree shirt and we'll keep doing bible study and also a pre for the love and seen him alive and can show me my seem ally and two weeks later. God amazingly unser a career about love and assume that live with a big fight between my wife and i. Yeah i i. I know christianity migraine. So many many times. I think oh gotta will show me a sign or a a magical thing to to tell me. Yeah and mcgarth like sound him. God you shoot a believe you me but i never got away use of big fight our life and make me to the point that confession and repentance and i can get a into a little bit detail about the fight. I think that fight goes on went..

daza bethlehem Grynbaum Alisa vulcan dowd matthew senate finney iran jesus la Rob baylor mcgarth migraine
"zhu" Discussed on Strength to Strength

Strength to Strength

03:02 min | 11 months ago

"zhu" Discussed on Strength to Strength

"I yeah for me. I think that divine appointment. I tried to find something to do to help with the library. There are some chinese book there. There were some chinese in the library. They didn't know whilst that so. I volunteered to have them to organize the book. And one day a one there early and i have nothing to do a jazz like walk around in the library in the calendar. I founded the brochure of The bridge waesche as a english learning center. Now as facial pong for away so i called bro short. That day i was so excited and to talk all. Maybe i can try to give them a call to learn to learn learn fund mother English opportunity to learn at their and the before that i was so disappointed. All desperate at one to immigration learning center ties. Want to learn english at there because they have us is medical. I'd learning class. But i'm not immigrants so i can not take any philosophies out there and i was so desperate in the ads. Do remember that day. My life told me even though she was not a believer at that time she told me it got close a door for you. He will be opening another window you. I didn't pay attention or awkward with her but later on. I think a few weeks later as long abroad shorter of the bridge at a modern library. I i call it. Aleka devonian pokemon and the next morning. a call to The bridge so i successfully during late at the bridge i think that is the starred the journey to encountered mazing with news of jesus christ at that time with the breach. I might bother a marlin waiver that time. He is the director and also he was teacher at their and i might say cruella the also yeah get evolving to katcher neither and the sex johnson and also not abroad broader asked him a remo. Yeah i think on lace journey. I started gradually started. A jesus cries chris hannity because her a lot of people talking about him. Why was in china. I heard jesus christ and the cross. I knew nothing about christianity.

Aleka cruella chris hannity johnson china
"zhu" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

04:40 min | 11 months ago

"zhu" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"Nice. Because i hope that that at least lends itself to the kind of randomness that is also our life and these mutations and things so yeah i think one of the things that i like. So much about the book and the illustrations and the story in general is how it can be related to on so many levels. It's a wonderful children's picture book but it's also a very universal story about life and what it means to be different than what it means to love. That's a rare thing to be able to do especially in a slim little book. So it's quite an amazing accomplishment. Thank you ping. I have two questions for you. My first one is this not too long ago. You went back into your live journal account and found an entry that you wrote when you were about fifteen or sixteen that stated i'm going to be an illustrator so you stated it way back when that day. How did you feel reading that injury so many years later and seeing how you manifested your reality. I think that when i got accepted to college. And maybe it was just stow declaration of my major. It's actually a very pleasant thing to hear. Because i don't oftentimes get to tap into past me and i guess in a way. I'm thankful for past me's determination and almost blind ambition in wanting to try this as a life. Because i don't know what else i would've done. I feel very fortunate that i've been able to. It's certainly not a career that i was able to do by myself. I had a lot of support and help along the way. I hope to also continue to help others who are interested in doing this as a life as a career. My last question is this when you won the art directors club. Young guns award. You were asked to finish the sentence despite what you might think illustration is not blank. You finish the sentence by stating that illustration is not about illustration so my last question is. What do you think it's really about. I at the end of the day is a job and i feel that these past few years. I've really tried to distinguish the difference between wet. A job is and what my life is. So much of my early years were focused on dedicating my life to illustration rather than trying to set certain boundaries in order to maintain a level of balance in my life and i wanted to be able to continue to be my career and something that i can use as a tool to keep myself alive and also make work. That's interesting and communicates and hopefully inspires people. I guess it's a little complicated these days. But i i hope to shift the scales a little bit on the things that are in my life to in order for this to continue being part of it and also for other parts of my life to also have opportunities to grow. Can you talk a little bit about why. It's become complicated. yeah. I think the fact that i've used a lot of my own experiences a lot of my own thoughts and ideas to make work better or make work good comes at the expense of my own energy and maybe instead of being able to work on a project or something that would be fulfilling for myself. It's then spent on something that's for someone else so it's kind of like finding your personal boundaries between your professional life and your personal life. Yeah well really really look forward to seeing where you go next. And i can only imagine that it'll be wonderful thank you. That's that means a lot and thank you so much for taking the time to talk to me and giving me this chance to hopefully share a little bit about myself absolutely pink..

two questions first one one sixteen past few years years later about fifteen Young
"zhu" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

04:32 min | 11 months ago

"zhu" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"Feels nice. It's almost like cooking a recipe that you're familiar with and you're just like able to enjoy that process Israel yes to it. Yeah i love that. You said that working with gouache means that you're taking tiny risks. Every time the paint touches the paper. It's a finicky material. And over the last few years. I've switched from using water squash to acrylic gouache because the water bay squashes very sensitive. And you can't really layer it very easily. If i sneezed on it it would just disappear. It would just become a different thing and it's also the act of painting. I think with something that you can't really erase is it's different from oil painting where you can like scrape it off and redo it but you see all the evidence there and i think part of the painting process for me. And maybe the reason why there's like a lot of fluidity and movement is because oftentimes those gestures are natural gestures the textures of the brush their the movement of my actual hand going across the paper. And sometimes things don't end up being the way you want so you either have to calculate those risks or you have to find a way to make them look. Intentional is part of the fun as well. Your most recent book was illustrating murray of his latest effort. The children's picture book the snail with the right heart. Congratulations on such a spectacular result. Thank you yeah. That was a wonderful product to work with maria and with enchanted lion. The snail with the right heart is based on Real scientific event and it's a story about science the poetry of existence. It's about time and chance genetics and gender love and death evolution and infinity. I'm just a couple of you know. Light topics concepts made real in the concrete. Finite life of one tiny unusual little snail. Name jeremy who is discovered living in a pile of compost in an english garden. Can you share what happens in the story next. So jeremy gets discovered on a little pile of dirt. And i think he he ends up resembling and representing this idea that nature and life is something that can flower into many different things. And maybe not when you expect it to and sometimes not in your lifetime. I don't want to spoil the book too much. It was really wonderful working on a story that had so much so much life and so much time in so many little moments that felt very relatable and other things that were so abstract you can only really imagine what those situations were link the beginning of time. Well what's interesting about jeremy's that his heart is on the right side of his little body. As opposed to left. And i think that emerging from this wonderfully singular snails life. Because it's about like one in. Zillion chances that this could happen to us. Nail or a person is. Is it real invitation. Not to mistake difference defect. I think that's one of the underlying themes of the books that i love so much and to really welcome diversity in every life no matter how big or small did the subject of the book influenced the style of your paintings or the way in which you approached doing the artwork. It definitely influenced it in the sense that i wanted to be able to capture the moments of the dinosaurs on earth versus. You know being able to see the process of snails meeting all the way to like the future and beyond and so. I think i treated a lot of the paintings with a more watercolor treatments rather than very opaque lay dance of paint. It was a combination of really letting the paint of bleed and moments just letting the natural elements of that kind of expose itself rather than trying to contain everything and make it very perfect. And there's there's a little bit of both and it was.

earth jeremy maria both last few years Zillion chances one tiny unusual underlying themes english one
"zhu" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

06:35 min | 11 months ago

"zhu" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"Do you get your clients. Do you pursue them. Do they to use a combination of both. I started my career with an agent. And i did that because i thought maybe that was the answer to how to get these clients. That don't know who i am yet. And i don't know if she was my silver bullet in any way. I think i learned a lot about that experience. Just as how. Maybe how. I wanted to run my business more so than who the clients necessarily should be. It's always hard to answer this question. Only because most of the time you never really know how someone saw your work it could be something in the times it could be someone else mentioned your work. It could be so many things. So i was fortunate enough to start my career and the early waves of social media and it was the time when things were still quite pure and people were very interested in other people and seeing how these things work so i was using instagram for taking photos of my food and nonsense things and eventually i was just kind of taking photos of snapshots of drawings that i was making. I was lucky because people started just following me or they would leave comments. I would see their work. We started building these small little friendship groups on social media and i imagined that that had something to do with exposing my work to different groups of people early on but i do think like the editorial realm when i did do a few new york times pieces like maybe two or three new york times pieces later. People were kind of reaching out more consistently than they were in the past. And i think there was definitely a combination of lake luck and taking jobs that were at least had like a blade and big readership. And i also think it's great to have help from your peers. You know like we've pulled our director names before just so that we can all get a chance at sending things out to be able to hopefully get a chance that having them see your work and maybe you if not now then maybe months from now they'll think of you for something that's just the hope so the consistency and in staying on the radar has definitely been something. That's helped me. Jessica hitch the great Illustrator and lettering artist recently did a workshop on pricing which it seems like every designer in the world wanted and needed and tried to take. How have you learned about pricing. Your work can you talk a little bit about for the young designers and illustrators out there that are seeing you as a role model. How do you know how much to charge someone. I actually used jessica's pricing back. When she wrote the article for fast company and i thought it was really helpful because there was really no other information out there like that and since then i think she's made an updated version which is great but a lot of the pricing comes from just the budgets. That are already existing. I find that editorial pricing stays very much within the same brown like a few hundred dollars to a few thousand depending on the size of the peace. And i also think most of the time clarity have a number that they're coming to you with but if they don't a lot of the times i refer back to a job that similar to that or i consider what they're going to be using it for consider if i'm ever going to see it again if i can never have ownership over it again and all. Those things are measurements of. Not just your work but the future work that you could do and also pass work that you've done. It's a reflection of your personal value as an artist which i think a lot. Of the times we devalue or it's hard to stand behind how much you think you're worth so there's a lot of benefit in talking to other and hopefully friends or peers. Who are open about those conversations. There's a great website called light. Box dot info that is a crowd sourced website where illustrators have contributed their information on what they've made for certain jobs and it's you know who the client was that they pay on time. What were the asks so on and so forth and it's a great way for people to at least see what other people have at least made so if you don't have an immediate community of illustrators it's nice to be able to go on there and have a reference point for any of that so talk about your process for creating your illustrations. Do you still work primarily with wash these days. I've actually been working a lot digitally for different products which is nice but the feeling of painting with paint is never going to be replaceable. For me. i work on paper and i keep it as simple as possible really. I have a drawer of paints. And i use a pencil to put my line work. After i've sketched out an idea on the computer printing out those xerox like blind drying and then using a light. Patrick trace it on to the paper that i use. I've also over time have realized it's been easier for me to kind of do a color sketch on the computer with digital colors. Because i don't want to be making those decisions while i'm painting and it's saved me a lot of reduce actually as well so i also have scanned in all the swatches of the paint that i have in order to kind of make sure that digital colors that i'm using in my sketches are the same as the ones that i can actually be produced in person so a lot of fluorescent colors are really great in the computer. They just don't really exist in real life. So i want to train creators realistic of a road map for myself as possible. And then when i moved onto painting the actual thing it's almost like that's when the actual Active just like making the peace. Come together if.

Jessica Patrick both instagram thousand jessica three new york two few hundred dollars
"zhu" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

07:41 min | 11 months ago

"zhu" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"Nine hundred final months of college. You visited new york city to gather some firsthand illustrator experienced by bringing your portfolio around and not on doors and brian ray had given you the contact information for leeann chapter and the great greatly and chaplain. Who at the time was the art director of the op. ed section. she's also an extraordinary illustrator and she agreed to meet with you. Talk about that meeting and then what happens subsequently lucky that she was willing to meet me. I was so grateful to brian for giving me the context that he had. This is the time before having an iphone or ipad and all that so bringing the physical portfolio felt like. It still made a lot of sense. And i work in painting so all this stuff was like in a classic portfolio is like i look like clipper going to like my i did with. Brian suggested i. I wrote emails. I trusted him and she wrote back to me and she was very generous with your time and said that i could come by the new york times office and show her some work and actually going to the times building felt so it was like a pilgrimage itself. Every time i feel the exact same way no matter how their mecca exactly and she looked as she was earnestly interested in my work. We talked about it. I explained what the projects were you know. Showed her some of the stuff. I did in. Brian paul's class and it was very overwhelming. Anyway so i end up just going home. I think i was leaving new york in like a couple of days and lianne emails me here. I think two days before. I left and offered me a job which was just i mean. Everyone remembers their first jobs. I was i. Didn't i don't even know if i've really read everything that she was asking me to do. I just saw lake. Would you like to and then by this day and just like skim. That email was like yes. Yes yes yes please. Yes and it was for the now non existent op. Ed letters page. It was just like this. Tiny little stamp stamp-sized image. That was a response to people's letters that they had written in. And i think my article was about the difference between reading out loud versus reading in your head or something like that. And so at the time i was very invested drawing animals and using animals as like this kind of connective tissue between articles and like art. So i also learned that. That's not necessarily the most functional way to make illustrations because they don't always translate as far as visuals go. You can't just like put like a burden just because the articles like it has nothing to do with birds and you just want us bird characters as most. Sometimes it just doesn't make any sense. So in this case. I remember sending her a bunch of little sketches and one of them was like this elephant like reading out loud to like a. I don't know like another group of elephants or something which like an image. That's going to be like to buy one inch like. Could you even draw crowd. It was very. I wasn't thinking at all about like what dimensions were like. How much detail would be rendered. I was just excited at the time. She said they were all really cute and nice but that like having an elephant reading could be misinterpreted as something that was like about republican politics or just things that i never thought about and would not have been thinking about so it was really great to have someone who was able to kind of explain to me for the first time that not everything can be used to say. Everything's so you know. I immediately changed all of that to humans instead. Because you know on another level like animals don't free. They had nothing to do with reading. So i ended up making it a scene in the subway because i felt like maybe just as a no march to my new york visit that it would be nice to kind of use the subway as a location where people were constantly reading to themselves. But in this case we're reading out loud to each other or something like that so that was the end of my first job and i felt very much blake. Is this possible. It actually felt possible for the first time because that whole thing wasn't an actual disaster. So what did you parents think. When they saw your first published piece in all things are times they were pretty much like. Oh it is real like this job is real a and it helped confirm a few things for them and my mom bought the paper she also like when i finally did get paid for that job she like made a fake jumbo check and laminated it for me which was very sweet so it was. It was nice. You've stated that there are a lot of similar habits and procedures that you've learned from your work with the new york times that you follow in your other editorial assignments and i'm wondering if you can share with some of those are it's a lot of the same sort of problem solving there's always some context for the illustration there's always going to be dimensional restrictions. There's always going to be things that are director wants. And i think the the process in making an editorial piece varies of course based on whatever the article may be but i i try to use each of those opportunities to explorer like things that i'm interested in or techniques or colors like these tiny opportunities so that might work doesn't all end up looking the same again and again but the way that i figure out how what i wanna make oftentimes involves like a lot of writing and note taking in the beginning just kind of almost were dumping and really rough thumbnail sketching just in order to not continue to think about those things as i'm trying to think of ideas on top of that so i make a lot of lists. I do preliminary sketches. I kind of try and figure out what the color language could be for each of these assignments. Because i feel like half the information is just the emotional connection with the colors themselves and those combinations and how that translates so i also trained gauge. How are directors and clients are as far as what they're looking for what they reference when they are hiring me to do something. Is it something that i've done before. Is it something entirely new or have an opportunity to push my ideas a little bit more until i can abstract realm or should we stay more literal. Can we use animals again. Can we go back to people. It gets a little bit of just feeling it out as much as you can through like an email so you graduated shortly after your first published piece in the new york times and you've been a freelance illustrator. Ever since in that time you've worked with some of the biggest and most prestigious clients and brands in the world. The new yorker google delta coca cola pedagogy pentagram worby parker reebok and so many more. That's just a real shortlist as well as illustrating books and we'll talk about that in a bit..

iphone brian Brian ipad brian ray new york Brian paul one inch lianne first jobs one first job each two days before new yorker google first published piece first time Nine hundred final them
"zhu" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

03:45 min | 11 months ago

"zhu" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"Around keenan's at ted fellow and his play thoughts of a colored man will be the first new play to debut since broadway shutdown over a year ago. I talked with him about how empathy guides all of his work. But i love life was drawing and painting. Eventually in my teenage years i stumbled across the art form of poetry and then when i got to college i decided to study acting when i started learning. The great american plays. See myself represented. I wanted to create something that me and my peers can unapologetically be ourselves and debt. Small novel idea. I had ended up turning into thoughts of a color man. The play by play on broadway. I read an op. Ed that you wrote in american theatre magazine about the motivation behind thoughts of a colored man and you stated this. My ultimate goal was to foster empathy. Because i wanted to be seen. I wanted to help. Create a world in which the lives of black men were as valuable as their white counterparts. Fueled by angst like an architect. I began to piece together. Fragments of poems monologues and thoughts. I had written out poured the first draft of the play that would become thoughts of a colored man. Keenan winey has empathy. Been so important to you and to this play in particular. I didn't realize that. I was weaving in the element of empathy to my characters until i started hearing responses from people witnessing my work and i started to realize when people would tell me how much they learnt from seeing these black men in their environment not necessarily attached to discrimination or racism but really seeing these men in everyday life and seeing him engaged with each other so very early on. I knew empathy was very important for me in my work. Because i would hope that if anybody read anything from me or sore any of my productions they learnt a little more than they knew before they came in that door so they might look at that young man sitting at a bus. Stop a little different. They might look at that. Grocery store worker a little bit different. They might see that man. That's riding on the train with them. Just a little bit different. So empathy is very important for me. And i think it's very important for us just as human beings. How would you define empathy empathy for me is the understanding and care for something or someone. That's unlike you. How are you able to create empathy in your work. I tried to write from the most authentic truthful place that i can and being truthful in. My work doesn't mean that my carrots my stories are going to be perfect because they're not where we're not perfect human being's right so i don't create my characters to be perfect. I create them to all be flawed and in those flaws. That's where we see humanity. What is your advice for. People trying to develop a greater sense of empathy tried to surround yourself in talk to immerse yourself in situations in things that are unlike you. There has to be an effort. Put in to building empathy by taking yourself out of your comfort zone in out of your own personal community. Whatever that community is nothing once that door opens is such a beautiful beautiful thing to be able to open your mind and your spirit did things. That's unlike yourself lexus. Also believe that empathy emerges when you focus on people and leads to innovation the lexus. Ls was inspired by humans. An engineer to a higher standard the human standard visit dot com slash l. s. fats l. e. ex us dot com slash.

first first draft a year ago american Keenan winey
"zhu" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

02:31 min | 11 months ago

"zhu" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"Crunch were two hours was all you had so there was no time to really let your mind wander. You just had to kind of pour out the things that you could think about at that moment and try and make the best of it you know like i think the practice of that was also using different muscles and it was. It was very cool to be able to do that. It feels very mysterious. Because it's not even about i mean. Of course it's about being able to draw in technique and style and so forth. But i think the best illustrations in the op. Ed page is are the ones that surprise you in connecting ideas and it always amazes me when i see things from people like christoph niemann who can create an entire language an entire story within a stroke. It feels so completely foreign to me like it's it really is a very different language that somehow when spoken by grade. Illustrators becomes universal yeah. I think it's something that i've also learned over time and found to make the most sense to me. Is what is something that we can all relate to. Were trying to communicate. It's i know the commercial are but it's really communication are at so the baseline is that you want people to understand what you're making you want people to be able to solve your visual to solve the image for themselves so that they can see and make sure that it makes sense to them a lot of like the res. I love christoph. Neiman's worked for that reason. Because he uses things that are so ordinary and everyday that people are familiar with and he's able to kind of distort them and push them into these new realms and kind of create secondary worlds and all of a sudden. You just kind of wonder like how come. I couldn't have thought of that. This way of trying to connect with other people and not have them feel like you're explaining it to death for them by giving them an opportunity to also use what they know in order to understand what you're saying and i think that middle ground is a good place to be here now. It's time for an ad created with our sponsor. Lexus kaneohe. Scott the second. I am now officially a broadway. Play right and i'm a hybrid artist. I'm an artist. All.

Scott christoph niemann two hours second Lexus Neiman christoph kaneohe
"zhu" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

08:49 min | 11 months ago

"zhu" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"Actually in retrospect ya you stated that while you're in school you were constantly apologizing for your work but it's also where you learned to stop apologizing fieldwork. How did you learn that well. That's something. I think. I'm still figuring out to me because it was in part. I felt like i was wasting people's time putting up work. That wasn't good or wasn't strong. This is mainly. Maybe the first two years two or three years. When i was in school and i just i just didn't have any confidence. I had no idea what i was doing. Everyone else seemed very much like they did their research. They knew they had references. They had an understanding of our history. And just just a general perspective. That was much more rich than mine. So i think the apologies just came from like. I'm sorry this is my best work. I'm sorry this is like rushed. I'm sorry i did this wrong. I didn't have time to do this. I didn't i didn't. It was all like things that i could have done or i wanted to do. And it was nothing about what was actually in front of us and there was no conversation. I wasn't opening a conversation about what i was trying to do. And i think that. I probably wasted a lot of moments and critiques. Were just talked about where things could be better rather than like. Imagine this situation around my work. I think people were all there to learn and it took me a while to realize that and growing from that really did help to kind of move past and therefore figure out how to become like this illustrator. What everyone was there for a really with their time in college where you felt equal to your peers or where you began to understand your and your talent or did that come later. I think it's hard to say only because with being young it always kind of felt like i was playing catch up. And it's hard to know if you're seeing equally because somehow it was like everyone's like little sister or like you know trying to fit in with everybody else and that could still be something that i'm working on now to train. Make sure that. I respect my own work and make sure that i could stand up for it and what it's valued at but i i would hope that people saw me as an equal just because it's so isolating on. Its own any way so hard to say. Do you think that sense of yourself. Fueled your ambition. I think so. Because i kind of felt like that. Underdog an away. Maybe no one knew who i was and i could just come out of anywhere. I could go in any direction i didn't. I didn't have a style already or anything like that so in that way. It made me pretty excited to think. Like well i could. I could try other things. I can figure things out along the way while. I'm here but i you know. I think there's a natural competition that you experience when you see a lot of very talented people and you can't help but just either one alike. Follow the the drift. That's behind them just to kind of keep up with them because it was inspiring. It was great to be around people like that. I think a lot of my really close friends are from that time in my life and the age range spans between like people who were the same age as me versus you know people who were like married with children already and there was. It was cool to be able to have that during that time. Talk of the bed class. You attended with brian ray. The former art director at the new york times and the current modern love column illustrator. And your professor at the time. Rogers they are great. They've helped me so much when i was in school. And those are memorable turning points for me. Because i was meandering a lot during my college years where i just wasn't sure you see someone do something great and you want to try and go in that direction and then you kind of loose sense of what you're actually interested in. So i think by the time. I took that class. I think it was a combination of brian and paul being instructors but it was also my a other classmate owen freeman. Who was there. Ta that class really did help. Explain illustration away. No other class had really explained to me before which was oh. Here's something that i'm familiar with. Which is like media newspapers and you can see on a daily basis. Here's our within and here's a very broken down way of making art in order to do this like oneplus to this could be your career at least an entry way into one so i was where a lot of things started making sense. It was like. Oh here's an article. And there's so many articles in this world that need art accompanied with a just like books need covers just like posters. Need information there's all this these applications so it was very much like a real world experience type of class and it was thrilling to be like. Oh i don't know if. I have one day to do this or if i have one week to do this. And maybe i have dilemma. My ideas it was this kind of speedy fund boot camp that i had multiple opportunities to try different things within that context and it was very fun and it was. It was very nice to be able to believe that it was real as well. The class was based around the op. Ed page in the new york times and from what i understand when you're working for the bid page it's an assignment that you have to come up with an idea in two hours dry. Explain it and i think to quote you not lose your head in the process. So i mean whenever i talked to anybody. That's done work for the up ed pages whether it's pulsar or brian. I'm just astounded that. It's actually possible to do something like that to get an assignment be told what it is you have to create an illustration for come up with a range of ideas. Come up with a kick ass idea. Sketch it dry file. It two hours really two hours. It can be quite quick. And i do think that the exciting part was when i was able to make a piece that was based on just something that everyone got it at the same time you know like we were all illustrating the same articles for class and it actually was a nice confidence builder because it felt like we were all kind of starting in the same place. It was almost like this kind of pop quiz. Where are you and how do you see things right so right. It was nice. Because i felt like i could keep up. I felt like i had ideas that were able to make sense in this context and i didn't necessarily have to be like this expert or lived very many years. I was reading this information. And what we're gleaning from. It is just how we're understanding the words and the context and building a scenario from that so it was a mix of course your own understanding and knowledge of things. What kind of metaphor is you could bring in. And i think it was nice because it was validating for the very few experiences that i did have an also things about you know having grown up with like chinese parents. Chinese immigrant parents like other life experiences like that. All of a sudden coming in where it was like language or the way that i saw things or things that i learned from my painting teachers who spoke to me and chinese and metaphors in chinese that made sense language wise. Sometimes there's very strange juxtaposition 's and it's not talking about the thing that it's explaining but it's used in a way to explain a bigger situation and i feel like a lot of this kind of like cut and paste and kind of collage of what i had already on. Hand was what i had as a tool kit for any of this type of work is just that so it was validating and it was confidence building. It was fun and exciting. So yeah i think the time limit thing was actually a positive as well because i think i would struggle with long term projects. I had a week to do it. I'd wait until the last day to do it. You know and all of a sudden you're here under this time. Crunch were two hours was all you had so there was no time to really let your mind wander. You just had to kind of pour out the things that you could think about at that moment and.

two hours brian ray Rogers brian three years paul one week first two years new york two Chinese owen freeman op. Ed one day a week chinese many articles oneplus
"zhu" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

05:52 min | 11 months ago

"zhu" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"Liberating to be able to do something that maybe they didn't fully understand or that other people didn't understand and it was exciting. I it wasn't that i didn't get along with people in high school. I think what i to. When i felt like i wanted to express myself was more of like artistic expression or like drawing and getting my ideas out there you know and now i do kind of regret like isolating myself that much. I think it would be nice to obviously still have connections to that part of my life through people who can share memories with and stuff and now you're like oh it would have been nice for someone to remember something that maybe i forgot during that time because i don't i can't i don't have that perspective so much so you if there's any high school students listening to this don't ignore everybody and then there's always facebook right where the highschool people seem to always be able to be discovered right. How did your parents feel about your growing interest in art. Were they supportive of you. Moving in that direction professionally. I think they started to get a little nervous. When i became interested because like i said it was something that they didn't fully understand and they ended up. I think trying to corral me in directions that were very similar to what their friends kids were doing. Like or interests are doing well on tests like things that they could really compare and see progress and understand that it was hard for them to just accept that. Somehow this sixteen year old person was going to know what they were gonna do for the rest of their life with that sort of attitude. And i do feel like a lot of what they tried to do. Was not necessarily to discourage me from that but it was more so they wanted to make sure that it was something i could really commit to or that. I knew what i was getting myself into. Rather than just it was a phase. Or like i felt annoyed a little bit at the time that i felt like i had to fight for this. But in retrospect it does feel like they did it from place of concern and care rather than like true discourage matt like that. They weren't going to speak to me anymore. I decided to become an artist. So well a commercial illustration is in the easiest career to pick and certainly not the most secure and it's actually incredibly courageous for anybody. Choose a life as an artist. Did you feel at the time you only apply to art schools. Ultimately you only apply to art schools you got into the schools you applied to you. Ended up at the art center in pasadena. But did you have a sense that this was really possible that this this could be a direction in your life that that could be successful or we just sort of going along with the flow of enjoying what you were doing. I started out trying to trust my instincts. The best i could. I really did not know what i was getting myself into and it was like grabbing onto small bits of things that were familiar. It's like oh this is drawing this is painting you know and trying to understand that in the context of how to make it a career definitely through high school. I had no idea what i was doing. I just stumbled across the concept of being an artist for a living so applying to schools felt very logical. Because it felt like. That's what people do. After high school you go to college. My parents were not in support of having me take a year off or to experiment to see what it was that i was really interested in. It was felt like there. Was this kind of like you. We're running out of time like if you didn't seize every opportunity that you could while you were young that somehow the age was going to work against you and so i actually ended up applying to colleges because it felt like a compromise between like this but i want to do what i want to do so yet nothing. Nothing made sense to me. And i think it was because i was very young. I was seventeen years old idea so and also a lot of my classmates. They were older than i was because a lot of them came from different backgrounds or they changed careers and they were very dedicated to like this new trajectory. So for me. I felt like i went from hanging out with a bunch of people my age. Sixteen seventeen year olds and all of a sudden. I was like twenty five to thirty year. Olds when i was eighteen. But that really did help me understand illustration a little bit faster. Because i had all these people had different and more mature life experiences. And i think they tolerated me as like they're younger classmate who really didn't know anything about anything. It was like curious but you know it didn't help me very much until later. Down the road. I think early on at school when hanging up your work. Fear i critique. She felt that nearly everyone else's work was better. Really giving him really yes i. There's no way that isn't true. It's it's because they were older. They had better experiences. They had time to practice. They might have even gone to a different or at school. I was very intimidated. And i think i. I don't know there was definitely times when i just. I probably didn't try very hard. Because i knew it wasn't going to be very good. And i think i had to learn how to build my own confidence and try and make the most out of the situation. I was in. Because i was around such talented people and it would be sort of foolish to waste that on self pity and like yeah it was. It was pretty scary..

sixteen year eighteen facebook thirty year pasadena twenty five Sixteen seventeen year seventeen years old
"zhu" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

08:39 min | 11 months ago

"zhu" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"Zoo will to design matters. Thank you so much for having me. It's great to be here. Thank you ping. Is it true that when you sing songs tiered dogs. They run away from you. I think that's true. I think i torment them. Maybe a little too often and now there's only one of them that guess they used to flee together now it's just one. Do you have a particularly bed singing voice or did they just not like the tunes. You were picking. I think i'm a little overbearing sometimes. Just an overly loving mother. Maybe i actually loved. When i read that because i also do the same thing. I make all sorts of songs. I've two cats and a dog. And i make up songs for all of them and constantly saying them. My wife. this morning was like okay. Let's try another tune. It's weird we kind of have such strange parts of ourselves. Come out when we talk to animals. I feel like there's honesty and you won't be judged for it somehow. Exempt maybe by looks or their body language but not by like language and other human things true true. So i know you group in california in town east of pasadena called arcadia and they know that when you were little you like to play alone and make imaginary worlds. What kind of worlds will you creating anything from. Just pretending my surroundings where something else you know like a closet could be just this like secret layer or when you go outside and climb a tree. It's you know somehow more incredible like a tree house or there's something else to it. I think it was because we grew up with not too much. So the imagination was kind of world the richness came from and i. It wasn't so much of like escapism. I think it was very much out of curiosity. Just natural wild imagination wanting make more out of a situation. That didn't seem like very much. So cut myself entertained. Your dad came to the united states to go to college at the university of washington. In seattle where you were born in you then moved to rhode island. We are dead earned his phd and then finally moved across the country. California when your dad got his job at the jet propulsion laboratory jpl. now. I understand the booth. Your parents steadied meteorology. Did mom work at jpl. L. as well no she actually wasn't able to continue working in meteorology when she got to the us because of language barriers and she ended up having to also take care of us so her career trajectory kind of changed but for my dad. He stayed at jpl for a few years and then ended up switching jobs to more of lake. Data management like computer engineering ends of things will. You've said that pursuing the arts wasn't an option for either of your parents. And i'm wondering if you can talk a little bit about why. And if they could have if they would've yeah. They grew up in china during the cultural revolution's so there was a huge limitation on personal choice. I think during that time and they you met in college and at the time a lot of people were just pushed into careers or into directions that they kind of tested while in and because my parents did well in the sciences they. That's the direction they went in. But my dad was the one who really introduced me a lot to art in a way as far aqui museums elaborate. Yeah yeah exactly. And my mom was the one who helped. Send me to art class. When i was a kid. I mean driving me to and picking me up for weekend after weekend for years is no small feat either so it was definitely something that helped with developing my interest in. Are you actually fell in. Cheer i art class quite serendipitous. I understand when you were twelve years old. You only took the weekly saturday class. Initially because your friends were taking it and you wanted to hang out with them so it wasn't something that you had of bugged her about because you wanted to pursue this specific discipline. I just wanted to play all the time like all kids do for the most part it. Maybe it was. Because i had to go to chinese school after school during the week so i felt like i never really had any time to do things that were fun. The drawing class was definitely like a hangout. Excuse and gradually over time. My friends either lost interest or their parents decided to kind of introduce them into other activities. And i just kind of stayed. I remember saying anything about wanting to leave or wanting to stay i think remained there and i continued and it never got boring for me. Were these the classes that you attended. That were taught by chinese draftsmen. Who only spoke to you in chinese or was that the school that you were going to that your parents were sending you to. It was the chinese school drawing class. It was different from like chinese school. Academics which was during the week and then these are teachers were from asia and they would speak to be in mandarin and it was interesting to also learn art through that because the language translates differently. Sometimes and there's some things that i felt like. They could explain better through mandarin than in english of course because that wasn't their language but i i kind of appreciate now. In retrospect having that different sort of perspective on how they taught me painting versus how. I've learned it through college and it was nice to have that experience. Understand that way you learned through your chinese teachers was more technical than conceptual Do you feel like that gave you a different perspective than the other kids that were in the more american art classes. I didn't really understand drying as something. That could be anything more than just kind of these saturday activities especially when i was younger because my parents didn't seem to express like oh. If you keep doing this you could do working this. And this could be your job or career. I think it was purely recreational for a long time so learning how to draw technically felt kind of flake practicing doing anything well over a period of time just practicing and exercising these muscles so i guess i didn't mind the lack of conceptual thinking because it felt very much focused on just trying to be better at something that you weren't good at yet like anything in school so i think it didn't really dawn on me until maybe partway through high school. When i realized that this was a career these were there were schools made for these kinds of things. People do this for a living and then all of a sudden it just became probably the interest accelerated a little bit then just because it all kind of clicked in together and maybe it was simultaneously. Because i was not the greatest student in school. Either so i was like. Oh maybe i have like this escape or an alternate path that i can take instead of having to like force myself to be interested in things that i really truly just was not interested in when thing that i discovered in my research was saying that it felt good to pretend you had some secret power since you were so average. Most things in drawing could be yours. I also read that. You didn't have a lot of friends in high school. So i'm wondering if if that was really true. And if drying set of became your way of communicating with the world. I think that my attitude in high school was one. That's probably familiar to other teens. Where you kind of feel like it's you against the world you don't really want to be a part of what everyone else is interested. And i really was interested in kind of similar to imagine worlds that i felt like i lived in when i was a kid. Just like i could make something better for myself. Even if it's not entirely real or that other people understand necessarily think i was very okay with that kind of it's not so much. Isolation as it is like independence. Because i felt very monitored at home my parents just like they just had a very watchful eye over like what i was doing so in a way it was like a freedom it was kind of.

china rhode island california asia two cats seattle California united states arcadia mandarin a dog twelve years old english this morning jet propulsion laboratory university one chinese saturday one of them
"zhu" Discussed on Mandarin Slang Guide

Mandarin Slang Guide

05:06 min | 1 year ago

"zhu" Discussed on Mandarin Slang Guide

"Joe, you guy you and you and I first of all, what we say the whole thing because I don't think I've heard anyone say the whole thing together? Yeah. Usually people just say jewelry guy and the second part is just pretty much. To. Speak of the devil. We all know what winning Rome or something like that. We all know what the second half supposed to be. Exactly. So what sort of situation could we use this end? So it's usually used to refer to a situation where you have to parties and one party seems to suffer at the hands of another party or get the short end of the deal or something. Right. But in reality, both of them are willing participants in this as also used to describe a situation where you're like this seeming imbalance. Is Kind of just an act put on for appearances. Yeah. I'm thinking about like a there some scandal in a big company and the CEO gets fired, but he's also given a golden parachute. It's like Oh we've chastised you. We've publicly beaten you. We don't like you here's a billion dollars go buy an island or something like that right and case maybe the CEO goes to like to his know balls and goes like you make me the fall guy you know and and then you know behind the scenes he gets the golden parachute gets. Whatever you know giant package of compensation not step gracefully out of the scene. Yes. Only situation where one person or Here's to be victimizing someone else, but it's really it's all just a big plan, right? Exactly. All right. So those are our phrases and we only talked about four phrases today but I mean when we were talking about this on email I gave a couple of suggestions and you came back with a list of ten or fifteen. There's so many expressions that come from the romance of the three. Kingdoms. But we don't have that much. Time. So let's review and actually I'm going to quiz you on these to see how good your not I mean. You say you're the expert you don't see how the expert I say that you say you're the expert on romance of the Three Kingdoms. Now, let's see how far that really goes. For example, if I want to describe someone who is leading on his or her underlings with empty promises for the future than this is. While May, GCA. Perfect. All right. I'll have to try something harder than for example, if I say someone's name and then they just appear as if by magic what's that? Would Be Schwartz I'll tell tell tell you though. Is Getting really hard to stump you about this. Okay. What if I off somewhere else and I'm just having so much fun there that I forget about my responsibilities back home or is sort of lose my original culture what is that called? That would be somebody who is Lopez. Judges can we couldn't Matata okay. Yes. We would've accepted levels shoe or Matata. So you got them both. So that's three correct answers one more correct answer and you'll win. Something once opposes. So if two parties are having a fake fight where one appears to be beating the other one, other one is actually in on it. What's that called? That would be a case of. Hong. You got. You've done it. John Do..

CEO Matata Joe John Do Hong Schwartz Lopez
"zhu" Discussed on Mandarin Slang Guide

Mandarin Slang Guide

05:40 min | 1 year ago

"zhu" Discussed on Mandarin Slang Guide

"And. So one day while he was in the capital, the way prime minister invited Liu. Shan and some of his entourage to a banquet and at this banquet, they arranged for some entertainment that included a dance performance. So dancing started off, they know they start doing traditional dances of the Kingdom of way but then it way through they switch to doing traditional dances from the Kingdom of Shu. an all Lucia entourage were former shoe officials. So they when he saw their native dance being performed by. In a foreign land that brought them all to tears. I reminded him of everything they had lost. But Lucia himself along was smiling laughing at good time just enjoying himself completely oblivious. So at one point, the way prime minister asked him. So do you miss the land of shoe and Lucia reply like without even hesitating Oh no, it's fun here so I don't Miss It. Yeah and so dad made the way Prime Minister even the way prime minister side inside like you know God this guy. So unfeeling, no wonder his kingdom fell who could possibly helped him hang onto his kingdom. So. Later on a little bit later in the banquet. Lucia. was going to the bathroom. One of his former officials followed him and said, Hey, you know if you tell the prime minister that you missed your homeland, maybe he will send you back there you know. So later, the banquet, the prime minister asked him again. So do you miss you and this time they were shot and started pretending to weep and say, Oh, God yes I missed so much. China squeeze out through fake tears cling. Really. With the prime minister apparently had like her like his fellow exchange earlier. So the prime minister last and said, so did that guy over there tell you to say that Yes he did. How did you know? So all his all his entourage were humiliated you know and a way minister had good laugh and the funny thing is that it actually have worked out for Lucia and because this show, the prime minister that this guy is basically not a threat. It. Is Worried about pleasure. You know he's not type to think about staging a rebellion. So he didn't really worry about new shine anymore but that's the story from which we got the phrase love and it's used to describe somebody who is so you know enrapture by pleasure. So focused on indulging themselves that they forget about their roots. do you have any good situations where we might use local social in the modern? World. Think of I. Think about like you know situations whereas let's say like a hypothetical situation country boy goes into the city and become. So caught up in the city lifestyle that forgets his roots he loses. That part of himself right Ooh I just thought about the lion king when Simba goes in, does who Kuna Matata with Tony Koumba and then he spends a longtime local social ing but eventually he's forced to go back and solve it. There we go. For Romance of the Three Kingdoms meets the Lion King match made in heaven it was the same story all along and nobody knew they should do a musical about debt..

prime minister Lucia Shan Liu Kuna Matata China Simba Tony Koumba
"zhu" Discussed on Mandarin Slang Guide

Mandarin Slang Guide

04:09 min | 1 year ago

"zhu" Discussed on Mandarin Slang Guide

"Manner and slaying guide MSG. The Chinese learning podcast that tastes great and probably isn't all that bad for you. I'm Josh Allen Davis bringing you the words perspectives that aren't in your textbook. I'm very excited today to be joined by Special Guest John Ju- Hi John Hey Josh how you doing very well, how are you? I'm good. Thank you for inviting me on the show. It is my pleasure. You see John is good at a lot of things, strategic communication design writing web development but the reason I know who John Is, and the reason I'm excited to have him on the show that he's the host of the romance of the Three Kingdoms podcast and what he's done with the podcast has taken a very dense eight, hundred thousand word historical novel with about a thousand characters in it and On. A Herculean job of it into a podcast that's delightful and engaging and educational, and Hilarious to listen to, and it's kind of hard to overstate the extent to which the romance of the Three Kingdoms still influences modern Chinese language and culture. So on today's show, we'll be talking about some of the expressions and references that you might here in your everyday life that come from this novel but I John I really WanNa know what motivated you to take on the insane job of podcasting the entire romance of the Three Kingdoms Yeah sure So back in two, thousand, thirteen, my wife, and I became new parents. So. For that entire next year, we just had basically zero mental capacity to do anything. Really. You know intellectually stimulating think the most intellectually challenging thing we did was just sit on the couch and watch reruns of. The mid nineties, a Hercules legendary journeys. Show I won't knock that. That's great. Yeah. So but then by twenty fourteen. I had gone to a point where. Starting to get some of that mental energy bag and started Gallo restless wind pursue something a little more intellectually challenging. So I started thinking about what projects I could take on and I always been interested in podcasting medium started listening to podcasts in the early mid to thousands back when it was really a do it. Yourself have project right so always been trusted. that. So I thought about maybe do a podcast and then I start thinking about what can I do a podcast about just given my background. So I grew up in. China. spend the first ten years of my life in China before moves to the United States. So just given bad background and you know I thought maybe do something about Chinese culture and helps increase. American understanding of Chinese culture. But you know I'm not historian you know I'm not an expert in really anything you know makes two of US I suppose. Yeah I did grow up you know listening to. Great. Stories like three kingdoms in the water margin and leading them listening to them on the radio watching TV adaptations. So you kinda being immersed in them and so I thought maybe I could not tackle one of these novels and you know anyone who has ever picked up English translation of the romance of Three Kingdoms in particular they would know that it's very dense. It's gone ton of names. He will names place names not read like just a series of battles. and. It's hard to get into if you're not familiar with the story and the characters going in. So I thought a podcast may be a good way to help people get into the story in a more approachable fashion. Yeah. That's absolutely one of the things that I loved about it because when I read it in English, I hadn't started learning Chinese yet. So all these Pinon names and placenames they were impossible to keep straight. But I feel like even though I, read it cover to cover many years ago listening to you narrate it really helped me for the first time get really clear about who are these people what are they? Doing. Where are they?.

John John Ju Josh Allen Davis John I Hercules Gallo China United States China.
"zhu" Discussed on Newsradio 600 KOGO

Newsradio 600 KOGO

08:15 min | 2 years ago

"zhu" Discussed on Newsradio 600 KOGO

"Zhu's week in review growing protests all over the floor blame the American people demanding that they're staying open for business your host is single handedly being blamed for these protests now the difference is it most hosts being blamed for something accept the blame when gladly accept the responsibility most host when the light being thought of as having that kind of power on the other hand Rush Limbaugh America's real anchorman I don't really know that I have this kind of power and I have not I have not urged one protest I never do this I don't urge people to call Congress I did it one time to show what would happen if I did it we shut down the switchboard I do not do this I do not do activism on the radio I don't I've never told people to cut up there Exxon credit cards and send them somewhere I just don't do it because I believe you people have enough intelligence and self minded listen to what you want to do you are not my number robots and this on going allegations that all right your host and responsible for the protest is essentially an attempt to say that all of you who are demanding that your states open up the economy you're nothing but a bunch of mine of robots which they've been saying about US census program debuted in nineteen eighty eight but you're essentially brain dead that I am a savanna Gullett a pied Piper you tune in here every day to find out what to think do you want to do I want to be mad about and of course it's ridiculously absurd day for thirty one years this accusation slash allegation has been made for thirty one years they know they're lying about it the media for thirty one years they know they're making it up but it has become I mean it's not it's not a cliche it's become a narrative I grab audio sound bite number seven I want to thank fellow broadcasts colleague Tucker Carlson Chatsworth Osborne junior known affectionately here on his fox program last night I tried to put this in perspective we have protests against lockdowns across this country you may like them you may not but what does that tell you why are they happening did Rush Limbaugh do all that no he didn't here's the truth if Americans have confidence in the government's response to this virus was wise and thoughtful and thoroughly rooted in science we wouldn't be protesting against those decisions in the numbers they are but they don't believe that and they don't believe it for good reason exactly right now I get most hosts I would be arguing with Tucker Carlson if if if they have been blamed for causing the protests and Tucker Carlson I got nothing to do with it they be insulting Tucker Carlson is not knowing what he's talking about let's see my friends I am not I'm not burdened or shackled or distracted by a silly little ego requirements and some people have to tell themselves they matter I know I matter so I it ticks me off it literally takes me because what it is ultimately is is an insult to all of you enter the people approach and of course whenever the left protests which is a way of life we never hear anybody blame for it other than the people they are pro testing isn't it fascinating when the website's protesting something it's always the fault of the people there protesting the protesters are right the protesters must be listening to the protesters have just call whenever there are anti government protests anti Medicare anti governor anti Washington protests one of the protesters are my number about stupid idiots don't even know what they're protesting they're just following orders issued to them by in St the conservative media and you can book it every time it happens the reason these protests are happening is people are fed up they want to go back to work and I thought you can't suppress the nose the left you know they they might think if they ignore what we have learned from the Stanford research in Santa Clara county and just repeat that if you missed it yesterday to researchers at Stanford University inferred Stanford is not Hillsdale college it's not I hated right wing institution it saves their very long ten protected esteem the left wing Citadelle in academe and they censor researchers out to Santa Clara county and they found that the infection rate is fifty to eighty five times higher than the official reported number the death rate the number of deaths is the same it means that if if the infection rate is fifty to eighty five times higher it means the mortality rate for covert nineteen is way way down in Lincoln all one point oh one to putting in the neighborhood of the flow it means if that many people in Santa Clara county have had the disease of exposed to it have antibodies or they didn't know they had it it means a lot of people get this infection and don't even know what they can be contagious what if people get it who do suffer from it thank you number them following that is hospitalizations and hospitalizations are weighed down third band in one place and that would be the New York metro area Dennis Prager here's a piece today in American greatness and has an excellent question can I share with you a question the Dennis Prager asks if half of the country's deaths we're in Montana would New York City shut down if half the nation's deaths were in Missouri if half of the nation's deaths were in North Dakota or something for pick a state they've never even heard of you know like what does that mean Wyoming Hey why don't well while he's got a couple left wing citizen there the ticket standpoint as pic a state and if half the deaths were coming from as they would know Yorkshire double governor Cuomo shut down what the rest of the country shut down according to The New York Times corona virus report on Sunday at two forty eight PM eastern time there were thirty five thousand six hundred seventy six covert nineteen deaths in the U. S. of those eighteen thousand or in the New York metro area another numbers forty two thousand now still the percentage of deaths nationwide over half of them are in the New York metro area fifty two percent of all deaths occur in New York metro area now let's imagine if the reverse were true imagine that Georgia North Carolina two contiguous states like the New York metro area let's see Georgia North Carolina had a combined total of twenty one million people Hey dad eighteen thousand six hundred ninety coronavirus dance while metro New York at only a hundred and fifty eight which is the number of deaths in North Carolina and Georgia combined this.

Zhu
Why Do Some Noises Drive Me Crazy?

BrainStuff

03:57 min | 2 years ago

Why Do Some Noises Drive Me Crazy?

"You want to strangle people. Who Chew with their Mouth Open? I've been does this sound of slurping noodles drive you mad. What about chewing gum? Heavy breathing. Frequent sighing or chronic snoring does the sound of of flatware dragging and clinking across a plate. Fill you with UN ending rage if so you might just have Missa Fonje Sonja and you're not alone but what is it. There are still a lot of questions about this relatively new diagnosis. But we know that some sounds drive certain people people acutely bonkers and I am not talking about slate annoyances or just getting irritated. I'm talking about having certain sounds trigger powerful intense feelings ranging from panic anxiety to anger and yes even arousal if ordinary irritation would be three on a one one to ten scale than this stuff is more of a twelve or if you ask someone with a two million. The list of trigger sounds goes on on the PS. Like the sounds of Pop. Kiss noises plastic bags and even pouring water can all make missa phony sufferers. I furious so what exactly is going on here. The term missile fonje means hatred of sounds and it was made by two neuroscientist. Scientists Powell and Margaret Gesture. Bof Most experts believe that. Mississippi is a neurological problem. Rather than a problem with an individual's hearing System in two thousand thirteen doctor Judith. Krauthammer argued that the problem could be traced back to areas of the brain called the insular cortex in the anterior cingulate Cortex a dysfunctional assessment of neural signals in the brain triggers. This intense discomfort. Interestingly the enough these areas are also hubs for processing anger pain and sensory information. There are competing views of the causes of Misa Fonje August August are molar believes that dysfunction is in the central nervous system that it's hard wired and people and is a physiological abnormality rather than an auditory disorder. Powell gesture bov believes that people can't be born with miss a phony but that there might be genetic factor in the mix currently experts think it develops in late childhood and early adolescence and worsens over time missing. Phony is also often confused with other such as CD. phobic disorders or hyper accuses. People with hyper accuses are overly sensitive to certain frequencies or ranges of sound however if you have Missa Fonje the volume of your trigger. Sound probably doesn't matter. Miss Phone can develop from a range of possible oh factors in patients with other audio. Disorders can also develop the condition. According to audiologist Miriam Westcott tonight. A sufferers can also develop mischief over time Westcott argues that some causes for Misa phony may include an obsession with sounds that irritated or scared Zhu in childhood pointing to a possible psychological factor. So all right if we put all of this together than it seems that experts agree on a few things things. One people with Misa phony aren't just cranky jerks they have no control over their reaction to Misa Fonje develops over time and three. It may likely be caused by multiple factors and there's a little bad news at this point. There's no universally recognized and effective effective treatment for mischief so if the sound of snoring smacking and other mouth noises turns you into a monster. Then you'll be glad to. I know that research on continues as I'm speaking to you.

Misa Fonje Missa Fonje Missa Fonje Sonja Powell Miriam Westcott Chew Mississippi UN Miss Phone Insular Cortex Anterior Cingulate Cortex Krauthammer Margaret Gesture BOV ZHU
"zhu" Discussed on Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

02:55 min | 3 years ago

"zhu" Discussed on Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

"So every single moment is an opportunity for us to check ourselves before we wreck our selves. And so I just try and play the game if I'm miserable. If I'm obsessed if I'm angry, if I'm cranky, it is my responsibility because it's based on what I'm thinking or believing in that moment, it's not the outside world causing me to feel this. It's what I'm doing up here. That's making me have that reaction of. I'm the problem. I am also the solution. So how do you in your own life begins on one this is assuming you've literally walk yourself? So you realize okay, I'm the problem. I know this is it. Zhu's ation is at framing is it saying, I'm gonna take a new perspective on this. It literally is like lighten up girl, you're fine. Like, do you have a roof over your head right now? Yes. Then things are damn good. Is there some food in the fridge? You're probably luckier than millions of people on the planet. Right now is they're running water in the kitchen and in the bathroom. Yes. Again, you're better off than probably a billion people or more. So that little reframe helps me and then in the moment again, it sounds so simple. But I think we're all searching for these really complex things. We don't need them. If you can catch yourself arguing with reality in the moment and realize that's not a wise thing to do. You can then back yourself up and go, okay. That didn't turn out. Right. So what am I going to do about it, and my going to be miserable in this moment? And let this ruin my night or my going to send off the mail to say, hey, once that we're gonna come, and let's readjust our communication plans at this doesn't happen again. But the argument in the irritation is not necessary to get a new result. Energy is something. That's I find really interesting unim- picking up on something that you said that oftentimes a fund people can't talk about it in a way that does anything to give me the hives the you actually can't. So just because it gets so detached from my real experience. Yes. But you one way that you make it really concrete, which I think is super interesting and gave me this real sense of how to externalize what I'm doing internally to actually change the neuro chemistry that I'm experiencing. Yes. In order to be able to convey, something new which is you've said, hey, your butts rice somebody in Email, and then you give people advice on what to visualize and all that do you know what I'm talking about? I don't. So it's really good. So now, I get a teach you stuff. It's awesome. If it you said that, hey, you're about to Email somebody and depending on what it is. You may be in an aggressive state. Yes. Yes. Yes. So the fact that your energy gets embedded into your communications. We all know that right? Like you've received the Email, that's Kurt. And you can just almost feel the punch in the face that comes through you've gotten the tax where you're like, they are definitely pissed at me. I believe in. I do this a lot with Email marketing, especially in our business every time I sit down to write a new Email..

Kurt Zhu